Grapple ARS-7 - History

Grapple ARS-7 - History

Grapple

(ARS-7 dp 1,897; 1. 213'6"; b. 39'; dr. 14'1"; s. 14.8 k.;
cpl. 120; a. 4 40mm.; cl. Diver)

Grapple (ARS-7) was launched by Basalt Rock Co. Napa, Calif., 31 December 1942, sponsored by Mrs. Thomas D. Rose; and commissioned 16 December 1943 at Vallejo, Calif., Lt. Robert Fisher in command.

One of the first ships designed to operate as a combat
salvage vessel, Grapple conducted shakedown off the California coast until 15 February 1944 when she sailed for Pearl Harbor with barge YW-9 in tow.With three barges in tow, she departed Pearl 21 March 1944, proceeded via Majuro and Tarawa to Espiritu Santo, New Hebrides, Florida Island, and Guadalcanal. There Grapple performed miscellaneous screening exercises and readied for her part in the upcoming invasion of Guam, another step in America's sweep to victory across the Pacific. On 15 June she came under enemy attack for the first time as three Japanese dive bombers came out of the sun in a surprise attack. Alert antiaircraft crews shot down one of them and seriously damaged another.

Grapple cleared Kwajalein, staging area for the Guam assault, on 15 July, then 6 days later was standing off Guam in support of the first wave of assault troops. Her vital salvage work at Guam included pulling stranded landing craft off the beaches and repairing damaged ships, usually within range of enemy fire. Demolition crews from Grapple also performed the important work of clearing the Apra Harbor entrance of a Japanese freighter sunk by American bombers. After the consolidation of Guam, Grapple returned to Espiritu Santo via Entwetok for repairs and preparation for next major assault.

Rendezvousing with a convoy at Florida Island, Grapple sailed 4 September for the initial assault phase on Peleliu Island, Palaus, which began 15 September. Under constant fire from enemy shore batteries, she laid small-craft mooring buoys inside Peleliu's protective reef before being dispatched to aid Wadleigh (DD-689), badly damaged in a mine field. While working on the disabled destroyer, a project which lasted over 2 weeks, Grapple also assisted a number of beached landing craft and effected temporary repairs on others.

On 24 December Grapple entered Leyte Gulf, late the scene of one of the war's bloodiest and most decisive naval battles, for further salvage work. Four days later she 3 sailed into Mindanao Gulf to salvage William Hawkins, an abandoned Liberty ship still smouldering from kamikaze attacks. The salvage ship, with Sharon in tow, and her two destroyer escorts were attacked by Japanese fighter planes in the pre~dawn hours of 30 December, but the planes were driven off.

From Leyte Grapple headed north as the invasion of the Philippines unfolded deep into enemy held territory at Lingayen Gulf, again in the initial assault phase. Brilliant salvage work at Lingayen Gulf from 6 January to 26 February 1945 earned Grapple and her crew the Navy Unit Citation.

She remained on fire-fighting, rescue, and salvage station at Ulithi and Saipan through 7 May, distinguishing herself in fire-fighting efforts on the carrier Randolph, hit by kamikazes on 11 March. After towing a derrick and a lighter to Leyte, Grapple sailed for Pearl Harbor. On 6 June she was diverted to assist William Hawkins, adrift near Johnston Island; taking the merchantman in tow she reached Hawaii 11 June, stooping only long enough to disengage her tow before continuing to Portland, Oreg.where she docked 22 June.

Japan surrendered before Grapple reached Hawaii again on 19 October. There she performed various duties until returning to the coast. She reached San Diego 16 May, decommissioned there 30 August 1946 and went in reserve.

With the outbreak of hostilities in Korea, Grapple recommissioned 20 December 1951 at San Diego, Lt. Roy Coniam in command. After training exercises, she sailed to Pearl Harbor and from there to Japan, reaching Sasebo 8 May 1952. Five days later she sailed for Korea and joined British units of the United Nations Fleet off Daido Ko 17 May. later she sailed to Ullong Do and was temporarily converted into a 'coating laboratory as navy doctors frantically tried to stem a typhoid epidemic sweeping the peninsula.

On 8 August Grapple began "flycatcher" duty off the Korean coast, patrolling at night to thwart enemy sampans laying mines in the shallows While at anchor near Wonsan 12 August, Grapple came under heavy fire from shore batteries, and before she could clear the area was hit just below the water line. Her damage control party removed the unexploded projectile and patched up the 6" by 15" hole' Three days later still on patrol, Grapple received more serious injuries—this time at the hands of a friend. Because of a mistake in identification signals, Chief opened fire on Grapple at a range of about 900 gaurds. Several shells fell short or exploded above the ship, but one 3'' projectile hit just above the pilot house, killing 2 men' injuring 11 others, critically, and doing extensive damage to pilot house and gun deck. After repairs at Sasebo, Grapple returned to Korea, making three more "flycatcher" patrols to protect U.S. ships operating off shore before returning to Pearl Harbor 9 December 1902. She then sailed for overhaul at Seattle.

Subsequently, Grapple has based at Pearl Harbor, performing a variety of salvage duties in the mid-Pacific and other areas. In 1953, 195O, 1956, and 1957, late summer Arctic supply cruises took her through Aleutian waters and into the hazardous ice floes of the Arctic Circle to repair and supply units of the fleet stationed there. In nine Western Pacific cruises to date, Grapple has crossed the Pacific to Korea, Japan, Formosa, the Philippines South Vietnam, and Hong Kong. On these, Grapple extensively trained ROK and Nationalist Chinese divers in newest salvage techniques.

Extraordinary duties for Grapple included blasting the coral reef to widen the harbor entrance at Johnston Island in April 1964 prior to nuclear testing. In addition while prepared to act during a flare-up in the Quemoy-Matsu area in August and September 1958, she assisted Hilo Hawaii, in mopping up after a devastating tidal wave May 1960. During July and August 1964 she participated in the successful salvage operation of freeing Frank Knox (DDR-742), grounded on Pratas Reef in the South China Sea.

Departing Pearl Harbor 16 November 1966, Grapple reached waters off South Vietnam 10 December for salvage and rescue operations. Late in the month she prepared to salvage a grounded tug from a reef north of Hue, South Vietnam. Grapple is still on station in the Pacific, providing valuable salvage and rescue work for planes and ships as well as participating in a variety of miscellaneous duties and exercises.

Grapple received one battle star for World War II service and one for Korean service.


USNS Grapple (T-ARS-53)

USS Grapple (ARS-53) is a Safeguard-class salvage ship in the United States Navy. Her home port is Norfolk, Virginia. On 13 July 2006 Grapple was decommissioned from US Navy service and converted to civilian operation by Military Sealift Command. She was redesignated as USNS Grapple (T-ARS 53).

  • USS Grapple (ARS 53)
  • USNS Grapple (T-ARS 53)
    : 8434336 : 368848000 : NGRP
  • 2,633 long tons (2,675 t) light
  • 3,317 long tons (3,370 t) full load
  • 7 officers and 92 enlisted (USS)
  • 4 military and 26 civilian (USNS)
  • 2 × Mk 38 25 mm chain guns
  • 2 × 0.5 in (12.7 mm)machine guns

Seeking ultimate fate of captured Japanese midget submarine, HA-55

According to a War Diary from COMSERON 12, this 80-foot sub was raised by "work parties" from 60-feet of water in Tanapag Harbor, Saipan on/about August 16, 1944.  Furthermore, the War Diary mentions in the Narrative of the Day (August 16) that the sub was turned over to ISCOM Saipan for inspection and beached near an oil dock.  I checked the log books and war diaries of SERVON 12 salvage vessels, specifically the USS Clamp (ARS-33), USS Gear (ARS-34), and USS Grapple (ARS-7), and found no mention of the sub.

According to an index file onsite at NARA, College Park, the USS Holland (AS-3) inspected a captured midget submarine on August 15, 1944.  Again, no mention of the sub is found in the Holland's war diary or log book, I have no evidence the Holland inspected the HA-55, however the dates and location are too close to ignore.  Tracking down HA-55's inspection report would be a step in the right direction, however the ultimate resting place of the sub (I have reason to believe it was re-sunk) is my goal.


USS Grapple

Two ships in the naval United States Navy were named USS grapple.
USS grapple ARS-7, commissioned in 1943 and struck in 1977, and sold to Taiwan.
USS Grapple ARS-53, which was commissioned in 1985. in active service.

USS Grapple ARS - 53 is a Safeguard - class salvage ship in the United States Navy. Her home port is Norfolk, Virginia. On 13 July 2006 Grapple was decommissioned
in the United States Navy USS Grapple ARS - 7 a Diver - class rescue and salvage ship commissioned by the U.S. Navy Grāpple the brand name of a commercially
USS Grapple ARS - 7 is a Diver - class rescue and salvage ship commissioned in the United States Navy from 1943 to 1946 and from 1951 to 1977. In 1977
On 6 September 1987, USS Grapple ARS - 53 left Little Creek, Virginia, with three minesweepers in tow: USS Fearless MSO - 442 USS Illusive MSO - 448
USS Grapple ARS - 7 USS Preserver ARS - 8 USS Shackle ARS - 9 Converted to USCGC Acushnet WMEC - 167 USS Protector ARS - 14 USS Cable ARS - 19 USS Chain ARS - 20
A grappling hook or grapnel is a device invented by the Romans in approximately 260BC. The grappling hook was originally used in naval warfare to catch
sunk as a target on 6 April 1988, being towed to the target area by the USS Grapple ARS - 53 U.S. National Research Council, Subcommittee on Zinc Cadmium
Exercise: Teamwork. USNS Grapple T - ARS - 53 along with two Norwegian tugs removed Boulder from the shoal. As of February, 2019, Grapple is berthed behind Boulder
a mass of flame. Firefighters from USS Wilson DD - 408 finally extinguished the fires, and salvage tug USS Grapple ARS - 7 towed Sharon back to Leyte
his father. Carter served during the Vietnam War, on the salvage ship USS Grapple ARS - 7 He received a less than honorable general discharge in late

Charleston and Port Everglades, Florida. In August 1987 Fearless was towed by Grapple ARS - 53 to the Persian Gulf in support of Operation Earnest Will, arriving
USS Hyman G. Rickover SSN - 709 a Los Angeles - class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for Admiral Hyman G. Rickover
came from Maryland to give medical supplies to the relief effort. The USS Grapple also was called in to do underwater salvaging of flooded areas throughout
sister ships are Safeguard ARS - 50 Salvor ARS - 52 and Grapple ARS - 53 On 19 January 2006 USS Grasp was decommissioned and transferred to the Military
USS Moosbrugger DD - 980 was a Spruance - class destroyer built for the United States Navy by the Ingalls Shipbuilding Division of Litton Industries at
USNS Grasp T - ARS - 51 USNS Salvor T - ARS - 52 and USNS Grapple T - ARS - 53 On 26 September 2007 USS Safeguard was transferred to the Military Sealift Command
USS O Flaherty DE - 340 was a John C. Butler - class destroyer escort built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was named for Ensign Frank
Burke DDG - 51 USS Stout DDG - 55 USS Mitscher DDG - 57 USS Laboon DDG - 58 USS Ramage DDG - 61 USS Gonzalez DDG - 66 USS Cole DDG - 67 USS Mahan DDG - 72 USS McFaul DDG - 74
August 1952. USS Barton DD - 722 minor damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 2 casualties, 10 August 1952. USS Grapple ARS - 7 minor

single - ship action of the First Barbary War fought between the American schooner USS Enterprise and the Tripolitan polacca Tripoli off the coast of modern - day
YAG - 40 USS Grapeshot 1877 USS Grapple ARS - 7, ARS - 53 T - ARS - 53 USS Grasp ARS - 24, ARS - 51 T - ARS - 51 USS Gratia AKS - 11 USS Gratitude SP - 3054 USS Gravely
pirate vessels operating off the Seychelles in the Indian Ocean. The frigate USS Nicholas was attacked by small arms from a pirate skiff while steaming off
the original PDF on 3 November 2012. Retrieved 13 February 2019. USS Grapple Command History 2002 PDF Naval History and Heritage Command. 25 September
USS Grapple was the target for about thirty rounds of 105 - millimeter artillery. The ship was hit once below the waterline causing slight damage. USS Barton
USS APc - 1 USS APc - 2 USS APc - 3 USS APc - 4 USS APc - 5 USS APc - 6 USS APc - 7 USS APc - 8 USS APc - 9 USS APc - 10 USS APc - 11 USS APc - 12 USS APc - 13 USS APc - 14 USS APc - 15
and functioning in a short period of time. Therefore, command decided to grapple the three cables out of the sea and cut them in several places, disrupting
Capture of USS Essex, was a naval action fought during the War of 1812. It took place off Valparaiso, Chile on March 28, 1814 between the frigate USS Essex
damaged or mislaid cable, a grapple system is used to gather cable from the ocean floor. There are several types of grapples each with certain advantages
Office of Coast Survey allowed the U.S. Navy rescue and salvage ship USS Grapple ARS - 53 to anchor safely over the debris field without disturbing the
USS Ault DD - 698 was an Allen M. Sumner - class destroyer in the United States Navy. She was named for Commander William B. Ault, air group commander aboard

  • USS Grapple ARS - 53 is a Safeguard - class salvage ship in the United States Navy. Her home port is Norfolk, Virginia. On 13 July 2006 Grapple was decommissioned
  • in the United States Navy USS Grapple ARS - 7 a Diver - class rescue and salvage ship commissioned by the U.S. Navy Grāpple the brand name of a commercially
  • USS Grapple ARS - 7 is a Diver - class rescue and salvage ship commissioned in the United States Navy from 1943 to 1946 and from 1951 to 1977. In 1977
  • On 6 September 1987, USS Grapple ARS - 53 left Little Creek, Virginia, with three minesweepers in tow: USS Fearless MSO - 442 USS Illusive MSO - 448
  • USS Grapple ARS - 7 USS Preserver ARS - 8 USS Shackle ARS - 9 Converted to USCGC Acushnet WMEC - 167 USS Protector ARS - 14 USS Cable ARS - 19 USS Chain ARS - 20
  • A grappling hook or grapnel is a device invented by the Romans in approximately 260BC. The grappling hook was originally used in naval warfare to catch
  • sunk as a target on 6 April 1988, being towed to the target area by the USS Grapple ARS - 53 U.S. National Research Council, Subcommittee on Zinc Cadmium
  • Exercise: Teamwork. USNS Grapple T - ARS - 53 along with two Norwegian tugs removed Boulder from the shoal. As of February, 2019, Grapple is berthed behind Boulder
  • a mass of flame. Firefighters from USS Wilson DD - 408 finally extinguished the fires, and salvage tug USS Grapple ARS - 7 towed Sharon back to Leyte
  • his father. Carter served during the Vietnam War, on the salvage ship USS Grapple ARS - 7 He received a less than honorable general discharge in late
  • Charleston and Port Everglades, Florida. In August 1987 Fearless was towed by Grapple ARS - 53 to the Persian Gulf in support of Operation Earnest Will, arriving
  • USS Hyman G. Rickover SSN - 709 a Los Angeles - class submarine, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for Admiral Hyman G. Rickover
  • came from Maryland to give medical supplies to the relief effort. The USS Grapple also was called in to do underwater salvaging of flooded areas throughout
  • sister ships are Safeguard ARS - 50 Salvor ARS - 52 and Grapple ARS - 53 On 19 January 2006 USS Grasp was decommissioned and transferred to the Military
  • USS Moosbrugger DD - 980 was a Spruance - class destroyer built for the United States Navy by the Ingalls Shipbuilding Division of Litton Industries at
  • USNS Grasp T - ARS - 51 USNS Salvor T - ARS - 52 and USNS Grapple T - ARS - 53 On 26 September 2007 USS Safeguard was transferred to the Military Sealift Command
  • USS O Flaherty DE - 340 was a John C. Butler - class destroyer escort built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was named for Ensign Frank
  • Burke DDG - 51 USS Stout DDG - 55 USS Mitscher DDG - 57 USS Laboon DDG - 58 USS Ramage DDG - 61 USS Gonzalez DDG - 66 USS Cole DDG - 67 USS Mahan DDG - 72 USS McFaul DDG - 74
  • August 1952. USS Barton DD - 722 minor damage after 1 hit from a shore battery at Wonsan, North Korea, 2 casualties, 10 August 1952. USS Grapple ARS - 7 minor
  • single - ship action of the First Barbary War fought between the American schooner USS Enterprise and the Tripolitan polacca Tripoli off the coast of modern - day
  • YAG - 40 USS Grapeshot 1877 USS Grapple ARS - 7, ARS - 53 T - ARS - 53 USS Grasp ARS - 24, ARS - 51 T - ARS - 51 USS Gratia AKS - 11 USS Gratitude SP - 3054 USS Gravely
  • pirate vessels operating off the Seychelles in the Indian Ocean. The frigate USS Nicholas was attacked by small arms from a pirate skiff while steaming off
  • the original PDF on 3 November 2012. Retrieved 13 February 2019. USS Grapple Command History 2002 PDF Naval History and Heritage Command. 25 September
  • USS Grapple was the target for about thirty rounds of 105 - millimeter artillery. The ship was hit once below the waterline causing slight damage. USS Barton
  • USS APc - 1 USS APc - 2 USS APc - 3 USS APc - 4 USS APc - 5 USS APc - 6 USS APc - 7 USS APc - 8 USS APc - 9 USS APc - 10 USS APc - 11 USS APc - 12 USS APc - 13 USS APc - 14 USS APc - 15
  • and functioning in a short period of time. Therefore, command decided to grapple the three cables out of the sea and cut them in several places, disrupting
  • Capture of USS Essex, was a naval action fought during the War of 1812. It took place off Valparaiso, Chile on March 28, 1814 between the frigate USS Essex
  • damaged or mislaid cable, a grapple system is used to gather cable from the ocean floor. There are several types of grapples each with certain advantages
  • Office of Coast Survey allowed the U.S. Navy rescue and salvage ship USS Grapple ARS - 53 to anchor safely over the debris field without disturbing the
  • USS Ault DD - 698 was an Allen M. Sumner - class destroyer in the United States Navy. She was named for Commander William B. Ault, air group commander aboard

USS Grapple Arrives to Assist Grasp at News Article.

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Indian students in U.S grapple with fear as protests rise.

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Blasting reef at Johnston Island [ edit | edit source ]

Extraordinary duties for Grapple included blasting the coral reef to widen the harbor entrance at Johnston Island in April 1954 prior to nuclear testing. In addition while prepared to act during a flare-up in the Quemoy–Matsu area in August and September 1958, she assisted Hilo, Hawaii, in mopping up after a devastating tsunami May 1960. During July and August 1964 she participated in the successful salvage operation of freeing Frank Knox (DDR-742), grounded on Pratas Reef in the South China Sea.


Operation DOMINIC Nuclear Tests 1962, Section 1

Joint Task Force 8 was created as a military command structure for interservices participation in the DOMINIC I series.

DOMINIC I was assigned to Pacific Basin tests, while the II phase was conducted at what is now the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS/N2S2).

In the spinup toward, during, and after the Cuban Missile Crisis, 96 nuclear tests took place in 1962. Here are the numbers listed by related fiscal year operations:

34 NOUGAT: weapons development
36 DOMINIC I: weapons development, high altitude and underwater nuclear phenomena, delivery systems, tracking, and military effects
22 STORAX: weapons development and one overlapping PLOWSHARE excavation test called Sedan
4 SUNBEAM (DOMINIC II): tests of small tactical warheads, a mobile delivery system, their military effects, and troop maneuvers

All nuclear tests required the command approval of United States presidents in office during those operations.

The "better dead than red" Cold Warriors would be appalled at the left image.

Instrument trailers were pervasive during nuclear testing operations, for capturing valuable scientific data.

Weapon development airdrop tests were conducted off of Chistmas Island/Kiritimati, now part of the Republic of Kiribati, in the Line Islands group.

Compare to a third party posting, of the original color condition:

September 1961: Soviets resume testing with the greatest megatonnage series in history
October 24, 1962: film's stated activation of Joint Task Force 8 by presidential decree
April 1, 1962: targeted date for the beginning of testing in the Pacific theater
Early November 1962: DOMINIC I is completed

What? The date for activation should have been said as 24 October, 1961, within a month of Soviet nuclear resumption trials.


7th Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment

The 17th Cavalry Regiment was first organized under the provisions of the National Defense Act of 1916 at Fort Bliss, TX on 30 June 1916 and constituted on 1 July 1916. At that time, General Pershing had taken U.S. Military formations into Mexico only a short time earlier and the need for Cavalry troops was pressing.

Originally organized as G Troop, 17th Cavalry Regiment the 7th Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment was formally reactivated on 25 November 1966. The Squadron adopted the name “Ruthless Riders” and shortly thereafter, deployed to Vietnam on 28 October 1967 as a separate Air Cavalry Squadron of the 1st Aviation Brigade. The Squadron mission was to provide reconnaissance and security for the 4th Infantry Division and other allied units. The Squadron routinely conducted successful combat operations, gathered valuable intelligence, and killed and captured enemy Soldiers. For their achievements and distinguished combat service, the Squadron was awarded a Presidential Unit Citation and four Valorous Unit Awards for their actions in Vietnam.

The Squadron saw post-war service at Fort Hood, Texas, where they were assigned to 1st Cavalry Division and 6th Air Cavalry Combat Brigade, Fort Hood Texas, where they served as an attack helicopter squadron. The 7th Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment was again inactivated on 16 July 1986.

In 2001, the organization of the U.S. Army significantly changed as a result of transformation to fight the Global War on Terror. Prior to their deployment to Operation Iraqi Freedom III, 1st Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment, 82d Airborne Division was directed to move from Fort Bragg, North Carolina to Fort Campbell, Kentucky in early spring of 2006. In anticipation of their move, the 1-17th Cavalry adopted the designation as the “Palehorse” Squadron with the motto of “Death Rides.” Following a successful deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom III, the Squadron was re-designated as 7th Squadron, 17th Cavalry regiment on 10 April 2006, serving as part of the 159th Combat Aviation Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

In December 2008, the Squadron deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, establishing a base of operations at FOB Fenty, Jalalabad, Afghanistan. The Squadron served valiantly, earning a Meritorious Unit Commendation, a Valorous Unit Award, and was recognized as the Army’s Top Aviation unit for their heroic and steadfast combat actions in the tough terrain and highly contested areas of Regional Command-East.

Approximately one year from their return from Jalalabad, the Squadron returned to Afghanistan in December 2010 this time establishing operations in Kandahar, Afghanistan, where they conducted, aggressive reconnaissance and security missions, as well as air assault security and training assistance to the Afghan Air Corps.

Elements of the squadron again deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in late 2013, where they exemplified the cavalry spirit by providing reconnaissance, security, quick reaction force and FOB defense operations in both RC-East and RC-South. The actions and efforts of the Palehorse Soldiers were also integral in providing security during Afghanistan’s Presidential Elections in 2014.

7th Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment was de-activated on 17 July 2015 at Fort Campbell, Kentucky as part of the Army Aviation Restructuring Initiative, but its distinguished lineage and legacy will live on as the Palehorse Squadron was reactivated as part of the 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division on 22 October 2015 at Fort Hood, Texas.


USS Ault (DD 698)

USS AULT was one of the ALLEN M. SUMNER - class destroyers and the first ship in the Navy to bear the name. She was decommissioned in July 1973 and stricken from the Navy list on September 1, 1973. AULT was sold for scrapping on April 30, 1974.

General Characteristics: Awarded: 1942
Keel laid: November 15, 1943
Launched: March 26, 1944
Commissioned: May 31, 1944
Decommissioned: May 31, 1950
Recommissioned: November 15, 1950
Decommissioned: July 16, 1973
Builder: Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Kearny, NJ.
FRAM II Conversion Shipyard: Boston Naval Shipyard, Boston, Mass.
FRAM II Conversion Period: June 1962 - December 1962
Propulsion system: four boilers, General Electric geared turbines 60,000 SHP
Propellers: two
Length: 376.3 feet (114.7 meters)
Beam: 41 feet (12.5 meters)
Draft: 18.7 feet (5.7 meters)
Displacement: approx. 3,180 tons full load
Speed: 34 knots
Aircraft after FRAM II: two DASH drones
Armament after FRAM II: three 5-inch/38 caliber twin mounts, two Mk-10 Hedgehogs, Mk-32 ASW torpedo tubes (two triple mounts), two Mk-25 ASW torpedo tubes (removed prior to decommissioning)
Crew before FRAM II: 336

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS AULT. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.

USS AULT was laid down on 15 November 1943 at Kearny, N.J., by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. launched on 26 March 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Margaret U. Ault, the widow of Comdr. Ault and commissioned on 31 May 1944, Comdr. Joseph C. Wylie in command.

After fitting out, the destroyer departed New York on 10 July 1944 for shakedown training in the Caribbean. She returned to New York for post-shakedown availability and to complete preparations for the long cruise to join the action in the Pacific. Acting as an escort for WILKES-BARRE (CL 103), AULT sailed on 6 September for Trinidad. Detached from escort duty upon her arrival, she transited the Panama Canal and proceeded independently via San Diego to Pearl Harbor where she arrived on 29 September.

After three months of intensive training in Hawaiian waters, the warship got underway on 18 December and headed west to join Vice Admiral John S. McCain's Fast Carrier Task Force. After a refueling stop at Eniwetok on Christmas Day, AULT entered Ulithi Lagoon on 28 December 1944 and, along with her sister ships of Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 62, reported to Rear Admiral Bogan for duty in the escort screen of Task Group (TG) 38.2.

When AULT reached the forward area, Leyte was in American hands but the Philippines were still the focus of the carrier's operations, and they were directed to strike targets on Luzon and Formosa early in January 1945. AULT sortied on 30 December 1944 with TG 38.2 screening that task group. After the strike on Formosa on 9 January, the destroyer in company with WALDRON (DD 699), CHARLES S. SPERRY (DD 697), and JOHN W. WEEKS (DD 701), swept Bashi Channel ahead of Task Force (TF) 38, while proceeding into the South China Sea. Heavy weather as well as the proximity of the enemy created a tense atmosphere in which the carriers continued to mount strikes against the Camranh Bay area, Hong Kong, Hainan, Swatow, and the Formosa Strait. Returning to the Pacific through the Balintang Channel on the night of 20 January, the task force launched final strikes against Formosa and Okinawa before returning to Ulithi on 25 January.

Shortly before the assault on Iwo Jima, TF 38 was reorganized as TF 58 under Vice Admiral Mitscher. AULT was assigned to Rear Admiral Sherman's ESSEX (CV 9) TG 58.3, which launched diversionary strikes against Formosa, Luzon, and the Japanese mainland on 16 and 17 February. The carriers provided air cover for the operations on Iwo Jima on 19 February and raided the Tokyo area on the 25th and Okinawa on 1 March before retiring to Ulithi on 4 March.

The destroyer returned to the action with TG 58.3 on 14 March for operations to neutralize Japanese air power during the forthcoming Okinawa campaign. In response to strikes against Kyushu and Honshu, the Japanese retaliated with air strikes against the task group and, on 20 March, AULT splashed her first two enemy planes. On 23 and 24 March, the task group launched preinvasion strikes against Okinawa and, on 27 March, AULT assisted the ships of DesRon 62 and four cruisers in shore bombardment of Minami Daito Shima. The warship's next two months were enlivened by days and nights of continuous general quarters. Kamikaze attacks on 6 and 7 April damaged HAYNSWORTH (DD 700) and HANCOCK (CV 19). On 11 April, a suicide plane that missed ESSEX came perilously close to AULT but her gunners splashed the plane close aboard her starboard quarter. KIDD (DD 661) was badly hit that day. AULT again participated in the bombardment of Minami Daito Shima on 10 May, then rejoined the task force to assist in repelling heavy enemy air attack. While screening BUNKER HILL (CV 17) on the morning of the 11th, AULT splashed one kamikaze, but two others hit the carrier. After rescuing 29 men from the stricken ship, the destroyer escorted her to the replenishment group and rejoined the action on the 13th. During attacks on 13 and 14 May, she succeeded in splashing three more planes. On 1 June, AULT put into San Pedro Bay, Leyte, after 80 days at sea.

Task Force 58 was redesignated TF 38 and, on 1 July, AULT sortied for strikes against the Japanese home islands. On 18 and 19 July, the ship joined with Cruiser-Division 18 and other destroyers in an antishipping sweep of Sagami Wan and a bombardment of Nojima Saki. The following day, she rejoined the task group and continued to support the carriers until Japan capitulated on 15 August.

AULT operated off the coast of Honshu on patrol until 2 September when she entered Tokyo Bay and anchored near MISSOURI (BB 63) during the formal surrender ceremony on board that battleship. The destroyer soon resumed patrol with the task group out of Tokyo and continued that duty until 30 October, when she steamed for Sasebo, Japan, to perform more carrier and escort duties. On 31 December 1945, the destroyer departed Japan, bound for the United States, and arrived at San Francisco on 20 January 1946. After a short respite, she was underway again and headed via the Panama Canal for Boston. Following brief stops along the east coast, the vessel entered the shipyard in Boston on 26 April 1946 for a well-deserved overhaul.

The yard work was completed on 15 March 1947, and AULT steamed to Charleston, S.C., her base for local operations and training exercises until 12 July, when she sailed for New Orleans and two years there as a Naval Reserve training ship. During her operations in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean, she visited such ports as Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Kingston, Jamaica Coco Solo, Canal Zone Port-au-Prince, Haiti Veracruz, Mexico and Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua. During this period, she also performed planeguard duties for carriers operating out of Pensacola, Fla., and underwent an overhaul in Charleston from 24 February to 11 May 1948.

On 21 August 1949, after a month of intensive training in Guantanamo Bay, AULT put into Norfolk to fit out for her first Mediterranean cruise. From 6 to 16 September, the warship steamed across the Atlantic to join 6th Fleet tactical exercises and maneuvers, including a simulated assault on Cyprus. Her ports of call included Aranci Bay, Sardinia Cannes, France Argostoli and Piraeus, Greece and Famagusta, Cyprus. AULT departed Gibraltar on 16 November headed for the British Isles and put into Plymouth, England, on 19 November. Prior to leaving Europe, she called at Antwerp, Belgium Rouen, France Portland, England and Leith, Scotland. She moored in Norfolk on 26 January 1950 and prepared for inactivation. She was placed out of commission, in reserve, on 31 May and was towed to the Charleston Naval Shipyard for berthing in the Inactive Reserve Fleet.

However, her respite was brief. With the outbreak of the Korean War, the Navy needed more active destroyers. On 15 November 1950, AULT was recommissioned at Charleston under the command of Comdr. Harry Marvin-Smith. She steamed to her home port, Norfolk, for the Christmas holidays and to Guantanamo Bay for refresher training in March. After a post-shakedown overhaul in Charleston, the ship returned to her home port, sortied with her sister ships of DesRon 22, and carried out antisubmarine warfare exercises in Cuban waters. She returned to Norfolk on 13 August for upkeep.

AULT sailed for the Mediterranean on 3 September for another tour with the 6th Fleet and stopped for liberty calls in ports in Sicily, Italy, France, Greece, and Portugal. On 30 January 1952, she departed Gibraltar in Destroyer Division (DesDiv) 222 and steamed via Bermuda to Norfolk where she arrived on 10 February.

The warship's activities during the first few months of 1952 consisted of training exercises in the Virginia capes, Caribbean operations, and an upkeep period in Charleston. On 4 June, she embarked midshipmen for a training cruise that took them to Torbay, England Le Havre, France and Guantanamo Bay. Upon her arrival back at Norfolk on 4 August, AULT conducted local type training into the new year.

During February 1953, the ship participated in drills in the Caribbean while operating out of St. Thomas and St. Croix, Virgin Islands. On 11 March, she commenced an overhaul in the Charleston Naval Shipyard. Upon completion of the yard work, she steamed back via her home port to Guantanamo Bay where she arrived on 31 July for refresher training. Following two months training and one month loading supplies, AULT departed Norfolk on 2 November with DesDiv 222 for an around-the-world cruise. After transiting the Panama Canal and stopping at San Diego, Pearl Harbor, and Midway, she arrived at Yokosuka, Japan, on 6 December and reported for duty with the 7th Fleet.

On 20 December, AULT collided with HAYNSWORTH (DD 700) during ASW exercises in the Sea of Japan. The former's bow was torn off at frame eight, and the damaged destroyer was towed to Yokosuka for repairs by GRAPPLE (ARS 7). On 14 March 1954, AULT once again got underway for training and a subsequent voyage westward through the Indian Ocean, the Mediterranean Sea, across the Atlantic Ocean, to arrive home at Norfolk on 4 June. She operated with various warships along the way and made port calls at Hong Kong, Singapore Colombo, Ceylon Port Said, Egypt Athens Naples Villefranche, France Barcelona, Spain and Gibraltar. For the remainder of 1954, she operated along the east coast.

For the first six months of 1955, the destroyer conducted Caribbean exercises and local operations, including planeguard duty off Jacksonville, Fla., with carrier LAKE CHAMPLAIN (CV 39). She entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 1 July for a three-month overhaul which was followed by one month of refresher training at Guantanamo Bay. The warship returned to her home port on 26 November and commenced type training and local operations along the east coast.

On 1 May 1956, AULT sailed for the Mediterranean where she participated in Kiel Week ceremonies in Kiel, Germany 6th Fleet exercises and a month and one-half in the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf. The cruise ended with her arrival in Norfolk on 17 September.

On 28 January 1957, AULT got underway again with DesRon 22 for a five-month tour of duty overseas. The destroyer exercised with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean and called at ports in Italy, Greece, Turkey, Lebanon, and Sicily before returning to Norfolk in June. After three months of local operations along the east coast, AULT sortied with ESSEX on 3 September to join other destroyers in North Atlantic and Arctic waters for Operation "Strikeback." Upon completion of the exercise, she put into Cherbourg, France, on 30 September for a short leave period before heading home. She moored in Norfolk on 21 October and resumed local operations. On 19 November she entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard.

After a four-month overhaul, refresher training, and upkeep, the destroyer got underway on 17 June 1958 for hunter-killer operations in the Atlantic with LEYTE (CV 32). On 2 September, she steamed in company with DesDiv 222 to the Mediterranean for another six-month deployment before resuming local operations out of Norfolk in March 1959.

In June, the ship entered the Great Lakes for Operation "Inland Sea," a celebration honoring the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway. Later in the year, she assisted the Fleet Sonar School in Key West, Fla., and participated in Atlantic coast exercises.

With the beginning of 1960, AULT was again deployed to the Mediterranean. During her seven-month tour with the 6th Fleet, the destroyer became one of the first American warships to enter the Black Sea since World War II. She returned to Norfolk in September and commenced overhaul in December. AULT emerged from the shipyard in March 1961, sailed to Guantanamo Bay for refresher training, and then resumed normal operations. She returned to the Mediterranean in August to participate in NATO Exercises "Checkmate I" and "Checkmate II," and Operation "Greenstone." She also took part in Operation "Royal Flush V" with the British Navy prior to her steaming back to the United States.

In June 1962, AULT entered the Boston Naval Shipyard for a fleet rehabilitation and modernization (FRAM) overhaul. Designed to extend the life of the destroyer by eight years, the overhaul enabled her to meet the challenge of newer and faster enemy submarines. AULT's 40-millimeter and 20-millimeter gunmounts were removed, and her 01-level afterdeck was converted to a helicopter flight deck to facilitate the use of drone antisubmarine helicopters (DASH), one of the Navy's newest weapon systems which enabled the destroyer to reach out farther in search of submarine targets.

After completion of the overhaul in February of 1963, AULT devoted the rest of the year to improving her readiness and the skill of her crew through various exercises and training cruises. Following a midshipmen cruise during the summer, the ship proceeded to Norfolk to take on DASH and to continue training. AULT was the first destroyer to carry the drones to Europe, when she sortied for the Mediterranean in February 1964 with DesDiv 142. Following participation in NATO exercises and visits at the usual ports in the Mediterranean, the destroyer returned to the United States and a new home port, Mayport, Fla. She spent the remainder of the year operating in the Key West area. In January 1965, she participated in Operation "Springboard" in the Caribbean which was highlighted by several gunnery exercises and the firing of hundreds of rounds of ammunition in shore bombardment exercises at Culebra Island. The warship also trained in Hunter-Killer operations in March and was on station in the western Atlantic for the Gemini 3 space shot.

On 17 March, AULT steered a familiar course toward the Mediterranean. Besides a full three-month schedule of drills, the ship made port calls in Marseilles, Golfe Juan, Livorno, Naples, and Palma before returning to Norfolk to spend the last four months of 1965 in the local operating areas training, requalifying in gunfire support, and going to sea for hurricane evasion. As a result of her intensive training, AULT won the DesRon 14 battle efficiency award, as well as battle efficiency awards for both the operations and weapons departments.

AULT participated in Operation "Springboard" in January and February 1966, conducting ASW operations, shore bombardment, a full power run, and various gunnery exercises. She returned to Mayport only to head out to sea again for planeguard duty with INTREPID (CVA 11). Upon her return to her home port, the destroyer underwent a preoverhaul availability and then entered the Charleston Naval Shipyard on 12 April for major work which ended on 14 September. She arrived back in Mayport on 7 October and devoted the last quarter of the year to training at Guantanamo Bay in preparation for a lengthy deployment to Vietnam.

In company with DesDiv 161, AULT departed Mayport on 7 February 1967, transited the Panama Canal on 12 February, and stopped at Pearl Harbor, Midway, and Yokosuka before joining the 7th Fleet on 11 March. After a short period of ASW drills with SPINAX (SS 489) near Subic Bay, she steamed with TICONDEROGA (CVA 14) to station in the Gulf of Tonkin for planeguard duties. On 16 April, the destroyer was assigned to TU 77.1.1 for Operation "Sea Dragon," offensive surface operations against waterborne logistic craft and coastal defense sites in North Vietnam. As part of this unit, she joined COLLETT (DD 730), BOSTON (CAG 1), and HMAS HOBART in conducting sweeps from Cap Lay north to Thanh Hoa.

The warship was relieved on 30 April and returned to Subic Bay for upkeep. On 7 May, she got underway to the III and IV Corps areas of South Vietnam to provide gunfire support. For the next three weeks, AULT responded to requests for shore bombardment during the day, and for harrassment, interdiction,and illumination fire during the night. As the only destroyer available in both Corps areas, she was responsible for the coast from the mouth of the Mekong in the IV Corps area to Vung Tau and Ham Tan in the III Corps area.

From 28 May to 2 June, AULT provided gunfire support in the I Corps area then proceeded to Kaohsiung, Formosa, for upkeep alongside DELTA (AR 9) and then a week of rest and relaxation in Sasebo. On 19 June, the ship returned to the I Corps area of South Vietnam and, in the next three weeks, fired over 6,000 rounds of 5-inch ammunition at targets in the Quang Ngai and Chu Lai areas. After a six-day port visit to Hong Kong and five days of upkeep in Subic Bay, she once again operated in Operation "Seadragon," came under heavy fire from coastal defense batteries north of Dong Hoi, but suffered no casualties or damage. On 1 August 1967, AULT completed her Vietnam tour and began her voyage home. She stopped at Kaohsiung, Yokosuka, Midway, Pearl Harbor, San Francisco, and Acapulco, and even made a side trip south of the equator to convert "Pollywogs" into "Shellbacks." The destroyer transited the Panama Canal on 7 September, arrived in Mayport on 11 September, and devoted the remainder of 1967 and the first six weeks of 1968 to leave and upkeep.

From 12 to 23 February, AULT participated in Operation "Springboard 1968" in the San Juan operating area. On 4 March, she participated in another Caribbean exercise, Operation "Rugby-Match," a major fleet exercise which simulated a realistic air, surface, and subsurface threat environment. On 27 April, AULT sailed with BIGELOW (DD 942) for the Mediterranean and four months of continuous 6th Fleet operations. She returned to Mayport on 27 September, underwent upkeep, and performed three weeks of planeguard duties in December for SHANGRI-LA (CV 38). As a reward for her high degree of readiness and training, AULT was again awarded the battle efficiency "E."

For the first quarter of 1969, the destroyer spent most of her time in port at Mayport. She made cruises to the Caribbean in May, June, and July for training and returned to her home port to prepare for her last overseas deployment. AULT sailed for the North Atlantic on 2 September 1969 to participate in the NATO exercise, Operation "Peacekeeper." However, her orders were modified on 24 September, and she steamed to the Mediterranean to relieve ZELLARS (DD 777). She remained with the 6th Fleet for a three-month cruise highlighted by her participation in Operation "Emery Cloth," a British ASW exercise in which AULT was the sole representative of the United States Navy. On 4 December, the warship returned home and prepared for Naval Reserve duty. She was designated a Naval Reserve training ship on 1 January 1970, and steamed to Galveston, Tex., on 12 January. There, she relieved HAYNSWORTH (DD 700) as training ship for Houston naval reservists.

AULT spent the next three years making training cruises in the Gulf of Mexico and in the Caribbean. On 1 May 1973, she departed Galveston for her last cruise, a voyage to Mayport for inactivation. The destroyer was decommissioned on 16 July 1973, ending a career of 29 years of service. Struck from the Navy list on 1 September 1973, AULT was sold to the Boston Metals Company, Baltimore, Md., and subsequently scrapped.

AULT earned five battle stars during World War II and two during her operations in Vietnam.

Accidents aboard USS AULT:

William Bowen Ault - born in Enterprise, Oreg., on 6 October 1898 - served briefly as an enlisted man in the Navy (19 April 1917 - 23 April 1918) before entering the Naval Academy as a midshipman. Graduating on 2 June 1922, Ault served at sea in the battleship ARKANSAS (BB 33) before reporting to the Naval Air Station (NAS), Pensacola, Fla., on 23 August 1924 for flight instruction. After winning his wings, Ault served with Aircraft Squadrons, Scouting Fleet, before commencing a tour in the aviation unit of the light cruiser CINCINNATI (CL 6) on 10 September 1925. Detached from that ship a little over a year later, he served at the Naval Academy as an instructor before reporting for duty with Observation Squadron (VO) 3, Aircraft Squadrons, Scouting Fleet, on 15 June 1927.

Further duty at the Naval Academy, as an instructor in the Department of Ordnance and Gunnery, followed before he flew with Patrol Squadron (VP) 10-S, Scouting Fleet, based in aircraft tender WRIGHT (AV 1). He then served on the staff of Capt. George W. Steele, Commander, Aircraft, Scouting Force, from June of 1931 to June of 1932 and alternated tours of duty afloat and ashore: in Torpedo Squadron (VT) 1-S, based on board LEXINGTON (CV 2) at NAS, Norfolk, Va. and in the observation unit of the battleship MISSISSIPPI (BB 41).

Ault - by this time a lieutenant - next assisted in fitting-out YORKTOWN (CV 5), thus becoming a "plank owner" of that ship when she went into commission in the autumn of 1937. He then served in YORKTOWN's sister ship, ENTERPRISE (CV 6), commanding VT-6. On 5 August 1939, less than a month before the start of World War II in Poland, Ault assumed command of the Naval Reserve Aviation Base, Kansas City, Kansas, a billet in which he served into 1941.

On 22 July 1941, Lt. Cmdr. Ault once more reported to LEXINGTON, and, the following day, became her air group commander. He was serving in that capacity when the Japanese air attack on the Fleet at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941 drew the United States into World War II.

Ault helped to plan and execute the attacks on Japanese shipping at Lea and Salamaua, New Guinea, in March 1942. On the day before the strike, 9 March, Ault and a wingman flew to Port Moresby, where the group commander learned of the existance of a key mountain pass through the forbidding Owen Stanleys, information that, in the words of the task force commander, contributed "a great deal toward [the] success" of the attacks that ensued. On the day of the raid, 10 March, Ault, given the authority to carry out or abort the attack on the basis of whatweather he found, flew unaccompanied to the pass and orbitted. Finding favorable weather, he transmitted information to that effect and directed the passage of planes from LEXINGTON and YORKTOWN (CV 5) toward Lae and Salamaua. Those groups sank three transports, put a fourth transport out of action, and caused varying degrees of damage to a light cruiser, a minelayer, three destroyers and a seaplane carrier. The transmontane raid postponed the Japanese projected conquest of Tulagi and Port Moresby for a month, the time necessary to replace the vital amphibious ships lost off New Guinea and marshal carrier air support. Commander, Aircraft Battle Force, later commended Ault for his work.

In the subsequent Battle of the Coral Sea in May 1942, which itself resulted from the successful Lae and Salamaua raid, Ault led LEXINGTON's group into combat, both in the attacks on the Japanese light carrier SHOHO on 7 May and in those on the fleet carrier SHOKAKU on the 8th. During the latter action, both Ault and his radio-gunner, Aviation Radioman 1st Class William T. Butler, apparently suffered wounds when "Zero" fighters attacked the group commander's plane. Ault tried in vain to return to a friendly deck, not knowing that LEXINGTON had taken mortal damage in his absence. Unaware of LEXINGTON's distress he radioed the ship at 1449, to tell her that he had only enough gasoline for 20 minutes. YORKTOWN, which had taken over communications for LEXINGTON, heard Ault's broadcast but failed to pick him up on her radar. Sadly informed that he was on his own but wished "Good luck," LEXINGTON's air group commander asked that word be relayed to the ship that "We got a 1,000 pound bomb hit on a flat top." Ault changed course to the north, in a last vain attempt to be picked up on radar. YORKTOWN again wished him good luck. Ault, perhaps grimly aware of the fate that lay ahead, radioed bravely: "O.K. So long, people. We got a 1,000 pound hit on the flat top." No further word was ever received from LEXINGTON's air group commander, and neither he nor Aviation Radioman Butler was ever seen again.

Ault's courageous leadership of LEXINGTON's air group in the Battle of the Coral Sea earned him the posthumous award of the Navy Cross.


Grapple ARS-7 - History

According to our records Minnesota was his home or enlistment state and Ramsey County included within the archival record. We have St Paul listed as the city. He had enlisted in the United States Navy. Served during the Korean War. Smith had the rank of Petty Officer Second Class. His military occupation or specialty was Radioman Second Class. Service number assignment was 6383159. During his service in the Korean War, Navy Petty Officer Second Class Smith experienced a traumatic event which ultimately resulted in loss of life on August 15, 1952 . Recorded circumstances attributed to: Non-Hostile Death. Incident location: Korea. Radioman Second Class Smith was a crew member of the salvage ship, USS GRAPPLE (ARS-7). On the night of August 15, 1952, his ship was on patrol off the Korean coast, looking for enemy sampans laying mines, flycatcher Duty. The minesweeper, USS CHIEF (AM-315) accidentally fired two rounds at the USS GRAPPLE, one striking the pilot house, killing two seamen and wounding nine others. Robert is remembered at the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington. This is a National Parks Service and American Battle Monuments Commission location.

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