Brattleboro Memorial Hospital

Brattleboro Memorial Hospital

Brattleboro Memorial Hospital is a modern, well-equipped, and professionally staffed community hospital catering to the healthcare needs of the residents of greater Brattleboro and the tri-state area in northeastern United States. The medical facility is affiliated with Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center.BMH provides the best of services in cardiology, orthopedics, cancer care, pain management, nutrition counseling and therapy, respiratory care, and diabetes management, and is backed by state-of-the-art facilities and a well-qualified medical staff.Other facilities featured in the infirmary are a birthing center, radiology department, HIV/Aids clinic, lifeline personal services and a comprehensive rehabilitation infrastructure.Brattleboro Memorial Hospital is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO).


Brattleboro, Vermont

Brattleboro ( / ˈ b r æ t əl b ʌr oʊ / ), [4] originally Brattleborough, is a town in Windham County, Vermont, United States. The most populous municipality abutting Vermont's eastern border with New Hampshire, which is the Connecticut River, Brattleboro is located about 10 miles (16 km) north of the Massachusetts state line, at the confluence of Vermont's West River and the Connecticut. In 2010, Brattleboro's population was 12,046.

Marlboro College Center for Graduate and Professional Studies [5] and SIT Graduate Institute [6] were located in the town until 2020. [7] [8] There are satellite campuses of three colleges as well: Community College of Vermont, [9] Union Institute and University, [10] and Vermont Technical College. [11] The town is home to the New England Center for Circus Arts [12] and the Vermont Jazz Center. [13]

The Brattleboro Retreat, a not-for-profit mental health and addictions psychiatric hospital, is also located in the town.


BMH Announces Groundbreaking for Emergency Department Renovation

Brattleboro Memorial Hospital held a groundbreaking ceremony for the Emergency Department renovation and expansion on Friday, November 9. Construction will start on Monday, November 12.

BMH President and CEO Steven R. Gordon stated “This is an exciting time for our community and Hospital family. The State of Vermont recognized the urgent need for an updated Emergency Department and BMH received rapid Certificate of Need approval this past year.”

The Brattleboro Memorial Hospital Emergency Department was last renovated in 1982. At that time it was constructed to serve approximately 6,000 patients annually. Over the past 30 years, the patients served by the Emergency Department have more than doubled with over 13,000 patient visits last year.

The Emergency Department renovation and expansion constitutes a $7.5 million investment in the community’s hospital. A feasibility study undertaken by BMH last spring indicated that the community would provide strong support to complete this project. “BMH has a long history of partnering with the community to ensure access to high quality health care. Investing in this critical Emergency Department project continues this community hospital partnership ensuring the best quality care for Brattleboro area residents for the future,” says Gordon.

While the first phase of the construction is taking place, the current main entrance to the hospital will be closed. Access to the hospital for all patients and visitors will be through the Richards Building. BMH volunteers and staff will be stationed at the Richards Building entrance to serve as guides. It is anticipated that this first phase will continue through the summer of 2013. Completion of the entire project is scheduled for the spring of 2014.


The Nurse Navigator, also located in the Richards Building, works in close conjunction to ensure accessibility and access to key programs for patients.

Mammography is considered the most effective tool for early breast tumor detection it uses low dose x-rays to evaluate breast tissue for abnormalities. Most medical experts agree that successful treatment of breast cancer often is linked to early diagnosis. Mammography plays a central part in early detection of breast cancers because it can show changes in the breast up to two years before a patient or physician can feel them.

Current guidelines from the American Cancer Society, the American Medical Association and the American College of Radiology recommend screening mammography every year for women, beginning at age 40.

Digital full field mammography offers a number of practical advantages and patient conveniences:

  • Digital images are easily stored and transferred electronically, eliminating the dependency on one set of film images.
  • This advanced technique allows the radiologist to alter the orientation, magnification, brightness and contrast to produce optimal images of the breast that can be seen on a computer screen.
  • It is used in conjunction with Computer-Aided Detection software, or CAD, which uses a digitized mammographic tool to search for abnormal areas of density, mass, or calcification. The CAD system highlights these areas on the images, alerting the need for further analysis.

The advantages of digital mammography and computer-aided detection are:

  • Superior contrast resolution of digital mammography
  • The ability to manipulate images make for more accurate detection of breast cancers,
  • Second Look Technology: the computer-aided detection, or CAD, obtains a second, computerized reading in the hope of finding more cancers or more accurately gauging signs of malignancy.

Before scheduling a mammogram, you should discuss problems in your breasts with your doctor.

Here at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital scheduling is easy with just a call to 802-251-8451 with many appointment times and days available to make your appointment a quick and easy part of your day.

On the day of your exam:

  • Do not use deodorant or body power. Tiny flecks of these substances may appear on the mammography images and interfere with the interpretation
  • If you have breast implants, be sure to notify the Mammography Department prior to your appointment. We allow a longer appointment time for imaging breast implants

To image your breast, the mammography technologist will place you near the machine and your breast will be positioned on a platform and compressed with a paddle. With the application of compression on your breast you will feel pressure on the breast as it is squeezed by the compressor. Some women with sensitive breasts may experience some minor discomfort.

Breast compression is necessary in order to:

  • Even out the breast thickness-so that the tissue can be visualized
  • Spread out the tissue-so that small abnormalities won’t be obscured
  • Allow use of a lower x-ray dose
  • Hold the breast still-to eliminate blurring of the image caused by motion
  • Reduce x-ray scatter-to increase image sharpness

SCREENING VS. DIAGNOSTIC:

Routine screening views of the breasts are a top to bottom and side view.

In addition to the four views obtained in a screening mammogram, there are many specialized views that are possible to further investigate a finding, which may also be further evaluated with the use of ultrasound.

A diagnostic mammogram is a specialized mammogram designed to solve a particular problem.

Reasons to have a diagnostic mammogram:

  • Questions arising from a screening mammogram.
  • Breast symptoms such as a lump, focal breast pain or nipple discharge.
  • Follow-up exams.
  • Personal history of breast cancer.

Importance of compression:

  • Reduces radiation dosage
  • Provides several technical improvements in image quality
  • Immobilization of the breast reduces blurring caused by motion
  • Localization of structures in the breast are brought closer to the image receptor, which reduces geometric blurring
  • The breast tissue is more uniform, which results in more even penetration and less difference in radiographic density
  • Reduction of the breast thickness, which reduces the ratio of scatter to primary radiation, thereby better subject contrast
  • The spreading of breast tissue enables suspicious areas to be more easily identified.

Post-Mammography Instructions:

We regret any discomfort you may have experienced from compression during your mammogram. Do not be alarmed if, as a result of compression, there is some temporary skin discoloration involving one or both breasts. Occasionally there will be a mild aching as a result of compression. If the aching persists, you may contact your physician.

Compression allows clearer pictures of you breasts. It is important for you to understand that:


BMH breaks virtual ground for expansion

Brattleboro Memorial Hospital Board of Directors and Thompson Trustees received a hard hat, trowel and special gift during the Annual Meeting of the Southern Vermont Health Services Corporation and its subsidiary, BMH. All were asked to “don their hats and grab their trowel” to commemorate the virtual groundbreaking ceremony for the hospital’s expansion.

BRATTLEBORO — The Annual Meeting of the Southern Vermont Health Services Corporation and its subsidiary, Brattleboro Memorial Hospital was held on October 30 via Zoom.

Stephen Phillips, partner at Philips, Dunn, Shriver & Carroll of Brattleboro and current chairperson of the BMH Board of Directors, opened the meeting by welcoming the more than 40 BMH Corporators as well as the Thompson Trustees.

Patty O’Donnell, past-chair of the BMH Board of Directors, introduced two newly elected officers of the Board: William Daley of Brattleboro, president/CEO of The Vermont Country Deli, as incoming Board chair and Rhonda Calhoun of Newfane was nominated for vice chair.

Special recognition was given to Donna McElligott for her years of dedicated service to the BMH Board of Directors.

CEO Steven R. Gordon and Chief Operating Officer Eilidh Pederson provided attendees with a summary of the hospital’s clinical, operational, and tactical responses to COVID-19.

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Immediately following the meeting all Corporators and guests were invited to remain online for the virtual groundbreaking ceremony for the Ronald Read Pavilion.

Gina Pattison, director of development and marketing, provided a brief history of the life and legacy of Ronald Read, noting the lasting impact of his generous bequest and shared that the building will be dedicated in his name. Pattison also shared the background of the Thompson Trust and recognized the impact of the continued support by the Trustees which enabled a multitude of infrastructure and medical advancements in the local community she said the surgical center will be dedicated as the “Thomas Thompson Trust Surgery Center.”

She closed by honoring the late Dr. Gregory Prah, chief of Anesthesia Services at BMH. Following his unexpected passing and to honor his commitment and compassion to staff and patients, the operating and recovery rooms will be named “The Greg Prah, MD Surgical Suite.”

BMH has provided healthcare services for over 115 years. A licensed, 61-bed, not-for-profit community hospital, it serves a rural population of about 55,000 people in 22 towns in Vermont, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. The medical staff includes board-certified providers, both primary care and many specialists, and its 600 employees enjoy the help of over 110 active volunteers.


Windham County rolls out vaccine, 'turns back the clock'

Crystal Durocher, a registered nurse with Grace Cottage Family Health & Hospital, in Townshend, Vt., administers the Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine to Windham Counties' first recipient, Dr. Kimona Alin, Hospitalist and Emergency Department physician with Grace Cottage Family Health & Hospital, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020.

Stephen Kapral, senior director of pharmacy for Grace Cottage Family Health & Hospital, in Townshend, Vt., assembles Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine that will be administered to front line employees on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020.

Crystal Durocher, a registered nurse with Grace Cottage Family Health & Hospital, in Townshend, Vt., administers the Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine to Rebecca Lapointe, nurse manager for Grace Cottage Family Health & Hospital, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020.

Lauren Duncan, a registered nurse at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, in Brattleboro, Vt., gives a thumbs up to the camera as Katherine Cummings, care coordinator at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, administers Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020. The hospital hosted a clinic to start administering the COVID-19 vaccines to front line workers and first responders.

John Todd, nurse practitioner at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, in Brattleboro, Vt., was the first one at the hospital to get the Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine as Beth Weissman, clinical supervisor at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, administers the shot on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020.

Beth Weissman, clinical supervisor at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, in Brattleboro, Vt., administers the Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine to Denise Paache, family practice doctor at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020. The hospital hosted a clinic to start administering the COVID-19 vaccines to front line workers and first responders.

TOWNSHEND — The long awaited moment to vaccinate frontline workers has begun.

“It was absolutely painless,” Dr. Kimona Alin said at about 10:15 a.m., sitting in the same spot where she received the injection of the Pfizer vaccine in a room at Grace Cottage Hospital in Townshend. “And I feel elated at the fact that we are finally starting to turn the clock back to a time that we can now barely remember before this COVID-19 pandemic.”

Crystal Durocher, a registered nurse with Grace Cottage Family Health & Hospital, in Townshend, Vt., administers the Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine to Windham Counties' first recipient, Dr. Kimona Alin, Hospitalist and Emergency Department physician at Grace Cottage Family Health & Hospital, and Rebecca Lapointe, nurse manager for Grace Cottage Family Health & Hospital, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020.

Alin said she hopes everyone will feel “comfortable and safe” taking a vaccine for the virus. After her comments, she was applauded by fellow staff members waiting to get their shots.

The vaccine is looked at by Alin as an extra layer of precaution as the hospital treats patients who don’t know if they have COVID-19 or not. She works in the emergency room and as a hospitalist.

Crystal Durocher, a registered nurse with Grace Cottage Family Health & Hospital, in Townshend, Vt., administers the Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine to Timothy Shafer, clinical physician and president of the medical staff, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020.

Kristopher Radder Brattleboro Re

Dr. Timothy Shafer, hospitalist and president of medical staff at Grace Cottage who was next to get the vaccine, said he was “honored and thrilled.”

“I feel every successful vaccine is a miracle of science and medicine,” he said, adding that the COVID-19 vaccines were particularly impressive due to the speed and dexterity that went into producing them.

His hope is that the vaccines bring about “a new era” where people can go back to feeling safe and society can reopen.

Stephen Kapral, senior director of pharmacy at Grace Cottage, said the plan is to provide about 30 vaccinations to staff on Wednesday and about 25 on Thursday. Next week, he expects the hospital to receive as many as 300 doses of the Moderna vaccine.

“It’s remarkable the vaccine is to market in less than a year,” he said, as he believes the quickest turnaround for other vaccines has been about four years.

Stephen Kapral, senior director of pharmacy for Grace Cottage Family Health & Hospital, in Townshend, Vt., assembles Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine that will be administered to front line employees on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020.

Kristopher Radder Brattleboro Re

Heather Boucher, director of quality and infection prevention at Grace Cottage, anticipates all staff members will get the first dose by the new year. The second and final shots should be administered by the end of January.

Altogether, about 200 employees at Grace Cottage are expected to get vaccinated. The hospital also is providing vaccinations for Bayada Home Health Care, the Visiting Nurse and Hospice for Vermont and New Hampshire, and local emergency medical services providers such as rescue squads based in Jamaica and Newfane.

John Todd, nurse practitioner at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, in Brattleboro, Vt., was the first one at the hospital to get the Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine as Beth Weissman, clinical supervisor at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, administers the shot on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020.

Kristopher Radder Brattleboro Re

At about 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, staff at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital and first responders started getting vaccinated after the hospital’s first 170 doses of the Pfizer vaccine arrived. The goal is to get “patient facing” health care workers vaccinated first.

“Such a relief,” said John Todd, family nurse practitioner at Putney Family Medicine who helped with vaccination planning.

Members of the the Brattleboro Memorial Hospital received the first dose of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020.

Imogene Drakes, laboratory director at BMH, said she feels it’s important for those who are Black, Indigenous and people of color (BIPOC) to see others like them getting vaccinated.

“BIPOC people have been very severely affected by this virus and I would like as many BIPOC people as possible to get the vaccine so it doesn’t continue happening to this community,” she said. “I’m hoping many BIPOC follow suit.”

Katherine Cummings, care coordinator at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, in Brattleboro, Vt., administers the Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine to Imogene Drakes, director of the laboratory at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020. The hospital hosted a clinic to start administering the COVID-19 vaccines to front line workers and first responders.

Kristopher Radder Brattleboro Reformer

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Dr. Kat McGraw, chief medical officer at BMH, applauded staff for their “heroic effort” during the pandemic. She said she’s proud of everything they have done for the community.

“The vaccine is the tool to break this disease and get our life back,” she said.

Brattleboro Police Capt. Mark Carignan said the vaccine will help to control the virus and make people feel safer.

“I’m looking forward to being part of the first crew to get vaccinated,” he said, standing in line. “I think this is the very first step.”

Beth Weissman, clinical supervisor at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, in Brattleboro, Vt., gives Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine to Brattleboro Police Capt. Mark Carignan on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020. The hospital hosted a clinic to start administering the COVID-19 vaccines to front line workers and first responders.

Kristopher Radder Brattleboro Reformer

Carignan said people will still need to wear masks and keep physical distance between each other before reaching what the experts call “herd immunity.”

Over time, Brattleboro Fire Capt. David Emery believes the vaccine will reduce anxiety.

“I think people really want to move on to the next step and make this a part of history,” he said, describing himself as being “over the top excited” to get vaccinated as he stood in line. “I think it brings great hope for 2021.”

Beth Weissman, clinical supervisor at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, in Brattleboro, Vt., administers the Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine to Brattleboro Fire Department Capt. David Emery on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020, as staff members take photos. The hospital hosted a clinic to start administering the COVID-19 vaccines to front line workers and first responders.

Kristopher Radder Brattleboro Re

Also getting vaccinated Wednesday was Emily Wilson, captain of Rescue Inc. Other emergency personnel are scheduled to get the vaccine in the next few days.

For Todd, who was first to get the vaccine in Brattleboro, the injection felt like less of a jab than the flu shot.

“There was nothing overwhelming about it,” he said.

Todd will be encouraging people to get the vaccine as it becomes available, even those who have had COVID-19 because it should provide the full antibody response needed. Potential side effects he cited include a low-grade fever and pain at the injection site — nothing that concerned him.

With a snowstorm in the forecast, Todd said the hospital had “creative solutions” to continue the vaccination effort. He noted everything in the health care world currently has some degree of difficulty due to the pandemic.

One silver lining involves moving to telehealth in some cases. With the storm, Todd won’t have to miss appointments done by video calls.

Todd wishes the vaccine could have been available six months ago, when there was a lull in cases. He recommends keeping holiday gatherings small.

Lauren Duncan, a registered nurse at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, in Brattleboro, Vt., gives a thumbs up to the camera as Katherine Cummings, care coordinator at Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, administers Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020. The hospital hosted a clinic to start administering the COVID-19 vaccines to front line workers and first responders.

Kristopher Radder Brattleboro Reformer

It’s unclear how long the vaccine will last. Todd said health officials are counting on at least one year and health care workers are going to keep masking up until there’s more information on whether vaccinated people can still spread the virus.

Vaccinated health care workers are providing data to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Asked if he feels like a guinea pig, Todd said, “Not at all.”

Instead, he described being grateful to get the vaccine and be involved in efforts to encourage others to do the same.

“I’m really happy this is rolling ahead,” he said, with plans to return for the second dose in 21 days. “We know it’s safe enough.”


Brattleboro Memorial Hospital - History

T’is June 2021, and we continue daily COVID-19 dashboard numbers from the Vermont Department of Health, Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, and MA and NH counties that surround Brattleboro. Scroll down the new comments for the latest.

Annie Guion of Windham County Humane Society To Retire

Annie Guion has announced her retirement from the Windham County Humane Society. Here’s the letter:

After 14 years of the best work of my life and my most fun and fulfilling job to date, it is time for me to move on to the next adventure. My partner is retiring and we are planning to pursue some long-held dreams and check some items off the bucket list. I love the Windham County Humane Society (WCHS) and in order to ensure a smooth transition, I will be staying through the end of 2021.

MGHTMRI

The only thing we know for sure about CV-19 is that we don’t know ANYTHING for sure.

There are lots of conflicting stories about the ”Pandemic” floating around and no way to tell for sure which of them are accurate.

MSNBC is saying one thing and FOX is saying another.

Brattleboro Selectboard Special Meeting

The Brattleboro Selectboard will hold a special meeting on Monday, June 28, 2021 at 4:30pm in the Selectboard Meeting Room at the Municipal Center. The public can also connect to the public session of the meeting using zoom. The Board will convene at 4:30pm and is expected to immediately enter into executive session to discuss the appointment or employment or evaluation of a public officer or employee. The Board will reconvene after the executive session and immediately adjourn. No action will be taken.

Brattleboro Committee Meeting Warnings

The Brattleboro Citizens Police Communication Committee (CPCC) will meet on Monday, June 28, 2021 at 5:30pm in the Brooks Memorial Library Main Reading Room. The RTM Finance Committee will meet on Tuesday, June 29, 2021 at 6:00pm at the Brattleboro Co-op Outdoor Café. The Brattleboro Tree Committee will meet at 6:30pm at 9 Southern Avenue in Brattleboro.

New Map Shows Broadband (Lack of) Availability

The NTIA has released a new map showing indicators of broadband need. It takes several data sources, combines them, and then shows how different parts of the country compare.

It’s a fascinating map, showing where people in the US are getting fast internet speeds (big cities, Silicon Valley, and a few places here and there), and how the rest of us are doing.

For Windham County the numbers are like this:

Good Time To Hike Wantastiquet

On Wantastiquet, the trail is dry and the mountain laurel is blooming. On June 23, 2021, there was no water on the carriage road trail up to the summit. Not even a puddle. Really, things are that dry. You can wear sneakers. And the mountain laurel will be in bloom for another week. Invasive mountain laurel is everywhere on Wantastiquet, unfortunately, but it sure is pretty for these two weeks. It doesn’t bloom well at lower elevations, so you won’t see blossoms until the 7th hairpin turn (out of 9). The blossoms are much better if you continue past the summit towards Mine Ledge. (The trail after the antenna tower is narrow. I found a tick on my arm within three minutes. Past the summit, tick precautions are necessary.)

The view from the summit is disappointing now. The scruffy oak trees were last cleared out in 2009. Now they block most of downtown Brattleboro. Instead, you should take the side trail at the 6th hairpin turn to see the view from the lower lookout–the preferred spot for Brattleboro panoramas for 165 years. I’ve posted the two panoramas I took today on iBrattleboro’s photo section. It was a post-thunderstorm morning with low humidity–perfect for a photo. There’s even some mountain laurel in bloom on that side trail. That outcrop will have good blueberries in two weeks.

Thugs, Politicians and Guns

I can’t stop being outraged at the lack of action by politicians on the issue of gun control. It would be easy to become insensitive to the daily reports of mass shootings in this country but every time I hear about one I become more and more depressed because I know that nothing will change in my lifetime, if ever.

This lack of action makes it clear that the U.S. political system is controlled by amoral, unethical and inhumane people. It is fueled by self-interest and the only time that things get done is when politicians think they can get more votes or more financial support in the next election.

Gun control is not about guns or mental health. It is about a failed political system.

Noticed Around Brattleboro – Summer 2021

It’s the summer 2021 edition of “Noticed Around Brattleboro” – your seasonal catch-all for little things not worthy of a full story but certainly worthy of making note of for the history books.

• Exit 2 I-91 bridge work is ongoing. Looks like a new surface for the upper level.

• Hermit Thrush Brewery has a sign up where Silver Moon used to be.

BCTV Schedules – Week of June 21, 2021

BCTV Channel 1075 schedule for the week of 6/21/21

5:30 am North Branch Nature Center – Gulls Demystified
7:06 am HANDS in the Kitchen – Plant Based Proteins 4/15/21
8:00 am Democracy Now! – Democracy Now! Daily Broadcast
9:00 am Juno Singles – Derrik Jordan – Suite for an Imaginary Country
9:30 am Community Conversation – Cutting the Cable Cord

Brattleboro Senior Meals Menu June 21 to June 25

IMPORTANT INFORMATION AT THE BOTTOM OF THE MENU

Brattleboro VFW Breakfast/Lunch Info. Public Welcome to All Meals

Breakfast every Wednesday and Saturday from 6am-10am. Public welcome, as are to-go’s. Breakfast specials are offered every Wednesday, and the special for this Wednesday the 23rd will be the meat lover’s omeltte with toast for $7.50. Also offering corned beef hash, eggs cooked your way, homemade pancakes, breakfast sandwiches, and more.

Listed below are our $7 lunch specials offered Thursday’s and Friday’s. Also selling burgers, fries, etc. during our lunches that are served 11:30 am-1:30 pm.

Brattleboro Planning Commission To Release Downtown Plan For Review

The Brattleboro Planning Commission announces the release of the Downtown Plan. This Plan outlines a vision for placemaking and public space improvements to attract and retain businesses and residents. It looks at pedestrian and bicycle improvements, stormwater and landscaping, and how arts and cultural activities can enliven and revitalize public spaces.

In mid- to late 2019, a series of activities were held to engage the public. Surveys, walking tours, demonstration projects, and open studios were all used to allow the public to share ideas and aspirations for downtown. The Downtown Plan presents a starting point to help envision how to create an active, vibrant, and sustainable downtown.


Ancestors Who Were Born or Died in Brattleboro, Vermont, USA

We currently have information about ancestors who were born or died in Brattleboro.

Ancestors Who Were Married in Brattleboro, Vermont, USA

We currently have information about ancestors who were married in Brattleboro.

Genealogy Resources for Brattleboro

Not the place you are looking for? Try again!

Brattleboro Memorial Hospital - History

T’is June 2021, and we continue daily COVID-19 dashboard numbers from the Vermont Department of Health, Brattleboro Memorial Hospital, and MA and NH counties that surround Brattleboro. Scroll down the new comments for the latest.

Annie Guion of Windham County Humane Society To Retire

Annie Guion has announced her retirement from the Windham County Humane Society. Here’s the letter:

After 14 years of the best work of my life and my most fun and fulfilling job to date, it is time for me to move on to the next adventure. My partner is retiring and we are planning to pursue some long-held dreams and check some items off the bucket list. I love the Windham County Humane Society (WCHS) and in order to ensure a smooth transition, I will be staying through the end of 2021.

MGHTMRI

The only thing we know for sure about CV-19 is that we don’t know ANYTHING for sure.

There are lots of conflicting stories about the ”Pandemic” floating around and no way to tell for sure which of them are accurate.

MSNBC is saying one thing and FOX is saying another.

Brattleboro Selectboard Special Meeting

The Brattleboro Selectboard will hold a special meeting on Monday, June 28, 2021 at 4:30pm in the Selectboard Meeting Room at the Municipal Center. The public can also connect to the public session of the meeting using zoom. The Board will convene at 4:30pm and is expected to immediately enter into executive session to discuss the appointment or employment or evaluation of a public officer or employee. The Board will reconvene after the executive session and immediately adjourn. No action will be taken.

Brattleboro Committee Meeting Warnings

The Brattleboro Citizens Police Communication Committee (CPCC) will meet on Monday, June 28, 2021 at 5:30pm in the Brooks Memorial Library Main Reading Room. The RTM Finance Committee will meet on Tuesday, June 29, 2021 at 6:00pm at the Brattleboro Co-op Outdoor Café. The Brattleboro Tree Committee will meet at 6:30pm at 9 Southern Avenue in Brattleboro.

New Map Shows Broadband (Lack of) Availability

The NTIA has released a new map showing indicators of broadband need. It takes several data sources, combines them, and then shows how different parts of the country compare.

It’s a fascinating map, showing where people in the US are getting fast internet speeds (big cities, Silicon Valley, and a few places here and there), and how the rest of us are doing.

For Windham County the numbers are like this:

Good Time To Hike Wantastiquet

On Wantastiquet, the trail is dry and the mountain laurel is blooming. On June 23, 2021, there was no water on the carriage road trail up to the summit. Not even a puddle. Really, things are that dry. You can wear sneakers. And the mountain laurel will be in bloom for another week. Invasive mountain laurel is everywhere on Wantastiquet, unfortunately, but it sure is pretty for these two weeks. It doesn’t bloom well at lower elevations, so you won’t see blossoms until the 7th hairpin turn (out of 9). The blossoms are much better if you continue past the summit towards Mine Ledge. (The trail after the antenna tower is narrow. I found a tick on my arm within three minutes. Past the summit, tick precautions are necessary.)

The view from the summit is disappointing now. The scruffy oak trees were last cleared out in 2009. Now they block most of downtown Brattleboro. Instead, you should take the side trail at the 6th hairpin turn to see the view from the lower lookout–the preferred spot for Brattleboro panoramas for 165 years. I’ve posted the two panoramas I took today on iBrattleboro’s photo section. It was a post-thunderstorm morning with low humidity–perfect for a photo. There’s even some mountain laurel in bloom on that side trail. That outcrop will have good blueberries in two weeks.

Thugs, Politicians and Guns

I can’t stop being outraged at the lack of action by politicians on the issue of gun control. It would be easy to become insensitive to the daily reports of mass shootings in this country but every time I hear about one I become more and more depressed because I know that nothing will change in my lifetime, if ever.

This lack of action makes it clear that the U.S. political system is controlled by amoral, unethical and inhumane people. It is fueled by self-interest and the only time that things get done is when politicians think they can get more votes or more financial support in the next election.

Gun control is not about guns or mental health. It is about a failed political system.

Noticed Around Brattleboro – Summer 2021

It’s the summer 2021 edition of “Noticed Around Brattleboro” – your seasonal catch-all for little things not worthy of a full story but certainly worthy of making note of for the history books.

• Exit 2 I-91 bridge work is ongoing. Looks like a new surface for the upper level.

• Hermit Thrush Brewery has a sign up where Silver Moon used to be.

BCTV Schedules – Week of June 21, 2021

BCTV Channel 1075 schedule for the week of 6/21/21

5:30 am North Branch Nature Center – Gulls Demystified
7:06 am HANDS in the Kitchen – Plant Based Proteins 4/15/21
8:00 am Democracy Now! – Democracy Now! Daily Broadcast
9:00 am Juno Singles – Derrik Jordan – Suite for an Imaginary Country
9:30 am Community Conversation – Cutting the Cable Cord

Brattleboro Senior Meals Menu June 21 to June 25

IMPORTANT INFORMATION AT THE BOTTOM OF THE MENU

Brattleboro VFW Breakfast/Lunch Info. Public Welcome to All Meals

Breakfast every Wednesday and Saturday from 6am-10am. Public welcome, as are to-go’s. Breakfast specials are offered every Wednesday, and the special for this Wednesday the 23rd will be the meat lover’s omeltte with toast for $7.50. Also offering corned beef hash, eggs cooked your way, homemade pancakes, breakfast sandwiches, and more.

Listed below are our $7 lunch specials offered Thursday’s and Friday’s. Also selling burgers, fries, etc. during our lunches that are served 11:30 am-1:30 pm.

Brattleboro Planning Commission To Release Downtown Plan For Review

The Brattleboro Planning Commission announces the release of the Downtown Plan. This Plan outlines a vision for placemaking and public space improvements to attract and retain businesses and residents. It looks at pedestrian and bicycle improvements, stormwater and landscaping, and how arts and cultural activities can enliven and revitalize public spaces.

In mid- to late 2019, a series of activities were held to engage the public. Surveys, walking tours, demonstration projects, and open studios were all used to allow the public to share ideas and aspirations for downtown. The Downtown Plan presents a starting point to help envision how to create an active, vibrant, and sustainable downtown.


New dental center sees 100-plus patients in less than two months

People take photos of the ribbon cutting of the new Windham County Dental Center, on Canal Street, in Brattleboro, on Tuesday, July 9, 2019.

Carmen Derby, executive director of the United Way of Windham County, talks about the history leading up to the ribbon cutting of the new Windham County Dental Center on Tuesday, July 9, 2019.

Carmen Derby, executive director of the United Way of Windham County, talks about the history leading up to the ribbon cutting of the new Windham County Dental Center on Tuesday, July 9, 2019.

BRATTLEBORO — The Windham County Dental Center hasn't even been open for two months yet and it has already seen more than 110 patients to whom it's provided more than 400 services.

"One of the most common services we offer is extraction," said Carmen Derby, executive director of the United Way of Windham County, which partnered with Brattleboro Memorial Hospital to pioneer this innovative model.

All new patients receive an examination and evaluation, said Derby, before undergoing procedures such as an extraction. She hopes that once the dental center has dealt with the most serious cases, it can focus on regular cleanings and general oral health.

"By the end of June, we have seen patients from most of the towns in Windham County," said Derby.

The Windham County Dental Center evolved from the annual Adult Dental Care Day hosted by the United Way for almost 10 years. During Adult Dental Care Day, folks who had no way of paying for care received it at no cost courtesy of the United Way, a number of donors, and dentists that offered their services.

But the need was greater than just that one day a year. According to a recent community health needs assessment conducted by the hospital, there are about 5,000 adults in Windham County who don't have a regular dental care provider.

"Patients go the emergency room to get access to dental care," Eilidh Pederson, BMH's vice president of Medical Group Management and Population Health, told the Reformer in April. "And we had been hearing from our primary care clinicians that they couldn't find 'dental homes' for their patients dependent on Medicaid and those who don't have dental insurance."

Now there is a dental home for those patients that does accept Medicaid. And even though Medicaid reimbursements will double in January, from $510 to more than $1,000, thanks to legislation passed in the Vermont State House, it's still not enough to cover the cost of care.

"On average, Medicaid only covers about 50 percent of the costs," said Derby.

While the center accepts Medicaid and patients without insurance, it also accepts commercial insurance from people who live or work in Windham County.

"We welcome any and all patients to get their dental care through us," said Pederson.

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The United Way and BMH received a $450,000 grant from the Thomas Thompson Trust to help pay for operations over the next three years. Other donations for the first year came from the Estate of Pinky and Marion Green, the Holt Fund and the Stratton Foundation. United Way and BMH also received $24,000 worth of in-kind work from local companies to get the building ready for patients. Those companies included GPI Construction, A.L. Tyler and Sons, Alliance Mechanical, Southern Vermont Telephone and Derby Building and Woodwork.

The United Way and BMH also received support from the Brattleboro Rotary Club and Horizon Dental, which provided equipment for the dental center.

The director of the Windham County Dental Center is Dr. Robert Ruhl, of Deerfield Valley Dental Care in Wilmington, who is also a BMH employee. He has been receiving assistance from Dr. Peter Abel and Dr. Paul Davenport, from Rutland, who have volunteered their services.

"Any other dentist who wants to volunteer should reach out," said Derby. "This is something that can really make a difference for the center."

On Tuesday, July 9, the United Way and BMH hosted an official ribbon cutting at the facility on the corner of Canal Street and Belmont Avenue.

Among those who spoke was Susan Monahan, a trustee with the Thomas Thompson Trust and Sen. Becca Balint, one of two senators who represent Windham County in Montpelier and who was instrumental in doubling the Medicaid allowance for dental care in Vermont.

"A concerned group of community members came together to make a difference three years ago and here we are, showing our community just how much they mean to us," said Pederson during the ribbon cutting. "This Center is the legacy of so many community members who played a role in making this happen. It is because of their work and their generosity that our community is left better than how we found it."

"This milestone is the result of a significant partnership between Brattleboro Memorial Hospital and United Way of Windham County," said Gov. Phil Scott in a letter read during the ribbon cutting. "This effort has already offered new dental services to meet the demand in Windham County, especially to those on Medicaid or without insurance. Thanks to the work of community partners and stakeholders, this accomplishment is a great success."

Derby and Pederson also see the Windham County Dental Center as a model for other communities around the state.

"We are presenting at a Vermont Hospital Association meeting in September," said Pederson. "We are going to talk about how community groups came together to incorporate medical and dental care in a way that impacts the most people possible."


Watch the video: BCTV Open Studio: Brattleboro Memorial Hospital Auxiliary