Thorn DD-647 - History

Thorn DD-647 - History

Thorn DD-647

Thorn(DD-647: dp. 1,630 (f.); 1. 348'4"; b. 36'1"; dr. 17'5" s. 37 k.; a. 4 5', 4 40mm., 7 20mm., 5 21" tt., 6 dcp. 2 dct.; cl. Gleaves)The first Thorn (DD-647) was laid down on 15 November 1942 at Kearny, N.J., by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Co.; launched on 28 February 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Beatrice Fox Palmer; and commissioned on 1 April 1943, Lt. Comdr. Edward Brumby in command.Following shakedown and trials out of Casco Bay, Maine, Thorn joined Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 19. Between 28 May 1943 and 2 January 1944, the destroyer conducted four round-trip convoy escort missions on the New York-Norfolk-Casablanca route-the first trip as part of Task Force (TF) 69 and the other three as part of TF 64. On her last convoy run, she escorted two oilers to Punta Delgada, in the Azores, in company with Stockton (DD-646)—the first ships to enter the port under the terms of the new agreement between the Allies and the government of Portugal.On 3 January 1944, the day after Thorn arrived back in New York harbor, Turner (DD 648) blew up and sank in Ambrose Channel, 5,000 yards astern of Thorn. Calling away the ship's motor whaleboat, Thorn sent a rescue party to try to recover survivors. Lt. James P. Drake, USNR, and Boatswain's Mate, First Class, E. Wells were awarded Navy and Marine Corps Medals for their bravery in the rescue of three Turner survivors, and three other men received commendation bars for their part in the operation.Late in January, Thorn sailed for the Pacific and transited the Panama Canal on the 29th. Ordered to report to relieve DesRon 1 in New Guinea waters, the destroyer and her sisters of DesDiv 37 headed for the southwest Pacific. Thorn was detoured to Guadalcanal and Rendova to escort a detached oiler group. She finally arrived at Milne Bay, New Guinea, on 29 February.Thorn moved directly from there to Cape Sudest where, on 4 March, the destroyer embarked troops and supplies of the Army's 7th Cavalry Division and immediately proceeded to Los Negros Island for the invasion of the Admiralties. In addition to making three additional escort trips between Cape Sudest and Seeadler Harbor, Thorn participated in two shore bombardments of Pityili Island, conducted antisubmarine patrols north of the Admiralties, and acted as a fighter director vessel.On 10 April-while making a practice torpedo run during preparations for forthcoming Allied landings at Hollandia-Thorn struck an uncharted reef. Damage to her screws and shafts forced the ship back to the west coast for an overhaul. En route home, she escorted Massachusetts (BB-59) to Bremerton, Wash. She subsequently escorted Thetis Bay (CVE 90) from the Puget Sound Navy Yard to San Francisco, Calif., where she eventually arrived on 22 May.After completing her overhaul at the Hunter's Point Navy Yard, Thorn conducted refresher training and then escorted Mississippi (BB -41) to Hawaii. She arrived at Pearl Harbor on 11 August. She then escorted Maryland (BB 46) to Purvis Bay, Solomon Islands, where she joined escort carrier Task Unit (TU) 32.7.1 and proceeded to the Palaus for the landings on 15 September. During this deployment as screen and plane guard, Thorn rescued the crews of three Grumman TBM "Avenger" torpedo planes which had "ditched."Detached from escort duty at the end of September, Thorn joined the 7th Fleet at Manus, in the Admiralties, on 3 October. As American forces massed for the initial assaults on the Japanese-occupied Philippine Islands, Thorr. joined the fire support screen for TF 77. She entered Leyte Gulf on the night of the 18th and screened battleships and cruisers during their early shore bombardments.As Allied troops swarmed ashore two days later, the destroyer provided interdiction fire at Abuyog, south of the Leyte beaches, and patrolled the southern end of Leyte Gulf for the following week. At dawn on the 21st, Thorn's gunners opened fire on a Japanese Aichi "Val" and sent the enemy dive bomber splashing into the sea near the transport area. On the 22d, the destroyer and Portland ( CA-33 ) splashed another enemy aircraft.During the fierce night action at Surigao Strait, Thorn screened the American battleships as they mauled the Japanese force coming through the strait. Originally ordered to conduct a torpedo attack on the Japanese battle line, Thorn and her mates were recalled as the Japanese fled posthaste from the direction whence they had come. Thorn then formed up with the lefthand flank of cruisers and destroyers and headed south to polish off the "cripples" from the Japanese force. The American ships came across one Japanese destroyer and smothered it with fire which summarily dispatched it to the depths. During her 17 salvoes, Thorn observed 12 hits.That evening, Thorn's division received orders to lie-to off Homonhon Island, to conduct a torpedo attack on a Japanese force expected from the eastward. The enemy, however, retired into the San Bernardino Strait that afternoon, and the American destroyer unit was recalled on the 26th.Ordered to Ulithi, Thorn departed Philippine waters to rejoin the 3d Fleet in the Carolines, for duty with the Fast Carrier Task Force. From 5 to 24 November, Thorn participated in TF 38's strikes against Japanese targets in the Philippines, screening and planeguarding for the fast carriers. She returned to Ulithi with TG 30.8 for duty with a logistics support group. She subsequently resumed planeguarding, this time standing by escort carriers. She assisted Cape Esperanec (CVE-88) during the 18 December typhoon. Following this heavy storm-which sank three destroyers-Thorn searched for survivors in the storm area.During the carrier strikes on Lingayen in early January 1945 and the subsequent carrier raids on Japanese shipping in the South China Sea, Thorn escorted a fast oiler group for replenishment evolutions with the aircraft carriers. While returning to the Carolines, via Leyte Gulf and the Mindoro Strait Thorn rescued the crew of a downed TBM and the pilot of a crashed fighter before arriving at Ulithi on the 27th. The destroyer again screened oilers during the operations against Iwo Jima and also entered waters near the strategic island to screen heavy fire support units. On 21 February, Thorn and Ute (ATF76) learned that Bismarek Sea (CVE-95) had been struck by two Japanese suicide planes, and they rushed to aid the stricken ship. However, when they searched the scene, the escort carrier had already gone to the bottom, the victim of Japanese kamikazes.Two days in Ulithi followed the ship's return, and, on 13 March, Thorn reformed with the 5th Fleet support group built around Detroit (CL-8) for the Ryukyu operations. On 25 March, Thorn and Aglwin (DD-355) made depth charge attacks on a sonar contact and observed an oil slick after the last drop. They conducted a retirement search before rejoining the formation on the 26th, but could not verify that the contact had actually been a submarine.Thorn subsequently conducted four escort missions with the replenishment group, escorting oilers into Kerama Retto to fuel the fire support ships off Okinawa and making her first run on 1 April. On the second run, Thorn observed two enemy planes splashing into the sea, victims of combat air patrol (CAP) fighters and ship gunfire. On the third, a kamikaze crashed Taluga (AO-62), two miles astern, while another enemy suicide plane splashed alongside a nearby small patrol craft.The destroyer then spent two weeks at Ulithi, replenishing for further operations with the logistics support group. She rejoined the oilers and supply ships at sea on 28 May. On 5 June, Thorn rode out her second major typhoon, steaming through the eye of the storm at 0530. Two days later, she joined a group of four damaged escort aircraft carriers which were retiring to Guam.On 4 July, soon after screening the CVE's out of the "front lines" for repairs, Thorn resumed work with the replenishment and support group and continued screening and supporting it through the surrender of Japan. During this period, she sank seven drifting mines.Following Japan's surrender, Thorn steamed off Tokyo Bay until 9 September, when the entire group entered Sagami Wan. The next day, the support group's base was established at the Yokosuka Naval Base where Thorn remained through the end of September.Streaming her homeward-bound pennant, Thorn, in company with DesRon 19, steamed out of Tokyo Bay on 8 October and joined Tennessee (BB-43) and California (BB-44) off Wakayama the following day. On 15 October, the group sailed on the first leg of their homeward-bound voyage, subsequently stopping at Singapore, Colombo, and Cape Town. The destroyer eventually arrived in New York on 7 December 1945, via St. Helena and Ascension Islands in the Atlantic After a month's overhaul, she proceeded to Charleston S.C., where she was decommissioned and placed in reserve on 6 May 1946.Thorn lay in reserve through the 1950's and 60's. Struck from the Navy list on 1 July 1971, the ship's hulk was authorized for use as a target and was sunk by aircraft from America (CVA-66) in November 1973.Thorn received seven battle stars for her World War II service.


Atlantic service, May 1943 – January 1944 [ edit | edit source ]

Following shakedown and trials out of Casco Bay, Maine, Thorn joined Destroyer Squadron㺓 (DesRon 19). Between 28 May 1943 and 2 January 1944, the destroyer conducted four round-trip convoy escort mission signs on the New York–Norfolk–Casablanca route — the first trip as part of Task Force 69 (TF69) and the other three as part of TF64. On her last convoy run, she escorted two oilers to Ponta Delgada, in the Azores, in company with Stockton (DD-646) — the first ships to enter the port under the terms of the new agreement between the Allies and the government of Portugal.

On 3 January 1944, the day after Thorn arrived back in New York harbor, Turner (DD-648) blew up and sank in Ambrose Channel, 5,000 yards astern of Thorn. Calling away the ship's motor whaleboat, Thorn sent: a rescue party to try to recover survivors. Lt. James P. Drake, USNR, and Boatswain's Mate, First Class, E. Wells were awarded Navy and Marine Corps Medals for their bravery in the rescue of three Turner survivors, and three other men received commendation bars for their part in the operation.


Southwest Pacific service, February – September 1944 [ edit | edit source ]

Late in January, Thorn sailed for the Pacific and transited the Panama Canal on the 29th. Ordered to report to relieve DesRon 1 in New Guinea waters, the destroyer and her sisters of Destroyer Division 37 (DesDiv 37) headed for the southwest Pacific. Thorn was detoured to Guadalcanal and Rendova Islands to escort a detached oiler group. She finally arrived at Milne Bay, New Guinea, on 29 February.

Thorn moved directly from there to Cape Sudest where, on 4 March, the destroyer embarked troops and supplies of the Army's 7th Cavalry and immediately proceeded to Los Negros Island for the invasion of the Admiralties. In addition to making three additional escort trips between Cape Sudest and Seeadler Harbor, Thorn participated in two shore bombardments of Pityilu Island, conducted antisubmarine patrols north of the Admiralties, and acted as a fighter director vessel.

On 10 April — while making a practice torpedo run during preparations for forthcoming Allied landings at HollandiaThorn struck an uncharted reef. Damage to her screws and shafts forced the ship back to the West Coast for an overhaul. En route home, she escorted Massachusetts (BB-59) to Bremerton, Washington. She subsequently escorted Thetis Bay (CVE-90) from the Puget Sound Navy Yard to San Francisco, California, where she eventually arrived on 22 May.

After completing her overhaul at the Hunter's Point Navy Yard, Thorn conducted refresher training and then escorted Mississippi (BB-41) to Hawaii. She arrived at Pearl Harbor on 11 August. She then escorted Maryland (BB-46) to Purvis Bay, Solomon Islands, where she joined escort carrier Task Unit 32.7.1 (TU32.7.1) and proceeded to the Palaus for the landings on 15 September. During this deployment as screen and plane guard, Thorn rescued the crews of three Grumman TBM Avenger torpedo planes which had "ditched."


Commissioned into service

Commissioned into service two months later on April 23, KIDD commenced her shakedown cruise at Casco Bay, Maine. She saw her first duty covering the North Atlantic sea lanes near Argentia, Newfoundland. She then provided escort for new carriers during their shakedown cruises from Norfolk to Trinidad. In August of 1943, she transited the Panama Canal along with three other destroyers providing escort for USS ALABAMA (BB-60) and SOUTH DAKOTA (BB-57) and proceeded to Pearl Harbor.

During a simulated torpedo attack in September of that year, KIDD was struck by two star-shells fired from the NORTH CAROLINA (BB-55). As fortune had it, her forward damage control party was exercising in the immediate vicinity with a make-believe casualty strapped into a stretcher. One of the shells entered the compartment and crossed just above the chest of the pretended casualty. The sailor suffered a minor abrasion from a fleck of debris. The skipper reported to the task force commander: “KIDD claims to be the best prepared ship in the Navy. We had a victim already strapped in the stretcher when he was wounded.”

It was early on at this point in her career when she picked up the nickname that would become her trademark. Taking their mascot pirate to heart, crew members began to “ransom” rescued pilots for ice cream mix and other delicacies from their comrades aboard aircraft carriers so that her reputation grew as the “Pirate of the Pacific.” Other destroyers conducted this practice, but KIDD did so with a certain flair. The Pirates were one of the first “tin cans”—destroyers—to have their very own ice cream machine, something usually reserved for the larger vessels of the fleet.


THORN DD 988

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.


    Spruance Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid 29 August 1977 - Launched 22 November 1978

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


Thorn DD-647 - History

April 1943 - March 1946

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Thorn DD 647 cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • The Story of the USS Thorn (Detailed Written Description)
  • Crossing the Line (Equator)
  • Divisional Group Photos With Names
  • Roster of Names Rank and Hometown
  • Roster of Plank Owners and Non Plank Owners
  • Many Shipboard Activity Photos

Over 85 Photos on 55 Pages

Once you view this CD you will have a better idea of what life was like on this Destroyer during World War II.


Service in the Atlantic and Mediterranean

The USS Thorn was a Spruance-class destroyer built by Ingalls Shipbuilding of Pascagoula, Mississippi. The 8,040-ton destroyer was commissioned on February 16, 1980. Based out of the Norfolk Virginia Naval Station, the Thorn was a member of UNITAS XXV during 1985. This exercise is an annual event in which the U.S. Navy conducts exercises alongside South American nation navies. The next year Thorn was sent to Europe, returning in 1987.

The vessel was then sent to the Mediterranean in late 1987, docking at Barcelona, Spain that December. In 1994, Thorn underwent an overhaul which took the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Corporation shipyards three months.

1997 saw the Thorn patrolling the Persian Gulf, enforcing United Nations sanctions against Iraq. During most of 1998 the Thorn was in port, receiving a new computer system which allowed the crew to monitor conditions throughout the ship. Next she sailed to the Mediterranean with the USS Enterprise carrier group. Thorn again sailed to the Mediterranean in 2001, 2003, and 2004.


Our Newsletter

Product Description

USS Thorn DD 647

April 1943 - March 1946

World War II Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Thorn cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

Additional Bonus:

  • 22 Minute Audio " American Radio Mobilizes the Homefront " WWII (National Archives)
  • 22 Minute Audio " Allied Turncoats Broadcast for the Axis Powers " WWII (National Archives)
  • 20 Minute Audio of a " 1967 Equator Crossing " (Not this ship but the Ceremony is Traditional)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.
    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.


    Mục lục

    Thorn được chế tạo tại xưởng tàu của hãng Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company ở Kearny, New Jersey. Nó được đặt lườn vào ngày 15 tháng 11 năm 1942 được hạ thủy vào ngày 28 tháng 2 năm 1943, và được đỡ đầu bởi bà Beatrice Fox Palmer. Con tàu được cho nhập biên chế cùng Hải quân Hoa Kỳ tại Xưởng hải quân Brooklyn vào ngày 1 tháng 4 năm 1943 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Thiếu tá Hải quân Thiếu tá Hải quân Edward Brumby.

    Đại Tây Dương Sửa đổi

    Sau khi hoàn tất việc chạy thử máy ngoài khơi Casco Bay, Maine, Thorn gia nhập Hải đội Khu trục 19. Từ ngày 28 tháng 5 năm 1943 đến ngày 3 tháng 1 năm 1944, nó đã hộ tống bốn chuyến vận tải khứ hồi đi lại giữa New York, Norfolk và Casablanca chuyến đầu tiên trong thành phần Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 69 và ba chuyến kia trong thành phần Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 64. Trong chuyến đi sau cùng, nó đã cùng với tàu chị em Stockton (DD-646) hộ tống hai tàu chở dầu đi đến Ponta Delgada thuộc quần đảo Azores, là những con tàu đầu tiên đi vào cảng này sau khi có được thỏa thuận mới giữa Đồng Minh với chính phủ Bồ Đào Nha.

    Vào ngày 3 tháng 1 năm 1944, một ngày sau khi Thorn quay trở lại cảng New York, tàu khu trục Turner (DD-648) bị nổ tung và đắm trong eo biển Ambrose, cách 5.000 yd (4,6 km) về phía đuôi của Thorn. Nó gửi một đội cứu hộ đi trên xuồng máy đến cứu vớt những người sống sót.

    Tây Nam Thái Bình Dương Sửa đổi

    Vào cuối tháng 1 năm 1944, Thorn lên đường đi sang Mặt trận Thái Bình Dương, băng qua kênh đào Panama vào ngày 29 tháng 1. Nhận mệnh lệnh thay phiên cho Đội khu trục 1 tại vùng biển New Guinea, nó và các tàu chị em thuộc Đội khu trục 37 hướng sang khu vực Tây Nam Thái Bình Dương. Được lệnh đi đến Guadalcanal và đảo Rendova hộ tống một đội tàu chở dầu biệt phái, nó cuối cùng đi đến vịnh Milne, New Guinea vào ngày 29 tháng 2. Nó di chuyển trực tiếp đến mũi Sudest, nơi vào ngày 4 tháng 3 đã nhận lên tàu binh lính và tiếp liệu thuộc Trung đoàn 7 Kỵ binh của Lục quân, rồi lập tức lên đường đi đến đảo Los Negros tham gia Chiến dịch Quần đảo Admiralty. Nó còn thực hiện ba chuyến đi vận tải giữa mũi Sudest và Seeadler Harbor, hai lượt bắn phá đảo Pityilu, tiến hành các cuộc tuần tra chống tàu ngầm về phía bắc quần đảo Admiralty, và hoạt động như một tàu dẫn đường máy bay chiến đấu.

    Vào ngày 10 tháng 4, đang khi tiến hành một cuộc thực tập ngư lôi chuẩn bị cho Chiến dịch Reckless tiếp theo nhằm đổ bộ lên Hollandia, Thorn va phải một dãi san hô ngầm không thể hiện trên hải đồ. Những hư hại cho chân vịt và trục động cơ buộc nó phải quay trở về vùng bờ Tây để đại tu. Trên đường quay trở về nhà, nó hộ tống cho thiết giáp hạm Massachusetts (BB-59) đi đến Bremerton, Washington rồi sau đó đi kèm tàu sân bay hộ tống Thetis Bay (CVE-90) trong chặng đường từ Xưởng hải quân Puget Sound đến San Francisco, California, nơi nó đến vào ngày 22 tháng 5.

    Sau khi hoàn tất việc đại tu tại Xưởng hải quân Hunter's Point, Thorn tiến hành huấn luyện ôn tập trước khi hộ tống cho thiết giáp hạm Mississippi (BB-41) đi Hawaii. Nó đi đến Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 11 tháng 8, để rồi lại hộ tống cho thiết giáp hạm Maryland (BB-46) đi vịnh Purvis thuộc quần đảo Solomon, nơi nó gia nhập Đơn vị Đặc nhiệm 32.7.1 và tiếp tục đi đến Palaus tham gia cuộc đổ bộ vào ngày 15 tháng 9. Trong đợt hoạt động này, nó cứu vớt những đội bay của ba chiếc máy bay ném bom-ngư lôi Grumman TBF Avenger bị bắn rơi trên biển.

    Philippines Sửa đổi

    Được cho tách khỏi nhiệm vụ hộ tống vào cuối tháng 9 năm 1944, Thorn gia nhập Đệ thất Hạm đội tại đảo Manus thuộc quần đảo Admiralty vào ngày 3 tháng 10. Khi lực lượng Hoa Kỳ được tập trung cho cuộc đổ bộ lên quần đảo Philippine còn do Nhật chiếm đóng, chiếc tàu khu trục gia nhập lực lượng hỗ trợ hỏa lực của Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 77. Nó tiến vào vịnh Leyte trong đêm 18 tháng 10, bảo vệ cho các thiết giáp hạm và tàu tuần dương trong các cuộc bắn phá chuẩn bị ban đầu. Khi lực lượng Đồng Minh đổ bộ lên bờ hai ngày sau đó, nó bắn pháo can thiệp tại Abuyog về phía Nam các bãi đổ bộ Leyte, và tuần tra khu phía Nam vịnh Leyte trong một tuần lễ tiếp theo. Lúc sáng sớm ngày 21 tháng 10, pháo thủ của nó đã bắn vào một chiếc máy bay ném bom bổ nhào Nhật Bản, bắn chiếc Aichi D3A rơi xuống biển gần khu vực vận chuyển. Sang ngày 22 tháng 10, nó cùng tàu tuần dương Portland (CA-33) bắn rơi một máy bay đối phương khác.

    Trong Trận chiến eo biển Surigao ác liệt vào ban đêm, Thorn đã hộ tống các thiết giáp hạm Hoa Kỳ khi chúng đối đầu với lực lượng Nhật Bản đang băng qua eo biển. Nguyên được giao nhiệm vụ tấn công bằng ngư lôi vào đội hình hàng chiến trận đối phương, nó và các tàu khu trục tháp tùng được gọi quay trở lại khi lực lượng Nhật Bản rút lui về phía Nam qua eo biển Surigao rồi sau đó hình thành nên sườn phía trái các tàu tuần dương và khu trục tiến về phía Nam, kết liễu một tàu khu trục hư hại nặng thuộc lực lượng Nhật Bản đã bị đánh bại. Chiều tối ngày 25 tháng 10, Đội khu trục 39 của Thorn được lệnh phục kích ngoài khơi đảo Homonhon về phía Đông của vịnh Leyte, để tiến hành một đợt tấn công bằng ngư lôi vào một lực lượng Nhật Bản dự đoán sẽ tiến đến từ phía Đông. Tuy nhiên, đối phương đã rút lui qua eo biển San Bernardino vào xế trưa hôm đó, và đơn vị tàu khu trục Hoa Kỳ được gọi quay trở lại vào ngày 26 tháng 10.

    Được lệnh đi Ulithi, Thorn rời vùng biển Philippine để gia nhập Đệ Tam hạm đội tại khu vực quần đảo Caroline, hoạt động cùng lực lượng tàu sân bay nhanh, Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 38. Từ ngày 6 đến ngày 24 tháng 11, nó tham gia các cuộc không kích của Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 38 xuống các mục tiêu của quân Nhật tại Philippine, bảo vệ và canh phòng máy bay cho các tàu sân bay nhanh. Nó quay trở lại cùng Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm, và được phân về Đội đặc nhiệm 30.8 phối thuộc cùng một đội hỗ trợ tiếp liệu. Nó lại được giao vai trò canh phòng máy bay, lần này là với các tàu sân bay hộ tống và đã trợ giúp cho chiếc Cape Esperance (CVE-88) chống chọi qua cơn bão Cobra vào ngày 18 tháng 12, vốn đã nhấn chìm ba tàu khu trục Hoa Kỳ. Khi cơn bão đã tan, nó tham gia tìm kiếm những người sống sót sau cơn bão.

    Trong khi các tàu sân bay thuộc lực lượng đặc nhiệm không kích xuống vịnh Lingayen vào đầu tháng 1 năm 1945, và sau đó xuống tàu bè Nhật Bản trong Biển Đông, Thorn hộ tống một đội tàu chở dầu nhanh để tiếp nhiên liệu cho lực lượng đặc nhiệm. Trên đường quay trở về quần đảo Caroline ngang qua vịnh Leyte và eo biển Mindoro, nó đã cứu vớt đội bay một chiếc Grumman TBF Avenger và phi công một máy bay tiêm kích bị rơi trước khi về đến Ulithi vào ngày 27 tháng 1. Chiếc tàu khu trục lại hộ tống các tàu chở dầu để phục vụ cho chiến dịch không kích xuống Iwo Jima, đồng thời tiếp cận vùng biển gần hòn đảo để bảo vệ cho các tàu chiến bắn phá hạng nặng. Sau khi được tin Bismarck Sea (CVE-95) bị hai máy bay tấn công cảm tử Kamikaze đánh trúng vào ngày 21 tháng 2, nó đã cùng Ute (ATF-76) đi đến để trợ giúp chiếc tàu sân bay hộ tống, nhưng chỉ đến nơi sau khi Bismarck Sea đã bị đắm.

    Nhật Bản Sửa đổi

    Thorn quay trở về Ulithi và ở lại đây trong hai ngày, trước khi được tái tổ chức vào ngày 13 tháng 3 trong thành phần Đội hỗ trợ cho Đệ Ngũ hạm đội, được hình thành chung quanh tàu tuần dương hạng nhẹ Detroit (CL-8) để hoạt động tại quần đảo Ryūkyū. Vào ngày 25 tháng 3, Thorn cùng tàu khu trục Aylwin (DD-355) đã tấn công bằng mìn sâu vào một tín hiệu sonar thu được, phát hiện những vệt dầu loang trước khi rút lui để quay trở lại đội hình vào ngày 26 tháng 3 tuy nhiên họ không thể khẳng định đã tiêu diệt được tàu ngầm.

    Thorn sau đó tiến hành bốn chuyến hộ tống cùng các đội tiếp liệu, hộ tống các tàu chở dầu đến Kerama Retto để tiếp nhiên liệu cho các tàu thuộc đội hỗ trợ hỏa lực ngoài khơi Okinawa, thực hiện chuyến đầu tiên vào ngày 1 tháng 4. Trong chuyến đi thứ hai, nó chứng kiến hai máy bay đối phương bị những máy bay tiêm kích tuần tra chiến đấu trên không (CAP) và hỏa lực phòng không bắn rơi. Trong chuyến thứ ba, một máy bay Kamikaze đã đánh trúng tàu chở dầu Taluga (AO-62) cách 2 nmi (3,7 km) về phía đuôi Thorn, trong khi một máy bay tự sát khác bị bắn rơi cạnh một tàu tuần tra gần đó.

    Thorn trải qua hai tuần lễ tại Ulithi để tiếp liệu và nghỉ ngơi trước khi tiếp tục hoạt động cùng đội tiếp liệu. Nó gia nhập cùng các tàu chở dầu và tàu tiếp liệu ngoài khơi ngày 28 tháng 5 rồi đến ngày 5 tháng 6, lại chịu đựng thêm một cơn bão thứ hai trước khi gia nhập cùng một nhóm bốn tàu sân bay hộ tống bị hư hại hai ngày sau đó, và tháp tùng chúng rút lui về Guam. Nó tiếp nối hoạt động cùng đội tiếp liệu vào ngày 4 tháng 7, và hoạt động hỗ trợ tiếp liệu cho lực lượng đặc nhiệm tàu sân bay nhanh cho đến khi Nhật Bản đầu hàng kết thúc cuộc xung đột. Trong giai đoạn này nó đã phá hủy bảy quả thủy lôi trôi nổi trên biển bằng hải pháo.

    Sau chiến tranh Sửa đổi

    Sau khi kết thúc chiến tranh, Thorn hoạt động ngoài khơi vịnh Tokyo cho đến ngày 9 tháng 9, khi toàn đội rút lui về Sagami Wan. Sang ngày hôm sau, căn cứ của đội hỗ trợ được thiết lập tại Yokosuka, nơi nó ở lại cho đến cuối tháng 9. Con tàu cùng Hải đội Khu trục 19 lên đường quay trở về Hoa Kỳ, rời vịnh Tokyo vào ngày 8 tháng 10 và gia nhập cùng các thiết giáp hạm Tennessee (BB-43) và California (BB-44) ngoài khơi Wakayama vào ngày hôm sau. Nhóm tàu chiến khởi hành cho chặng đầu tiên quay trở về nhà vào ngày 15 tháng 10, ghé qua Singapore, Colombo và Cape Town, rồi ngang qua St. Helena và đảo Ascension tại Đại Tây Dương. Chiếc tàu khu trục cuối cùng về đến New York vào ngày 7 tháng 12, và sau một tháng được đại tu, nó đi đến Charleston, South Carolina, nơi con tàu được cho xuất biên chế và đưa về lực lượng dự bị vào ngày 6 tháng 5 năm 1946.

    Thorn bị bỏ không trong gần ba thập niên, cho đến khi tên nó được rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 1 tháng 7 năm 1971. Lườn tàu được sử dụng như một mục tiêu thực hành, và nó bị máy bay từ tàu sân bay Saratoga (CV-60) đánh chìm vào ngày 22 tháng 8 năm 1974, ở vị trí khoảng 75 dặm (121 km) về phía Đông Jacksonville, Florida. [1]

    Thorn được tặng thưởng bảy Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II.


    The Thorn conducted shakedown and then joined Destroyer Squadron 19. From May 1943 to January 1944 she escorted four convoy missions to Casablanca. The day after she arrived back in New York, her fellow destroyer the USS Turner exploded and sank in Ambrose Channel. The Thorn sent a small boat party which rescued three survivors. Later that month the ship sailed for Pacific waters and arrived in New Guinea on February 29, 1944. From there she moved to the Admiralty Islands to support invasion operations, providing shore bombardments and acting as fighter director.

    While preparing for the landings at Hollandia, the Thorn struck an uncharted reef on April 10. The resulting damage sent the ship back to Hunter's Point, California, for repair and overhaul. The Thorn then escorted the USS Mississippi on the way back to Pearl Harbor. As part of the landings on the Palaus the ship rescued the crews of three ditched torpedo planes. She screened battleships and cruisers during the initial assaults on the Philippines, downing an enemy aircraft on October 21. She fired 17 salvos at a Japanese destroyer at Surigao Strait, scoring 12 hits.

    The Thorn was recalled to Ulithi on October 26 but rejoined the fight in the Philippines in November. The ship assisted the USS Cape Esperance during the December typhoon. The Thorn was then assigned escort duty with a fast oiler group supporting the carriers for strikes on Lingayen. Returning to Ulithi, she rescued two downed aviators.

    The Thorn took part in the Iwo Jima operation and the attacks on the Ryukyus, dropping depth charges on March 25, 1945. She escorted oilers in support of the Okinawa operation. Following replenishment at Ulithi, the destroyer resumed escort operations through the end of the war and remained in Japan until October 8. With the home-bound pennant flying, she headed back to homeport via Singapore, Colombo and Cape Town. She arrived at New York on December 7, 1945.


    Watch the video: Boeing C-17 Globemaster Jet Crash All Hell breaks loose