Grayson DD- 435 - History

Grayson DD- 435 - History

Grayson

Cary Travers Grayson was born in Culpeper, VA., 11 October 1878. After completing his medical studies, he was appointed Acting Assistant Surgeon, USN, 14 July 1903. A variety of posts led Grayson to Washington, where on 12 December 1912 he was assigned to the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery with additional duty as Aide to the White House. Commissioned Rear Admiral 29 August 1916, he served as personal physician and aide to President Woodrow Wilson during World War I. Before transferring to the Retired List 20 December 1928, Admiral Grayson received the Navy Cross for exceptionally meritorious service as aide and physician to President Wilson. He was also made Commander of the National Order of the Legion of Honor by the French government. Admiral Grayson served as chairman of the American Red Cross from 1935 until his death 15 February 1938.

I

(DD-435: dp. 2,525; 1. 34S'4"; b. 36'1"; dr. 13'6"; s.
37.4 k.; cpl. 276; a. 4 5", 5 21" tt.; cl Gleaves

Grayson (DD-435)was laid down 17 July 1939 by the Charleston Navy Yard, s.a., Iaunched 7 August 1940; sponsored by Mrs. Alice Gertrude Gordon Grayson Harrison (Mrs. George Leslie Harrison), widow of Rear Admiral Grayson; and commissioned 14 February 1941, Lt. Comdr. Thomas M. Stokes in command.

After shakedown along the New England coast and in Chesapeake Bay, Grayson joined Destroyer Division 22 of the Atlantic Fleet. On 28 August the new destroyer became flagship of DesRon 11 operating in the Caribbean out of Guantanamo Bay. She reported for neutrality patrol in the North Atlantic waters between Newfoundland and Iceland 26 October.

After 10 months patrolling and protecting convoys in the icy North Atlantic Grayson was ordered to the Pacific to join an American fleet battered but resolutely carrying the war to the enemy. She sailed from San Diego 2 April 1942 as part of Hornet's escort and rendezvoused at sea 13 April with Enterprise under Admiral William "Bull" Halsey. From this fast carrier force, steaming less than 800 miles from there Japanese home islands, General "Jimmy" Doolittle launched his famed B-25 raid on Tokyo IS April, bringing war to the enemy's own land.

The task group sailed into Pearl Harbor 25 April. Grayson departed almost immediately for repairs in California, but soon returned to the Pacific war.

Grayson again found herself with a fast carrier force as she sailed from Pearl Harbor 15 July to escort Enterprise and Hornet. Reaching Guadalcanal via Tongatabu 7 August 1942, the carriers launched their planes to cover Marine landings there, America's first major blow of the war on the road to Japan; and then operated in the area to block Japanese reinforcements. As they maneuvered off Guadalcanal, Enterprise was hit by Japanese bombs 24 August in an action filled half-hour which saw Grayson down two planes and damage a third. The task group dispersed, Enterprise returning to Pearl Harbor for repairs, and Grayson joined TF-11, built around Saratoga under Admiral Fletcher. Action soon followed. Sighting a Japanese submarine on the surface the next day, 25 August, Grayson closed for the kill. After expending 46 depth charges, her entire supply, in a series of five attacks, the destroyer finally had the satisfaction of seeing a huge air bubble and oil slick rise to the surface indicating the death of another Imperial submarine.

The battle-proven ship and crew remained in the bitterly contested waters around Guadalcanal for nearly 8 months in a variety of duties. The versatile Grayson convoyed troop transports loaded with reinforcements from Noumea and other staging areas to Guadalcanal, patrolled in "The Slot", served as a radar picket ship, and performed valuable rescue work. On 18 October she picked up 75 survivors from DD-Meredith, sunk by aerial torpedo 16 October, and helped escort the barge Vireo, loaded with desperately needed fuel and ammunition, to Guadalcanal.

Returning to Pearl Harbor 15 April 1943 for overhaul, Grayson continued on to the States for further repairs and finally sailed to New Caledonia, arriving 24 September. She accounted for at leant four and possible two more Japanese barges loaded with evacuees from Kolombangara during three nights of action, 30 September-3 October, with DesRon 21 under Commander A. D. Chandler. After 3 months of patrol duty, Grayson sailed for Puget Sound Navy Yard 16 December for overhaul.

Grayson soon returned to the Pacific, putting in at Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands, 10 February 1944. Patrol duty in the Solomons, Carolines, and Marshalls occupied her the following 6 months. On 30 March Grayson supported initial assault landings on Pityiliu Island Admiralties, from.22 to 24 April she was fighter-director ship for the landings at Tanahmerah Bay, Dutch New Guinea. She bombarded Biak Island 27 May and Noemfoor Island 2 July prior to invasion landings.

On 1 September 1944 Grayson joined TG 38, for carrier strikes against the enemy in the Palau Islands, scene of the next major invasion. She returned to Seeadler Harbor 31 September. She again sailed 2 October for a major strike against Okinawa and the Philippines. Japanese planes harassed the withdrawal, and on 15 October Grayson rescued 194 men from the torpedoed light cruiser Houston, who was towed safely to Ulithi.

From Ulithi, Grayson sailed straight to Saipan, where on 3 November she took up radar picket and lifeguard duty. Finally Grayson was ordered home, reaching Seattle 9 June 1945 for her first real rest since the war began.

Grayson returned to Pearl Harbor 1 September 1945, the day of the signing of the Articles of Surrender in Tokyo Bay. After brief training she sailed for the United States. transiting the Panama Canal 8 October, she put in at Charleston, S.C., 16 October. Eleven days later the battle-scarred "tin can" hosted over 5,000 visitors as a grateful and jubilant public paid tribute on Navy Day. Grayson remained at Charleston until decommissioned, 4 February 1947, and was placed in reserve. At present she is berthed at Orange, Tex.

Grayson received 13 battle stars for World War II service.


Grayson DD- 435 - History

A Tin Can Sailors
Destroyer History

Admiral Cary T. Grayson was the personal physician and aide to President Woodrow Wilson during World War I. The DD-435 was launched on 7 August 1940 and commissioned on 14 February 1941. Her first assignment took her to Guantanamo Bay and Caribbean waters. Then, in October, she headed north for ten months on patrol and escort duty steaming between Newfoundland and Iceland.

Early in the spring of 1942, the GRAYSON was ordered to the Pacific. She sailed from San Diego in April 1942 as part of the escort for the HORNET (CV-8), which carried sixteen B-25s under the command of General 'Jimmy' Doolittle whose raid on Tokyo on 18 April brought war home to the enemy for the first time.

The GRAYSON’s next assignment found her escorting the carrier ENTERPRISE (CV-6) bound for 'Operation Watchtower,' the invasion of Guadalcanal. One of the screening destroyers for the carriers ENTERPRISE, SARATOGA (CV-3), and WASP (CV-7), she was part of the Air Support Force for the upcoming invasion. On 7 and 8 August 1942, the carriers launched their planes and the GRAYSON and the rest of the screening ships turned their guns skyward to stop a flight of Japanese bombers that swooped down on the marines landing on Guadalcanal. By the afternoon of the 8th, the First Marine Division had taken the airstrip—later named Henderson Field—and with the aid of fire from navy ships and airplanes, had driven the Japanese to ground.

The GRAYSON continued operations in the area with the ENTERPRISE and Task Force 16 to block Japanese reinforcements from getting through to their troops on the islands. At 1700 on 24 August, the task force engaged enemy Zeros and bombers northeast of the lower Solomons. In an action-filled half-hour that saw the GRAYSON’s gunners down two planes and damage a third, the ENTERPRISE was hit by three bombs and retired from the war zone. With the ENTERPRISE headed for Pearl Harbor for repairs, her task group dispersed. The GRAYSON joined Task Force 11, built around the carrier SARATOGA. Action soon followed. Sighting a Japanese submarine on the surface on 25 August, the GRAYSON closed in for the kill. After expending her entire supply of forty depth charges in a series of five attacks, the destroyer’s crew finally had the satisfaction of seeing a huge air bubble and oil slick rise to the surface indicating the death of another Imperial submarine.

The battle-proven ship and her crew remained in the bitterly contested waters around Guadalcanal for nearly eight months, convoying troop transports, patrolling the 'Slot,' serving as a radar picket ship, and performing vital search and rescue work. On 18 October 1942, the destroyer’s crew picked up seventy-five survivors from the destroyer MEREDITH (DD-434), sunk by aerial torpedo on 15 October. They then helped escort the tug VIREO (ATO-144) and its barge loaded with desperately needed fuel and ammunition to Guadalcanal.

After an extensive overhaul in the United States, the GRAYSON returned to the Pacific theater on 24 September 1943. On the night of 1 October, she joined a destroyer strike force to attack the stream of Japanese barges evacuating the garrison at Vella Lavella and Kolombangara. The GRAYSON’s gun crews accounted for at least four and possibly two more Japanese barges loaded with evacuees during three nights of action. Concluding the year with three months of patrol duty, she steamed east for an overhaul at Puget Sound.


Grayson DD- 435 - History

Posted on 03/04/2017 9:23:23 PM PST by Jeff Head

My Review and Build of Dragon Kit #1027, 1/350 Gleaves Class Destroyer, USS Grayson, DD-435 REVIEW & BUILD, Doolittle Raid Vessel

Gleaves Class Destroyers

The Gleaves-class destroyers were a class of 66 destroyers of the United States Navy built from 1938㫂. They were designed by Gibbs & Cox. and these were the main production destroyers of the US Navy when it entered World War II. The succeeded the Benson class of which 30 were built before and into World War II.

They were initially meant to be a part of a 24-ship class authorized for 1938㫀. Bethlehem Shipbuilding, whichhad been given a contract to build six of these destoyers requested that the six ships designed by them use less complex machinery. Initially, Gleaves and Niblack, although designed by Gibbs & Cox and built by Bath Iron Works, were to follow the earlier Benson design. S,. when BVethlehem started building it temporarily made the USS Livermore the lead ship with more complex machinery and the class was initially called the Livermore class. However, it soon proved possible for Gleaves and Niblack to be built to the Livermore design that Bethlehem was using, and so this allowed Gleaves to be the first in class since it was completed before Livermore and had a lower hull number.

Eighteen of these were commissioned in 1940㫁. The remaining 48 were authorized in 1940㫂 when it became more and more clear that the US was going to be pulled into the war and as the demand to help England with tranpsort duties across the Atlantic continued to rise.

During World War II the Benson and Gleaves class destroyers were the backbone of the pre-war Neutrality Patrols and brought the action to the enemy by participating in every major naval campaign of the war around the world.

It was not until the Fletcher class was built that a design had more vessels built. In fact, the larger Fletcher class was authorized in 1941 as the US entered the war and 175 of those destroyers wee built over a three year period at several yards around the country. So, with the Benosn, the Gleaves, and then the Fletcher class, by 19440, the United States had built 272 destroyers and commissioned them and brought them into the War effort. The charateristics of these frigates are as follows:

Displacement: 1,630 tons
Length: 348 ft 3 in (106.15 m)
Beam: 36 ft 1 in (11.00 m)
Draft: 11 ft 10 in (3.61 m)
Propulsion:
- 50,000 shp (37,000 kW)
- 4 boilers
- 2 propellers
Speed: 37.4 knots (69 km/h)
Range: 6,500 nmi (12,000 km 7,500 mi) at 12 kn (22 km/h 14 mph)
Complement: 16 officers, 260 enlisted
Armament:
5 × 5 in (127 mm) DP guns,
6 × 0.5 in (12.7 mm) guns,
6 × 20 mm AA guns,
10 × 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes,
2 × depth charge tracks

I am building this vessel as the USS Grayson, DD-435, even though it was sold as the USS Livermore, DD-429.

Grayson was launched in August 1940 and commissioned in February 1941. Before the US officaillt entered the war, and immediately thereafter, Grayson was involved with escorting convoys across the Atlantic to England.

I chose to build this model as the USS Grayson because it was one of four Gleaves class destroyers that served with the USS Hornet, CV-8 (TF-18), and USS Enterprise, CV-6 (TF-16), during the early days of the war and in the first major offensive strike at Japan, during the Doolittle Raid on Japan in April 1942. These are the four Gleaves class that accompanied the raid:

USS Gwin, DD-433
USS Mredith, DD-434
USS Grayson, DD-435
USS Monssen, DD-436

. all but Grayson were sunk before the war ended and only Grayson survived the war.

After ten months patrolling and protecting convoys in the icy North Atlantic, Grayson was ordered to the Pacific to join an American fleet battered after Pearl Harbor and around the Philippines, but resolutely carrying the war to the enemy. As stated, ssailed from San Diego on 2 April 1942 as part of aircraft carrier Hornet's escort and rendezvoused at sea 13 April with Enterprise under Admiral William F. Halsey, Jr. From this fast carrier force, steaming less than 800 miles from the Japanese home islands, General Jimmy Doolittle launched his B-25 raid.

The task group sailed into Pearl Harbor on 25 April. Grayson departed almost immediately for repairs in California, but soon returned to the Pacific war.

Guadalcanal
Grayson found herself with a fast carrier force as she sailed from Pearl Harbor July 15, 1942, to escort Enterprise and Hornet. Reaching Guadalcanal via Tongatapu on August 7, 1942, the carriers launched their planes to cover Marine landings there, and then operated in the area to block Japanese reinforcements. As they maneuvered off Guadalcanal, Enterprise was hit by Japanese bombs on 24 August in an action filled half-hour which saw Grayson down two planes and damage a third.

with the Enterprise damaged, the task group dispersed, Enterprise returning to Pearl Harbor for repairs, and Grayson joined Task Force 11, built around Saratoga under Admiral Frank Jack Fletcher. Action soon followed. Sighting a Japanese submarine on the surface on August 25th, Grayson closed for the kill. After expending 46 depth charges in a series of five attacks, the destroyer saw a huge air bubble and oil slick rise to the surface indicating that they had sunk an Imperial submarine.

The battle-proven destroyer and crew remained in the bitterly contested waters around Guadalcanal for nearly eight months in a variety of duties. During that time, many of her sisters were sunk. Grayson convoyed troop transports loaded with reinforcements from Nouméa and other staging areas to Guadalcanal, patrolled in "The Slot", served as a radar picket ship, and performed valuable rescue work. On 18 October she picked up 75 survivors from her sister Gleaves destroyer, USS Meredith, which had been sunk by aerial torpedo on 16 October, and helped escort the barge Vireo, loaded with needed fuel and ammunition, to Guadalcanal.

Kolombangara
Returning to Pearl Harbor April 15, 1943 for overhaul, Grayson continued on to the States for further repairs and finally sailed to New Caledonia, and arrived there on Sptember 24th.. She accounted for at least four and possible two more Japanese barges loaded with evacuees from Kolombangara during three nights of action, 30 September – 3 October, with DesRon 21 under Commander A. D. Chandler. After three months of patrol duty, Grayson sailed for Puget Sound Navy Yard December 16, 1943 for another overhaul.

1944
Grayson soon returned to the Pacific, putting in at Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands, February 10, 1944. Patrol duty in the Solomons, Carolines, and Marshalls occupied her the following six months. On March 30, 1944, Grayson supported initial assault landings on Pityilu Island, Admiralties, from April 22-24 she was fighter-director ship for the landings at Tanahmerah Bay, Dutch New Guinea. She then bombarded Biak Island on May 27 and Noemfoor Island on July 2 prior to invasion landings.

On September 1, 1944 Grayson joined TG 38, for carrier strikes against the enemy in the Palau Islands, scene of the next major invasion. She returned to Seeadler Harbor on September 30th an then sailed on October 2nd for a major strike against Okinawa and the Philippines. Japanese planes harassed the withdrawal, and o October 15th Grayson rescued 194 men from the torpedoed light cruiser Houston, who was towed safely to Ulithi.

Prom Ulithi, Grayson sailed straight to Saipan, where on November 3rd she took up radar picket and lifeguard duty. Finally Grayson was ordered home, reaching Seattle June 9, 1945 for her first real rest since the war began.

End of World War II and fate
Grayson returned to Pearl Harbor September 1, 1945, the day of the signing of the Articles of Surrender in Tokyo Bay. After brief training she sailed for the United States. transiting the Panama Canal on October 8th, 1945, she put in at Charleston, South Carolina, October 16th. Eleven days later the battle-scarred "tin can" hosted over 5,000 visitors as a grateful and jubilant public paid tribute on Navy Day.

Thereafter, Grayson remained at Charleston until decommissioned, February 4, 1947, and was placed in reserve.

She remained in reserve for many years and was finally struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 1972 and sold in June 1974 for scrap.

For her services in world Wr II, Grayson received 13 battle stars.

Introduction and What's in the Box - February 27, 2016

This Dragon kit is one of their Modern Sea Power Smart Kits. Tt comes with many detailed and small plastic parts which have been very finely molded.

The kit has 13 plastic sprues and 2 Phot etch Sprues. The photo etch contains many detail parts for sensors, ladders, equipment, ladders. but no railing. I used a set of Tom's MOdels 1/350 scale railing to put railing on the ship.

The ship also comes with six crew members. but I did not paint or use them, thugh tey are very decent 3D pieces.

There are almost 300 parts altogether, and they go together nicely for such a small vessel.

Many, many fine details. One will have to be patient with these parts in orde to put the vessel together properly, but it looks like it will make a very nice kit.

The instructions are very well done on eight pages, two of which make for a good, color layout of the paint scheme.

The decals are well done too, though I did not use the pathway markings. For one, they are relatively dark gray and were hard to see with the deck coloring.

The hull can be built as a waterline model of you wish, though I chose to build the kit with the full hull.

All in all, this is a very good Dragon model and it really compares well to similar Trumpeter models for the amount of detail.

I would recommend these "Smart MOdels" to anyone wanting a very decent build.

Here's how the kit looked out of the box:

The Build - Hull, props, and main decks - March 1, 2017

I started off by painting the hull, tand the vertical surfaces in neutral gray before adding the came, and the decks in a flat dark gray.

I then built the hull, added the props, and then added the main forward and at decks.

The Build - Main Deck houses, funnels, and main armament - March 2, 2017

Next I built the main deck houses. There are thee of these. The forward gun mount and bridge, a central deck house where the funnels and the torpedo luanchers along with one of the .50 caliber sections, and then an aft deck house for the another .50 caliber section and the after gun mounts.

I also then painted the cam scheme, using a Ocen Blue Gray that I mixed, a Ryal Naval Gray, which is dark for the upper surfaces, and a darker gray for the darker color on the hull. I then built the funnels and attached them, and then built the four 5" guns and tow torpedoe launchers, each mounting five torpedoes.

Here's how all of that went:

The Build - Main Mast, .50 cal MGs, LIfe Boats, Life Rafts - March 4, 2017

At this point I was ready to build the main mast. I used some of the Pht Etch here and the prts here are very fine and much care has to be taken not to bend or break them, including the mast and cross arms.

I then similarly had to exhibit care with the very small .50 cal machine gun assembles. There are six of them and they are tiny. but very well modled.

Finally I bilt the Life boat and life raft assemblies and placed them, having to place the photo etch addes to the mid ships area because they are underneat the life boats and davits.

The ship is looking ver nice at this point.

The Build - Depth Charges, deck details, railings - March 5, 2017

At this point I built the depth charge and anti-submarine warfare equipment as well as the MANY deck details and equipment all around the vessel.

When that was completed I then added the railing to the vessel and the decals.

This completed the vessel, but was time consuming because so many of these parts are very small and needed to be carefully attached:

The Build - Final touch up paint, clear dull coat, and completing the model - March 5, 2017

At this point I went around the model and touched up some of the areas that needed final touch up as a result of the building that went on around them after they had been painted and installed.

I then added two coats of dull coat clear paint. This allows the finish that is more glossy from the glue to be rendered dull like the rest of the model so that it all blends in well together.

After theis, the vessel was completed and ready to show off in its final pictures:

. and finally a couple of shots with the Grayson and the Hornet together:

. and there you have the completed USS Grayson, DD-435, that was a part of the Doolittle Task Force.


Grayson DD- 435 - History

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DDG-42 Mahan
DDG-43 Dahlgren
DDG-44 William V. Pratt
DDG-45 Dewey
DDG-46 Preble

Benson-Livermore Class

DD-421 USS Benson
DD-424 USS Niblack
DD-427 USS Hilary P. Jones
DD-430 USS Eberle
DD-433 USS Gwin
DD-436 USS Monssen
DD-439 USS Edison
DD-442 USS Nicholson
DD-453 USS Bristol
DD-456 USS Rodman
DD-459 USS Laffey
DD-462 USS Fitch
DD-483 USS Aaron Ward
DD-486 USS Lansdowne
DD-489 USS Mervine
DD-492 USS Bailey
DD-495 USS Endicott
DD-598 USS Bancroft
DD-601 USS Champlin
DD-604 USS Parker
DD-607 USS Frazier
DD-610 USS Hobby
DD-613 USS Laub
DD-616 USS Nields
DD-619 USS Edwards
DD-622 USS Maddox
DD-625 USS Harding
DD-628 USS Welles
DD-634 USS Doran
DD-637 USS Gherardi
DD-640 USS Beatty
DD-646 USS Stockton
DD-422 USS Mayo
DD-425 USS Madison
DD-428 USS Charles F. Hughes
DD-431 USS Plunkett
DD-434 USS Meredith
DD-437 USS Woolsey
DD-440 USS Ericsson
DD-443 USS Swanson
DD-454 USS Ellyson
DD-457 USS Emmons
DD-460 USS Woodworth
DD-463 USS Corry
DD-484 USS Buchanan
DD-487 USS Lardner
DD-490 USS Quick
DD-493 USS Carmick
DD-496 USS McCook
DD-599 USS Barton
DD-602 USS Meade
DD-605 USS Caldwell
DD-608 USS Gansevoort
DD-611 USS Kalk
DD-614 USS MacKenzie
DD-617 USS Ordronaux
DD-620 USS Glennon
DD-623 USS Nelson
DD-626 USS Satterlee
DD-632 USS Cowie
DD-635 USS Earle
DD-638 USS Herndon
DD-641 USS Tillman
DD-647 USS Thorn
DD-423 USS Gleaves
DD-426 USS Lansdale
DD-429 USS Livermore
DD-432 USS Kearny
DD-435 USS Grayson
DD-438 USS Ludlow
DD-441 USS Wilkes
DD-444 USS Ingraham
DD-455 USS Hambleton
DD-458 USS Macomb
DD-461 USS Forrest
DD-464 USS Hobson
DD-485 USS Duncan
DD-488 USS McCalla
DD-491 USS Farenholt
DD-494 USS Doyle
DD-497 USS Frankford
DD-600 USS Boyle
DD-603 USS Murphy
DD-606 USS Coghlan
DD-609 USS Gillespie
DD-612 USS Kendrick
DD-615 USS McLanahan
DD-618 USS Davison
DD-621 USS Jeffers
DD-624 USS Baldwin
DD-627 USS Thompson
DD-633 USS Knight
DD-636 USS Butler
DD-639 USS Shubrick
DD-645 USS Stevenson
DD-648 USS Turner

Sims Class

DD-409 USS Sims
DD-410 USS Hughes
DD-411 USS Anderson
DD-412 USS Hammann
DD-413 USS Mustin
DD-414 USS Russell
DD-415 USS O'Brien
DD-416 USS Walke
DD-417 USS Morris
DD-418 USS Roe
DD-419 USS Wainwright
DD-420 USS Buck

Benham Class

DD-397 USS Benham
DD-398 USS Ellet
DD-399 USS Lang
DD-402 USS Mayrant
DD-403 USS Trippe
DD-404 USS Rhind
DD-405 USS Rowan
DD-406 USS Stack
DD-407 USS Sterett
DD-408 USS Wilson

Somers Class
DD-381 USS Somers
DD-395 USS Davis
DD-396 USS Jouett
DD-394 USS Sampson
DD-383 USS Warrington

Gridley Class
DD-380 USS Gridley
DD-382 USS Craven
DD-400 USS McCall
DD-401 USS Maury


Contents

The Series 92 engines were introduced in 1974. [7] Compared to the Series 71 engines they were derived from, the Series 92 featured a larger bore of 4.84025 ± 0.00125 in (122.942 ± 0.032 mm) and an identical stroke of 5 in (130 mm) for a nominal displacement per cylinder of 92 cu in (1,510 cc), from which the Series 92 derives its name.

In the 1980s and early 1990s, the Series 92 was used as a major bus engine in North America. It was also available for several other applications: Trucks, buses, motor homes, construction, fire trucks/apparatus, industrial equipment, several military vehicles, and marine applications.

The Series 92 left the market in the summer of 1995 and the four stroke Detroit Diesel engine Series 60 was introduced as a replacement.

  • 9.0 litre (V6), 12.1 litre (V8), 18.1 litre (V12) and 24.1 litre (V16)
  • Power ratings ranging from 253 to 950 horsepower (189 to 708 kW)
  • Supported the DDECI, DDECII, DDECIII and DDECIV.

(two joined 6V92 engine blocks)

(two joined 8V92 engine blocks)

Power output specifications (6V92) Edit

  • 775 ft⋅lbf (1,051 N⋅m) @ 1200 rpm 253 horsepower governed at 2100 rpm
  • 816 ft⋅lbf (1,106 N⋅m) @ 1200 rpm 277 horsepower governed at 2100 rpm
  • 957 ft⋅lbf (1,298 N⋅m) @ 1300 rpm 300 horsepower governed at 2100 rpm
  • 1,020 ft⋅lbf (1,380 N⋅m) @ 1300 rpm 335 horsepower governed at 2100 rpm

Power output specifications (8V92) Edit

The model number indicates the basic configuration of the engine. [8] : 7 The model designator consists of the number of cylinders (6, 8, 12, or 16), the block layout (V), engine series (92), and a lettered suffix which provides information about forced induction (T for turbocharged, A for aftercooled), so for instance, an 8V92TA designates a Series 92 V8 engine that is turbocharged and aftercooled. [9]


1944 [ edit | edit source ]

Grayson soon returned to the Pacific, putting in at Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands, 10 February 1944. Patrol duty in the Solomons, Carolines, and Marshalls occupied her the following 6 months. On 30 March Grayson supported initial assault landings on Pityilu Island, Admiralties, from 22 to 24 April she was fighter-director ship for the landings at Tanahmerah Bay, Dutch New Guinea. She bombarded Biak Island on 27 May and Noemfoor Island on 2 July prior to invasion landings.

On 1 September 1944 Grayson joined TG 38, for carrier strikes against the enemy in the Palau Islands, scene of the next major invasion. She returned to Seeadler Harbor on 30 September. She again sailed 2 October for a major strike against Okinawa and the Philippines. Japanese planes harassed the withdrawal, and on 15 October Grayson rescued 194 men from the torpedoed light cruiser Houston (CL-81), who was towed safely to Ulithi.

Prom Ulithi, Grayson sailed straight to Saipan, where on 3 November she took up radar picket and lifeguard duty. Finally Grayson was ordered home, reaching Seattle 9 June 1945 for her first real rest since the war began.


Grayson DD- 435 - History

1,475 Tons (standard)
2,370 Tons (submerged)
307' 2" x 27' 3" x 14' 7.5"
10 x 21" Torpedo Tubes
(6 fwd, 4 aft) with 24 torpedoes
3" deck gun
40mm cannon
20mm cannon

Conducted her shakedown cruise in in Long Island Sound operating from Newport, New London, and New York. On September 8, 1941 departed New London with USS Grampus (SS-207) for patrol duty in the Caribbean Sea and Chesapeake Bay and then arrived at Portsmouth on November 30, 1941 for overhaul. Afterwards, departed bound for the Pacific and transited the Panama Canal then proceeded to Pearl Harbor arriving February 8, 1942.

First Patrol
On February 15, 1942 departs Pearl Harbor on her first war patrol off Saipan and Guam. There she had a four-day encounter with an enemy submarine the enemy I-boat fired two torpedoes at Grayback on the morning of February 22, then continued to trail her across the Pacific. Grayback spotted the enemy conning tower a couple of times, and the Japanese ship broached once but the Grayback could not get into position to attack. After four days, Grayback shook the enemy sub and continued on patrol. On March 17 she sank her first ship, a 3291-ton cargo ship off Port Lloyd then returned to Pearl Harbor on April 10, 1942 ending the patrol.

Second Patrol
On May 4, 1942 departs Pearl Harbor on her second war patrol with air cover and USS Grayson (DD-435) then proceeds alone into the central Pacific. On May 13, 1942 at dawn passed within 145 miles of Makin Island. On May 16, 1942 arrives Ocean Island and made no sightings. During this patrol, Grayback found no targets and even patrolled on the surface during the day. On June 22, 1942 arrived to Fremantle ending the patrol.

Third War Patrol
On June 22, 1942 departed Fremantle on her third war patrol and proceeded to the Lombok Strait. On July 21, 1942 passed Lombok Island and the next day spotted two small fishing boats. On July 24, 1942 entered Makasar Strait and at 7:30pm fired on by a small patrol boat and made a deep dive expecting a depth charge attach and was chased until 10:10pm. On July 25, 1942 at 1:25am surfaced and cleared the area. On July 26, 1942 spotted small Maru on a parallel corse and attempted to get into an attack position. On July 27, 1942 entered the Celebes Sea. On July 30, 1942 entered the Balabac Strait bound for the South China Sea then returned via the same route. On September 3, 1942 returned to Fremantle ending the patrol. Afterwards, back to Pearl Harbor for an overhaul with SJ radar installed, de-gaussing cable reinstalled and sound tested with four days of training activities.

Fourth War Patrol
On October 19, 1942 departed Pearl Harbor under the command of LtCdr John E. Lee on her fourth war patrol escorted by USS Boggs and for the next three days made dive tests and drills while proceeding westward. On October 23, 1942 roughly 600 miles east of Wotje when the submarine made a radar contact and submerged. On October 24, 1942 directed to patrol off Buka Passage but four days later instead ordered to patrol off Truk.

On October 29, sighted an unidentified plane and submerged then surfaced and received a near miss from a a bomb or depth charge. At 2:29 spotted three ships including two tankers and a destroyer. Fired torpedoes at the rear tanker but missed because it turned and was again depth charged by an aircraft. Afterwards, dove as the destroyer made several depth charge attacks over two hours but all exploded astern and departed by 5:00pm.

On October 31, 1942 began patrolling off Otta Pass south of Truk. On November 3, 1942 at 4:15am spotted a freighter and attempted to attack but was unable to get close enough. At 12:31pm while submerged at 100' three depth charges exploded in the vicinity. On November 5, 1942 again depth charged and evaded patrol boats. On November 6, 1942 spots a Chiyoda type seaplane tender and fires three torpedoes claiming two hits, but fails to score any. Afterwards, attached by a E8N2 Dave floatplane that drops 3 x 60kg depth charges that caused minor damage. On December 13, 1943 ended the patrol at Fremantle.

Fifth Patrol
Departed Australia on December 7, 1942. A week later, Pharmacist's Mate Harry B. Roby was called upon to perform an emergency appendectomy, the second to be done on a patrolling submarine. With Grayback running a hundred feet beneath the surface, the untutored Roby successfully removed the infected appendix, and his patient was back standing watch by the end of the patrol. On December 25, Grayback surfaced to sink four landing barges with her deck guns. Four days later she was again fired on by an enemy submarine but maneuvered to avoid the torpedoes. On January 3, 1943 sunk I-18, one of 25 Japanese submarines destroyed by western submarines during the war.

On January 5, 1943 Grayback served as beacon ship for the shore bombardment of Munda and during the early morning she received word that six crew from B-26B "Queenie" 41-17586 shot down two days earlier were awaiting rescue on Rendova Island. Grayback sent ashore two men, then submerged at dawn to avoid enemy aircraft. The submariners found the aviators, three of whom were injured, and together continued to hide in the jungle. As night fell, Grayback surfaced offshore and by coded light signals directed the small boat back to the submarine. For this action skipper Edward C. Stephan earned the Navy Cross and U.S. Army Silver Star.

Grayback continued on patrol, torpedoing and damaging several Japanese ships. On January 17 she attacked a destroyer escorting a large transport, hoping to disable the escort and then sink the freighter with her deck guns. However, the destroyer evaded the torpedoes and released 19 depth charges on the submarine. One blew a gasket on a manhole cover and caused a serious leak and retnred to Brisbane arriving February 23, 1943.

Sixth Patrol
Departed February 16, 1943 to patrol the Bismarck Sea and Solomon Sea without any success. Her SJ radar had failed to function and although she had taken several shots at cargo ships, none were sunk. Returned on April 4, 1943.

Seventh Patrol
On April 25, 1943 departed Brisbane on her seventh war partol. On May 11, Grayback was radioed the position of a enemy convoy by USS Albacore (SS-218). Surfacing at night, this submarine fired a spread of six torpedoes at the seven freighters and three escorts. The three escorts charged and she had to go deep to elude the attacking enemy. She was credited with the sinking Yodogawa Maru. On May 16, 1943 she torpedoed and seriously damaged destroyer Yugiri northwest of Kavieng near Mussau Island. The next day Grayback intercepted four transports with one escort and sank England Maru and damaged two others before she was forced to dive. On May 30, returned to Pearl Harbor ending the patrol then proceeded to San Francisco for overhaul.

Eighth Patrol
On September 12, 1943 returned to Pearl Harbor on under the command of Commander John Anderson Moore. On September 26, 1943 departed on her eighth war patrol with USS Shad (SS-235) and rendezvoused with USS Cero (SS-225) at Midway to form the first U.S. Navy submarine wolfpack. The three submarines under the command of Captain Momsen aboard Cero, searched the China Sea and returned to base with claims of 38,000 tons sunk and 3300 damaged. Grayback accounted for two ships, a passenger-cargo vessel torpedoed 14 October and a former light cruiser, Awata Maru, torpedoed after an end-around run on a fast convoy October 22. The submarines had expended all torpedoes and on November 10, 1943 returned to Midway. Afterwards, CO Commander John Anderson Moore earned thee Navy Cross with the citation published in the Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 329 (August 1944).

Ninth Patrol
Departed Pearl Harbor on December 2, 1943 for the East China Sea. Within five days of her first contact with Japanese ships, she had expended all her torpedoes in a series of attacks which netted four ships for a total of over 10,000 tons. On December 16, 1943 at 10:19pm attacks convoy of four freighters and three escorts and fired four torpedoes at the second and third ships in the convoy and hits and sinks Gyokurei Maru. On December 19, 1943 surfaces to continue attacking the convoy but SJ radar spots a target closing fast and crash dives and turns firing her four stern torpedoes with at least three hitting and sinking Numakaze.

Two nights later, 20 December to 21 December, she spotted another convoy of six ships and, after an end-around run she fired a spread of nine torpedoes into the heart of the Japanese formation. This first attack sunk one freighter and damaged another before Grayback dived to elude depth charges. Three hours later she surfaced and sank a second freighter. After an unsuccessful attack the following night had exhausted her torpedo supply, Grayback headed home. The submarine surfaced 27 December and sank a fishing boat with deck guns before returning to Pearl Harbor on January 4, 1944.

Afterwards, CO Commander John Anderson Moore earned the a second Navy Cross (Navy Cross with gold star) for his actions with the citation published in the Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 330 (September 1944). Grayback has been awarded the Navy Unit Commendation for the period of her last four patrols (Sixth Patrol to Ninth Patrol when lost).

Tenth Patrol
On January 28, 1944 departed Pearl Harbor on her tenth war patrol bound for the East China Sea. On February 19, 1944 Grayback sunk two cargo ships Taikei Maru and Toshin Maru plus damaged two others. On February 25, 1944 transmitted her second and final report about the sinking of tanker Nanho Maru and severe damage to Asama Maru. With only two torpedoes remaining, she was ordered back from patrol.

Sinking History
On February 27, 1944 Grayback fired her last two torpedoes sinking Ceylon Maru. Afterwards, spotted on the surface by a B5N Kate and bombed scoring a hit and "exploded and sank immediately" at roughly Lat 25° 47' N Long 128° 45'E, into the East China Sea to the south of Okinawa. Also, anti-submarine ships dropped depth charges on a trail of air bubbles and observed an oil slick that swelled to the surface of the South China Sea.

On March 7, 1944 when Grayback did not arrive when due at Midway. On March 30, 1944 ComSubPac listed her as missing and presumed lost with all hands. Grayson CO, John Anderson Moore was posthumously awarded after this mission by third Navy Cross during March 1945.

Grayback ranked 20th among all submarines in total tonnage sunk with 63,835 tons and 24th in total number of ships sunk with 14 sinkings to her credit. The submarine and crew earned two Navy Unit Commendations for their seventh, eighth, ninth, and tenth war patrols. Grayback received eight battle stars for World War II service.

Shipwreck
On June 5, 2019 the wreck of the Grayback was discovered upright on the bottom at a depth of 1,400' / 426.72m by Lost 52 Project led by Tim Taylor. The submarine had severe damage aft of the coning tower from the bomb impact. On November 10, 2019 the discovery was reported in the media.

Memorials
The entire crew was officially declared dead January 12, 1946. All earned the Purple Heart, posthumously. All remain listed as Missing In Action (MIA) and are memorialized at Manila American Cemetery on the tablets of the missing.

Commander John Anderson Moore was posthumously earned a third Navy Cross (Navy Cross with 2 Gold Stars with the citation published in the Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 336 (March 1945).

At Heslar Naval Armory in Indianapolis, Indiana is a memorial to USS Grayback with a bronze plaque and a torpedo established by the Submarine Veterans of W.W.II, Hoosier Squadron.

References
NARA USS Graback SS-208 Report of Second War Patrol
NARA USS Grayback SS-208 War Diary May 4, 1942 to May 31, 1942
NARA USS Grayback SS-208 War Diary June 1, 1942 to June 22, 1942
NARA USS Grayback SS-208 War Diary July 15, 1942 to September 3, 1942
NARA USS Graback SS-208 Report of Fourth War Patrol
Combined Fleet - Submarine Operations Research Group Attack Data USS Grayback (SS-208)
Naval History and Heritage Command - Grayback (SS 208)
American Battle Monuments Commission - John A. Moore
FindAGrave - John A. Moore (photo, Navy Cross citations)
NavSource USS Grayback (SS-208)
Lost 52 Project - USS Grayback SS-208 Expedition 2019
New York Times "Navy Submarine, Missing for 75 Years, Is Found Off Okinawa" November 10, 2019

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Seeking update on DD-214 request for Grayson Knight

My father mailed his request for his DD-214 to NPRC on 01/20/21.  Can you give us any feedback on the status of this request? His name is Grayson  Carter Knight, Military Service Number is 590-26-92, with a date of birth of 12/17/1943.

Re: Seeking update on DD-214 request for Grayson Knight
Rachael Salyer 29.03.2021 8:44 (в ответ на dana sykes)

Thank you for posting your request on History Hub!

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, on November 7, 2020, NPRC regressed back to a &ldquoClosed - Except for Emergencies” operating status when local public health metrics worsened and no longer met NARA’s standards for remaining open. As of March 15, 2021, the National Personnel Records Center is back to Phase One.  More staff will be able to enter the building to expand the types of cases worked.  Please see  NARA’s Press Release: National Personnel Records Center Prepares for Expansion of Onsite Workforce for more information .  Currently, NPRC will continue servicing requests ONLY associated with medical treatments, burials, and homeless veterans seeking admittance to a homeless shelter. If your request is urgent, please see Emergency Requests and Deadlines .  Please still refrain from submitting non-emergency requests such as replacement medals, administrative corrections, or records research until NPRC returns to pre-COVID staffing levels.

If your request was regarding one of the three emergency circumstances, please resubmit your SF-180 online with eVetRecs (click the ‘Start Request Online’ button).  Please remember that if you use eVetRecs, you must specify that the request is for an emergency by typing &ldquoEMERGENCY” in the comments section.


Common Cummins ISX Issues

When you find your ISX engine is experiencing issues, always refer to your manufacturer’s manual first. Address any problems immediately to avoid more severe damage. Here are some tips to keep in mind before making engine repairs to your ISX engine :

– Check the dual or single overhead cams.

– Inspect the spring-loaded cam gear and release the tension before unloading.

– Use a puller tool for the front and back seal.

– Work with specified parts for ISX engines.

Do you have a single or dual cam ISX15 ? Does it have an EGR system?

When it comes to common ISX engine issues, some problems may not affect your engine depending on the year it was made. It’s important to know what version of the marine engine you’re operating to understand what troubleshooting and repairs are necessary.

For example, ISX engines engineered before 2002 will experience more problems with EGR compared to modern types. In 2008, Cummins began noticing the SCR system experienced failing revolving parts, interfering with the engine’s horsepower. Clogged inlets came about in 2010 when recirculation was occurring, also affecting HP. Depending on the version you have, common Cummins ISX engine problems involve the turbocharger, EGR, camshafts and timing wedge:

Variable Geometry Turbocharger

The turbocharger is one of the most notorious ISX15 failures and can be expensive to fix. While they are ideal for direct throttle response, VGTs often experience a buildup of carbon, soot, rust and other contaminants. You may feel no response from the engine or an extreme retort at low RPMs. The best fix is to clean the exhaust side of the VGT, replace its parts or swap it for a fixed unit.

EGR System

Another common problem is a leaking EGR valve which can cause black smoke and power loss to your ISX engine . Although it’s tricky to diagnose, you can monitor the unit’s coolant to see if leaks are present. If you’re using more coolant than usual, it can be an indication of a leak. Another sign is if you notice white residue from the burnt coolant. EGR system issues are more common in older versions of ISX engines .

Camshaft

The rocker arms within your ISX engine may be damaging the camshafts, which causes an improper amount of oil to pass. When the rockers hit the camshaft lobes, it flattens them. This deprivation causes your marine or generator application to experience performance issues. You can replace both the camshaft and rockers to deter the problem. Swapping rocker arms for new ones is vital. Otherwise, they will flatten the new camshaft as well.

Timing Wedge

Problems with a timing wedge often happen after you repair or overhaul the camshaft. Wedges have a tendency to wear, which inadvertently alters the camshaft timing, therefore, wrecking the engine’s balance. Fuel injection that occurs at the wrong time can affect the entire system, if it’s too late, it can create soot, contaminating the oil. Over time, a buildup of contamination can form in the oil filter, resulting in a drop in oil pressure.

Avoid the timing wedge issue easily by simply changing the oil filter . If the problem seems to improve, you will then need to retime the ISX engine using a dial indicator. It’s a sensitive procedure, so you may need to rely on professionals to take over.

Certain ISX engines experience more problems than others, but each issue has a set of simple troubleshooting procedures. One of the best ways to eliminate problems with your Cummins ISX engine is to conduct preventative and regular maintenance according to your manufacturer’s manual.


Grayson DD- 435 - History

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Watch the video: USS Houston - The Galloping Ghost of the Java Coast