How have the valuations of premium examples of legacy technologies behaved historically, around their time of becoming obsolete?

How have the valuations of premium examples of legacy technologies behaved historically, around their time of becoming obsolete?

Classic car prices are at an all-time high, with prestigious vehicles from the late 20th century such as e.g. a 1960s Porsche 911 fetching upwards of £125,000 and a 1960's supercar such as e.g. a Ferrari 275 GTB fetching over $27 million.

Such appreciation has been commonplace throughout history for prestige items, especially when they're in limited supply and can no longer be made - a classic example would be e.g. the Stradivarius violin or even Faberge eggs or unique works of art.

A stradivarius violin is a good analogy with cars because it can (and should) still be used as a concert violin, despite its age - in the same way classic cars are driven occasionally for rallying etc., or even as a daily driver. Motor vehicles however, are at a unique crossroads insofar as we are entering the electric vehicle revolution - within two or three decades petrol may be more difficult to come by and the cost of ownership for petrol vehicles will increase, and their useability decrease.

I'm interested in learning historical perspectives on the values of specifically prestige items which have become obsolete in the same way, and what happened to their values around the time they became obsolete. Did they appreciate, or depreciate? A suitable example might be an expensive (possibly e.g. jewelled or ceremonial) sword at the time swords became obsolete due to firearms with bayonets entering mass production. Another example could be e.g. harpsichords as pianos replaced them etc.