The Complete Illustrated History of the Inca Empire

The Complete Illustrated History of the Inca Empire

Jam-packed with wonderful photographs (over 1,000 and all in colour) of sites and artefacts, the book has merit merely as a pretty adornment to any coffee table but spread over its 500-plus pages is so much factual information that it is a welcome addition to any library on the Incas. Indeed, many of the topics examined by Dr. Jones are hard to find in other works, for example, such themes as Inca metalwork, sculpture, pottery, mummification, and aspects of daily life. There are also, of course, in-depth sections on the facets of Inca culture for which they have become most famous - their sun-worship, architecture, textiles, and final collapse. The civilizations of the Andes which preceded the Incas are not neglected either and there are plenty of sections on the Moche, Chavin, and Nazca cultures, for example.

Useful timeline pages which compare contemporary Andean civilizations and a plethora of maps help to orientate the reader through the history of the region and there is a good index too for those wishing to read up on specific areas. The only quibble with this excellent book is that it was originally published in two volumes and so in this single-volume hard-back version, which seems to have merely stuck the two originals together, one after the other, there is some repetition of content so that it is best read by sections rather than from cover to cover. In summary, this is a fine volume, very reasonably priced considering its number of photos and glossy paper, and a wonderfully accessible presentation of the Incas. I for one will be buying other books in this series.


The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Inca Empire: A Comprehensive Encyclopedia of the Incas and Other Ancient Peoples of South America with More Than 1000 Photographs Hardcover – 1 January 2013

This book is more about Andean Civilisation as a whole than just the Incas themselves. It is great for introducing core concepts of Inca and ancient Andean belief, architecture, art and the little recorded history that there is.

It is broken into a single topic for every two pages (sometimes 4) with the implication that you can jump into any topic at will in the book and read it as an individual essay. Unfortunately when you read the book from front to back you start to get a lot of repeated information as it tries to re-explain concepts related to numerous topics. The type face is also quite small which may be difficult for some to read.

Despite this it's a great book and pretty damn hefty with about 499 pages of information excluding the index. It has a lot of photos as it states though due to the books small proportions so are most of the photos that accompany text.

If you're totally new to Andean Civilisation like I was then I'd say its well worth the money. it has inspired me to seek out more about the Incas themselves and their precursors who are often more interesting (especially the Moche).


Andean Worlds : Indigenous History, Culture, and Consciousness Under Spanish Rule, 1532-1825

This broadly gauged, synthetic study examines how the Spanish invasion of the Inca Empire (called Tawintinsuyu) in 1532 brought dramatic and irreversible transformations in traditional Andean modes of production, technology, politics, religion, culture, and social hierarchies. At the same time, Professor Andrien explains how the indigenous peoples merged these changes with their own political, socioeconomic, and religious traditions. In this way European and indigenous life ways became intertwined, producing a new and constantly evolving hybrid colonial order in the Andes.

After beginning with a study of Tawintinsuyu on the eve of the Spanish invasion, Andrien then presents the salient topics in Andean colonial history: the emergence of the colonial state the colonial socioeconomic order indigenous culture and society Spanish attempts to impose Roman Catholic orthodoxy and Andean resistance, rebellion, and political consciousness. By drawing on his own research and the contributions from scholars in many disciplines, Kenneth J. Andrien offers a masterful interpretation of Andean colonial history, one of the most dynamic and creative fields in Latin American studies.

"This is a clearly written, comprehensive, and well-balanced account. . . particularly in discussions of the often vexed and central question of Spanish versus Native American issues."--Peter J. Bakewell, Edmund and Louise Kahn Professor of History, Southern Methodist University


Narrative of the Incas

One of the earliest chronicles of the Inca empire was written in the 1550s by Juan de Betanzos. Although scholars have long known of this work, only eighteen chapters were actually available until the 1980s when the remaining sixty-four chapters were discovered in the collection of the Fundación Bartolomé March in Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Narrative of the Incas presents the first complete English translation of the original manuscript of this key document. Although written by a Spaniard, it presents an authentic Inca worldview, drawn from the personal experiences and oral traditions told to Betanzos by his Inca wife, Doña Angelina, and other members of her aristocratic family who lived during the reigns of the last Inca rulers, Huayna Capac Huascar and Atahualpa. Betanzos wrote a history of the Inca empire that focuses on the major rulers and the contributions each one made to the growth of the empire and of Inca culture.

Filled with new insights into Inca politics, marriage, laws, the calendar, warfare, and other matters, Narrative of the Incas is essential reading for everyone interested in this ancient civilization.

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Narrative of the Incas

De Betanzos, an interpreter who married the Inca princess Dona Angelina Yupanqui, was a little-known contemporary recorder of Peru's Incan heritage. His narrative of the Incas begins with Viracocha's . Читать весь отзыв

Narrative of the Incas

De Betanzos, an interpreter who married the Inca princess Dona Angelina Yupanqui, was a little-known contemporary recorder of Peru's Incan heritage. His narrative of the Incas begins with Viracocha's . Читать весь отзыв


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About the Author

Dr David M Jones studied at the University of California, Berkeley and obtained a PhD in the Archaeology of the Americas at the Institute of Archaeology, University of London. He is the co-author with Brian Molyneaux of The Illustrated Encyclopedia of American Indian Mythology and was consultant on The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Aztec & Maya and The Aztec and Maya World (all published by Lorenz Books) and co-author of the Blue Guide Mexico. He wrote on Mesoamerican and South American art for The Grove Dictionary of Art.

Reviews

"This book takes you to the very heart of the Inca civilization. From the dizzying heights of the Andean cordilleras to the golden kingdoms of coastal Peru and onwards to the Incas the story unfolds with breathtaking clarity." (Tony Morrison, photographer and author of Pathway to the Gods)"


11c. The Inca Empire: Children of the Sun

When Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro landed in Peru in 1532, he found unimaginable riches. The Inca Empire was in full bloom. The streets may not have been paved with gold &mdash but their temples were.

The Coricancha , or Temple of Gold, boasted an ornamental garden where the clods of earth, maize plants complete with leaves and corn cobs, were fashioned from silver and gold. Nearby grazed a flock of 20 golden llamas and their lambs, watched over by solid gold shepherds. Inca nobles strolled around on sandals with silver soles protecting their feet from the hard streets of Cuzco.

The Inca called their empire Tahuantinsuyu , or Land of the Four Quarters. It stretched 2,500 miles from Quito, Ecuador, to beyond Santiago, Chile. Within its domain were rich coastal settlements, high mountain valleys, rain-drenched tropical forests and the driest of deserts. The Inca controlled perhaps 10 million people, speaking a hundred different tongues. It was the largest empire on earth at the time. Yet when Pizarro executed its last emperor, Atahualpa, the Inca Empire was only 50 years old.

The true history of the Inca is still being written. According to one story, four brothers emerged from Lake Titicaca. During a long journey, all but one disappeared. Manco Capac survived to plunge a golden staff into the ground where the Rios Tullamayo and Huantanay meet. He founded the sacred city of Cuzco.

The Sacred City of Cuzco

Cuzco is nestled in a mountain valley 10,000 feet above sea level. It formed the center of the Inca world. The first emperor, Pachacuti transformed it from a modest village to a great city laid out in the shape of a puma. He also installed Inti, the Sun God, as the Incas' official patron, building him a wondrous temple.

And he did something else &mdash which may explain the Inca's sudden rise to power. He expanded the cult of ancestor worship. When a ruler died, his son received all his earthly powers &mdash but none of his earthly possessions. All his land, buildings, and servants went to his panaqa, or other male relatives. The relatives used it to preserve his mummy and sustain his political influence. Dead emperors maintained a living presence.

A new ruler had to create his own income. The only way to do that was to grab new lands, subdue more people, and expand the Empire of the Sun.


From the heights of Machu Picchu, the entire Urabamba Valley in the Andes Mountains can be seen.

How was this done? Life in traditional Andean villages was fragile. One married couple would help another planting or harvesting crops. They would receive help in their own fields in return. The Inca tailored this practice of reciprocity &mdash give-and-take &mdash to their own needs.

Their cities centered on great plazas where they threw vast parties for neighboring chiefs. Festivities continued for days on end, sometimes lasting a month. Dignitaries were fed, and given gifts of gold, jewels, and textiles. Only then would the Inca make their requests for labor, to increase food production, to build irrigation schemes, to terrace hillsides, or to extend the limits of the empire.

Machu Picchu and Empire

The Inca were great builders. They loved stone &mdash almost as much as they revered gold. At magical Machu Picchu, a frontier fortress and a sacred site, a mystic column, the hitching post of the Sun, is carved from the living rock. Another slab is shaped to echo the mountain beyond.


Spanish leader Francisco Pizarro captured and ransomed the last Inca emperor, Atahuallpa, for 24 tons of gold worth $267 million today. After receiving the ransom from the Inca people, the conquistadors strangled Atahuallpa anyway.

Temples and fortifications at Machu Picchu were constructed from vast, pillowy boulders, some weighing 100 tons or more. Constructed without mortar, the joins between them are so tight as to deny a knife-blade entry. A vast labor force was required. There are records of 20 men working on a single stone, chipping away, hoisting and lowering, polishing it with sand, hour-by-hour for an entire year.

A network of highways allowed Inca emperors to control their sprawling empire. One ran down the spine of the Andes, another along the coast. Inca builders could cope with anything the treacherous terrain required &mdash steep paths cut along mountain sides, rope suspension bridges thrown across steep ravines, or treacherous causeways traversing floodplains. Every mile and a half they built way stations as resting points. Bands of official runners raced between them covering 150 miles a day. A message could be sent 1200 miles from Cuzco to Quito in under a week.


The Inca Empire ranged 2,500 miles from Ecuador to southern Chile before its destruction at the hands of Spanish conquistadors in 1532.

Everyone was expected to contribute to the empire. Land was divided in three. One third was worked for the emperor, one third was reserved for the gods, and one third the people kept for themselves. All were required to pay taxes as tribute.

The Inca could not write. Tax collectors and bureaucrats kept track of things with quipu , knotted strings. Varying lengths, colors, knot-types, and positions, enabled them to store enormous quantities of information.

Despite its glory, the Incas was a brittle empire, held together by promises and threats. When Pizarro executed the last emperor, it rapidly collapsed. Catholic priests demanding allegiance to a new Christian god soon replaced the Children of the Sun. As they had for thousands of years, the hardy peoples of the Andes adapted. They took what they must from their new masters, and held onto as many of their old ways as they could.


The Last Days of the Incas

The epic story of the fall of the Inca Empire to Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro in the aftermath of a bloody civil war, and the recent discovery of the lost guerrilla capital of the Incas, Vilcabamba, by three American explorers.

In 1532, the fifty-four-year-old Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro led a force of 167 men, including his four brothers, to the shores of Peru. Unbeknownst to the Spaniards, the Inca rulers of Peru had just fought a bloody civil war in which the emperor Atahualpa had defeated his brother Huascar. Pizarro and his men soon clashed with Atahualpa and a huge force of Inca warriors at the Battle of Cajamarca. Despite being outnumbered by more than two hundred to one, the Spaniards prevailed—due largely to their horses, their steel armor and swords, and their tactic of surprise. They captured and imprisoned Atahualpa. Although the Inca emperor paid an enormous ransom in gold, the Spaniards executed him anyway. The following year, the Spaniards seized the Inca capital of Cuzco, completing their conquest of the largest native empire the New World has ever known. Peru was now a Spanish colony, and the conquistadors were wealthy beyond their wildest dreams.

But the Incas did not submit willingly. A young Inca emperor, the brother of Atahualpa, soon led a massive rebellion against the Spaniards, inflicting heavy casualties and nearly wiping out the conquerors. Eventually, however, Pizarro and his men forced the emperor to abandon the Andes and flee to the Amazon. There, he established a hidden capital, called Vilcabamba—only recently rediscovered by a trio of colorful American explorers. Although the Incas fought a deadly, thirty-six-year-long guerrilla war, the Spanish ultimately captured the last Inca emperor and vanquished the native resistance.


The Shape of Inca History: Narrative and Architecture in an Andean Empire

In The Shape of Inca History, Susan Niles considers the ways in which the Inca concept of history informed their narratives, rituals, and architecture. Using sixteenth-century chronicles of Inca culture, legal documents from the first generation of conquest, and field investigation of architectural remains, she strategically explores the interplay of oral and written histories with the architectural record and provides a new and exciting understanding of the lives of the royal families on the eve of conquest.

Niles focuses on the life of Huayna Capac, the Inca king who ruled at the time of the first European incursions on the Andean coast. Because he died just a few years before the Spaniards overturned the Inca world, eyewitness accounts of his deeds as recorded by the invaders can be used to separate fact from propaganda. The rich documentary sources telling of his life include extraordinarily detailed legal records that inventory lands on his estate in the Yucay Valley. These sources provide a basis&mdashunique in the Andes&mdashfor reconstructing the social and physical plan of the estate and for dating its construction exactly.

Huayna Capac's country palace shows a design different from that devised by his ancestors. Niles argues that the radical stylistic and technical innovations documented in the buildings themselves can be understood by referring to the turbulent political atmosphere prevalent at the time of his accession. Illustrated with numerous photographs and reconstruction drawings, The Shape of Inca History breaks new ground by proposing that Inca royal style was dynamic and that the design of an Inca building can best be interpreted by its historical context. In this way it is possible to recreate the development of Inca architectural style over time.


Unveiling the Mystery of the Inca

Situated high in the Peruvian Andes, the 15th century Inca palace complex at Machu Picchu is one of the most spectacular archaeological sites in the world. In this beautifully illustrated book, leading American and Peruvian scholars provide an unprecedented overview of the site, its place within the Inca empire, the mysteries surrounding its establishment and abandonment, and the discoveries made there since the excavations by archaeologist Hiram Bingham III in the early 20th century. Drawing on the most recent scientific findings, the authors vividly describe the royal estate in the cloud forest where the Inca emperor and his guests went to escape the pressures of the capital.

In addition to Bingham's exciting account of his first expedition in 1911, the book includes new and archival photographs of the site as well as color illustrations and explanations of some 120 gold, silver, ceramic, bone, and textile works recovered at Machu Picchu.

This is the catalogue of an exhibition that opened at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History in January 2003.

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Item 9780300136456

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Watch the video: The Inca Empire Explained in 11 Minutes