Gasconade APA-85 - History

Gasconade APA-85 - History

Gasconade

A county in east central Missouri.

(APA~: dp. 4,247, 1. 426', b. 58', dr. 16', s. 16.9 k., cpl. 320, a. 1 5", 8 40mm., 10 20mm., cl. Gilliam; T. S4 SE2-BD1)

Gasconade (APA-85) was laid down 7 November 1944 under Maritime Commission contract by the Consolidated Steel Corp., Ltd., Wilmington, Calif.; launched 23 January 1945; sponsored by Mrs. Winnie Cave, acquired by the Navy 10 March 1945, and commissioned 11 March 1945 at San Pedro, Calif., Lt Comdr Allen E. Stiff in command.

After shakedown, Gasconade departed San Francisco 8 May on a troop transport voyage to the Philippines Steaming via Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, and Ulithi, she

arrived Samar 3 June. Loaded with mail and cargo, she steamed to San Francisco from 18 June to 6 July; thence transported additional troops to the Philippines. Arriving Leyte Gulf 2 August, she served as receiving ship unti1 mid-August when she proceeded to Manila Bay to stage for the Allied occupation of Japan.

Gasconade departed Manila 20 August; and, as part of a huge transport task force carrying the first sea-borne occupation forces to Japan, she entered Tokyo Bay 2 September while surrender terms were being signed on board Missouri ( BB-63) . She debarked her troops at Yokosuka ~ September; steamed to the Philippines from 4 to 11 September, then carried more occupation troops from Mindanao to Kure. Japan, from 19 September to 6 October.

After returning to Leyte Gulf 11 October,Gasconade embarked military passengers and sailed for the United States 17 October as part of the "Magic Carpet" fleet. She reached Portland, Oreg., 2 November, transported occupation troops to Nagoya, Japan, 18 November to 5 December: and sailed 8 December on another "Magic Carpet" voyage, arriving Seattle 19 December. After carrying a garrison force to Guam from 13 to 29 January 1946, she voyaged to Pearl Harbor from 30 January to 8 February with returning veterans embarked.

Assigned to Joint Task Force 1, Gasconade during the next 3 months prepared for Operation "Crossroads," a program of nuclear tests in the Marshall Islands. Departing Pearl Harbor 18 May in company with Transport Division 92, she reached Bikini Atoll, Marshalls, 30 May On 22 June her crew transferred to Besear (APA-37) Designated a target ship for the experiments, she survived an atomic blast 18 July.

Gasconade decommissioned in the Marshall Islands 28 August. In December she was taken in tow at Kwajalein for transfer to the United States, where she arrived San Francisco 27 January 1947. After undergoing structural and radioactivity tests, she was redesignated n target ship in March 1948. She was sunk by torpedoes 21 July in the Pacific Ocean off lower California.


A nuclear weapon is an explosive device that derives its destructive force from nuclear reactions, either fission (fission bomb) or from a combination of fission and fusion reactions (thermonuclear bomb).

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Gasconade, Missouri

By 1811 Isaac Best established a horse-driven grist mill near the mouth of the Gasconade River from which a hamlet later sprang up and took the name of the river. The town was the first county seat of Gasconade County and in 1821, missed being the capitol of Missouri by two votes.

According to Goodspeed's 1888 History of Missouri, the first settlers were John G. Heath, who built the first log house, and Mr. Shuman, who built the first frame house in 1868. The first druggist was Richard Zumwald, the first blacksmith was Joseph Mundwiller, the first shoemaker was John Wolter and the first grocery keeper was John G. Heath.

From about 1877 until approximately 1912, one of the largest ice houses was located in the town. The ice was cut from the Gasconade River during the winter months and stored in a long building where the ice was covered with saw dust during the summer months or until it was shipped. The ice was brought up from the river on a large conveyer.

Mr. William Jett and his son, Bufford, operated a tie mill in Gasconade in the late 1800s and the early 1900s. Rafts of logs were floated down the Gasconade River to the town. A railroad spur along the river bank was used to supply box cars to load the ties on a ship to the different points where they were used to construct the railway. The ties were sold for about five cents per tie.

By 1811, Isaac Best established a horse-driven grist mill near the mouth of the Gasconade River from which a hamlet later sprang up and took the name of the river.

In 1855, Gasconade was the scene of the historic railroad bridge disaster when on November 1, the first excursion train on the Pacific railroad, now the Union Pacific, was carrying many notables from St. Louis to Jefferson City for the opening of the State Legislature. The train broke through the bridge at the town of Gasconade with a casualty list of 43 dead and many injured.

The town is divided into 15 blocks and also into 255 lots of various sizes, because of the Missouri Pacific Railway, around which the town was built.

The Corps of Engineers Boatyard is the principal establishment of the town. At the lower end of the boatyard is the mouth of the Gasconade River.

(Additional information about the Boatyards can be found at the GCHS Archives in an article by Jim Thomas in the GCHS Newsletter, Vol. IX, No. 1, Spring 1998)

"On December 27, 1820, Daniel Morgan Boone, son of the famous pioneer, Daniel Boone, was appointed the first of several commissioners of Gasconade County 'to find the most suitable place for the erection of a courthouse and jail in the County of Gasconade.' He and other commissioners selected a 50-acre site near the mouth of the Gasconade River at the town then called Gasconade City, now just Gasconade. They paid $10 for the 50 acres. This was the first county seat. No description of a courthouse at this site has been found. Court records of the period indicate that the court continued to meet at the homes of various citizens. In 1825, because of the repeated flooding of the courthouse site at Gasconade City, the county seat was moved to the new town of Bartonsville, also near the Gasconade River. That part of the then larger Gasconade County, in what is now Osage County."


Gasconade APA-85 - History

119 East First Street, Room 23
Hermann, MO 65041
(573) 486-3100 Real Estate
(573) 486-3100 Personal Property
Office Hours: 8:00am to 4:30pm, Monday through Friday
E-mail: [email protected]

The Assessor's job is to place value on all taxable real and personal property within the county as of January 1st, the assessment date set by State Statute. All county assessors' offices are regulated and overseen by the Missouri State Tax Commission. Monthly visits by field representatives and annual spot reviews of properties aid them in evaluating the Assessor's compliance with the statute requirements.

The assessed value, as determined by the Assessor's office, is a percentage of the market value of the property. The assessment percentage is set by state law and determined by the classification of the property. The classification and assessment rates of real property include Agricultural at 12%, Residential at 19% and Commercial properties at 32%. The assessed property value is one part of the formula in determining property taxes, with the other factor being a tax rate or levy, which is determined by the various taxing entities and jurisdictions. These include eight separate school districts, two road districts, six cities, three fire districts, five ambulance districts, and other miscellaneous levy districts such as the health department, the library, the Sheltered Workshop and the Counseling Center.

In 2019 we assessed 5110 cars, 11164 trucks, 1655 motorcycles, 708 RVs, 1425 boats, 7 airplanes, 5492 trailers, 64 utility vehicles, and 438 historic vehicles. Each of these 25,625 vehicles has to be individually assessed each year. In addition to this we have livestock including horses, cattle, hogs, sheep, goats, poultry, along with exotic animals. We also assess farm machinery, manufactured homes and business equipment.

On the real estate side, we have 14,764 parcels. In Missouri, every odd year each parcel needs to be reinspected and have a value assigned.

In addition to doing the above listed work, we also have to track the ownership and property lines of all the real estate. This is done by analyzing the deeds recorded in the County Recorder's office. The County Recorder's office will record nearly 4,000 documents this year.

In 2018, our GIS was made available to the public online. This tool is a online plat book which is updated periodically through the year.

So you can see our workload is quite extreme. While computers have lessened the workload for many offices, computers cannot make the job of assessors automatic.

In 2014 we added online personal property filing. For those who would rather stay with paper filing, that option will remain available to you. You, the taxpayer, can choose which option is best for you. Also in 2014, we added a fee based access to our information for the businesses that rely on our information to do their job. We will strive to meet our statutory obligations by continuing to automate our system.

Please call the office if you have any questions. We will be glad to provide you with any help and assistance that you may need. Thank you!

Paul Schulte, Gasconade County Assessor
Julia Baker, Chief Appraiser/Mapper
Lisa Diebal, Real Estate Clerk
Donna Struttman, Personal Property Clerk


Operational history

World War II

After shakedown, Gasconade departed San Francisco 8 May on a troop transport voyage to the Philippines. Steaming via Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, and Ulithi, she arrived Samar 3 June. Loaded with mail and cargo, she steamed to San Francisco from 18 June to 6 July thence transported additional troops to the Philippines. Arriving Leyte Gulf 2 August, she served as receiving ship until mid-August when she proceeded to Manila Bay to stage for the Allied occupation of Japan.

After hostilities

Gasconade departed Manila 20 August and, as part of a huge transport task force carrying the first sea-borne occupation forces to Japan, she entered Tokyo Bay 2 September while surrender terms were being signed on board USS Missouri  (BB-63) . She debarked her troops at Yokosuka 3 September steamed to the Philippines from 4 to 11 September, then carried more occupation troops from Mindanao to Kure, Japan, from 19 September to 6 October.

Operation Magic Carpet

After returning to Leyte Gulf 11 October, Gasconade embarked military passengers and sailed for the United States 17 October as part of Operation Magic Carpet. She reached Portland, Oregon, 2 November, transported occupation troops to Nagoya, Japan, 18 November to 5 December and sailed 8 December on another Magic Carpet voyage, arriving Seattle 19 December. After carrying a garrison force to Guam from 13 to 29 January 1946, she voyaged to Pearl Harbor from 30 January to 8 February with returning veterans embarked.

Operation Crossroads

Assigned to Joint Task Force 1, Gasconade during the next 3 months prepared for Operation Crossroads, a program of nuclear tests in the Marshall Islands. Departing Pearl Harbor 18 May in company with Transport Division 92, she reached Bikini Atoll, Marshalls, 30 May. On 22 June her crew transferred to USS Bexar  (APA-237) . Designated a target ship for the experiments, she survived an atomic blast 18 July.

Decommission and sinking

Gasconade decommissioned in the Marshall Islands 28 August. In December she was taken in tow at Kwajalein for transfer to the United States, where she arrived San Francisco 27 January 1947. After undergoing structural and radioactivity tests, she was redesignated a target ship in March 1948. She was sunk by torpedoes 21 July in the Pacific Ocean off lower California.


The Many Twisting Secrets of the Gasconade

The Gasconade River is known as one of the most crooked rivers in the world. Less publicized are the towering bluffs, hairpin turns, hundreds of caves and springs and impressive hardwood forests that line this spectacular Missouri river.

You don’t need to dig hard to uncover a fascinating history along the Gasconade either, including stories of Osage Indians, French fur trappers, Civil War raiders, tie hackers, legendary buried gold in the Moccasin Bend area north of Waynesville and even Jesse James.

The Gasconade’s rich past may not be as evident today, but river-goers are still in the know about Gasconade “gold”—the golden trout of the pioneers called brown bass, bronzebacks, redeyes, smallies, or smallmouth bass, which is more commonly used by modern-day anglers.

The angling history of this river is quite fascinating, but never more fascinating than today, with the modern fisheries management programs in place. The Gasconade is home to one of the Missouri Department of Conservation’s 10 Special Bass Management Areas.

“It is the perfect smallmouth river,” said Justin Richardson, of Rolla, and longtime fan of the Gasconade. “You can catch smallmouths far upstream where you can only wade or very near where it runs into the Missouri 300 miles downstream.”

There is 20 miles of specially managed smallmouth area from Riddle Bridge at the end of Highway Y, north of St. Roberts, to the Highway D Bridge at Jerome. However, Richardson prefers to fish above the managed area.

“The managed area has some terrific fishing, but tends to attract more people,” he advised. “I prefer to put in at the Highway 17 Bridge north of Waynesville. It is 15 miles to Riddle Bridge, where the managed area begins, but I spend most of my fishing time in the first 5 or 6 miles below Highway 17. There are lots of big rocks in this stretch. The channels are deep and the current moves right along.”

Richardson still uses a time-tested lure here, the Twin Spin “Nugget.”

“I slow-roll the lure over rocks and logs I look for this structure in 4 to 6 feet of water. Adding a No. 101 green and white pork frog to the bait makes it a killer.”

He added he rigs his favorite baitcaster with 10-pound P Line, and catches 12- to 14-inch smallmouths.

Nick Miller, of Bourbon, spends a lot of time on the Gasconade and prefers to fish in the SMA region of the river.

“Smallmouth fishing on the Gasconade has improved dramatically since the beginning of the Special Management Area,” he stated.

Rule changes instituted over a decade ago have allowed smallmouths to increase in size. Limits on them are now one fish per day, with an 18-inch length limit. The new regulations came into play not long after bass anglers had begun to accept the idea of catch and release.

“I wouldn’t think of killing a smallmouth,” Miller said. “I believe most fishermen on the rivers these days feel the same way. It takes a long time for a smallmouth to grow to 18 inches.”

He added that if handled properly, a smallmouth bass may be caught and released several times by the time it reaches 18 inches and it’s far more favorable than someone taking a smallmouth home to eat.

Miller is quite good at smallmouth fishing and has earned himself a slot on Cowtown USA’s pro fishing staff. He runs one of Cowtown’s Legend SS jet boats while fishing the Gasconade.

“You have to have a good boat to run the river,” Miller said. “All waters are not created equal, and I often run a lot of miles to find the best smallmouth fishing spots. I have fished all of my life and the Legend SS is the best boat I have ever used.”

I tagged along with Miller on a recent fishing trip to the Gasconade. He normally likes to put it at the Jerome access, but recent floods destroyed the MDC access, which is now under repair. Miller spends most of his time between Jerome and Boiling Spring, 8 miles upstream. He took us the long way around and used the area near Highway P just off of 28, south of Dixon, and put in at Boiling Spring.

Within minutes, Miller had the first smallmouth of the day in the boat.

“I like a suspending model that will suspend to 8 feet, but I seldom take it that deep.”

After catching several fish in the vicinity of Boiling Spring, Miller reluctantly headed toward Jerome. He had caught a 5-pound largemouth within 100 yards of Boiling Spring two days prior. He catches a lot of fish near the Jerome Bridge during the cold winter months. He rotated between the bridges and a mile-long stretch of boulder-strewn banks upriver from the bridges. I filmed as Miller steadily put bass in the boat using a Smithwick Rogue and a Storm Wiggle Wart.

Patience is still the key to fishing and Miller exercised his perfectly as he utilized his trolling motor to put the boat in a perfect position to cast to awaiting smallmouth bass.

I had as much fun filming as Miller did fishing. And as we motored back toward Boiling Spring, I couldn’t help but think about the allure of the Gasconade River and the stories and legends that endure. However, it is the real “gold” of the Gasconade, the big brownies—these bronzebacks, these smallmouth bass—that Miller caught which will haunt my dreams.


Explanation

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The global elites hated Trump for putting “America First” and delaying the “Great Reset” (Agenda 21) planned by the “World Socialist VP” in 1992. Trump had the greatest economy, lowest unemployment, low individual/corporate taxes, made America #1 in energy production, brought businesses back, improved trade agreements, initiated Project 1776 to teach true history & America’s greatness, rebuilt our military, added a Space Force, built a border wall to keep drug smugglers/deadly fentanyl, terrorists and illegals from entering, lowered pharmaceutical costs and pulled out of Obama era Iran and Paris Accord that funded & aided our enemies. Globalist couldn’t steal America’s wealth with such a strong president and had to destroy him!

Fauci predicted in January 2017, “Trump would face a “surprise Infectious disease outbreak” and yearly sent billions to Communist Chinese to create a deadly virus, find a cure, with no oversight. Rumors indicate China made a bio-chemical weapon and has threatened America. Chinese silenced news of infected Wuhan virologists, allowed the virus to spread causing deaths and economic disaster worldwide to become #1 world power. The Communist helped finance Biden’s campaign, are part of his illegal, financial involvement in Hunter’s equity firm and can blackmail him. Don’t expect a thorough investigation of the Chinese labs.

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Legends of America

1st Street in Hermann, Missouri by Kathy Weiser-Alexander.

Hermann, Missouri, the county seat of Gasconade County, evolved out of an effort to preserve German culture and traditions in America.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1920

In the early 19 th century several waves of German immigrants came to America and settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Dismayed at how quickly their countrymen were being assimilated into American society, many of the Philadelphia Germans dreamed of building a new city in the “Far West” that could and would be “German in every particular.”

In an effort to protect German traditions and heritage, the German Settlement Society was created in 1836. The society had almost utopian goals of a new community that could perpetuate traditional German culture and establish a self-supporting colony built around farming, commerce, and industry.

The Society soon sent several scouts into America’s heartland to search out land for the creation of their new settlement. One of these scouts, George Bayer, a Philadelphia schoolteacher who represented the Society, purchased 11,300 acres of land near the confluence of the Gasconade and Missouri Rivers. The steep, rugged terrain reminded him of the Rhine Valley in Germany, even though the beautiful area was perhaps not the most practical site for a town.

His descriptions of the area generated great enthusiasm among potential settlers back in Philadelphia. A town named Hermann, named for a German national hero, was platted by the Society before they even saw the land. On paper, Hermann was flat, with spacious market squares and sweeping boulevards. Thinking big, they made their city’s main street 10 feet wider than Philadelphia’s.

This area outside of Hermann, Missouri does not reflect the steep hills and rugged terrain in the immediate vicinity of Hermann that the early pioneers faced. Photo by Kathy Weiser-Alexander.

Soon, 17 settlers from Philadelphia started traveling westward to create their new community and when they stepped off the steamboat in December 1837, they discovered what one settler described as a “howling wilderness.” The land that Bayer purchased was located along steep bluffs overlooking the Missouri River, and the area’s rocky soil appeared to be totally inhospitable to agriculture. Their idealism died quickly and some were very angry to discover that the Hermann lots they had purchased back in Philadelphia were what today’s residents jokingly refer to as “vertical acreage.”

The emigrants who came to Hermann quickly realized that they needed to find viable alternatives to traditional grain agriculture if their community was to prosper. Most of the land in the area is hilly and was covered with dense forests, generally limiting the size of farms to less than 120 acres. Fortunately, the land was fertile enough to support limited grain farming and livestock ranching, creating an agricultural base for the local economy. A unique natural feature that Hermann’s settlers noticed was an abundance of wild grapevines growing along the rocky hillsides. Local soils turned out to be ideal for grape cultivation, and viticulture quickly became a key element of the local economy.

In addition to the farmers, tradesmen, artisans, businessmen, and professionals were also involved in the early settlement and formation of Hermann. Within a short time, streets were laid out, solid houses were constructed, shops and businesses were established. Within two years the Settlement Society had dissolved and George Bayer had passed away. However, Hermann survived its rocky start, and by 1839, its population had grown to 450 residents.

Paddlewheel steamboat on the Missouri River

The new town also grew as a steamboat port along the Missouri River, which was the primary transportation resource in Missouri during the early decades of the 19 th century, and most emigrants who came to Hermann did so via the river. During these days, the town sported a tavern on every corner and the largest general store between St. Louis and Kansas City.

In 1842, Hermann became the county seat of Gasconade County. When the county was first organized in 1821 it was situated at Gasconade City along the Gasconade River. It then moved several times due to flooding so no permanent courthouse was built. In 1842, county voters decided to move the seat of government to Hermann to make sure it was out of the flood plain. Local residents contributed approximately $3,000 to build a square, two-story brick building located in the center of a city block along East Front Street. The courthouse sat atop a bluff overlooking the Missouri River, and its natural vistas added to the aesthetics of the community. By acquiring the county seat, Hermann gained prominence and ensured its continued success and growth.

Stone Hill Winery in Hermann, Missouri in 1888.

Within no time, area farmers developed new varieties of grapes well-suited to Missouri soils, and in 1847, Michael Poeschel opened Hermann’s first commercial winery on a hill overlooking the town. This winery would later become the Stone Hill Winery that still exists today.

In the fall of 1848, Hermann held its first Weinfest, bringing people to the city on steamboats from St. Louis where they enjoyed more than their share of sweet Catawba wine and marveled at the grapevine-covered hills. The Weinfest tradition continues in today’s Maifest and Octoberfest celebrations.

German wines, beer, ale, and liquor in 1871 by L.N. Rosenthal.

The quality of Hermann wines improved dramatically in the mid-1800s, thanks in large part to the work of George Husmann, whose father had purchased a Hermann lot while the family was still living in Germany. A self-taught scientist, Husmann studied soil types and crossed wild and cultivated grapes to create hybrids that could stand up to Missouri’s hot, humid summers and freezing winters.

In the latter half of the 19 th century, railroads replaced steamboats as the primary means of transportation and Hermann became a station point along the Missouri Pacific Railroad between St. Louis and Jefferson City in 1854. This allowed Hermann to maintain its regional prominence as an agricultural shipping point and commercial center. Train transportation and access to outside markets also allowed for the creation of several light industrial plants within Hermann, most notably a shoe facility operated by the Florsheim Company.

Hermann, Missouri Wine Vault

By 1860, approximately 30 steamboats were based in Hermann. These boats transported raw goods, such as lumber from surrounding forests, iron from the Meramec region, and barrels of wine and beer, downriver to St. Louis. The steamboats also contributed to the growth of Hermann’s early tourism industry by bringing visitors into the city. At this time, the town was called home to about 1,100 people.

In the early 1870s, Hermann residents began to celebrate Maifest, a traditional German celebration of the arrival of spring. After the German school was built, early Maifests were last-day-of-school picnics for children and after Sunday church, a bigger festivity was planned that included a parade to the city park, food, treats, and an afternoon of games. Many years later it would grow into a city-wide celebration.

The Carl Strehly House in Hermann, Missouri was built in 1842 and enlarged over the years.

Economic diversity in the city provided stability and allowed Hermann to maintain its German heritage. Local presses produced several German-language newspapers, including one that was published in the Carl Strehly House, that is now part of the Deutschheim State Historic Site. Many residents spoke German well into the 20th century.

By the turn of the century, Hermann’s winemakers had become wildly successful. Stone Hill Winery had grown to be the second-largest winery in the country and was winning gold medals at World’s Fair competitions around the globe. By this time, the town’s numerous vintners were producing an incredible three million gallons of wine a year. By 1904, 20 wineries operated in the Hermann vicinity, and Poeschel’s facility had grown to become the third-largest winery in the world.


Gasconade APA-85 - History

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USS Gasconade (APA-85)

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