The Samurai, Stephen Turnbull

The Samurai, Stephen Turnbull

The Samurai, Stephen Turnbull

The Samurai, Stephen Turnbull

Stephen Turnbull is one of the leading British experts on the Samurai, having written an impressively wide range of books on the topic. He is thus the ideal author for this overview of the history and culture of the Samurai, which covers a wide range of topics, starting with an overview of Japanese history and the role of the Samurai within, and moving on to examine their lifestyle, their weapons (focusing on the full range of weapons, not just the famous Samurai sword), the impressive range of armour, their attitude to death, their actual role in warfare, the development of the Japanese castle and finally their fall in the aftermath of the Meiji Restoration.

One can argue that the true Samurai faded away several centuries before their formal end – once the Tokugawa Shoguns stamped out internal warfare in Japan and began the long period of isolation the Samurai lost their role as warriors, and became increasingly irrelevant, lacking a real purpose. By the time the last Samurai rebelled against the changes imposed during the Meiji Restoration it had been two centuries since they had been genuinely involved in warfare, and they were outclassed by the well trained commoners of the new Imperial army. One minor quibble is that Turnbull doesn’t mention the poor treatment of shipwrecked sailors amongst the reasons for the American intervention in Japan – there had even been a ‘no second thought’ order to drive away or execute all westerners who landed in Japan, even shipwrecked sailors, that had only recently been revoked. There were of course other, less laudable motives, but this was a real issue at the time.

This is a very attractive book, copiously illustrated with a mix of original Japanese art, pictures of surviving arms, armour and castles and the occasion modern artwork. Samurai military equipment was undoubtedly very striking, and very colourful, and that comes across well here. Turnbull knows his subject, and the result is a very good overview of the samurai and their military role. Turnbull is very good at dismantling some of the myths about the Samurai, in particular when it comes to their weaponry, making it clear that the famous Samurai swords only came to prominence fairly late in their history. It is nice to see the story taken all the way to its end in the 19th century, as well as going back to the earliest days of the Samurai, so we can trace how they developed into the most familiar version as well as their decline.

Chapters
Chronology
The Warrior lifestyle
Arms and armour
'The way of the samurai is found in death'
The samurai at war
Strongholds of the samurai
The last samurai

Author: Stephen Turnbull
Edition: Hardcover
Pages: 208
Publisher: Osprey
Year: 2016



Here is a quick description and cover image of book The Samurai written by Stephen Turnbull which was published in 2016-7-19. You can read this before The Samurai PDF EPUB full Download at the bottom.

The world of the samurai, the legendary elite warrior cult of old Japan, has for too long been associated solely with military history and has largely remained a mystery. In this exciting new book, Stephen Turnbull, the world’s leading authority on the samurai, goes beyond the battlefield to paint a picture of the samurai as they really were. The world of the samurai warrior is revealed to be one of great richness, with familiar topics such as the cult of suicide, ritualised revenge and the lore of the samurai sword being seen in the context of an all-encompassing warrior culture that was expressed through art and poetry as much as through violence.


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Samurai mercenaries, the b attle of Tanaka, Samurai vs Ashigaru, and a fun ninja training manual!

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SAMURAI SNIPPETS

A NEW section of little gems from the world of the samurai, and elsewhere.

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My book on samurai mercenaries has been published and I have just finished revising the Osprey Essential History War in Japan 1467-1615 , but so much new material has become available since 2003 it will be practically a new book AND it will have all new pictures.

My current working project is a new Osprey Combat: Mongol Warrior vs European Knight, Eastern Europe 1237-42. The three engagements covered are Legnica (Liegnitz), Muhi (Sajo River) and the siege of Esztergom. I am also translating new material on the Hōjō family of samurai for a future book.

I also provide an advisory and consultancy service about Japan including a picture library holding 35,000 items.

My first degree was at Cambridge and have two MAs (in Theology and Military History) from Leeds University. In 1996 I received a PhD from Leeds for my thesis on Japan&rsquos Kakure Kirishitan. In its published form the work won the Japan Festival Literary Award in 1998.


The Samurai

Sto unendo lo studio della Storia del Giappone a quello della lingua giapponese per avere un quadro più completo. Il nome di Stephen Turnbull è quello più ricorrente quando si ricercano rinomati storici occidentali esperti riguardo il Paese del Sol Levante.
Ho comprato quindi su Amazon questo volume di 200 pagine circa (molte di foto e immagini) sulla figura del Samurai. Il libro copre diversi aspetti della vita del samurai concentrandosi soprattutto nei periodi di nascita della classe dei samura Sto unendo lo studio della Storia del Giappone a quello della lingua giapponese per avere un quadro più completo. Il nome di Stephen Turnbull è quello più ricorrente quando si ricercano rinomati storici occidentali esperti riguardo il Paese del Sol Levante.
Ho comprato quindi su Amazon questo volume di 200 pagine circa (molte di foto e immagini) sulla figura del Samurai. Il libro copre diversi aspetti della vita del samurai concentrandosi soprattutto nei periodi di nascita della classe dei samurai e del suo pieno sviluppo nel periodo Sengoku, toccando argomenti quali il look, le armi, la vita quotidiana, la vita in battaglia e il rapporto con la morte. Il tomo, che credo non esista in italiano ma potrei sbagliare, risulta completo e interessante per quanto riguarda l’analisi della figura del Samurai, e può essere uno stimolo per avvicinarsi alla storia del Giappone e un buono spunto per aggiungere libri da leggere sull’argomento (ho aggiunto almeno cinque libri in wishlist leggendo questo).

Nota a parte per l’edizione, hardcover, veramente pregevole. Sovraccopertina molto stilosa, il volume fa anche bella figura in qualsiasi libreria, e visto il prezzo irrisorio (pagato 7 sterline in offerta su Amazon UK) risulta un ottimo acquisto. . more

Samurai are something I&aposve always been curious about and found visually striking but they are kind of an obscure topic in the US. With the exception of The Last Samurai, there&aposs few movies about them and no TV shows that I can think of. So what I&aposm really saying is that, it isn&apost easy to learn about them if you don&apost know where to look and this book is a great place to start.

I knew only a little about samurai and Stephen Turnbull did a great job explaining unique aspects of Samurai culture like Samurai are something I've always been curious about and found visually striking but they are kind of an obscure topic in the US. With the exception of The Last Samurai, there's few movies about them and no TV shows that I can think of. So what I'm really saying is that, it isn't easy to learn about them if you don't know where to look and this book is a great place to start.

I knew only a little about samurai and Stephen Turnbull did a great job explaining unique aspects of Samurai culture like their weapons, armor, and harakiri/seppuku. There was also some nice information about important battles and moments during the samurai period like the Mongolian invasion. This book is a pretty easy and fast read as a result of the interesting subject matter. There are also lots of beautiful images of samurai and their castles in the book as well. Many are old woodblock prints but there are modern drawings too and both serve to bring to life this period of Japanese history.

All in all, this was a strong introduction to this topic and it won't be the last book on Samurai or by Stephen Turnbull that I will read. . more


Turnbull attended Cambridge University where he gained his first degree. He currently holds 2 MAs in Theology and Military History and a PhD [ clarification needed ] from the University of Leeds where he is a lecturer in Far Eastern Religions. [2]

He was on the editorial board of the short-lived Medieval History Magazine (2003–2005), which was published in association with the Royal Armouries. He was a consultant for the widely successful PC game Shogun: Total War and also its well-received sequel Total War: Shogun 2, both products of Creative Assembly, as well as historical advisor on the severely panned Hollywood film 47 Ronin starring Keanu Reeves. [3] [4] He was also a narrator for the Netflix documentary series Age of Samurai: Battle for Japan in 2021. [4]

He became semi-retired, but holds the post of Visiting Professor of Japanese Studies at Akita International University in Japan. [2]


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Samurai Heraldry

Many years ago- my late Father took me to see Kurosawa&aposs Samurai Epic Kagemusha The Shadow Warrior. I marveled at the amazing uniforms/armour in the movie- each unit clearly marked by its dress and banners. Being already familiar with the almost impossibility of distinguishing friend from foe in European Ancient and Medieval warfare, I immediately assumed that this was Creative License- Kurosawa and his art directors had gone off historical script to make things easier on the viewer. I was wrong Many years ago- my late Father took me to see Kurosawa's Samurai Epic Kagemusha The Shadow Warrior. I marveled at the amazing uniforms/armour in the movie- each unit clearly marked by its dress and banners. Being already familiar with the almost impossibility of distinguishing friend from foe in European Ancient and Medieval warfare, I immediately assumed that this was Creative License- Kurosawa and his art directors had gone off historical script to make things easier on the viewer. I was wrong- as this book ably discusses. With their lighter and more workable Lacquer Armour- and the ability of Lacquer to hold colours- Japanese units in the Medieval and Renaissance period WERE often more uniformly attired- and they DID carry a plethora of banners- some even worn individually on each soldier's back- that identified each unit and often each Samurai.

Stephen Turnbull's book is a real revelation to the previously uninformed. He explains Japanese heraldry - from the basic "Mon"- a unique crest/symbol- to the myriad of other forms of Identifying Expression that made Japanese warfare signs and flags different from the Western record. He patiently explains how the "branding" developed and spread- until by the later period, a Lord would have a Three Dimensional Standard, a Banner standard, and a plethora of sub-units and sub-lords' banners- that iterated the Identifying Symbols in logical patterns. I was held in rapt attention- and just LOVED Angus McBride's really wonderful Illustrations in the great Colour plate section- 10 plates of real beauty- not something I usually say about Military Illustrations!

With no adult themes and little gore (amazing for something about Samurai)- this is a fine book for any Junior reader over about 9-10. For the Gamer/Modeller/Military Enthusiast- this is a joy to behold, explaining as it does how to construct both Historical and Fantasy heraldry- something that even SciFi and Fantasy Gamers can appreciate. With Japanese style iconography so dominant in contemporary culture- there is no end to the places one may find themes from this book. This is that rare Osprey Military -themed book I think almost everyone should read- so dazzling are the pictures(both the B/w and the Colour plates)- and so far-reaching is the subject matter. A strong recommendation. . more


The Samurai, Stephen Turnbull - History

The Samurai
A Military History
Stephen Turnbull
Routledge Curzon Publishers
ISBN: 1873410387 (Amazon link)


The prolific Stephen Turnbull has written several fine military histories of Japan, and over the last five years I've read several of them. Okay, so it was the pretty pictures that got my attention at first, but somewhere along the way I picked up a genuine interest in medieval Japanese history. Turnbull must be selling quite well because over time his publishers seem have moved him to much nicer coffee-table sized hardback formats. This seems appropriate as the author maintains an historical Japanese image archive, the contents of which greatly enhance his recent books like Samurai: The World of the Warrior. By contrast, The Samurai is a less lavish production, being a reprint of a 1977 title. Apparently this was once regarded as a standard text for Japanese history. As you might then expect, it's perhaps a little less accessible for the casual reader than his later titles, and certainly under-illustrated. There are a dozen black and white plates in the middle, but as the text is riddled with references to painted scrolls it's a pity this new edition didn't opt for the more lavish treatment of his later books. Still, the content is absolutely excellent, if now strangely familiar in place.

Okay, so I've gained a background in Japanese history now, so it's not surprising that some sections seem familiar, but this title clearly served Turnbull as his mother-lode for other works. Certainly it's not unexpected to see some this material revised only slightly in later summary work, but it's also interesting how many small chapters or asides have later developed into full titles. For example, he has a few lines comment about the historical difficulty in addressing the topic of ninjas and alleged assassinations, a difficulty he presumably overcame when he later wrote the fascinating Ninja . (Quite possibly the winner of the " Historical topic most abused by the entertainment industry. " award.) On that note, the chapter with most material new to me dealt with medieval Japan's only overseas war, the invasion of Korea in the late C16th. Absolutely fascinating how different history might have been if Admiral Yi hadn't been so lucky when it came to surviving musket fire. so onto my reading list goes his 2002 title Samurai Invasion: Japan's Korean War 1592-1598 .

The Samurai: A Military History contains exactly what you would expect. It's a condensed history of Japan, from the creation myths to the Meiji Restoration. This is a military history only in that for the majority of Japanese history government and power went hand in hand with military might. The focus is primarily on samurai, but of course the classical samurai class was a relatively late invention. Equal coverage is given to the early bushi, the warrior monks, the Imperial Court, the role of religions (Buddhism and later Christiantity) and the impact of the Portuguese on society. The bulk of the discussion covers, naturally, the colourful periods of the Gempei War, the Sengoku-jidai period and the re-unification and emergence of the Tokugawa Shogunate. What makes Japanese history so interesting to me is that where Western military history often deals with vast impersonal armies (enlivened primarily by their leaders), discussion of logistics and fairly dry, to non-military minds, discussion of strategies, Japanese wars, even in the large scale, are still absolutely dominated by stories of individual daring. Admittedly some of those around the Gempei War in particular are liable to be more legend than fact, but when they're as entertaining as Benkei and Yoshitsune, who cares? Turnbull manages to strike a nice balance here, he provides a solid base of historical analysis, laying out the various political, social and economic forces behind events, while still managing to get in every juicy incident he can. His writing isn't half bad either, tending to be crisply paced and strong on explanation without breaking the central narrative. He's also not averse to quoting the Heiki Monogatari, or similarly dramatic sources, at every opportunity, which is very enjoyable.

About the only criticism I have is that this book just wasn't long enough. In particular the later chapters whoosh by there's a lot of detail on the battle of Sekigahara itself, but from 1600 onwards Turnbull is in fast-forward mode, providing a very terse summary of events. I almost have to wonder if there was an issue fitting to the original page-count? However, I enjoyed his closing remarks, where he contrasts the popular picture of the Samurai with the reality. He's quick to point out that the Hagakure and similar works on Bushido tend to originate from a very late period, and one in which Samurai were practically redundant after a century of peace. I was reminded of the tone of Karl Friday's Samurai, Warfare and the State in Early Medieval Japan as Turnbull runs down the list of 'Samurai values' and has some difficulty reconciling them with the history he's been telling.

Recommended as an excellent introduction to Japanese history, but probably not as good a choice for a casual reader as one of his later, and more lavishly illustrated, titles.


Stephen Turnbull

Samurai armies
The Mongols
The Book of the Samurai
Samurai Warriors
Samurai Warlords: The Book of the Daimyo
Ninja: The True Story of Japan's Secret Warrior Cult
The Samurai: A Military History
Samurai Warfare
The Samurai Sourcebook
Nagashino 1575: Slaughter at the Barricades
Ashigaru 1467–1649: Weapons, Armour, Tactics
Samurai Invasion: Japan's Korean War, 1592–1598
War in Japan: 1467–1615
Japanese castles, 1540–1640
Japanese Warrior Monks AD 949–1603
Kawanakajima 1553–1564: Samurai Power Struggle
Ninja AD 1460–1650
Samurai Commanders
Samurai: the world of the warrior
The Samurai Swordsman: Master of War


Stephen Richard Turnbull is a historian specializing in eastern military history, especially the Samurai of Japan. He attended Cambridge University where he gained his first degree. He currently holds an MA in Theology, MA in Military History and a PhD from the University of Leeds where he is currently a lecturer in Far Eastern Religions. He has also written a number of books on other medieval topics. He was on the editorial board of the short-lived Medieval History Magazine (2003–2005), which was published in association with the Royal Armouries. He is also a consultant for the widely successful PC game Shogun: Total War and it anticipated sequel Shogun 2: Total War, both products of Creative Assembly.


Samurai: The World of the Warrior by Stephen Turnbull – eBook Details

Before you start Complete Samurai: The World of the Warrior PDF EPUB by Stephen Turnbull Download, you can read below technical ebook details:

  • Full Book Name: Samurai: The World of the Warrior
  • Author Name: Stephen Turnbull
  • Book Genre: Asian Literature, Combat, Cultural, Historical, History, Japan, Japanese History, Japanese Literature, Martial Arts, Medieval, Military, Military History, Nonfiction, Reference, Research
  • ISBN # 9781841769516
  • Date of Publication: 2001-10-28
  • PDF / EPUB File Name: Samurai_-_Stephen_Turnbull.pdf, Samurai_-_Stephen_Turnbull.epub
  • PDF File Size: 36 MB
  • EPUB File Size: 34 MB