Irish adventurer “Captain Blood” steals crown jewels

Irish adventurer “Captain Blood” steals crown jewels

In London, Thomas Blood, an Irish adventurer better known as “Captain Blood,” is captured attempting to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London.

Blood, a Parliamentarian during the English Civil War, was deprived of his estate in Ireland with the restoration of the English monarchy in 1660. In 1663, he put himself at the head of a plot to seize Dublin Castle from supporters of King Charles II, but the plot was discovered and his accomplices executed. He escaped capture. In 1671, he hatched a bizarre plan to steal the new Crown Jewels, which had been refashioned by Charles II because most of the original jewels were melted down after Charles I’s execution in 1649.

On May 9, 1671, Blood, disguised as a priest, managed to convince the Jewel House keeper to hand over his pistols. Blood’s three accomplices then emerged from the shadows, and together they forced their way into the Jewel House. However, they were caught in the act when the keeper’s son showed up unexpectedly, and an alarm went out to the Tower guard. One man shoved the Royal Orb down his breeches while Blood flattened the Crown with a mallet and tried to run off with it. The Tower guards apprehended and arrested all four of the perpetrators, and Blood was brought before the king. Charles was so impressed with Blood’s audacity that, far from punishing him, he restored his estates in Ireland and made him a member of his court with an annual pension.

Captain Blood became a colorful celebrity all across the kingdom, and when he died in 1680 his body had to be exhumed in order to persuade the public that he was actually dead.


Known as one of the most audacious thieves in British history Colonel Thomas Blood attempted to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London using a disguise and plan that turned into madness and ended in arrest.

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Blood was born in County Clare, sometime around 1618, according to Clare Library. He was the son of a prosperous English blacksmith with lands in Meath and County Wicklow. Blood was raised in Meath. His grandfather Edmund Blood of Kilnaboy and Applevale was a Member of Parliament.

In 1642 the English Civil War broke out and Blood traveled to England to fight alongside King Charles I. However when it became clear to him that Oliver Cromwell was going to win, he swapped sides and joined the Roundheads.

After Charles I's defeat, in 1653, Blood was made the Justice of the Peace and granted a large estate. However, in 1660 when Charles returned to the throne Blood fled back to Ireland with his wife and son.

In Ireland Blood was joined with defeated and disgruntled Cromwellians who attempted to take seize Dublin Castle and take its governor, Lord Ormonde prisoner. This plot failed and Blood was forced to fell to Holland, with a price on his head for his crimes. He was now one of the most wanted men in England.

As the Clare Library’s research puts it:

“Thomas was a mysterious character. He was linked to various dissident groups who were hostile to the Government, though he was also involved in Government Counsels. It is thought that he worked as a Double-Agent, playing both sides against each other.”

Despite the bounty on his head Blood returned to England taking on the name Ayloffe. He even practiced medicine at a doctor in Romford, in east London.

The long con for the Crown Jewels

In 1670, after yet another failed attempt at kidnapping Lord Ormonde, Blood turned his focus towards a scheme to steal the Crown Jewels.

The Jewels were protected, at the Tower of London, behind a metal grille. The Keeper of the Jewels, Talbot Edwards, lived on the same floor, the basement, with his family.

Blood donned the disguise of a “parson” and went to see the Jewels. He became friendly with their Keeper, Edwards, and returned at a later date with a woman who was pretending to be this “parson’s” wife. Just as the visitors were leaving the fake wife had a violent stomach ache and was taken to the Edwards quarters to rest.

Four days later Blood returned, still disguised as the parson, with four pairs of white gloves for Mrs. Talbot, to show their gratitude. The families became friends and there were even discussions of Edwards pretty daughter meeting up with the parson’s wealthy nephew.

On May 9, 1671, the parson, along with his “nephew” and two other men made visited Edwards. While the young nephew chatted with Edward’s daughter the others in the party expressed an interest in viewing the Crown Jewels.

Edwards led the way and unlocked the metal door. At that very moment, Blood knocked him out cold, from behind.

The grille was removed from in front of the jewels and the crown, orb, and scepter were taken out. The crown was flattened with a mallet and put into a bag. The orb was stuffed down Blood’s trousers. The scepter, however, was too long to put in a bag so Blood’s brother-in-law, named Hunt, tried to saw it in half.

When Edwards regained consciousness he shorted “Murder, Treason!”

An engraving of the attempted theft of the Crown Jewels.

Blood and his merry men dropped the scepter and tried to run. Blood was arrested having tried to flee the Iron-Gate, after trying to shoot one of the guards.

Once in custody Blood refused to answer questions. Instead, he repeated, “I’ll answer to none but the King himself.”

Irish charm saves his neck

Quite amazingly Blood was right. Charles I was known to have a penchant for scoundrels and Blood was confident that his Irish charm might actually and literally save his neck yet again.

At the Palace, Blood was questioned by King Charles, Prince Rupert, The Duke of York, and other members of the royal family.

Charles was indeed amused at Blood’s audacity. His amusement was noted especially when Blood told him that the Crown Jewels were not worth the £100,000 as they were valued at, but only £6,000.

When the King asked, “What if I should give you your life?” Blood replied, “I would endeavor to deserve it, Sire!”

Not only was Blood pardoned but, much to the disgust of Lord Ormonde, he was also gifted land in Ireland work £500 a year.

Blood, a turncoat, con man, and thief, became a familiar figure around London and made frequent appearances at the Royal Court.

Once again how Blood got away with his crimes is questioned. The Clare Library askes again if Blood was a secret agent.

“The mystery remains as to what Colonel Blood had done to gain the King's pardon. At some time in his life Blood must have served the King well as a Secret Agent. This was his reward.”

Luck of the Irish runs out… finally

In 1679, Blood’s phenomenal luck ran out. The Clare man quarreled with his former patron, the Duke of Buckingham, who had demanded £10,000 in compensation for some insulting remarks Blood had made about his character.

Blood became ill in 1680 the Duke never got paid. Blood died on August 24, 1680, of that year at the age of 62.


Captain Blood steals crown jewels

In London, Thomas Blood, an Irish adventurer better known as “Captain Blood,” is captured attempting to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London.

Blood, a Parliamentarian during the English Civil War, was deprived of his estate in Ireland with the restoration of the English monarchy in 1660. In 1663, he put himself at the head of a plot to seize Dublin Castle from supporters of King Charles II, but the plot was discovered and his accomplices executed. He escaped capture. In 1671, he hatched a bizarre plan to steal the new Crown Jewels, which had been refashioned by Charles II because most of the original jewels were melted down after Charles I’s execution in 1649.

On May 9, 1671, Blood, disguised as a priest, managed to convince the Jewel House keeper to hand over his pistols. Blood’s three accomplices then emerged from the shadows, and together they forced their way into the Jewel House. However, they were caught in the act when the keeper’s son showed up unexpectedly, and an alarm went out to the Tower guard. One man shoved the Royal Orb down his breeches while Blood flattened the Crown with a mallet and tried to run off with it. The Tower guards apprehended and arrested all four of the perpetrators, and Blood was brought before the king. Charles was so impressed with Blood’s audacity that, far from punishing him, he restored his estates in Ireland and made him a member of his court with an annual pension.

Captain Blood became a colorful celebrity all across the kingdom, and when he died in 1680 his body had to be exhumed in order to persuade the public that he was actually dead.


Contents

Sources suggest that Blood was born in County Clare, in the Kingdom of Ireland, [3] the son of a successful land-owning blacksmith of English descent, and was partly raised at Sarney, near Dunboyne, in County Meath. He was apparently a Presbyterian. [4] His family was respectable and prosperous (by the standards of the time) his father held lands in the Counties Clare, Meath and Wicklow. His grandfather was a member of the Irish Parliament, and had lived at Kilnaboy Castle (also in County Clare). [5] He received his education in Lancashire, England. At the age of 20, he married Maria Holcroft, the daughter of John Holcroft of Holcroft Hall, Culcheth, Cheshire, and Golborne, Lancashire, and returned to Ireland. [6]

At the outbreak of the First English Civil War in 1642, Blood returned to England and initially took up arms with the Royalist forces loyal to Charles I. As the conflict progressed he switched sides and became a lieutenant in Oliver Cromwell's Roundheads. [5] In 1653 at the cessation of hostilities Cromwell awarded Blood land grants as payment for his service and appointed him a justice of the peace. Following the Restoration of King Charles II to the Crowns of the Three Kingdoms in 1660, Blood fled with his family to Ireland. [5] [6] The confiscations and restitutions under the Act of Settlement 1662 (which sought to cancel and annul some of the grants of land and real properties allocated as reward to new holders being Cromwellians under the Act of Settlement 1652) brought Blood to financial ruin, and in return Blood sought to unite his fellow Cromwellians in Ireland to cause insurrection. [6]

As part of the expression of discontent, Blood conspired to storm Dublin Castle, usurp the government, and kidnap James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, for ransom. On the eve of the attempt, the plot was foiled. Blood managed to evade the authorities by hiding with his countrymen in the mountains, and ultimately managed to escape to the United Dutch Provinces in the Low Country. A few of Blood's collaborators were captured and executed. As a result, some historians speculated that Blood swore vengeance against Ormonde. [6]

While in the Dutch Republic, Blood gained the favour of Admiral de Ruyter, an opponent of the English forces in the Anglo-Dutch Wars, and was implicated in the Scottish Pentland Rising of 1666 by the Scottish Presbyterian Covenanters. [6] At some point during this period, Blood became associated with the wealthy George Villiers, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, who 19th-century commentators believed used Blood as a means to punish his own political and social adversaries, since his own class ranking did not allow him to meet them "in the field". [2]

In 1670, despite his status as a wanted man, Blood returned to England and is believed to have taken the name Ayloffe and practised as a doctor or an apothecary in Romford Market, east of London. [5] A second attempt, this time on the life of the Duke of Ormonde, followed.

Since Ormonde's return to England, he had taken up residence at Clarendon House. [7] Blood had followed Ormonde's movements and noted that he frequently returned late in the evening accompanied by a small number of footmen. On the night of 6 December 1670, Blood and his accomplices attacked Ormonde while the latter travelled St James's Street. Ormonde was dragged from his coach, bound to one of Blood's henchmen, and taken on horseback along Piccadilly with the intention of hanging him at Tyburn. The gang pinned a paper to Ormonde's chest spelling out their reasons for his capture and murder. [6] [7] With one of his servants who had given chase on horseback, Ormonde succeeded in freeing himself and escaped. The plot's secrecy meant that Blood was not suspected of the crime, despite a reward being offered for the capture of the attempted assassins. In the King's presence, James's son, Thomas Butler, accused the Duke of Buckingham of being behind the crime. Thomas threatened to shoot Buckingham dead in revenge, if his father, James, was murdered. [2]

Theft of the Crown Jewels Edit

Blood did not lie low for long, and within six months he made his notorious attempt to steal the Crown Jewels. In April or May 1671 he visited the Tower of London dressed as a parson and accompanied by a female companion pretending to be his wife. The Crown Jewels could be viewed by the payment of a fee to the custodian. While viewing the Crown Jewels, Blood's "wife" feigned a stomach complaint and begged the newly appointed Master of the Jewel House, 77-year-old Talbot Edwards, to fetch her some spirits. [5] [6] [7] Given the proximity of the jewel keeper's domestic quarters to the site of the commotion, Edwards' wife invited them upstairs to their apartment to recover, after which Blood and his wife thanked the Edwardses and left. [6] [7]

Over the following days Blood returned to the Tower to visit the Edwardses and presented Mrs Edwards with four pairs of white gloves as a gesture of thanks. As Blood became ingratiated with the family, an offer was made for a fictitious nephew of Blood's to marry the Edwardses' daughter, who, Blood alleged, would be eligible, by virtue of the marriage, to an income of several hundred pounds. [6] [7]

On 9 May 1671, in furtherance of the deception, Blood convinced Edwards to show the jewels to him, his supposed nephew, and two of his friends while they waited for a dinner that Mrs Edwards was to put on for Blood and his companions. The jewel keeper's apartment was in Martin Tower above a basement where the jewels were kept behind a metal grille. Reports suggest that Blood's accomplices carried canes that concealed rapier blades, daggers, and pocket pistols. In entering the Jewel House, one of the men made a pretence of standing watch outside while the others joined Edwards and Blood. The door was closed and a cloak thrown over Edwards, who was struck with a mallet, knocked to the floor, bound, gagged and stabbed to subdue him. [6] [7]

After removing the grille, Blood used the mallet to flatten St. Edward's Crown so that he could hide it beneath his clerical coat. Another conspirator, Blood's brother-in-law Hunt, filed the Sceptre with the Cross in two (as it did not fit in their bag), while the third man, Perrot, stuffed the Sovereign's Orb down his trousers. Meanwhile Edwards refused to stay subdued and fought against his bindings. Accounts vary as to whether Edwards' struggle caused sufficient disturbance to raise the alarm or whether the attempt was foiled in more fortuitous circumstances. [2]

Popular reports describe Edwards' son, Wythe, returning from military service in Flanders, happening upon the attempted theft. [6] [7] At the door of the Jewel House, Wythe was met by the impromptu guard, who challenged him, before the young Edwards entered and went upstairs. The "guard" then alerted his fellow gang members. At around the same time, the elder Edwards managed to free his gag, and raised the alarm shouting, "Treason! Murder! The crown is stolen!"

As Blood and his gang fled to their horses waiting at St Catherine's Gate, they dropped the sceptre and fired on the warders who attempted to stop them, wounding one. [8] One drawbridge guard was struck with fear and failed to discharge his musket. As they ran along the Tower wharf it is said they joined the calls for alarm to confuse the guards until they were chased down by Captain Beckman, brother-in-law of the younger Edwards. Although Blood shot at him, he missed and was captured before reaching the Iron Gate. Having fallen from his cloak, the crown was found while Blood refused to give up, struggling with his captors and declaring, "It was a gallant attempt, however unsuccessful! It was for a crown!" [6] [7] The globe and orb were recovered although several stones were missing and others were loose. Hunt and Perrot were also taken, but not punished. [8]

Aftermath Edit

Following his capture, Blood refused to answer to anyone but the King and was consequently taken to the palace in chains, where he was questioned by King Charles, Prince Rupert, and others. King Charles asked Blood, "What if I should give you your life?", and Blood replied, "I would endeavour to deserve it, Sire!" [5] To the disgust of Ormonde, Blood was not only pardoned but also given land in Ireland worth £500 a year. In contrast, Edwards' family was awarded less than £300 by the King, a sum which was never paid in full, and he returned to his duties at the Tower regaling visitors with his tales of the attempted theft. He died in 1674 and his tomb rests in the chapel of St Peter's Ad Vincula, at the Tower of London.

The reasons for the King's pardon are unknown. Some historians have speculated that the King may have feared an uprising in revenge by followers of Blood, who were thought to have taken an oath to their leader. [7] Others speculate that the King had a fondness for audacious scoundrels such as Blood, and that he was amused by the Irishman's claim that the jewels were worth only £6,000 as opposed to the £100,000 at which the Crown had valued them. [5]

There is also a suggestion that the King was flattered and amused by Blood's revelation that he had previously intended to kill him while he was bathing in the Thames but had been swayed otherwise, having found himself in "awe of majesty." [6] It has also been suggested that his actions may have had the connivance of the King, because the King was very short of money at the time. [9]

Following his pardon, Blood became a familiar figure around London and made frequent appearances at Court, where he was employed to advocate in the claims of suitors to the Crown. In John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester's History of Insipids, he wrote of Blood:

Blood, that wears treason in his face,
Villain complete in parson's gown,
How much he is at court in grace
For stealing Ormond and the crown!
Since loyalty does no man good,
Let's steal the King, and outdo Blood!

In 1679 Blood fell into dispute with the Duke of Buckingham, his former patron, and Buckingham sued Blood for £10,000, for insulting remarks Blood had made about his character. In the proceedings that followed, Blood was convicted by the King's Bench in 1680 and granted bail, although he never paid the damages. [5]

Blood was released from prison in July 1680 but had fallen into a coma by 22 August. [10] He died on 24 August at his home in Bowling Alley, Westminster. His body was buried in the churchyard of St Margaret's Church (now Christchurch Gardens) near St. James's Park. It is believed that his body was exhumed by the authorities for confirmation: such was his reputation for trickery, it was suspected he might have faked his death and funeral to avoid paying his debt to Buckingham. [11] Blood's epitaph read:

Here lies the man who boldly hath run through
More villainies than England ever knew
And ne'er to any friend he had was true.
Here let him then by all unpitied lie,
And let's rejoice his time was come to die.

Legacy Edit

Blood's son Holcroft Blood became a distinguished military engineer rising to the rank of Brigadier-General he commanded the Duke of Marlborough's artillery at the Battle of Blenheim. [12] : 381 Descendants including General Bindon Blood, civil engineer William Bindon Blood, Maurice Petherick, and Brian Inglis, had distinguished careers in British and Irish society.


The Theft of the Crown Jewels

One of the most audacious rogues in history was Colonel Blood, known as the ‘Man who stole the Crown Jewels’.

Thomas Blood was an Irishman, born in County Meath in 1618, the son of a prosperous blacksmith. He came from a good family, his grandfather who lived in Kilnaboy Castle was a Member of Parliament.

The English Civil War broke out in 1642 and Blood came to England to fight for Charles I, but when it became apparent that Cromwell was going to win, he promptly changed sides and joined the Roundheads.

When Charles I was defeated in 1653 Blood was made a Justice of the Peace and was granted a large estate, but when Charles II returned to the throne in 1660 Blood fled to Ireland with his wife and son.

In Ireland he joined a plot with the disgruntled Cromwellians and attempted to seize Dublin Castle and take the Governor, Lord Ormonde prisoner. This plot failed and he had to flee to Holland, now with a price on his head. in spite of being one of the most wanted men in England, Blood returned in 1670 taking the name Ayloffe and practised as a doctor in Romford!

After another botched attempt to kidnap Lord Ormonde in 1670, where Blood narrowly escaped capture, Blood decided on a bold scheme to steal the Crown Jewels.

The Crown Jewels were kept at the Tower of London in a basement protected by a large metal grille. The Keeper of the Jewels was Talbot Edwards who lived with his family on the floor above the basement.

One day in 1671 Blood, disguised as a ‘parson’ went to see the Crown Jewels and became friendly with Edwards, returning at a later date with his wife. As the visitors were leaving, Mrs. Blood had a violent stomach-ache and was taken to Edward’s apartment to rest. The grateful ‘Parson Blood’ returned a few days later with 4 pairs of white gloves for Mrs. Edwards in appreciation of her kindness to his wife.

The Edwards family and ‘Parson Blood’ became close friends and met frequently. Edwards had a pretty daughter and was delighted when ‘Parson Blood’ proposed a meeting between his wealthy nephew and Edward’s daughter.

On 9th May 1671, ‘Parson Blood’ arrived at 7am. with his ‘nephew’ and two other men. While the ‘nephew’ was getting to know Edward’s daughter the others in the party expressed a desire to see the Crown Jewels.

Edwards led the way downstairs and unlocked the door to the room where they were kept. At that moment Blood knocked him unconscious with a mallet and stabbed him with a sword.

The grille was removed from in front of the jewels and the crown, orb and sceptre were taken out. The crown was flattened with the mallet and stuffed into a bag, and the orb stuffed down Blood’s breeches. The sceptre was too long to go into the bag so Blood’s brother-in-law Hunt tried to saw it in half!

At that point Edwards regained consciousness and began to shout “Murder, Treason!”. Blood and his accomplices dropped the sceptre and attempted to get away but Blood was arrested as he tried to leave the Tower by the Iron-Gate, after unsuccessfully trying to shoot one of the guards.

In custody Blood refused to answer questions, instead repeating stubbornly, “I’ll answer to none but the King himself”.

Blood knew that the King had a reputation for liking bold scoundrels and reckoned that his considerable Irish charm would save his neck as it had done several times before in his life.

Blood was taken to the Palace where he was questioned by King Charles, Prince Rupert, The Duke of York and other members of the royal family. King Charles was amused at Blood’s audacity when Blood told him that the Crown Jewels were not worth the £100,000 they were valued at, but only £6,000!

The King asked Blood “What if I should give you your life?” and Blood replied humbly, “I would endeavour to deserve it, Sire!”

Blood was not only pardoned, to the disgust of Lord Ormonde, but was given Irish lands worth £500 a year! Blood became a familiar figure around London and made frequent appearances at Court.

Edwards who recovered from his wounds, was rewarded by the King and lived to a ripe old age, recounting his part in the story of the theft of the Jewels to all the visitors to the Tower.

In 1679 Blood’s phenomenal luck ran out. He quarrelled with his former patron the Duke of Buckingham. Buckingham demanded £10,000 for some insulting remarks Blood had made about his character. As Blood became ill in 1680 the Duke never got paid, as Blood died on August 24th of that year at the age of 62.

The Crown Jewels have never been stolen since that day – as no other thief has tried to match the audacity of Colonel Blood!


Colonel Blood and the theft of the Crown Jewels

There has been one near successful attempt to steal the Crown Jewels, this took place in 1671 and was masterminded by Colonel Blood. Blood was an Irish adventurer, who already had several daring exploits to his discredit, one of which was a plot to seize Dublin Castle. At the time of the Restoration, his lands had been confiscated, leaving him bitter and penniless.

The Martin Tower

Blood's plan commenced by making himself familiar to the Assistant Keeper of the Jewels, a seventy-six year old ex-soldier called Talbot Edwards who lived with his wife and family in the Martin Tower (left) at the Tower of London. To supplement his wages, Talbot was allowed to show the jewels to visitors for a fee. Dressed convincingly as a parson, Blood came accompanied with a woman whom he addressed as his wife. She expressed a wish to see the crown and Edwards obliged. At this time the jewels were stored in a cupboard behind a wired grille in the Martin Tower. Having seen the jewels, the lady was seized with a violently upset stomach. This gained the pair admission to Edwards' private apartments, where the kindly Edwards lead them and allowed her to recuperate on a bed.

The 'parson' returned a few days later, bringing a gift of a pair of gloves as a gesture of thanks to Mrs Edwards, he was warmly received by the unsuspecting couple and invited to call again. The next time he did, Blood remarked that the Edwards had a daughter of marriageable age and raised the possibility that a marriage could be arranged between her and a nephew of his, whom, to whet their appetite, he added, was possessed of three hundred a year inland. The gullible Edwards' expressed themselves very interested and invited their visitor to come for dinner a few days later.

During his following visit, Blood piously said grace over the meal and expressed his admiration for a case of pistols, which he persuaded Edwards to sell to him. He arranged to return with the prospective husband on the morning of 9th May. He duly arrived on the appointed day, accompanied by his 'nephew' (in reality his son.) and two others, whom he introduced as friends. His wife would be arriving soon, he explained and in the meantime, to while away the time, he suggested that Edwards showed them the jewels. As Edwards reached the bottom of the stairs, he was overwhelmed and gagged. The old man struggled to free himself and made as much noise as he could. He was knocked about the head with a mallet, bravely, he continued to vigorously resist until one of the villains stabbed him in the stomach.

They then set to work removing the regalia from the cupboard and concealing them under their clothing. Blood himself crushed the crown to make it less conspicuous under his parsons cloak. Just as it looked likely that their audacious plan was likely to succeed, Edwards' son returned unexpectedly and raised the alarm. The gang was captured as they tried to get away and all the jewels recovered.

Edwards was promised a reward of two hundred pounds but never received it, the unfortunate man died of his wounds shortly after. Blood himself fared much better, King Charles II, intrigued by accounts of his exploits, wished to see the famous rogue. Disarmingly, he was never punished and was restored to his confiscated estates in Ireland, which lead to whispers that the merry monarch himself was involved in the plot in some underhand way. John Evelyn gathered that Colonel Blood had been taken into the Kings service as a spy.


Tag: Thomas Blood

Biên dịch: Nguyễn Thị Kim Phụng

Vào ngày này năm 1671, tại London, Thomas Blood, một người ưa mạo hiểm, nổi tiếng với biệt danh “Đại úy Blood” (Captain Blood), đã bị bắt khi cố gắng ăn cắp Vương miện Hoàng gia khỏi Tháp London.

Blood, một nghị sĩ trong thời kỳ Nội chiến Anh, đã bị mất tài sản đất đai ở Ireland sau khi chế độ quân chủ Anh được phục hồi vào năm 1660. Năm 1663, ông tự lập mưu chiếm Lâu đài Dublin từ tay những người ủng hộ Vua Charles II, nhưng âm mưu bị phát hiện và đồng bọn của Blood đã bị xử tử còn ông thì trốn thoát. Năm 1671, ông tiếp tục lập thêm một kế hoạch kỳ lạ khác nhằm đánh cắp Vương miện Hoàng gia, vừa được Charles II cho đúc lại vì hầu hết các trang sức của hoàng gia đã bị đem ra nấu chảy sau khi Charles I bị hành quyết vào năm 1649. Continue reading 󈫹/05/1671: ‘Đại úy Blood’ đánh cắp Vương miện Hoàng gia Anh”


Tag: Captain Blood

Biên dịch: Nguyễn Thị Kim Phụng

Vào ngày này năm 1671, tại London, Thomas Blood, một người ưa mạo hiểm, nổi tiếng với biệt danh “Đại úy Blood” (Captain Blood), đã bị bắt khi cố gắng ăn cắp Vương miện Hoàng gia khỏi Tháp London.

Blood, một nghị sĩ trong thời kỳ Nội chiến Anh, đã bị mất tài sản đất đai ở Ireland sau khi chế độ quân chủ Anh được phục hồi vào năm 1660. Năm 1663, ông tự lập mưu chiếm Lâu đài Dublin từ tay những người ủng hộ Vua Charles II, nhưng âm mưu bị phát hiện và đồng bọn của Blood đã bị xử tử còn ông thì trốn thoát. Năm 1671, ông tiếp tục lập thêm một kế hoạch kỳ lạ khác nhằm đánh cắp Vương miện Hoàng gia, vừa được Charles II cho đúc lại vì hầu hết các trang sức của hoàng gia đã bị đem ra nấu chảy sau khi Charles I bị hành quyết vào năm 1649. Continue reading 󈫹/05/1671: ‘Đại úy Blood’ đánh cắp Vương miện Hoàng gia Anh”


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Snippets of Irish History by Conor Cunneen IrishmanSpeaks

Conor is a Chicago based Motivational Humorous Business Speaker, Author and History buff.

1671: Irishman Steals Crown Jewels

Clare born Colonel Thomas Blood (1618-1680) steals the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London, but is captured very soon after. Blood was an interesting character by any standard. He was an adventurer, a double agent during the Civil War between the Royalist and Roundheads and of course thief.

Following the theft, he refused to speak to anyone except King Charles who not only agreed to meet with him, but also pardoned the Irishman and provided him with land in Ireland AND a pension. It has never been satisfactorily been explained how he was able to turn what should have been a treasonous act (and death penalty) into lifetime Crown generosity.

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Charles Kickham, rebel, novelist, poet, journalist and member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood is born in County Tipperary. Kickham was a contributor to the Irish People, the organ of the Fenian Irish Republican Brotherhood which the English authorities deemed seditious. He also authored a number of novels including the critically acclaimed Knocknagow.

Kickham was involved in the failed (some might say farcical) Young Ireland Rebellion of 1848. In 1865, following another effort at rebellion, he was sentenced to 14 years penal servitude. A man of great intelligence, at his sentencing he stated “I believe, my lords, I have said enough already. I will only add that I am convicted for doing nothing but my duty. I have endeavoured to serve Ireland, and now I am prepared to suffer for Ireland.”

Kickham was released from prison due to ill health in 1869. He continued to work with the Irish Nationalist movement until his death in 1882.

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1916: James Connolly Visited by Wife and Daughter in Kilmainham Jail

James Connolly’s wife and daughter visit him in Kilmainham jail where he lies seriously wounded. Daughter Nora wrote later in Portrait of a Rebel Father:

“On Tuesday I went with mother. There were soldiers on guard at the top of the stairs and in the small alcove leading to Papa’s room. They were fully armed and as they stood guard they had their bayonets fixed. In the room there was an R.A.M.C. officer with him all the time. His wounded leg was resting in a cage. He was weak and pale and his voice was very low. Mother asked was he suffering much pain. “No, but I’ve been court-martialled today. They propped me up in bed. The strain was very great.” She knew then that if they had court-martialled him while unable to sit up in bed, they would not hesitate to shoot him while he was wounded. Asked how he had got the wound he said: “It was while I had gone out to place some men at a certain point. On my way back I was shot above the ankle by a sniper. Both bones in my leg are shattered. I was too far away for the men I had just placed to see me and was too far from the Post Office to be seen. So I had to crawl till I was seen. The loss of blood was great. They couldn’t get it staunched.” He was very cheerful, talking about plans for the future, giving no sign that sentence had been pronounced an hour before we were admitted.

He was very proud of his men. “It was a good clean fight. The cause cannot die now. The fight will put an end to recruiting. Irishmen will now realize the absurdity of fighting for the freedom of another country while their own is enslaved.”

Interview with James Connolly Daughter – Nora

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This history is written by Irish author, business keynote speaker and award winning humorist IrishmanSpeaks – Conor Cunneen. If you spot any inaccuracies or wish to make a comment, please don’t hesitate to contact us via the comment button.

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