The Seleukid Empire of Antiochus III 223-187 BC, John D. Grainger

The Seleukid Empire of Antiochus III 223-187 BC, John D. Grainger

The Seleukid Empire of Antiochus III 223-187 BC, John D. Grainger

The Seleukid Empire of Antiochus III 223-187 BC, John D. Grainger

The Seleucid Empire was both the largest and the least stable of the empires that were carved out of the empire of Alexander the Great. Its greatest leader was probably its founder, Seleucus I, but close behind was Antiochus III. He inherited an empire that was in serious decline (his father was murdered on campaign in Asia Minor and large parts of the Empire had become independent) and managed to regain control of large areas that had been claimed by his predecessors, most famously in the east, but also in Coele Syria and Asia Minor. Antiochus is such a major figure that he is given an entire volume in NN's three volume history of the Seleucid Empire, and he rather deserves that accolade.

The author looks beyond Antiochus's military successes and failures and also examines his attempts to improve the long term stability of his Empire. This included treating his eldest son as a co-ruler (although clearly subordinate to Antiochus), and attempts to include his son in diplomatic agreements, so that they would outlive Antiochus. Although Antiochus successfully restored Seleukid control of much of the original Empire, he failed in his biggest challenge - to give the Seleukid Empire a more stable structure that would allow it to survive under less able monarchs. Some of his work on this is visible to us - the establishment of a religious cult devoted to the Imperial family for instance, but he failed to give the Empire any central institutions, or a workable government, and after his death the story is one of near constant decline, the loss of territory (at first on the outer edges of Empire, but eventually in its Syrian heart), civil wars and breakaway kingdoms, before eventually the last remnants of the Empire were swept away by a decree of Pompey the Great.

To a certain extent Antiochus's life feels like it falls into two very different parts. The early part of his life, where he was dealing with the Ptolomies, the eastern satrapies or the minor powers of Asia Minor feels like it belongs to the period of Alexander the Great. The second part of his life, when the Romans came onto the scene, feels rather more familiar. One gets the impression that Antiochus didn't really understand the Romans - his intervention in mainland Greece in the aftermath of their wars with Philip V of Macedon were always likely to trigger a military reaction from the Romans, but he doesn't appear to appreciated that. Having been defeated in Greece, he attempted to make peace, a move that was again unlikely to succeed (and he had the advantage of having Hannibal at his court by this time).

This is a useful biography of a major figure in the Hellenistic World, bringing him to life in his own right, rather than as just another stepping stone during Rome's rise to dominance in the Ancient World.

Chapters
1 – The New King's Survival
2 – The Fourth Syrian War
3 – Akhais and Attalos
4 – The Expedition to the East
5 – Asia Minor Again
6 – The Fifth Syrian War: Syrian
7 – The Fifth Syrian War: Asia Minor
8 – Thrace, Peace, and the Romans
9 – The Roman War: Greece
10 – The Roman War: Asia
11 – Return to the East

Author: John D. Grainger
Edition: Hardcover
Pages: 228
Publisher: Pen & Sword Military
Year: 2015



Antiochus III the Great

Antiochus III the Great ( / æ n ˈ t aɪ ə k ə s / Greek: Ἀντίoχoς Ántíochos c. 241 – 3 July 187 BC, ruled April/June 222 – 3 July 187 BC) [1] was a Greek Hellenistic king and the 6th ruler of the Seleucid Empire. [2] [3] [4] He ruled over the region of Syria and large parts of the rest of western Asia towards the end of the 3rd century BC. Rising to the throne at the age of eighteen in 222 BC, his early campaigns against the Ptolemaic Kingdom were unsuccessful, but in the following years Antiochus gained several military victories and substantially expanded the empire's territory. His traditional designation, the Great, reflects an epithet he assumed. He also assumed the title Basileus Megas (Greek for "Great King"), the traditional title of the Persian kings. A militarily active ruler, Antiochus restored much of the territory of the Seleucid Empire, before suffering a serious setback, towards the end of his reign, in his war against Rome.

Declaring himself the "champion of Greek freedom against Roman domination", Antiochus III waged a four-year war against the Roman Republic beginning in mainland Greece in the autumn of 192 BC [5] [6] before being decisively defeated at the Battle of Magnesia. He died three years later on campaign in the east.


The Seleukid Empire of Antiochus III 223-187 BC, John D. Grainger - History

The second volume in John Grainger's history of the Seleukid Empire is devoted to the reign of Antiochus III.

Too often remembered only as the man who lost to the Romans at Magnesia, Antiochus is here revealed as one of the most powerful and capable rulers of the age. Having emerged from civil war in 223 as the sole survivor of the Seleukid dynasty, he shouldered the burdens of a weakened and divided realm. Though defeated by Egypt in the Fourth Syrian War, he gradually restored full control over the empire. His great Eastern campaign took Macedonian arms back to India for the first time since Alexander's day and, returning west, he went on to conquer Thrace and finally wrest Syria from Ptolemaic control. Then came intervention in Greece and the clash with Rome leading to the defeat at Magnesia and the restrictive Peace of Apamea. Despite this, Antiochus remained ambitious, campaigning in the East again when he died in 187 BC the empire was still one of the most powerful states in the world.

About The Author

John D. Grainger is a former teacher turned professional historian. He has over thirty books to his name, divided between classical history and modern British political and military history. His previous books for Pen & Sword are Hellenistic and Roman Naval Wars Wars of the Maccabees Traditional Enemies: Britain’s War with Vichy France 1940-42 Roman Conquests: Egypt and Judaea Rome, Parthia and India: The Violent Emergence of a New World Order: 150-140 BC a three-volume history of the Seleukid Empire and British Campaigns in the South Atlantic 1805-1807.


The Seleukid Empire of Antiochus III 223-187 BC, John D. Grainger - History

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Overview

The second volume in John Grainger's history of the Seleukid Empire is devoted to the reign of Antiochus III. Too often remembered only as the man who lost to the Romans at Magnesia, Antiochus is here revealed as one of the most powerful and capable rulers of the age. Having emerged from civil war in 223 as the sole survivor of the Seleukid dynasty, he shouldered the burdens of a weakened and divided realm. Though defeated by Egypt in the Fourth Syrian War, he gradually restored full control over the empire. His great Eastern campaign took Macedonian arms back to India for the first time since Alexander's day and, returning west, he went on to conquer Thrace and finally wrest Syria from Ptolemaic control. 
Then came intervention in Greece and the clash with Rome leading to the defeat at Magnesia and the restrictive Peace of Apamea. Despite this, Antiochus remained ambitious, campaigning in the East again when he died in 187 BC the empire was still one of the most powerful states in the world.


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The second volume in John Grainger's history of the Seleukid Empire is devoted to the reign of Antiochus III. Too often remembered only as the man who lost to the Romans at Magnesia, Antiochus is here revealed as one of the most powerful and capable rulers of the age. Having emerged from civil war in 223 as the sole survivor of the Seleukid dynasty, he shouldered the burdens of a weakened and divided realm. Though defeated by Egypt in the Fourth Syrian War, he gradually restored full control over the empire. His great Eastern campaign took Macedonian arms back to India for the first time since Alexander's day and, returning west, he went on to conquer Thrace and finally wrest Syria from Ptolemaic control.

Then came intervention in Greece and the clash with Rome leading to the defeat at Magnesia and the restrictive Peace of Apamea. Despite this, Antiochus remained ambitious, campaigning in the East again when he died in 187 BC the empire was still one of the most powerful states in the world.

This is a useful biography of a major figure in the Hellenistic World, bringing him to life in his own right, rather than as just another stepping stone during Rome's rise to dominance in the Ancient World.

Read the complete review here.

History of War, John Rickard

Click here to read the full review

UNRV - reviewed by Philip Matyszak

We are, Grainger says, so 'hypnotised by the rise of Rome that we ignore the Seleukid and Ptolemaic interlude. His clear and fascinating account breaks this spell.

Minerva, March – April 2016 - Dominic Green

This is a well-researched and well written introduction to the topic and on those terms is well worth reading.

Slingshot

About John D Grainger

John D Grainger is a former teacher and historian of great experience with a particular interest in Classical and Hellenistic Greek history. His many previous works include the following for Pen & Sword: Hellenistic and Roman Naval Wars (2011) The Wars of the Maccabees (2012) Roman Conquests: Egypt and Judaea (2013) a three-part history of the Seleukid Empire (2014-16), King&rsquos and Kingship in the Hellenistic World 350-30 BC (2017), Antipater&rsquos Dynasty (2018), Ancient Dynasties (2019), The Roman Imperial Succession (March 2020) and The Galatians (August 2020). He lives in Evesham, Worcestershire.


Brings to life “a major figure in the Hellenistic World . . . in his own right, rather than as just another stepping stone during Rome’s rise” (HistoryOfWar.org).

The second volume in John Grainger’s history of the Seleukid Empire is devoted to the reign of Antiochus III. Too often remembered only as the man who lost to the Romans at Magnesia, Antiochus is here revealed as one of the most powerful and capable rulers of the age. Having emerged from civil war in 223 as the sole survivor of the Seleukid dynasty, he shouldered the burdens of a weakened and divided realm. Though defeated by Egypt in the Fourth Syrian War, he gradually restored full control over the empire. His great Eastern campaign took Macedonian arms back to India for the first time since Alexander’s day and, returning west, he went on to conquer Thrace and finally wrest Syria from Ptolemaic control.

Then came intervention in Greece and the clash with Rome leading to the defeat at Magnesia and the restrictive Peace of Apamea. Despite this, Antiochus remained ambitious, campaigning in the East again when he died in 187 BC the empire was still one of the most powerful states in the world.

“We are, Grainger says, so *‘*hypnotised’ by the rise of Rome that we ignore the Seleukid and Ptolemaic interlude. His clear and fascinating account breaks this spell.”—Minerva Magazine


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The Seleukid Empire of Antiochus III 223-187 BC, John D. Grainger - History

The second volume in John Grainger's history of the Seleukid Empire is devoted to the reign of Antiochus III.

Too often remembered only as the man who lost to the Romans at Magnesia, Antiochus is here revealed as one of the most powerful and capable rulers of the age. Having emerged from civil war in 223 as the sole survivor of the Seleukid dynasty, he shouldered the burdens of a weakened and divided realm. Though defeated by Egypt in the Fourth Syrian War, he gradually restored full control over the empire. His great Eastern campaign took Macedonian arms back to India for the first time since Alexander's day and, returning west, he went on to conquer Thrace and finally wrest Syria from Ptolemaic control. Then came intervention in Greece and the clash with Rome leading to the defeat at Magnesia and the restrictive Peace of Apamea. Despite this, Antiochus remained ambitious, campaigning in the East again when he died in 187 BC the empire was still one of the most powerful states in the world.

About The Author

John D. Grainger is a former teacher turned professional historian. He has over thirty books to his name, divided between classical history and modern British political and military history. His previous books for Pen & Sword are Hellenistic and Roman Naval Wars Wars of the Maccabees Traditional Enemies: Britain’s War with Vichy France 1940-42 Roman Conquests: Egypt and Judaea Rome, Parthia and India: The Violent Emergence of a New World Order: 150-140 BC a three-volume history of the Seleukid Empire and British Campaigns in the South Atlantic 1805-1807.


The Seleukid Empire of Antiochus III (223-187 BC)

The second volume in John Grainger's history of the Seleukid Empire is devoted to the reign of Antiochus III. Too often remembered only as the man who lost to the Romans at Magnesia, Antiochus is here revealed as one of the most powerful and capable rulers of the age. Having emerged from civil war in 223 BC as the sole survivor of the Seleukid dynasty, he shouldered the burdens of a weakened and divided realm. Though defeated by Egypt in the Fourth Syrian War, he gradually restored full control over the empire. His great Eastern campaign took Macedonian arms back to India for the first time since Alexander's day and, returning west, he went on to conquer Thrace and finally wrest Syria from Ptolemaic control. Then came intervention in Greece and the clash with Rome leading to the defeat at Magnesia and the restrictive Peace of Apamea. Despite this, Antiochus remained ambitious, campaigning in the East again when he died in 187 BC the empire was still one of the most powerful states
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The Seleukid Empire of Antiochus III, 223-187 BC Paperback / softback

The second volume in John Grainger's history of the Seleukid Empire is devoted to the reign of Antiochus III.

Too often remembered only as the man who lost to the Romans at Magnesia, Antiochus is here revealed as one of the most powerful and capable rulers of the age.

Having emerged from civil war in 223 as the sole survivor of the Seleukid dynasty, he shouldered the burdens of a weakened and divided realm.

Though defeated by Egypt in the Fourth Syrian War, he gradually restored full control over the empire.

His great Eastern campaign took Macedonian arms back to India for the first time since Alexander's day and, returning west, he went on to conquer Thrace and finally wrest Syria from Ptolemaic control.

Then came intervention in Greece and the clash with Rome leading to the defeat at Magnesia and the restrictive Peace of Apamea.

Despite this, Antiochus remained ambitious, campaigning in the East again when he died in 187 BC the empire was still one of the most powerful states in the world.


Watch the video: ΠΕΤΡΟΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΑΔΗΣ:Το Βασίλειο των Σελευκιδών κατά την Ελληνιστική Περίοδο. 25