Nicolas Charles Oudinot, Duc De Reggio 1767-1847.

Nicolas Charles Oudinot, Duc De Reggio 1767-1847.

Nicolas Charles Oudinot, Duc De Reggio 1767-1847.

An average Marshal but a brave and fearless leader of men, Marshal Oudinot saw action throughout the Napoleonic wars and eventually saw service in the restored Government following Napoleon's defeat. He first rose to fame in 1805 where he replaced Junot as commander of the reserve Grenadiers at Arras in February, but waswounded at Hollabrunn in March and forced to resign his command. After commanding the 2nd Foot dragoons and taking part in the siege of Danzig he became a Count of the Empire in 1808. He gained his Marshal rank after the battle of Wagram in 1809 and became Duke of Reggio in April 1810. In the 1812 campaign he commanded II Corps being wounded three times, first at Polotsk and then again at Berezina and finally two days later on 30th November. In 1813 he fought with XII Corps at Bautzen, Leipzig and Grossberen. In 1814 he fought at Brienne and was wounded, and went on to command VIII Corps at Arcissur-Aube and was wounded again. When the Bourbons were restored he switch allegiance and was appointed a commander but took no part in the Hundred Days Campaign. After the Napoleonic wars his career continued where he commanded I Corps in the invasion of Spain in 1823 and finally went on to become governor of Les Invalides. His many wounds were a testimony to a brave leader and although he was an average strategist his career was long and distinguished, he finally died at the age of eighty.

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Nicolas Charles Oudinot was the son of Nicolas Oudinot and Marie Anne Adam, the only one of their nine children to live to adulthood. His father was a brewer, farmer and distiller of brandy in Bar-le-Duc, Lorraine. He decided upon a military career, and served in the regiment of Medoc from 1784 to 1787, when, having no hope of promotion on account of his non-noble birth, he retired with the rank of sergeant. [1]

The French Revolution changed his fortunes, and in 1792, on the outbreak of war, he was elected lieutenant-colonel of the 3rd battalion of the volunteers of the Meuse. His gallant defense of the little fort of Bitsch in the Vosges in 1792 drew attention to him he was transferred to the regular army in November 1793, and after serving in numerous actions on the Belgian frontier he was promoted general of brigade, in June 1794 for his conduct at the Battle of Kaiserslautern. [1]

He continued to serve with distinction on the German frontier under Louis Lazare Hoche, Charles Pichegru and Jean Victor Marie Moreau, was repeatedly wounded and once (in 1795) taken prisoner after having been wounded again. He was André Masséna's right hand all through the Swiss campaign of 1799, first as a general of division, then as chief of staff, and won extraordinary distinction at the Second Battle of Zurich. He was present under Massena at the Siege of Genoa, and so distinguished himself at the Battle of Monzambano that Napoleon presented him with a sword of honour (an especially uncommon award replaced later by the Légion d'Honneur). He was made inspector-general of infantry, and, on the establishment of the empire, given the Grand Cross of the Legion of Honour, but was not included in the first creation of marshals. [1]

Oudinot was elected a member of the chamber of deputies, but had little time to devote to politics. He took a leading role in the war of 1805, commanding the famous division of "grenadiers Oudinot," made up of hand-picked troops and organized by him, with which he seized the Vienna bridges, received a wound at the Battle of Schöngrabern in Lower Austria against the Russians. In 1807, he participated in Joachim Murat's victory in the Battle of Ostrolenka in Poland and fought with resolution and success at the Battle of Friedland. [1]

In 1808 he was made governor of Erfurt and Count of the French Empire, and in 1809, after the Battle of Wagram, he was promoted to the rank of Marshal of France. He was made a titular duke in chief of the duché-grand fief of Reggio in the satellite Kingdom of Naples, and received a large money grant in April 1810. [1]

From 1810 to 1812 Oudinot administered the government of the former Kingdom of Holland, and commanded the II Corps of La Grande Armée in the Russian campaign. His corps was instrumental in building the bridge over the Berezina that allowed the evacuation of troops after the defeat at the Battle of Berezina. During this period he suffered another wounding in battle. [1]

He was present at the Battle of Lützen and the Battle of Bautzen, and when holding the independent command of the corps directed to take Berlin was defeated at the Battle of Grossbeeren. He was then superseded by Marshal Ney, but the latter was defeated at the Battle of Dennewitz. [1]

Oudinot was not disgraced. He held important commands at the Battle of Leipzig and in the campaign of 1814. On Napoleon's abdication, he rallied to the new government, and was made a Peer of France by the Bourbon Restoration King Louis XVIII. Unlike many of his old comrades, he did not desert to his former master during Bonaparte's 1815 return. [1]

His last active service was in the French invasion of Spain in 1823, in which he commanded a corps and was for a time governor of Madrid. He died as Governor of the Parisian veterans institution Les Invalides.

He married first, in September 1789, Charlotte Derlin (1768 – 1810) and had 7 children:

  • Marie-Louise (1790 – 1832): wife (1808) of general Pierre Claude Pajol (1772 – 1844) (1791 – 1863)
  • Nicolette (1795 – 1865): wife (1811) of general Guillaume Latrille de Lorencez [ Wikidata ] (1772 – 1855)
  • Emilie (1796 – 1805)
  • Auguste (1799 – 1835)
  • Elise (1801 – 1882)
  • Stephanie (1808 – 1893)

He married secondly, in January 1812, Eugenie de Coucy (1791 – 1868) and had 4 children:


Charles Oudinot

Lieutenant-General Charles Nicolas Victor Oudinot, 2nd Duc de Reggio (3 November 1791 in Bar-le-Duc – 7 June 1863 in Bar-le-Duc), the eldest son of Napoleon I's marshal Nicolas Oudinot and Charlotte Derlin, also made a military career.

He served through the later campaigns of Napoleon, 1809–1814, and was promoted to major in 1814 for gallant conduct. [1] Unlike his father he was a cavalryman, and after retirement during the early years of the Restauration held command of the cavalry school at Saumur (1822–1830) and was inspector-general of cavalry (1836–1848). [1]

Oudinot is chiefly known as the commander of the French expedition that besieged and took Rome in 1849, crushing the short-lived revolutionary Roman Republic and re-establishing the temporal power of Pope Pius IX, under the protection of French arms. His brief published account presents the French view of the events. After Louis Napoleon's coup d'état of 2 December 1851, when he took a prominent part in the resistance in favour of the Second Republic, he retired from military and political life, though remaining in Paris.

Beside the brief memoir of his Italian operations in 1849, he wrote several works of more specialized interest, on military ranks and orders, the use of soldiers in constructing public works and cavalry and its proper housing: Aperçu historique sur la dignité de marechal de France (1833) Considérations sur les ordres militaires de Saint Louis, &c. (1833) "De L'Italie et de ses Forces Militaires" (1835) L'Emploi des troupes aux grands travaux d'utilité publique (1839) De la Cavalerie el du casernement des troupes à cheval (1840) Des Remontes de l'armée (1840). [1]

This article about the period of the Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.


Oudinot, Nicolas-Charles

Nicolas-Charles Oudinot was born in Bar-le-Duc on 25 April, 1767, into a family from the petite-bourgeoisie. At the age of seventeen, after completing his studies in his hometown as well as in Toul and unwilling to follow in his father's professional footsteps, he signed up for the Médoc Infantry regiment, in 1784. Returning to the region three years later as a sergeant, he married Françoise-Charlotte Derlin in September 1789.

On 14 July, 1789, Oudinot was named captain and placed at the head of a band of national guard volunteers. Having served with distinction in a number of local disturbances, he was named chef de légion and commander of the département's National Guard in 1790, and was elected lieutenant-colonel of the 3e bataillon des volontaires de la Meuse, on 6 September, 1791, with whom he left for the north-eastern front.

Following his remarkable defence of Bitche, he was promoted to chef de brigade (colonel) on 5 November 1793 and was given the command of the 4e demi-brigade which had just been formed from one of the best regiments of the royal army: the Picardie regiment. In December of the same year, during the Haguenau affair, he received the first of many wounds that would make him the most injured maréchal in the Empire. A few months later, his actions at Kaiserslautern, where he cleared a passage with his bayonet through the ranks of Prussians, saw him promoted to Général de brigade (14 June 1794). He was, at the time, twenty-seven years old and, like the majority of future marshals of the Empire, had reached the rank of Général de brigade well before the events of 18 Brumaire. In October 1795, after receiving five sabre wounds at Neckerau and left for dead on the battlefield, he was taken prisoner by the Austrians. Freed the following year in an exchange of high-ranking officers, he rejoined the Armées du Rhin et de la Moselle, which were commanded by General Moreau. In 1799, during the Helvetian campaign, he distinguished himself during the captures of Zurich and Constance. At the time he was a chef d'état-major to Masséna, who named him général de division on 12 April 1799.

Oudinot went on to take part in all of the major campaigns of the Consulate and Empire, with the exception of the Spanish and Portuguese campaigns. Serving with Masséna in the Armée de Ligurie, he survived the siege of Gênes. During the final actions in Italy, he once again distinguished himself, notably in personally capturing (with the aid of his état-major) an Austrian battery that was guarding the Mincio passage (December 1800). In February 1805, on the eve of the creation of the Third Coalition, he was given the command of the grenadiers réunis, elite soldiers that would soon become known simply as “Oudinot's grenadiers”. That same year, he was victorious at Wertingen, Amstetten, Vienna and Hollabrünn and was involved in the victory at Austerlitz. He played an important role in the 1806 Prussian campaign where he took Ostrołęka with a brilliant cavalry charge and was equally distinguished facing the Russians at Friedland (June 1807). On 25 July, 1808, the Emperor named him comte de l'Empire. At the head of his company, nicknamed “the infernal column” due to the fear that it inspired amongst the enemy's ranks, he was successful at Ebersberg then at Essling during the Austrian campaign of 1809. After Lannes was fatally injured, the Emperor gave the command of the 2e corps to Oudinot. Shortly after, at Wagram, he once again performed magnificently, seizing victory and going beyond his orders from Napoleon. The latter awarded him his Maréchal's baton on 12 July 1809 and also named him Duke de Reggio.

Whilst it may initially appear that Oudinot was singled as a future maréchal very early on in his career, there were a number of factors that could have limited his rapid rise through the ranks. Firstly, he originally served in the Armée du Rhin and therefore did not meet Napoleon until after the creation of the Consulate. He was also a confirmed Republican and for a long time remained in the 'opposition' group of generals. And whilst he was undoubtedly a leader of exceptional bravery, he was not always the greatest strategist. Finally, his numerous wounds meant that all too often he was sidelined at the moment that awards and medals were distributed. Nevertheless, he married intrepidity with a chivalric spirit that was admired by his opponents, and, despite his apparently rough exterior, he also displayed an undeniable savoir-faire which led to a number of missions more diplomatic than military in nature.

In 1806, he was charged with the task of taking possession of the Neufchatel (Switzerland) principality on behalf of Berthier. The principality had been ceded to France by Prussia, and his impartiality led to the inhabitants offering him sword of honour and Neufchatel citizenship on his departure. As Governor of Erfurt, he had the delicate task of ensuring that the Congress which took place there (September 1808) was successful. Following Louis Bonaparte's abdication as king of Holland and Napoleon's resulting decision to annexe the country to the Empire, Oudinot was given the task of managing the occupation.

It was during his time in Holland that he learnt of the death of his wife, with whom he had seven children. On 19 January, 1812, he married Marie-Charlotte-Eugénie de Coucy, a young Ancien Régime aristocrat, with whom he had four more children. All his sons went into a military career: the oldest, Victor, was a lieutenant in the hussars in 1809, a squadron chief by the end of the Empire and, in 1849, was made commander in chief of the French expeditionary corps against the Roman Republic, the short-lived state that emerged after theocratic papal rule was overthrown in the same year. His second son, Auguste, was a colonel in the Chasseurs d'Afrique and was killed during the Algerian conquest. The third, Charles, was an infantry lieutenant-colonel and the fourth, Henri, was a général de brigade.

During the Russian campaign of 1812, he had a number of victories in the Pulutsk region (August 1812) and demonstrated admirable courage during the Battle of Berezina (November 1812).

He was involved in the German campaign of 1813 and the French campaign of 1814, during which he received his thirty-second wound. He was one of the generals at Fontainebleau who encouraged Napoleon to abdicate and, allied to the provisional government after the Emperor's abdication, was made commander in chief of the corps royal des grenadiers et chasseurs à pied (the former Garde Impériale). He was also named ministre d'état and a Peer of France under Louis XVIII. During the Cent-Jours, he refused to serve Napoleon or Louis, explaining to Napoleon upon being summoned, “Since I shall not serve you, Sire, I shall serve no-one.” Napoleon would later pay homage to this loyal and honourable conduct at St. Helena.

Upon Louis XVIII's return, Oudinot became Major General of the Garde Royale (8 September, 1815) and went on to serve under the Restoration governments. Although initially sidelined during the July Monarchy, the ageing maréchal accepted the functions of Grand Chancelier of the Légion d'honneur (1839) and, three years later, was made Governor of the Hôtel des Invalides. He died on 13 September, 1847.


Marshal Nicolas-Charles Oudinot

Commander of an elite grenadier division and Napoleon's most wounded marshal

Place of Birth: Bar-le-Duc, Meuse, France

Died: September 13, 1847

Place of Death: Paris, France

Arc de Triomphe: OUDINOT on the east pillar

Beginnings

One of the most wounded soldiers of the time, Nicolas-Charles Oudinot was the son of a brewer who would rise to become one of Napoleon's marshals. In 1784 at age seventeen he ran away from home and enlisted in the infantry, but three years later his father bought out his enlistment and he returned home. That was not enough to keep him out of the military though. When the Revolution started in 1789, Oudinot volunteered to join a company of volunteers and the following year he joined the National Guard of Meuse.

In 1791 Oudinot became a lieutenant colonel of the 3rd Battalion of Volunteers of the Meuse and then he went on to serve in the Army of the Rhine and the Army of the Moselle. In November of 1793 Oudinot was promoted to chef de brigade and took part in the defense of Bitche before being wounded by a shot to the head at Haguenau in December. Back in action before long, in May of 1794 he cleared a passage at Kaiserslautern with the bayonet and then fought at Morlautern. That June he was promoted to général de brigade and then in August his leg was broken by a shot and fall from a horse at the bridge of Wasserbillig.

Despite his wounds, Oudinot would frequently return to combat as soon as possible. In October of 1795 he fought at Neckerau where he was wounded by five sabre blows and a shot and then taken prisoner. Transported to Ulm, he was exchanged and released in January of 1796. Next Oudinot was named commander at Phalsbourg, and then in September he became chief of a brigade of cavalry. That month he fought at Ingolstadt where he was again wounded, taking four sabre blows to the neck and a ball to the thigh. Nevertheless he continued to serve and fought at Ettenheim the next month.

A series of administrative positions followed for Oudinot until he was sent to the Army of Switzerland in October of 1798. At Feldkirch in March of 1799, he took a number of prisoners on the first attempt to break through but then failed to break through on two more attempts. General Masséna praised Oudinot and promoted him to général de division, giving him command of a division. Oudinot's next major action came in June of that year when he was wounded by a ball in the chest at Rosenberg. At the end of July, he became chief of staff of the Army of the Danube and Switzerland, and then in August he was again wounded, this time by a ball to the shoulder blade while fighting at Schwyz. As usual, Oudinot continued to serve despite his wounds, and in September he played an important part in the Battle of Zurich where he was wounded by a ball to the chest. A few weeks later Oudinot fought at Andelfingen.

General Oudinot next traveled to Italy in late 1799, following Masséna as his chief of staff. In this capacity he took part in the defense of Genoa with Masséna. In August of 1800 he became Brune's chief of staff, and then he distinguished himself at Monzembano in December where he took an enemy battery. Afterwards, the First Consul presented him with a sabre of honor and a cannon he had captured.

Administrative positions followed during the Peace of Amiens. Oudinot became inspector general of cavalry and then took command of an infantry division at Bruges. During this time he became good friends with General Davout and acquired an aide named Pils, who always carried a first aid kit with him, so sure was he that it would be needed soon enough to treat Oudinot's wounds.

Commander of Elite Grenadiers

In 1805 Oudinot was given command of an elite division of grenadiers and he received the Grand Eagle of the Legion of Honor. During a review at the Camp of Boulogne that year, Oudinot and his men proudly paraded past Emperor Napoleon. Suddenly, Oudinot's horse stopped, and refused to go forward. In vain he tried to spur it forward, but the horse refused to budge, and even went so far as to attempt to buck him off. Thoroughly annoyed, Oudinot dismounted, drew his sword, and slid it through the horse's neck, killing it almost instantly. Napoleon later asked him, "Is that way you treat all your horses?" "Sire, that is my way when I am not obeyed," Oudinot replied. 1

As war broke out that year, Oudinot's elite division became part of Marshal Lannes' V Corps. That November, as the French were pursuing the Russians, Oudinot and his men encountered some of the Russian rearguard. As he and a squadron of cavalry were scouting the area, suddenly they were surprised by Russian infantry hiding in the woods. Oudinot rode straight up to them and ordered them to lay down their weapons, to which they complied. 2

Continuing to campaign, Oudinot took part in the famous capture of the Tabor Bridge. As Lannes and Murat and a few aides walked straight across the bridge, talking about a cease fire and being a distraction, Oudinot and his elite soldiers snuck up across the bridge, disabled the fuses, and seized control of it.

Oudinot was wounded shortly thereafter by a ball to the thigh at Hollabrun. He was recovering in Vienna when he learned of the imminent Battle of Austerlitz. Despite his wounds, he hurried to Napoleon and asked to be allowed to command his division in the battle. Napoleon was impressed by Oudinot's dedication, but knew his grenadier general was not up to full strength. Referring to Oudinot's wounds, Napoleon explained, "Your courage surpasses your strength. I have given your division to Duroc." 3 Oudinot still wished to command his division, and went to Duroc to ask to serve under him. Duroc agreed and they shared the command for the battle.

Oudinot again took command of a division during the campaign in Prussia in 1806, though initially he commanded a division of dismounted dragoons. That November he organized a division of grenadiers and voltigeurs, and he led them into action in February of 1807 at Ostrolenka, where he was almost taken prisoner. Next Oudinot and his division were sent to the Siege of Danzig , where they contributed to the success. One day during the siege, Oudinot and Lannes were on horseback talking, when a ricocheting ball flew into Oudinot's horse, killing it, then ricocheted and hit Lannes, then fell to the ground. Neither officer was hurt, but both were a little unnerved by just how lucky they had been. 4

After the successful conclusion of the siege, Oudinot's grenadier division became part of Lannes' Reserve Corps. During the fighting at Heilsberg, Oudinot noticed that the Emperor was within range of the enemy fire, and warned him, "Sire, if you remain exposed to enemy fire, I will order my grenadiers to seize you and lock you inside a caisson." Napoleon was annoyed but moved to safety, convinced that Oudinot would actually carry out his threat despite protocol. 5

A few days later Oudinot and his men were engaged in combat at Friedland, holding out against the Russian onslaught. Lannes had been frantically sending aides to Napoleon to bring the entire army to Friedland, but Napoleon, not appreciating the scope of what Lannes was facing, did not want to commit the entire army unless the entire Russian army was there, which it was. Frustrated by their desperate need of reinforcements and not getting any near as quickly as he would like, Oudinot sent one of his aides galloping off to Napoleon with the message, "Even my little eyes see the entire Russian army is here!" 6

After the victory at Friedland and the following Treaty of Tilsit, Oudinot and Marshal Mortier occupied their time by having fun in Danzig, with the most notable of their activities being how they would attempt to put out candles with pistol shots. Despite surprisingly fighting at Friedland unscathed, Oudinot's luck with regards to injury was still not good. In December that year his horse fell, rolled over him, and broke his leg. Worse, the doctors failed to set it correctly and it did not heal correctly, forcing better doctors to then re-break his leg and re-set it, though the second time it healed correctly. In the meantime he received numerous rewards, becoming a Knight of the Order of the Iron Crown, a Commander of the Order of Saint Henry of Saxony, a Knight of the Order of Saint-Wladimir of Russia, a Grand Cross of the Black Eagle of Prussia, a Grand Cross fo the Red Eagle of Prussia, and a Count of the Empire.

In 1809 General Oudinot returned to active campaigning when the Austrians declared war again. Taking command of a grenadier division again, he won at Pfaffenhofen and fought at Landshut and then his unit became part of Lannes' II Corps. He fought at Aspern-Essling that May and was wounded again. After Marshal Lannes' death, the command of II Corps was given to him, and he led them into battle at Wagram where he was again wounded, this time by a ball to the thigh. Further rewards followed for he was given the Grand Cross of the Order of Maximilien Joseph of Bavaria and created a Marshal of France alongside Marmont and Macdonald. The three new marshals were collectively nicknamed "Lannes small change" for being named marshals barely a month after Lannes' death. The army considered the three of them combined were equal to that of their now deceased marshal, Lannes.

The next year Oudinot was given command of the Army of the North to peacefully transition the Dutch into the French Empire. After Louis Bonaparte had abdicated the throne of Holland, the French under Oudinot moved in to complete the transition . As the mayor of Amsterdam handed the keys of the city to Oudinot, he broke out in tears. Oudinot, who was sympathetic to the mayor, told him, "Oh come, don't cry like that, or I'll do the same, and then we'll both look silly!" 7

Russian Campaign of 1812

In the meantime Marshal Oudinot received more rewards, including the Grand Cross of the Order of the Low Countries and becoming the Duke of Reggio. In 1812 Oudinot took command of the II Corps to lead them into Russia. That summer he won at Deweltowo, seized Dunabourg, was repulsed at Jboukowo, and won at Oboiarszina. Fighting at Polotsk in August, he was badly wounded by grapeshot to the shoulder and had to hand over his command to General Gouvion St. Cyr, who won the battle the following day and a marshal's baton.

By October Oudinot had recovered enough to resume command of II Corps, and in November he and his men won at Lochnitza. As one of the more intact corps of the army, II Corps was given an important part during the Battle of the Berezina. As Oudinot and his corps fought off the Russians on the far side of the Berezina, he was struck by a bullet and immediately fell to the ground. Feared for dead, his men were happily surprised to realize he was still alive, and they improvised a stretcher and carried him to the doctors. Oudinot's surgeon attended to him, but penetrating six inches into the wound and being unable to find the bullet, he left the bullet inside Oudinot. 8

The next day Oudinot set off with just his aides to return to France as quickly as possible to recover. As they were resting at a small cottage, a group of Cossacks surrounded the cottage and demanded their surrender. Oudinot stood up, reached for his pistols, and stated, "If they take me alive at least they will see who I am." He led his men in the defense of the cottage, and upon hearing the sound of battle, some French cavalry rode to the scene to assist in driving off the Cossacks. Oudinot again did not escape wounding, as just as the Cossacks began to flee, one of their shots hit the ceiling of the cottage, causing a beam to fall and hit Oudinot in the head. 9

1813 - 1815

Marshal Oudinot returned to a command in April of 1813 when he took command of XII Corps in Germany. In May he fought at Bautzen and Hoyerswerda, and then in June at Luckau. That August he was ordered to march on Berlin and was beaten by his former colleague Bernadotte at Gross-Beeren. That September Napoleon gave him command of two divisions of the Young Guard which he led into battle at Leipzig and Freyburg.

During the defense of France of 1814, Oudinot was again wounded, this time at Brienne. That February he took command of VII Corps and fought at La Rothière, Mormant, Méry-sur-Seine, and Bar-sur-Aube. The next month he fought at Veneuvre and then at Arcis-sur-Aube he was hit in the chest by a ball, his life being saved by the Grand Eagle of the Legion of Honor that absorbed the hit.

Oudinot was one of the marshals who called for Napoleon's abdication, and afterwards the returning Bourbons made him a Commander of Saint Louis and Peer of France. When Napoleon escaped from exile, Oudinot went to Metz and tried to gauge the support of the people. When the people began to riot in favor of Napoleon, he realized that the king's rule was over. He retired to Bar-le-Duc but was summoned to Paris by Napoleon. Napoleon tried to convince him to rejoin the army for the upcoming campaign, but Oudinot refused. He told Napoleon, "Since I will not serve you, sire, I will not serve anyone." 10


Napoleonic Wars [ edit | edit source ]

Nicolas took a leading role in the war of 1805, commanding the famous division of "grenadiers Oudinot," made up of hand-picked troops and organized by him, with which he seized the Vienna bridges, received a wound at the Battle of Schöngrabern in Lower Austria against the Russians and delivered the decisive blow in the Battle of Austerlitz. In 1807, he participated in Joachim Murat's victory in a battle at Ostrolenka in Poland and fought with resolution and success at the Battle of Friedland. In 1808 he was made governor of Erfurt and Count of the French Empire, and in 1809, after displaying brilliant courage at the Battle of Wagram, he was promoted to the rank of Marshal of France. He was made a titular duke in chief of the duché-grand fief of Reggio in the satellite Kingdom of Naples, and received a large money grant in April 1810.

Nicolas administered the government of the Kingdom of Holland from 1810 to 1812, and commanded the II Corps of La Grande Armée in the Russian campaign. His corps was instrumental in building the bridge over the Berezina that allowed the evacuation of troops after the defeat at the Battle of Berezina. He was again wounded. He was present at the Battle of Lützen (1813) and the Battle of Bautzen, and when holding the independent command of the corps directed to take Berlin was defeated at the Battle of Grossbeeren. He was then superseded by Marshal Ney, but the latter was defeated at the Battle of Dennewitz. Nicolas was not disgraced. He held important commands at the Battle of Leipzig and in the campaign of 1814. On Napoleon's abdication, he rallied to the new government, and was made a Peer of France by the Bourbon Restoration King Louis XVIII. Unlike many of his old comrades, he did not desert to his former master during Bonaparte's 1815 return. In 1816, he resigned from the army.


1911 Encyclopædia Britannica/Oudinot, Charles Nicolas

OUDINOT, CHARLES NICOLAS (1767–1847), duke of Reggio, marshal of France, came of a bourgeois family in Lorraine, and was born at Bar-le-duc on the 25th of April 1767. He had a passion for a military career, and served in the regiment of Medoc from 1784 to 1787, when, having no hope of promotion on account of his non-noble birth, he retired with the rank of sergeant. The Revolution changed his fortunes, and in 1792, on the outbreak of war, he was elected lieutenant-colonel of the 3rd battalion of the volunteers of the Meuse. His gallant defence of the little fort of Bitsch in the Vosges in 1792 drew attention to him he was transferred to the regular army in November 1793, and after serving in numerous actions on the Belgian frontier he was promoted general of brigade in June 1794 for his conduct at the battle of Kaiserslautern. He continued to serve with the greatest distinction on the German frontier under Hoche, Pichegru and Moreau, and was repeatedly wounded and once (in 1795) made prisoner. He was Massena's right hand all through the great Swiss campaign of 1799 — first as a general of division, to which grade he was promoted in April, and then as chief of the staff — and won extraordinary distinction at the battle of Zurich. He was present under Massena at the defence of Genoa, and so distinguished himself at the combat of Monzambano that Napoleon presented him with a sword of honour. He was made inspector-general of infantry, and, on the establishment of the empire, given the Grand Cross of the Legion of Honour, but was not included in the first creation of marshals. He was at this time elected a member of the chamber of deputies, but he had little time to devote to politics. He took a conspicuous part in the war of 1S05 in command of the famous division of the " grenadiers Oudinot, " formed of picked troops and organized by him, with which he seized the Vienna bridges, received a wound at Hollabriinn, and delivered the decisive blow at Austerlitz. In 1806 he won the battle of Ostrolenka, and fought with resolution and success at Friedland. In 1808 he was made governor of Erfurt and count of the Empire, and in 1809, after displaying brilliant courage at Wagram, he was promoted to the rank of marshal. He was made duke of Reggio, and received a large money grant in April 1810. Oudinot administered the government of Holland from 1810 to 1812, and commanded the II. corps of the Grande Armee in the Russian campaign. He was present at Liitzen and Bautzen, and when holding the independent command of the corps directed to take Berlin was defeated at Gross Beeren (see Napoleonic Campaigns ). He was then superseded by Ney, but the mischief was too great to be repaired, and Ney was defeated at Dennewitz. Oudinot was not disgraced, however, holding important commands at Leipzig and in the campaign of 1814. On the abdication of Napoleon he rallied to the new government, and was made a peer by Louis XVIII., and, unlike many of his old comrades, he did not desert to his old master in 1815. His last active service was in the French invasion of Spain in 1823, in which he commanded a corps and was for a time governor of Madrid. He died as governor of the Invalides on the 13th of September 1847. Oudinot was not, and made no pretence of being, a great commander, but he was a great general of division. He was the beau-ideal of an infantry general, energetic, thoroughly conversant with detail, and in battle as resolute and skilful as any of the marshals of Napoleon.

Oudinot's eldest son, Charles Nicolas Victor , 2nd duke of Reggio (1791–1863), lieutenant-general, served through the later campaigns of Napoleon from 1809 to 1814, being in the latter year promoted major for gallant conduct. Unlike his father he was a cavalryman, and as such held command of the cavalry school at Saumur (1822–1830), and the inspector generalcy of cavalry (1836–1848). He is chiefly known as the commander of the French expedition which besieged and took Rome in 1840 and re-established the temporal power of the pope. After the coup d’état of the 2nd of December 1851, in resistance to which he took a prominent part, he retired from military and political life, dying at Paris on the 7th of June 1863.

The 2nd duke wrote A perçu historique sur la dignité de maréchal de France (1833) Considerations sur les ordres militaires de Saint Louis, &c. (1833) L’Emploi des troupes aux grands travaux d’utilité publique (1839) De la Cavalerie et du casernement des troupes à cheval (1840) Des Remontes de l’armée (1840) and a brief account of his Italian operations of 1849.


Oudinot, Nicolas Charles

Nicolas Charles Oudinot (nēkôlä´ shärl ōōdēnō´) , 1767�, French soldier. A veteran of the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, he was created marshal of France (1809) and duke of Reggio (1810) by Napoleon I. He served as governor of Holland from 1810 to 1812. After Napoleon's first abdication Oudinot gave his support to Louis XVIII. He commanded the national guard during the Hundred Days, and for his support of Louis XVIII he was made a peer of France. Later, he participated in the Spanish expedition of 1823.

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Nicolas Oudinot

Nicolas-Charles-Marie Oudinot, născut pe 25 aprilie 1767 la Bar-le-Duc, decedat la 13 septembrie 1847 la Paris, Duce de Reggio, a fost un general francez al perioadei revoluționare și napoleoniene, Mareșal al Primului Imperiu (demnitate acordată în 1809) și pair al Franței Δ] .

Voluntar în regimentul Médoc-Infanterie în 1784, Oudinot devine căpitan al unei companii formate la Bar-le-Duc în 1789 și apoi locotenent-colonel în noiembrie 1791. În noiembrie 1793, în urma comportamentului său în bătălia de la Bitche, devine colonel și apoi se remarcă la bătălia de la Haguenau, pe 17 decembrie, când este rănit serios la cap. Pe 23 mai 1794, la Kaiserslautern, se remarcă din nou, conducând o impresionantă șarjă la baionetă, fiind numit general de brigadă o lună mai târziu. Pe 18 octombrie 1795, la bătălia de la Neckerau, este rănit de 6 ori și este capturat de austrieci. Este apoi eliberat, pe 7 ianuarie 1796, în cadrul unui schimb de prizonieri și își continuă cariera în armatele „Rinului”, „din Germania” și apoi „din Elveția”. În cadrul acestei din urmă armate, se remarcă în mod deosebit și este numit general de divizie, la propunerea comandantului armatei, generalul Masséna. În 1800, Oudinot îl urmează pe Masséna în Italia, lutptând la Genova Δ] .

După proclamarea Imperiului, Oudinot face campania din 1805, fiind rănit la coapsă la Bătălia de la Hollabrunn (8 octombrie 1805) și, fiind convalescent, asistă totuși la bătălia de la Austerlitz, unde supraveghează operațiunile diviziei sale de grenadieri și carabinieri reuniți, comandată provizoriu de Duroc. Apoi, în 1807, Oudinot se remarcă din nou la Danzig, unde este din nou rănit grav la picior, în luna mai, ceea ce nu îl împiedică să participe la victoria de la Friedland. Devine conte al Imperiului în 1808 și participă la operațiunile din cadrul războiului celei de-a Cincea Coaliții, câștigând o bătălie la Pfaffenhofen (19 aprilie 1809), apoi participând cu distincție la bătăliile de la Essling și Wagram, în ambele ocazii fiind rânit. Devine Mareșal al Imperiului în 1809 și Duce de Reggio în 1810. Participă apoi la campania din Rusia, câștigând la Polotsk, pe 17 august 1812, dar fiind grav rănit. Convalescent, își reia totuși funcția de comandant de Corp în timpul retragerii fiind din nou rănit la Berezina. În timpul campaniei din Saxonia, comandă extrema dreaptă a Marii Armate la bătălia de la Bautzen și câștigă bătălia de la Hoyerswerda (28 mai), dar este apoi învins de Bernadotte la Gross Beeren (23 august). Luptă apoi la Wachau și la Leipzig. În 1814 Franța este invadată și Oudinot este mereu în centrul acțiunii, văzând moartea cu ochii la Brienne, unde a avut ambele picioare atinse de o ghiulea, apoi la Arcis-sur-Aube, unde un glonte este oprit de placa decorației de Mare Vultur al Legiunii de Onoare. Cu această rană, Mareșalul acumulează nu mai puțin de 32 de răni, pe tot parcursul carierei sale, fiind Mareșalul rănit cel mai des Δ] .

După revenirea din exil a lui Napoleon I, Oudinot este convocat de Împărat dar transmite mesajul că nu dorește să se implice pentru că nu dorește «să joace un rol dublu, nici să servească doi stăpâni», fapt ce stârnește mânia Ministrului de Război Davout, care îi ordonă să se retragă pe domeniul său. După a doua Restaurație, Oudinot este membru al Consiliului privat și comandant al Gărzii Naționale din Paris. În 1817 este numit duce și pair al Franței, luând parte la noua campanie din Spania Δ] .

Ultimul său post a fost acela de Guvernator al Invalizilor. Numele Oudinot este înscris pe Arcul de Triumf din Paris Δ] .


Nicolas Charles Oudinot

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About Nicolas Charles Oudinot, duc de Reggio

Nicolas Charles Oudinot, 1st Comte Oudinot, 1st Duc de Reggio (25 April 1767 in Bar-le-Duc – 13 September 1848 in Paris), was a Marshal of France.

Nicolas Charles Oudinot was the son of Nicolas Oudinot and Marie Anne Adam, the only one of their nine children to live to adulthood. His father was brewer, farmer and distiller of brandy in Bar-le-Duc, Lorraine. He soon decided on a military career, and served in the regiment of Medoc from 1784 to 1787, when, having no hope of promotion on account of his non-noble birth, he retired with the rank of sergeant.

French Revolutionary Wars

The French Revolution changed his fortunes, and in 1792, on the outbreak of war, he was elected lieutenant-colonel of the 3rd battalion of the volunteers of the Meuse. His gallant defense of the little fort of Bitsch in the Vosges in 1792 drew attention to him he was transferred to the regular army in November 1793, and after serving in numerous actions on the Belgian frontier he was promoted general of brigade in June 1794 for his conduct at the Battle of Kaiserslautern.

He continued to serve with distinction on the German frontier under Louis Lazare Hoche, Charles Pichegru and Jean Victor Marie Moreau, was repeatedly wounded and once (in 1795) taken prisoner. He was André Masséna's right hand all through the Swiss campaign of 1799, first as a general of division, then as chief of staff, and won extraordinary distinction at the Battle of Zürich. He was present under Massena at the Siege of Genoa, and so distinguished himself at the Battle of Monzambano that Napoleon presented him with a sword of honour. He was made inspector-general of infantry, and, on the establishment of the empire, given the Grand Cross of the Legion of Honour, but was not included in the first creation of marshals.

Oudinot was elected a member of the chamber of deputies, but had little time to devote to politics. He took a leading role in the war of 1805, commanding the famous division of "grenadiers Oudinot," made up of hand-picked troops and organized by him, with which he seized the Vienna bridges, received a wound at the Battle of Schöngrabern in Lower Austria against the Russians and delivered the decisive blow in the Battle of Austerlitz. In 1807 he participated in Joachim Murat's victory in a battle at Ostrolenka in Poland and fought with resolution and success at the Battle of Friedland.

In 1808 he was made governor of Erfurt and Count of the French Empire, and in 1809, after displaying brilliant courage at the Battle of Wagram, he was promoted to the rank of Marshal of France. He was made a titular duke in chief of the duché-grand fief of Reggio in the satellite Kingdom of Naples, and received a large money grant in April 1810.

Oudinot administered the government of the Kingdom of Holland from 1810 to 1812, and commanded the II Corps of La Grande Armພ in the Russian campaign. His corps was instrumental in building the bridge over the Berezina that allowed the evacuation of troops after the defeat at the Battle of Berezina. He was again wounded.

He was present at the Battle of Lützen (1813) and the Battle of Bautzen, and when holding the independent command of the corps directed to take Berlin was defeated at the Battle of Grossbeeren. He was then superseded by Marshal Ney, but the latter was defeated at the Battle of Dennewitz.

Oudinot was not disgraced. He held important commands at the Battle of Leipzig and in the campaign of 1814. On Napoleon's abdication, he rallied to the new government, and was made a Peer of France by the Bourbon Restoration King Louis XVIII. Unlike many of his old comrades, he did not desert to his former master during Bonaparte's 1815 return.

His last active service was in the French invasion of Spain in 1823, in which he commanded a corps and was for a time governor of Madrid. He died as governor of the Parisian veterans institution Les Invalides.

Oudinot was not, and made no pretence of being, a great commander, but he was a great general of division. He was the beau-ideal of an infantry general, energetic, conversant with detail and in battle as resolute and skillful as any of Napoleon's marshals. He also inspired thinkers in the Austrian-Prussian revolutions of the late 19th century.

He married firstly in September 1789 Charlotte Derlin (1768 – 1810) and had 7 children:

He married secondly in January 1812 Eugenie de Coucy (1791 – 1868) and had 4 children:

About Nicolas Charles Oudinot, duc de Reggio (Français)

Nicolas Charles Marie Oudinot, duc de Reggio, né le 25 avril 1767 à Bar-le-Duc (Meuse), mort le 13 septembre 1847 à Paris, est un marຜhal d'Empire (1809).

Il serait le soldat ayant reçu le plus de blessures durant les guerres de la Révolution fran๺ise et de l'Empire, 34 blessures au total. En 1795-1796, il reçoit onze blessures : deux balles et neuf coups de sabre. Quand le futur marຜhal Canrobert le rencontrera aux eaux de Barèges, en 1830, il aura ce commentaire : « Ce n'était qu'une passoire »

Origines et jeunesse sous l'Ancien Régime

Maison natale du marຜhal Oudinot à Bar-le-Duc.

Né le 25 avril 1767 à Bar-le-Duc, capitale du duché de Bar, annexé depuis peu par la France (actuellement dans le département de la Meuse), Nicolas-Charles Oudinot, fils de Nicolas Oudinot et de Marie Anne Adam, est issu de la petite bourgeoisie meusienne.

Son père est artisan-brasseur. Après des études dans sa ville natale puis à Toul, il s'engage dans le régiment du Mຝoc de 1784 à 1787 où il obtient le rang de sergent. Il le quitte au bout de quelques annພs. Revenu à la vie civile, il revient dans sa ville natale où il se marie avec Charlotte Françoise Derlin avec laquelle il aura sept enfants.

Nicolas Charles Oudinot, lieutenant-colonel au 3e bataillon de la Meuse en 1792 (1767-1847), Raymond Quinsac Monvoisin, 1835. Il reprend du service quand ຜlate la Révolution et il est nommé second lieutenant-colonel du 3e bataillon de volontaires de la Meuse en 1791. Il se distingue en septembre 1792 par une belle dnse d'une attaque prussienne du château de Bitche et reçoit la première blessure de sa carrière.

Il fait 700 prisonniers. Il obtient le commandement du 2e bataillon du 2e régiment d'infanterie (ci-devant Picardie) dont le colonel venait d'émigrer puis celui de la 4e demi-brigade de première formation le 5 novembre 1793.

Le 23 mai 1794, il se fraie un passage à la baïonnette à la bataille de Kaiserslautern, ce qui lui vaut d'être promu colonel.

En juin 1794, attaqué près de Moclauter par 10 000 ennemis, il résiste pendant dix heures avec un seul régiment. Il opère ensuite sa retraite sans être entamé, et pour prix de cette conduite, il est fait général de brigade le 14 juin 1794.

Au mois de juillet suivant, il s'empare de Trèves par une manœuvre hardie et y commande jusqu'en août 1795. Passé alors à l'armພ de Moselle, il est en octobre attaqué de nuit à la bataille de Neckerau, blessé de cinq coups de sabre, pris et envoyé en Allemagne. ಜhangé au bout de cinq mois, il retourne à l'armພ et enlève Nordlingue, Donauworth et Neubourg.

Au blocus d'Ingolstadt, où il doit lutter contre des forces dຜuples, il reçoit une balle à la cuisse, trois coups de sabre sur les bras et un sur le cou cependant, sans attendre que sa guérison soit complète, il rejoint sa division à Ettenheim et charge l'ennemi le bras en ຜharpe. L'affaire du pont de Mannheim, la bataille de Feldkirch et la prise de Constance, que dndait le prince de Condé, lui valent le grade de général de division. Il sert sous Hoche, Pichegru et Moreau, puis en 1799 dans l'armພ d'Helvétie sous Masséna. Blessé de nouveau à la bataille de Zurich, il devient chef d'état-major de Masséna, qu'il suit en Italie et avec lequel il soutient le siège de Gênes.

Conservé par Brune dans les fonctions de chef d'état-major de l'armພ d'Italie, il se distingue à toutes les affaires dont les rives du Mincio sont le théâtre, le jour de Noël 1800, et il est chargé de porter à Paris la nouvelle de la paix bientôt signພ à Trévise. Après la bataille de Monzambano, Napoléon lui octroie un sabre d'honneur, puis la croix de la Légion d'honneur.

Il est élu en 1803 député de la Meuse, mais sans participer aux réunions de la Chambre.

Il fait la sélection des soldats pour former une division de grenadiers dans le corps de Lannes qui est surnommພ « la colonne infernale ». Il faudra peu de temps à ces soldats d'élite pour être connus sous le nom de « grenadiers d'Oudinot ».

Grand aigle de la Légion d'honneur en 1805, il part du camp de Boulogne à la tête de 10 000 grenadiers, s'empare de Vienne comme en passant, au bout de 45 jours de marche, se présente au pont du Danube que dndent 180 pis de canon, arrache la mຌhe du premier canonnier autrichien, passe le fleuve, occupe la rive opposພ avec sa division, et force à capituler toutes les troupes ennemies qu'il rencontre. Blessé à Wertingen il est remplacé par Duroc. Après avoir participé aux combats d'Amstetten, Oudinot, blessé encore une fois à celui de Juncersdorff, assiste, quoique convalescent, à la bataille d'Austerlitz, où il cueille de nouveaux lauriers. En 1806, il prend possession des comtés de Neuchâtel[4] et de Valangin, puis il entre à Berlin.

Au commencement de 1807, il gagne en Pologne la bataille d'Ostrołęka, ce qui lui vaut le titre de comte et une dotation d'un million. Il se rend ensuite avec une forte division pour renforcer le corps du marຜhal Lefebvre qui assiège Dantzig et amène la capitulation de cette place. Arrivés en retard[5] à la bataille d'Heilsberg, le 10 juin 1807, après avoir parcouru 60 km à marche forcພ, sans escales, ses grenadiers refusent de participer à l'assaut final et à la victoire contre les Russes[6], repoussant avec din une besogne qui n'ajouterait rien à leur gloire. Le 14 juin, à une heure du matin, il est à la gauche des troupes de Lannes, attaqué par 80 000 Russes dans la plaine de Friedland. Le corps de Lannes tient jusqu'à midi gr notamment aux grenadiers, et Napoléon, survenant avec le reste de l'armພ, remporte cette sanglante victoire qui est suivie bientôt de la paix de Tilsitt, signພ le 25 juin. Au cours de l'entrevue, l'Empereur présente Oudinot comme le « Bayard de l'armພ fran๺ise » au tsar Alexandre.

Nommé comte de l'Empire en 1808, il ne part pas en Espagne. Gouverneur d'Erfurt en 1808, pendant la réunion des souverains, il continue de commander en 1809 les grenadiers réunis. Cette avant-garde, partout victorieuse, bat les Autrichiens à Pfaffenhofen le 19 avril. Il entre le 13 mai à Vienne, concourt à la victoire à Wagram, ce qui lui vaut d'être nommé marຜhal d'Empire, le 12 juillet 1809, et duc de Reggio avec une forte somme d'argent en 1810.

En 1810, Napoléon lui confie le royaume de Hollande en remplacement de Louis Bonaparte, jusqu'à l'ouverture de la campagne de Russie. Placé alors à la tête du 2e corps de la grande armພ, à la suite de la mort du marຜhal Lannes pendant la bataille d'Essling, il se rend à Berlin, dont il est deux mois gouverneur, et participe ensuite à de nombreuses batailles jusqu'à ce que, grièvement blessé à celle de Polotsk, il doive remettre son commandement au général Gouvion-Saint-Cyr. Toutefois, en apprenant bientôt l'évacuation de Moscou, les premiers désastres fran๺is et la blessure de son successeur, il se hâte, quoiqu'à peine guéri, de rejoindre son corps. Il concourt, avec les marຜhaux Ney, Mortier et Victor, à assurer aux dປris de l'armພ fran๺ise le passage de la Bérézina, et est encore blessé.

En 1813, il est présent à la bataille de Lützen et combat glorieusement à la bataille de Bautzen, mais il essuie un rude ຜhec à la Gross Beeren. Après sa dite, ses troupes sont confiພs au marຜhal Ney, dont il partage, peu après, le sort à la bataille de Dennewitz. À la bataille de Leipzig, il combat encore mais quelques jours avant la bataille de Hanau, il tombe malade et est emporté mourant du théâtre de la guerre. Cependant, il prend part aux plus terribles affaires de la campagne de France en 1814, aux combats de Brienne et de Champaubert, ainsi qu'aux revers de Bar-le-Duc et de Laferté-sur-Aube. À la bataille de Brienne, il a les deux cuisses éraflພs par un boulet de canon, puis à la bataille d'Arcis-sur-Aube, sa plaque de Grand Aigle arrête une balle qui aurait dû être mortelle, le blessant légèrement.Il s'agit de sa trente-deuxième et dernière blessure de toute sa carrière militaire.

Après la capitulation de Paris et la dຜhບnce de Napoléon, le duc de Reggio se voue tout entier au service de Louis XVIII, qui le nomme colonel général des grenadiers et des chasseurs royaux, et gouverneur de Metz. Malgré tous ses efforts et l'aide apportພ dans cette tฬhe par le prt de Metz, le comte de Vaublanc, il ne peut contenir que jusqu'à Troyes l'impatience de ses troupes qui l'abandonnent pour aller au-devant de Napoléon.

Les Cent-Jours et la Restauration

Il passe les Cent-Jours dans sa campagne de Montmorency, évite de s'impliquer , mais se montre ouvertement opposé à la condamnation du marຜhal Ney. Après la Seconde Restauration, sur proposition du comte de Vaublanc alors ministre de l'Intérieur, il est nommé commandant en chef de la garde nationale parisienne, major-général de la Garde royale, pair de France, ministre d'État, grand-croix de l'ordre royal de Saint-Louis, et enfin chevalier du Saint-Esprit.

Pendant l'expຝition d'Espagne en 1823, le marຜhal Oudinot, à la tête du 1er corps d'armພ, entre sans coup férir[8] à Madrid, dont il reçoit du prince généralissime le commandement, et jusqu'à son départ pour Paris, il s'applique à maintenir le calme. Quand ຜlate la révolution de juillet 1830, Oudinot est encore un des quatre majors généraux de la Garde royale. Il prête serment au nouveau gouvernement, mais il paraît le bouder pendant quelques annພs puis, en 1837, il accepte le poste de grand chancelier de la Légion d'Honneur en 1839, qu'il n'a quitté, en 1842, que pour passer à celui de gouverneur de l'Hôtel royal des Invalides. Le marຜhal Oudinot meurt dans l'exercice de ces dernières fonctions le 13 septembre 1847, à six heures du soir, à l'âge de quatre-vingts ans.

Les papiers personnels du marຜhal Nicolas-Charles Oudinot sont conservés aux Archives nationales sous la cote 206AP[9].

Ses quatre fils et deux de ses gendres sont militaires (Claude-Pierre Pajol et Guillaume Latrille de Lorencez).

Marié une première fois, le 15 septembre 1789 à Bar-le-Duc, avec Charlotte Derlin, il a sept enfants :

Marie Louise Oudinot de Reggio (1790-1832) mariພ à Claude Pierre Pajol, général d'Empire

Nicolas Charles Victor Oudinot de Reggio (1791-1863), général de division

Nicolette Caroline Oudinot de Reggio (1795-1865), mariພ à Guillaume Latrille de Lorencez, général d'Empire Emilie Oudinot (1796-1805)

Auguste Oudinot de Reggio (1799-1835), colonel au 2e régiment de chasseurs d'Afrique tué le 26 juin 1833, lors du combat d'Illouley-Ismaël.

Élisa Oudinot de Reggio (1801-1882), mariພ à Armand, chevalier de Caunan, prt du Var de 1818 à 1823.

Stéphanie Oudinot de Reggio (1808-1893), mariພ en 1828 à Georges, baron Hainguerlot.

Veuf, il épouse, le 12 janvier 1812, Marie-Charlotte Eugénie de Coucy, une noble, âgພ de 24 ans de moins que lui, avec laquelle il a quatre enfants :

Louise Oudinot de Reggio (1816-1909), mariພ à Ludovic de Lévezou de Vesins

Caroline Oudinot de Reggio (1817-1896), mariພ avec Joseph Cuiller-Perron

Charles Oudinot de Reggio (1819-1858)

Henry Oudinot de Reggio (1822-1891)

Nicolas-Charles Oudinot (1767-1847)

Victor Oudinot (1791-1863), son fils

Charles Oudinot (1821-1889), son fils

Charles Oudinot (1851-1905), son fils

Henri Oudinot (1883-1956), son fils

Philippe Maupas Oudinot (1919- ), son fils

Nicolas-Charles Oudinot, Duque de Reggio (Bar-le-duc, 25 de abril de 1767 - Paris, 13 de setembro de 1847), foi um militar francês. Participou nas Guerras revolucionárias francesas e nas Guerras Napoleónicas. Recebeu o título de Marechal do Império em 1809.


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