John Wayne is born

John Wayne is born

John Wayne, an actor who came to epitomize the American West, is born in Winterset, Iowa.

Born Marion Michael Morrison, Wayne’s family moved to Glendale, California, when he was six years old. As a teen, he rose at four in the morning to deliver newspapers, and after school he played football and made deliveries for local stores. When he graduated from high school, he hoped to attend the U.S. Naval Academy. However, after the school rejected him, he accepted a full scholarship to play football at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

In the summer of 1926, Wayne’s football coach found him a job as an assistant prop man on the set of a movie directed by John Ford. Ford started to use Wayne as an extra, and he eventually began to trust him with some larger roles. In 1930, Ford recommended Wayne for Fox’s epic Western The Big Trail. Wayne won the part, but the movie did poorly, and Fox let his contract lapse.

During the next decade, Wayne worked tirelessly in countless low-budget western films, sharpening his talents and developing a distinct persona for his cowboy characters. Finally, his old mentor John Ford gave Wayne his big break, casting him in his brilliant 1939 western, Stagecoach. Wayne played the role of Ringo Kid, and he imbued the character with the essential traits that would inform nearly all of his subsequent screen roles: a tough and clear-eyed honesty, unquestioning valor, and a laconic, almost plodding manner.

After Stagecoach, Wayne’s career took off. Among the dozens of Westerns he appeared in—many of them directed by Ford-were memorable classics like Tall in the Saddle (1944), Red River (1948), Fort Apache (1948), She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949), Rio Bravo (1959), and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962). In all these films, The Duke, as he was known, embodied the simple, and perhaps simplistic, cowboy values of decency, honesty, and integrity.

Besides Westerns, Wayne also acted in war films. It was a small leap from the valorous cowboy or cavalry soldier to the brave WWII fighters of films like Sands of Iwo Jima (1949) and Flying Leathernecks (1951). Deeply conservative in his politics, Wayne also used his 1968 film, The Green Berets, to express his support of the American government’s war in Vietnam.

By the late 1960s, some Americans had tired of Wayne and his simplistically masculine and patriotic characters. Increasingly, western movies were rejecting the simple black-and-white moral codes championed by Wayne and replacing them with a more complex and tragic view of the American West. However, Wayne proved more adaptable than many expected. In his Oscar-winning role in True Grit (1969), he began to escape the narrow confines of his own good-guy image. His final film, The Shootist (1976), won over even his most severe critics. Wayne—who was himself battling lung cancer—played a dying gunfighter whose moral codes and principles no longer fit in a changing world.

Three years later, Wayne died of cancer. To this day, public polls identify him as one of the most popular actors of all time.


The Untold Truth Of John Wayne

Rio Bravo. North to Alaska. True Grit. The Cowboys. This is just a small sprinkling of the 179 movies actor John Wayne appeared in between 1926 and his death in 1979. Over 40 years later, Wayne remains an American icon for his roles in Westerns and war movies. Dozens of books have been written about Wayne and his illustrious career, which spanned exactly 50 years, according to the Internet Movie Database. He was, according to almost everyone, a family man dedicated to his roles in Westerns and war movies throughout his career.

But what do we really know about John Wayne? It turns out there are some tantalizing tidbits about his life which contributed heavily to his career, personal, and even public choices. But Wayne was a private man who, according to Factinate, announced in his early years, "I'm Duke Morrison, and I never was and never will be a film personality like John Wayne." Read on for some little-known information on the legendary film star.


THIS DAY IN HISTORY – John Wayne is born – 1907

After Stagecoach, Wayne’s career took off. Among the dozens of Westerns he appeared in—many of them directed by Ford-were memorable classics like Tall in the Saddle (1944), Red River (1948), Fort Apache (1948), She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949), Rio Bravo (1959), and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962). In all these films, The Duke, as he was known, embodied the simple, and perhaps simplistic, cowboy values of decency, honesty, and integrity.

Besides Westerns, Wayne also acted in war films. It was a small leap from the valorous cowboy or cavalry soldier to the brave WWII fighters of films like Sands of Iwo Jima (1949) and Flying Leathernecks (1951). Deeply conservative in his politics, Wayne also used his 1968 film, The Green Berets, to express his support of the American government’s war in Vietnam.

By the late 1960s, some Americans had tired of Wayne and his simplistically masculine and patriotic characters. Increasingly, western movies were rejecting the simple black-and-white moral codes championed by Wayne and replacing them with a more complex and tragic view of the American West. However, Wayne proved more adaptable than many expected. In his Oscar-winning role in True Grit (1969), he began to escape the narrow confines of his own good-guy image. His final film, The Shootist (1976), won over even his most severe critics. Wayne—who was himself battling lung cancer—played a dying gunfighter whose moral codes and principles no longer fit in a changing world.

Three years later, Wayne died of cancer. To this day, public polls identify him as one of the most popular actors of all time.


Later career

Wayne's politics also influenced his activities as a producer and director. Wayne's production companies made all kinds of films, but among them were Big Jim McClain (1951), in which he starred as a process server for the House Un-American Activities Committee fighting communists in Hawaii, and Blood Alley (1955), in which he played an American who helps a village to escape from the Communist Chinese mainland to Formosa. The two films that Wayne directed also are representative of his politics: The Alamo (1960) is an epic film about a heroic last stand by a group of Texans in their fight for independence against Mexico and included some preaching by the Wayne character about democracy as he saw it and The Green Berets (1968), in which Wayne played a colonel leading troops against the North Vietnamese, which was an outspoken vehicle in support of America's role in the war.

Wayne was married three times. He had four daughters and three sons by two of his wives (Josephine Saenez, 1933�, and Pilar Palette Weldy, after 1954). His second wife was Esperanza Diaz Ceballos Morrison (1946�). Wayne was the recipient of many awards during his career, including an Oscar for his role as the hard-drinking, one-eyed, tough law man in True Grit (1969) and an Academy Award nomination for his playing of the career marine in Sands of Iwo Jima (1949). Plagued by various illnesses during the last few years of his life, he publicly announced his triumph over lung cancer in 1964. But a form of that disease eventually claimed his life on June 11, 1979.


31. Lost Encounters of the Oscar Kind

Wayne rejected the starring role in All the King’s Men (1949) because he thought the script was un-American. Broderick Crawford eventually took the role, winning the 1949 Academy Award for Best Actor…incidentally beating out Wayne who was nominated for Sands of Iwo Jima (1949).

Wikipedia

John Wayne certainly had a racist history — does he have a Jewish one?

On the morning of Monday, June 29, 2020, President Donald J. Trump tweeted, “Can anyone believe that Princeton just dropped the name of Woodrow Wilson from their highly respected policy center. Now the Do Nothing Democrats want to take off the name John Wayne from an airport. Incredible stupidity!”

It’s no surprise that Trump would come to John Wayne’s defense. The late actor ticks many of the president’s favorite boxes: he was a racist, a homophobe, a conservative Republican, and an ardent anti-communist who fed names of suspected leftists to the House Un-American Activities Committee. He campaigned for Richard Nixon he supported the Vietnam War and he was a member of the far-right advocacy group, the John Birch Society.

There is indeed an airport named after Wayne in Orange County, Calif., replete with a statue of the man who once told Playboy Magazine, “I believe in white supremacy until the blacks are educated to a point of responsibility” and “I don’t feel we did wrong in taking this great country away from the Indians….”

Famed celebrity photographer Philip Stern, who shot the likes of Louis Armstrong, Lauren Bacall, Count Basie, Humphrey Bogart, Marlon Brando, James Dean, Marilyn Monroe and Frank Sinatra for Life, Look, Vanity Fair, and other pictorial magazines, recalled Wayne thusly: “Several times, when we were both a little drunk, I would call him a ‘Neanderthal fascist.’ He would call me a ‘bomb-throwing Bolshevik. We were, indeed, the odd couple.” (Stern, incidentally, once shot a series of photographs of celebrities reading the Yiddish Forward.)

If he weren’t long dead (he died in 1979), John Wayne would already have been cancelled. As Spike Lee told an interviewer in 2018, “I’ve never been a fan of John Wayne and John Ford and that cowboy bullshit. I hate them: Native Americans depicted as savages and animals. F—k John Wayne and John Ford.”

In his long film career, extending from the 1920s to the 1970s, Wayne undoubtedly worked with dozens of Jewish people – writers, directors, producers, fellow actors – and about the best that can be said of him is that he apparently did not leave a legacy of overt anti-Semitism.

In fact, Wayne played an essential role in getting “Cast a Giant Shadow,” a landmark, Hollywood pro-Israel blockbuster to the silver screen in 1966. Jewish writer and producer Mel Shavelson had been trying to make a film based upon the story of the real-life U.S. Army Reserve Col. David “Mickey” Marcus, who wound up commanding units of the nascent Israel Defense Forces during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War on his way to becoming a full-fledged Zionist martyr. Shavelson kept running into dead ends, however, in trying to get studio backing for the film.

Studio heads, many of them Jewish themselves, were reluctant to make such an overtly Jewish movie (in spite of the success of its predecessor, the Zionist epic “Exodus,” released in 1960). Shavelson asked Wayne to join the cast as the American general Mike Randolph. With Wayne attached to the project, the movie would bear the imprimatur of the 100% kosher all-American movie star, thereby making the movie safe for a general American audience.

It was Wayne who subsequently brought in Kirk Douglas to play Marcus, and from there they were able to entice Frank Sinatra, Yul Brynner and Angie Dickinson into the fold. Financing and distribution by United Artists soon followed.

Wayne explained to his biographer, Michael Munn, “I wanted to remind the world how we helped this little country of Israel get its independence and how it was an American army officer who gave his life for it.”

That’s small consolation for those who take offense at Wayne’s characterization of “Midnight Cowboy” as a movie about “f—gots” and his responsibility for ruining the careers of several Hollywood figures he fed to the House Un-American Activities Committee in his role as leader of the so-called Motion Picture Alliance for the Preservation of American Ideals.

Let’s give the last word on Wayne to radical activist and counterculture icon Abbie Hoffman, who told Time Magazine, “I like Wayne’s wholeness, his style. As for his politics, well — I suppose even cavemen felt a little admiration for the dinosaurs that were trying to gobble them up.”

Seth Rogovoy is a contributing editor at the Forward. He often mines popular culture for its hidden Jewish stories.


The Scots-Irish

John Wayne is arguably the most famous and most successful actor in history, quite an accomplish ment for a Scots-Irish boy from Winterset , Iowa. He was a complex man, his family very Presbyterian, yet John Wayne often described himself as a 'cardiac Catholic.' He lived his life as a Christian with noticeable Presbyterian focus and drive, yet his wife Pilar was Roman Catholic, as were all his children. John Wayne himself converted to the Catholic Church officially just days before he passed away.

John Wayne's childhood home in Winterset , Iowa

3 comments:

Marion Morrison went to Glendale High School in Glendale, CA with my Grandmother, Theo Elizabeth "Jane" Montgomery, her brother, John Barrett "Jack" Montgomery, and her brother, William Hays "Bill" Montgomery. Apparently, Marion asked her out and she was too shy to even answer him. He was a Football player. My Grand Uncles told me that they often found their shy, red haired, little sister embarrassing.

His cousin Della Morrison was my grandfather's cousin, so I believe he would be my cousin twice removed. :) It's a small world.

John Wayne had strong Scottish Hebridean connections. My Grandmother was a Morrison from Stornoway Lewis. Two of her brothers made their way to America. One brother farmed in Iowa , John Wayne's father The other became involved in the car industry and was President for two sessions with an office block named after him known as the Morrison block. I believe that John Wayne visited the isle of Lewis to look up surviving relatives. I am in my 84th year so the above happened a long time ago.


John Wayne is born - HISTORY

The John Wayne Birthplace & Museum lost a dear friend on June 5th, 2021. Carolyn Farr was for many years the voice and the face of the Birthplace. She was a friend to all of us, and anybody who visited the Museum most likely met Carolyn. She touched so many, and we will miss her so much. God bless you, Carolyn…and tell Duke hi.

The 2021 John Wayne Birthday Celebration will be postponed until May 27th and 28th of 2022. The situation with the pandemic is still too fluid to allow us to proceed this year, and we want to do it right and provide you with the celebration that you’ve come to expect.

We can tell you that the 2022 Celebration will be bigger and better than ever, as we celebrate the Grand Opening of the new addition to our museum. Stay tuned to our Facebook page and our website page for further announcements about an event that will include a special VIP reception in the new addition on Friday evening, along with our regular dinner and auction on Saturday evening. You’ll want to be there!

The John Wayne Birthplace & Museum has been included among the Bonus Features for the French Blu-ray release of John Wayne’s “The Alamo.” With appreciation to producers Roger Riley of WHO-13 in Iowa and Jean-Christophe Jeauffre of Jules Verne Adventures in France.

Copyright: ESC Productions / ESC Editions 2021 EDV 2588, all rights reserved.

John Wayne: The mere mention of his name produces images of courage and patriotism.

The life story of John Wayne began in the small central Iowa town of Winterset. He was born Marion Robert Morrison on May 26, 1907, the son of Clyde and Mary Brown Morrison.

His father, Clyde, was a pharmacist who worked on the south side of Winterset’s historic town square. In his youth, Clyde attended nearby Simpson College in Indianola, Iowa. John Wayne described his father as “The kindest, most patient man I ever knew.” Wayne’s mother Mary was of Irish descent, and Duke said, “She was a tiny, vivacious red-headed bundle of energy.” Their modest four-room home has been restored to reflect its appearance in 1907, the year of the actor’s birth.

Since the John Wayne Birthplace Society was established in 1982, more than a million visitors have journeyed to historic Madison County to tour the birthplace home. Guests have included President Ronald Reagan, movie legend Maureen O’Hara, Wayne’s widow and all of his children, and fans from 50 states and 40 foreign countries.

With the opening of the 6,100 square foot John Wayne Birthplace Museum adjacent to the home, visitors now have the opportunity to see the largest diversified exhibit of John Wayne artifacts in existence, including original movie posters, film wardrobe, scripts, contracts, letters, artwork and sculpture, and even one of his last customized automobiles.

The only museum in the world dedicated to John Wayne, the facility naturally includes a movie theater. Relax in comfortable seats (originally from Grauman’s Chinese Theater in Hollywood) and watch a documentary on Duke’s phenomenal film career. Be sure to explore our gift shop’s wide assortment of John Wayne merchandise perfect for souvenirs or great new items to add to your collection. You’ll be fascinated as you linger and learn about John Wayne the actor, the private citizen and an American legend.

John Wayne Birthplace & Museum Wins 2020 Tripadvisor Travelers’ Choice Award

The John Wayne Birthplace & Museum has been recognized as a 2020 Travelers’ Choice award-winner. Based on a full year of Tripadvisor reviews, award winners are known for consistently receiving great traveler feedback, placing them in the top 10% of hospitality businesses around the globe.

“We are proud of the facilities and exhibits, but crucial to making the John Wayne Birthplace & Museum an enjoyable and memorable experience for our guests is our outstanding staff,” said Liz Hansen, Manager.

“Winners of the 2020 Travelers’ Choice Awards should be proud of this distinguished recognition,” said Kanika Soni, Chief Commercial Officer at Tripadvisor. “Although it’s been a challenging year for travel and hospitality, we want to celebrate our partners’ achievements. Award winners are beloved for their exceptional service and quality. Not only are these winners well deserving, they are also a great source of inspiration for travelers as the world begins to venture out again.”

Great Gift Idea for John Wayne Fans!

Show your appreciation for a friend or loved one with a custom Tribute Brick in the walkways surrounding the John Wayne Birthplace house—and help us expand the John Wayne Birthplace Museum at the same time, too! Just in time for Christmas, orders placed before December 1st will be acknowledged with a photo of the brick which will be placed in the spring. Your message may be up to three lines with 14 characters per line, including spaces. Even better, the $150 cost for this 4” x 8” is permanent recognition of your support and is entirely tax-deductible! Visit www.johnwaynebirthplace.museum/support or call us at (877) 462-1044.

Singer, songwriter and celebrated western performer Red Steagall returned to Winterset on November 8th to tape an episode of his award-winning RFD-TV series, Somewhere West of Wall Street. Steagall was the musical headliner at last spring’s John Wayne Birthday Celebration and afterwards accepted an invitation to feature the John Wayne Birthplace & Museum on his popular cable television show.

While Madison County, Iowa is somewhat east of his usual Great Plains and Rocky Mountains territory, Steagall acknowledged that, since his show features museums that perpetuate the heritage of the American West, the John Wayne Birthplace was a perfect fit. “Small town America is where it happens,” said Steagall. “All types of characters grow up in small towns.”

The John Wayne Birthplace episode of Steagall’s show aired recently to help publicize the 2019 John Wayne Birthday Celebration saluting the 50th anniversary of Wayne’s Academy Award-winning performance in “True Grit.”

New: Souvenir Coins

Now available in the gift shop at the John Wayne Birthplace & Museum, souvenir coins in four designs!


History turns on tiny hinges

It’s been said that history turns on tiny hinges. Think of the seemingly inconsequential events in Scripture that changed the world: Joseph’s enslavement in Egypt led to the preservation of the Jewish people Moses’ encounter at the burning bush led to the Exodus and the Ten Commandments David’s battle with Goliath led to establishing the Davidic monarchy through which the Messiah came the disciples’ choice to leave their nets to follow Jesus led to apostolic Christianity John’s exile on Patmos gave us the Revelation.

And most of all, of course, we think of the birth of a baby boy on the outskirts of Jerusalem.

Every moment of your day is seen by your Father in heaven (cf. Matthew 10:29) as your Savior intercedes for you at his right hand (Romans 8:34). This means that every moment of this day, you can be led by the Holy Spirit (John 16:13) into God’s perfect purpose for your life (Romans 12:2).

Your role is to stay submitted to the Spirit, not just on Sunday or occasionally through the week but all through every day (cf. Romans 12:1). Begin your day by surrendering it to your Lord, asking his Spirit to guide and use you. Then stay in touch with your Father as you pray about all you experience (1 Thessalonians 5:17) and walk in his word and will (Proverbs 3:5–6).

If you will follow Jesus, he will make your temporal days to be eternally significant (Matthew 4:19).


John Wayne's Birthday – Meet the Duke's 3 Wives and 7 Children

Born Marion Michael Morrison and nicknamed "The Duke," John Wayne was known to be a man who won the hearts of millions with his acting prowess. Unfortunately, those who worked with and knew him personally have a different story to tell.

John Wayne during the filming of the movie 'Legend of the Lost', Tripoli, January 01, 1956 | Photo: Getty Images

According to Daily Mail, the late producer, director, and actor had many struggles that included loving those of the opposite sex a little too much. His love for women caused him to allegedly have numerous affairs during his first marriage to Josephine' Josie' Saenz.

[John Wayne] was posthumously honored with the Congressional Gold Medal and the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

John Wayne and his bride Miss Josephine Saenz, daughter of Dr. Jose Saenz, Panamanian Counsul in Los Angeles, on June 28, 1933, in Los Angeles | Photo: Getty Images

Even though he did his best to be a good husband to the society girl who came from Pasadena, all his efforts came to naught when he met the German actress and singer, Marlene Dietrich.

Josephine soon got tired of sharing her man with another woman, so she beckoned on her priest to have a conversation with her husband. John reportedly agreed to quit the affair only if his wife stopped bringing up the name of his mistress.

However, as soon as the priest left their home, Josephine resumed her rant about Marlene and the affair. It was at that point that the late actor knew that his marriage was over – he was married to Esperanza "Chata" Baur Diaz Ceballos by the next year.

John Wayn and his second wife Esperanza Bauer at a party for American comedian Red Skelton's television debut on January 01, 1951, Hollywood, California | Photo: Getty Images

John's marriage to Esperanza seemed to be a spur-of-the-moment event that his close friends tried to talk him out of.

The actor soon found out how right his friends were when the Spanish beauty when she became an alcoholic, and they got engaged in numerous arguments.

He divorced her in 1954, and he married his third wife, Pilar Pallete, who was an actress from Peru, in the same year.

John Wayne and his wife Pilar on board their yacht 'The Wild Goose' at Monte Carlo, on 26th August 1963 | Photo: Getty Images

The actor welcomed seven children from all these women, first of whom is Michael Wayne, who died in 2003. While he was alive, Michael was the former president and chairman of the John Wayne Foundation board.

Wide Open Country divulged that the actor's next child was his first daughter, Mary Antonia "Toni" Wayne LaCava who died in 2000.

Mary was an actress who spent most of her life as a wife to Donald La Cava and the mother to their eight children – Anita, Mark, Kevin, Christopher, Brigid, Brendan Peter, and David.

John Wayne reading a Prince Valiant comic with his four children, in Hollywood, California | Photo: Getty Images

John's next child is Patrick John Morrison, who built a slightly successful acting career for himself when he appeared in several movies such as "Mister Roberts" and "The Searchers."

Even though the King of Westerns’ fourth child and second daughter, Melinda Wayne Munoz, made several appearances in her father's films as a child, she didn't become a film star.

John's other children include Aissa Wayne (who became an attorney), John Ethan Wayne (who followed his father's steps by becoming an actor), and Marisa Wayne (who opted to enjoy being a wife and mother).


Watch the video: Glen, John Wayne and Tim Conway - The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour 14 Sept 1971 - Comedy Skit