Direct- AM-430 - History

Direct- AM-430 - History

Direct II

(AM-430: dp 620; 1 172'; b. 36'; dr. 10'; s. 16 k.;
cpl. 74; a. 1 40 mm.; cl. Agile)

The second Direct (AM-430) was launched 27 May 1953 by Hiltebrant Dry Dock Co., Kingston, N.Y.; sponsored by Mrs. D. C. Hiltebrant; and commissioned 9 July 1954, Lieutenant Commander B. H. Dean in command. She was reclassified MSO-430 on 7 February 1956.

Based at Charleston, S.C., Direct operated on minesweeping exercises and training with other ships. She also provided services to the Fleet Sonar School at Key West, Naval Mine Defense Laboratory at Panama City, and Mine Warfare School at Yorktown. From 1 May to 2 October 1957 she cruised to the Mediterranean for duty with the 6th Fleet. On 14 April 1958 her home port was changed to Yorktown, VA., and on 15 January 1959 to Little Creek, VA. Between 27 April and 27 August 1959 she served again in the Mediterranean, then served in amphibious exercises and other operations through 1962.


North Atlantic operations [ edit | edit source ]

Based at Charleston, South Carolina, Direct operated on mine-sweeping exercises and training with other ships. She also provided services to the Fleet Sonar School at Key West, Florida, Naval Mine Defense Laboratory at Panama City, Florida, and Mine Warfare School at Yorktown, Virginia. From 1 May to 2 October 1957 she cruised to the Mediterranean for duty with the U.S. 6th Fleet. On 14 April 1958 her home port was changed to Yorktown, Virginia, and on 15 January 1959 to Little Creek, Virginia. Between 27 April and 27 August 1959 she served again in the Mediterranean, then served in amphibious exercises and other operations through 1962.


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402 Engines

RPO LS3: 330 gross hp (1970), 300 gross hp (1971), 210 gross hp (1972), 240 gross hp (1972 with dual exhaust)

Similar to the L35, but with the 402’s larger bore (4.125-inch), oval port cast-iron heads, Quadrajet 4-barrel carb, 10.25:1 compression ratio in 1970 only (reduced to 8.5:1 in 1971 and later), and two-bolt main caps. Available primarily in Camaros and Chevelles. New SAE engine test procedures established in 1972 resulted in lower horsepower ratings.

RPO L34: 350 gross hp at 5,200 rpm

Same as the L34 396 engine but with the 402’s larger bore (4.125-inch), oval port cast-iron heads, higher-lift hydraulic lifter cam, Quadrajet 4-barrel carb, 10.25:1 compression ratio, open-element air cleaner, and dual exhausts. Most had two-bolt main caps, though some may have been equipped with four-bolt blocks.

RPO L78: 375 gross hp at 5,600 rpm

Same as the L78 396 engine but with the 402’s larger bore (4.125-inch), rectangular port cast-iron heads, high-lift solid lifter cam, high-rise aluminum intake manifold, 780-cfm Holley carb, forged pistons with an 11:1 compression ratio, fourbolt main caps, and forged steel crankshaft. Available in Camaros and Chevelles.


Originally Posted by DocsMachine

-Been there, done that. Why do you think I have a shop.

The guy I got my shop from built it, he said, because he had to change a clutch one weekend, just so he could get to work the following Monday. With no shop, he had to borrow a friend's glorified carport, and change it while literally laying on a sheet of ice.

Thousands of us have had that sort of experience. It doesn't directly compare.

The difference is.. our "ice" might be at 20 F - 30 F, our ambient air at 0 F to 30 F.

ALASKA? (Canada, Russia, Greenland, . Tibet. "etc". )

The ice and air can easily be 40, 50, and more degrees COLDER!

And that actually matters. "Bigtime!"

Titanium Join Date Jan 2005 Location Southcentral, AK Posts 3,296 Post Thanks / Like Likes (Given) 1 Likes (Received) 2715

Social Security

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Direct- AM-430 - History

Terri Kim (PhD London) is Professor of Comparative Higher Education, leading Higher Education Res. more Terri Kim (PhD London) is Professor of Comparative Higher Education, leading Higher Education Research Group (https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/the-higher-education-research-group) in the Cass School of Education and Communities, University of East London (UEL) and also an Honorary Senior Research Associate at the UCL Institute of Education an Associate of the Centre for Higher Education and Equity Research (CHEER), University of Sussex and a Principal Fellow of Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Previously she was an OECD/CERI consultant Visiting Scholar in International Relations at LSE Brain Korea 21 Contract Professor at Seoul National University full-time Lecturer at Brunel University London Visiting Scholar at the I.E.C., Collège de France in Paris Distinguished Visiting Scholar in the Faculty of Arts, Monash University in Melbourne.

She is a co-convenor of the SRHE Policy Network Editorial Board member of seven international journals, including Comparative Education Intercultural Education British Journal of Educational Studies (BJES) and Policy Reviews in Higher Education. She had also served as a member of the CESE (Comparative Education Society in Europe) Executive Committee (2012-16) and the CHER (Consortium of Higher Education Researchers) Conference Committee (2015-16). She has published one book, four edited volumes (journal Special Issues), and over 50 articles internationally in the field of comparative higher education.

She has strong interdisciplinary research interest in the relations of territory, mobility, knowledge, identity and network empires, (ethno)nationalism, cosmopolitanism, coloniality, interculturality citizenship and the issues of equity and diversity, statelessness and human rights social history of universities, varieties of academic capitalism, State-University relations, university governance, the academic profession and leadership in HE. Her long-standing research is on transnational academic mobility/migration, knowledge creation and identity capital. She is currently writing a book: Intellectual Strangers in the Open Society Then and Now: a Comparative Analysis.

Many of her invited talks [over 70 invitations including 30 plenary/keynote lectures in 21 countries] and over 50 international publications have taken into account the future directions and strategic needs of Governments, international agencies, and policy think tanks – e.g. OECD, UNESCO-UNEVOC, EMN (European Migration Network), Academia Europaea, UKCGE (UK Council for Graduate Education), Public Policy Exchange, University World News, QS Aim, Times Higher Education, The Conversation, etc.

** Terri's research profile and publication details are available in the following web sites:

Terri Kim (PhD London) is Professor of Comparative Higher Education, leading Higher Education Res. more Terri Kim (PhD London) is Professor of Comparative Higher Education, leading Higher Education Research Group (https://www.uel.ac.uk/research/the-higher-education-research-group) in the Cass School of Education and Communities, University of East London (UEL) and also an Honorary Senior Research Associate at the UCL Institute of Education an Associate of the Centre for Higher Education and Equity Research (CHEER), University of Sussex and a Principal Fellow of Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Previously she was an OECD/CERI consultant Visiting Scholar in International Relations at LSE Brain Korea 21 Contract Professor at Seoul National University full-time Lecturer at Brunel University London Visiting Scholar at the I.E.C., Collège de France in Paris Distinguished Visiting Scholar in the Faculty of Arts, Monash University in Melbourne.

She is a co-convenor of the SRHE Policy Network Editorial Board member of seven international journals, including Comparative Education Intercultural Education British Journal of Educational Studies (BJES) and Policy Reviews in Higher Education. She had also served as a member of the CESE (Comparative Education Society in Europe) Executive Committee (2012-16) and the CHER (Consortium of Higher Education Researchers) Conference Committee (2015-16). She has published one book, four edited volumes (journal Special Issues), and over 50 articles internationally in the field of comparative higher education.

She has strong interdisciplinary research interest in the relations of territory, mobility, knowledge, identity and network empires, (ethno)nationalism, cosmopolitanism, coloniality, interculturality citizenship and the issues of equity and diversity, statelessness and human rights social history of universities, varieties of academic capitalism, State-University relations, university governance, the academic profession and leadership in HE. Her long-standing research is on transnational academic mobility/migration, knowledge creation and identity capital. She is currently writing a book: Intellectual Strangers in the Open Society Then and Now: a Comparative Analysis.

Many of her invited talks [over 70 invitations including 30 plenary/keynote lectures in 21 countries] and over 50 international publications have taken into account the future directions and strategic needs of Governments, international agencies, and policy think tanks – e.g. OECD, UNESCO-UNEVOC, EMN (European Migration Network), Academia Europaea, UKCGE (UK Council for Graduate Education), Public Policy Exchange, University World News, QS Aim, Times Higher Education, The Conversation, etc.

** Terri's research profile and publication details are available in the following web sites:

Professor Terri Kim, PhD (London) PFHEA is a Full Professor of Comparative Higher Education at UE. more Professor Terri Kim, PhD (London) PFHEA is a Full Professor of Comparative Higher Education at UEL Honorary Senior Research Associate in the UCL Institute Education in London Associate of CHEER (Centre for Higher Education and Equity Research), University of Sussex and Principal Fellow of Higher Education Academy (PFHEA). She graduated from Yonsei University in Seoul with a Bachelor of Arts (summa cum laude), and at the UCL Institute of Education (University of London then) where she gained her MA in Comparative Education and PhD in Comparative Higher Education. Subsequently she did her postdoctoral research in International Relations at LSE in London. Previously she worked as a research consultant to OECD CERI Visiting Research Scholar in International Relations at LSE in London Brain Korea 21 Contract Professor at Seoul National University Lecturer at Brunel University London Visiting Scholar at the Collège de France, I.E.C. in Paris and Distinguished Visiting Scholar at Monash University, Faculty of Arts in Melbourne.

She was a recipient of the Yonsei University 100 Future Women Leaders Prize, a decennial award, selected by the Yonsei University Alumni Association in 2018. She is a co-convenor of the SRHE Policy Network, and serves on the editorial board of Comparative Education, Intercultural Education, British Journal of Educational Studies and Policy Reviews in HE.

Her scholarly interests centre on the relations of territory, mobility, knowledge, identity and network established–outsiders’ relationships minority-majority power relations - especially regarding border-crossing academic mobility/migration in international relations and individual life history the transnational comparative spectrum of meritocracy, mobility and elite formation knowledge and identity capital epistemic (in)justice and the interface between internationalisation, interculturality, and EDI policy and practice in HE.


Physical features

The Dead Sea is situated between the hills of Judaea to the west and the Transjordanian plateaus to the east. Before the water level began dropping, the lake was some 50 miles (80 km) long, attained a maximum width of 11 miles (18 km), and had a surface area of about 394 square miles (1,020 square km). The peninsula of Al-Lisān (Arabic: “The Tongue”) divided the lake on its eastern side into two unequal basins: the northern basin encompassed about three-fourths of the lake’s total surface area and reached a depth of 1,300 feet (400 metres), and the southern basin was smaller and considerably shallower, less than 10 feet (3 metres) deep on average. During biblical times and until the 8th century ce , only the area around the northern basin was inhabited, and the lake was slightly lower than its present-day level. It rose to its highest level, 1,275 feet (389 metres) below sea level, in 1896 but receded again after 1935, stabilizing at about 1,300 feet (400 metres) below sea level for several decades.

The drop in the lake level in the late 20th and early 21st centuries changed the physical appearance of the Dead Sea. Most noticeably, the peninsula of Al-Lisān gradually extended eastward, until the lake’s northern and southern basins became separated by a strip of dry land. In addition, the southern basin was eventually subdivided into dozens of large evaporation pools (for the extraction of salt), so by the 21st century it had essentially ceased to be a natural body of water. The northern basin—effectively now the actual Dead Sea—largely retained its overall dimensions despite its great loss of water, mainly because its shoreline plunged downward so steeply from the surrounding landscape.

The Dead Sea region occupies part of a graben (a downfaulted block of Earth’s crust) between transform faults along a tectonic plate boundary that runs northward from the Red Sea–Gulf of Suez spreading centre to a convergent plate boundary in the Taurus Mountains of southern Turkey. The eastern fault, along the edge of the Moab Plateau, is more readily visible from the lake than is the western fault, which marks the gentler Judaean upfold.

In the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods (about 201 million to 66 million years ago), before the creation of the graben, an extended Mediterranean Sea covered Syria and Palestine. During the Miocene Epoch (23 million to 5.3 million years ago), as the Arabian Plate collided with the Eurasian Plate to the north, upheaval of the seabed produced the upfolded structures of the Transjordanian highlands and the central range of Palestine, causing the fractures that allowed the Dead Sea graben to drop. At that time the Dead Sea was probably about the size that it is today. During the Pleistocene Epoch (2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago), it rose to an elevation of about 700 feet (200 metres) above its modern level, forming a vast inland sea that stretched some 200 miles (320 km) from the H̱ula Valley area in the north to 40 miles (64 km) beyond its present southern limits. The Dead Sea did not spill over into the Gulf of Aqaba because it was blocked by a 100-foot (30-metre) rise in the highest part of Wadi Al-ʿArabah, a seasonal watercourse that flows in a valley to the east of the central Negev highlands.

Beginning about 2.5 million years ago, heavy streamflow into the lake deposited thick sediments of shale, clay, sandstone, rock salt, and gypsum. Later, strata of clay, marl, soft chalk, and gypsum were dropped onto layers of sand and gravel. Because the water in the lake evaporated faster than it was replenished by precipitation during the past 10,000 years, the lake gradually shrank to its present form. In so doing, it exposed deposits that now cover the Dead Sea valley to thicknesses of between about 1 and 4 miles (1.6 and 6.4 km).

The Al-Lisān region and Mount Sedom (historically Mount Sodom) resulted from movements of Earth’s crust. Mount Sedom’s steep cliffs rise up from the southwestern shore. Al-Lisān is formed of strata of clay, marl, soft chalk, and gypsum interbedded with sand and gravel. Both Al-Lisān and beds made of similar material on the western side of the Dead Sea valley dip to the east. It is assumed that the uplifting of Mount Sedom and Al-Lisān formed a southern escarpment for the Dead Sea. Later the sea broke through the western half of that escarpment to flood what is now the shallow southern remnant of the Dead Sea.

Another consequence resulting from the Dead Sea’s lower water level has been the appearance of sinkholes, especially in the southwestern part of the region. As the water in the lake dropped, it became possible for groundwater to rise up and dissolve large subterranean caverns in the overlying salt layer until the surface finally collapses. Several hundred sinkholes have formed, some of them in areas popular with tourists.


یواس‌اس دایرکت (ای‌ام-۴۳۰)

یواس‌اس دایرکت (ای‌ام-۴۳۰) (به انگلیسی: USS Direct (AM-430) ) یک کشتی بود که طول آن ۱۷۲ فوت (۵۲ متر) بود. این کشتی در سال ۱۹۵۳ ساخته شد.

یواس‌اس دایرکت (ای‌ام-۴۳۰)
پیشینه
مالک
آب‌اندازی: ۲ فوریه ۱۹۵۲
آغاز کار: ۲۷ مه ۱۹۵۳
اعزام: ۹ ژوئیه ۱۹۵۴
مشخصات اصلی
وزن: ۶۲۰ long ton (۶۳۰ تن)
درازا: ۱۷۲ فوت (۵۲ متر)
پهنا: ۳۶ فوت (۱۱ متر)
آبخور: ۱۰ فوت (۳ متر)
سرعت: ۱۰ گره (۱۹ کیلومتر بر ساعت؛ ۱۲ مایل بر ساعت)

این یک مقالهٔ خرد کشتی یا قایق است. می‌توانید با گسترش آن به ویکی‌پدیا کمک کنید.


Direct- AM-430 - History

Since 1919, Pebble Beach Resorts has been host to unforgettable experiences, international stars and some of the most celebrated moments in golf history. Learn more about the early days of this famed destination and how Pebble Beach has transformed itself through the decades.

In the Beginning

Samuel Finley Brown Morse, who was a distant cousin of telegraph inventor Samuel Finley Breese Morse, founded Pebble Beach Company in 1919. Morse was a natural leader who had been captain of the national champion 1906 Yale football team and a member of the elite and secretive Skull and Bones for the class of 1907. He was introduced to the Pacific Improvement Company through a college classmate who was a nephew of William H. Crocker.

Pacific Improvement Company

At the age of 29, Morse was hired to manage the Pacific Improvement Company, which had extensive real estate holdings on the Monterey Peninsula—including Hotel Del Monte. In early 1916, Morse convinced the board to build Pebble Beach Golf Links by assuring them it would help increase interest in the development of the area.

February 22, 1919, saw the grand opening of Pebble Beach Golf Links and the Del Monte Lodge at Pebble Beach, which replaced a log-cabin lodge originally located on 17-Mile Drive.

Del Monte Properties Company

Five days after the grand opening, Morse formed the Del Monte Properties Company and acquired the Del Monte Unit from the Pacific Improvement Company.

In describing his purchase to a friend, Morse said, “The properties include 18,000 acres of land on the Monterey Peninsula, all of the Pacific Grove and Pebble Beach areas, Del Monte Forest lands (which are traversed by 17-Mile Drive), the Los Laureles Rancho (more commonly called the Del Monte Rancho), Hotel Del Monte and all improvements, Pebble Beach Lodge and all improvements, and the capital stock of the Monterey County Water Works, which supplies water to the towns of Monterey, Pacific Grove and Carmel.”

The initial Board of Directors, in addition to Morse, consisted of Herbert Fleishhacker, Jack Beaumont, K.R. Kingsbury, John Barenson, Wellington Gregg, Henry T. Scott, Hugh Goodfellow, Charles W. Clark and G.M. Heckscher.

In 1948, Morse appointed his son, John Boit Morse, president of the company to inject some youthful spirit into the operation. The elder Morse continued as chairman of the board. It was during this era that the company sold Hotel Del Monte and constructed offices and a shopping arcade at The Lodge at Pebble Beach.

In 1954, Richard Osborne was appointed president. Osborne had married Samuel F. B. Morse’s daughter, Mary. Under Osborne, the equestrian lifestyle was revitalized. It was also during the Osborne era that members of the Monterey Peninsula Country Club pooled their resources and bought the club from the company. Osborne also participated in the beginning of the development of Spyglass Hill Golf Course in 1963.

In November 1964, Osborne was bumped up to vice chairman and Aime G. Michaud was added to the board and named president.

The End of an Era

On May 10, 1969, Samuel F. B. Morse died, 10 years after ensuring that easements would preserve hundreds of acres of forest and coastline along the 17-Mile Drive for generations to come, and 50 years after establishing a veritable monument to the power of nature and beauty. Michaud saw getting the U.S. Open as a personal commitment to Morse’s goals, and on August 27, 1969, he got the deal done.

The board elected Al Gawthrop as chairman to replace Morse, and by 1970 Michaud was out. Gawthrop took on the presidency, and A. Thomas Taylor became the new chairman of the board.

Pebble Beach Company

On March 30, 1977, Del Monte Properties Company reincorporated as Pebble Beach Corporation. Twentieth Century-Fox used its profits from its film Star Wars to buy Pebble Beach Corporation in May 1979. During this era, Marvin Davis (after purchasing Twentieth Century-Fox) completed development of The Inn & Links at Spanish Bay.

In 1990, Davis sold Pebble Beach Company to Japanese businessman and golf fanatic, Minuro Isutani, who would then go on to sell to The Lone Cypress Company (formed by the Japanese Sumitomo Bank and Taiheiyo Club) in March of 1992.

In the summer of 1999, Arnold Palmer, Richard Ferris, Peter Ueberroth and Clint Eastwood—along with William Perocchi and GE Pension—offered limited partnership interests with the understanding that the plan was to never again sell Pebble Beach Company to another ownership group.