Accomac- LST-710 - History

Accomac- LST-710 - History

Accomac
II.

(LST-710: dp. 4,080 (f.); 1. 328'0n; b. 50'0"; dr. 14' 1n; s. 11.6 k.
(tl.); cpl. 119; a. 8 40mm.; el. LST-542)

The second Accomac (AP13 49) was laid down on 13 May 1944 at Jeffersonville, Ind., by the Jeffersonville Boat & Machine Co. as LST-710, Iaunched on 28 June 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Maude B. Schrieker, and commissioned on 24 July 1944.

LST-710 served in the Asiatic-pacific theater during World War II and participated in the invasion of Luzon carried out at Lingayen Gulf in January 1945. By the following summer, she had returned to the United States at San Diego where she began conversion to a self-propelled barracks ship. On 1 August 1945, she was named Accomac and was redesignated APB-49.

Accomac continued conversion work and remained at San Diego until 8 September when she got underway for Adak, Alaska. The barracks ship arrived at her destination on the 21st and began taking on cargo and mail. She stood out of Adak two days later and shaped a course for Japan. On 3 October, she anchored in Ominato Ro, Japan. Two weeks later, she moved to Aomori Wan where she remained for over a month. On 21 November, the ship left Aomori Wan for Yokosuka, arriving there on the 25th. she ended the old year, 1945, at Yokosuka. On 14 February 1946, Accomac weighed anchor and set course for Sasebo where she arrived four days later. The ship remained there until 3 March at which time she got underway for the United States. After 27 days at sea, the barracks ship reentered San Diego on 30 March. She remained there until decommissioned on 9 August 1946

She was berthed with the Pacific Reserve Fleet at San Diego for over 12 years. Though no date for her strike from the Navy list has been found, this probably occurred late in 1959. On 7 December 1959, she was sold to the Union Minerals & Alloys Corp., of New York City, for scrapping.

Accomac (APB-49) earned one battle star for her World War II service as LST-710.


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NO SIGNS ALLOWED ON TREES, POLES

Somerset Borough reminds residents not to place signs on trees or utility poles. The Somerset Borough Zoning Ordinance prohibits signs from being attached to trees or utility poles. Recently there have been incidents of yard sale signs being placed on trees, utility and sign poles, as well as traffic signal poles.

This is a violation of Section 183-34 of the Somerset Borough Zoning Ordinance, and is subject to a fine of up to $250 per day for each violation.


Accomac- LST-710 - History

H istory

Long before the first white settlers arrived in what is now Virginia, the Native Americans called the Eastern Shore by the name Accawmacke ---meaning the "across the water place". Accawmacke was settled very early by the English. According to history, the natives on the Eastern Shore were friendly and access to the area was easy. The word Chesapeake is the modern English spelling of the native term for "great water". To the early settlers, this "great water" made for easier travel than trying to go into the interior of the New World. So, early settlement was concentrated in the coastal areas.

The original shire of Accomac, created in 1634, covered the entire Eastern Shore. The name of the shire was changed to Northampton in 1642. This name change was part of an effort by the English to eliminate "heathen" names in the New World. So, an English name, Northampton, was chosen.

By the year 1663, many, many settlers has chosen the Eastern Shore as their new home. It was decided that the area should be divided into two counties. So, the northern half got back its original name--- but spelled Accomac.

Accomac County was abolished for a time in 1670. Governor William Berkeley, wanted to arrest Col. Edmund Scarburgh for the murders of some native chiefs. This was one of the incidents that led to Bacon's Rebellion in 1676. Scarburgh claimed to be a Burgess for Accomac, and members of the General Assembly were immune to arrest. So, to circumvent this situation, Governor Berkeley nullified the law that created the county. This eliminated Scarburgh's protection from being arrested. When Scarburgh died in 1671, the General Assembly re-created Accomac County.

Accomac County officially became Accomack in 1940, when the General Assembly resolved that the county name would be spelled with the "k".


USS Benton County (LST-263) was an LST-1-class tank landing ship built for the United States Navy during World War II. Named for nine counties of the United States, she was the only U.S. Naval vessel to bear the name.

USS LST-50 was an LST-1-class tank landing ship built for the United States Navy during World War II.

USS LST-998 was an LST-542-class tank landing ship in the United States Navy. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS LST-995 was an LST-542-class tank landing ship in the United States Navy. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS LST-994 was an LST-542-class tank landing ship in the United States Navy. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS LST-919 was an LST-542-class tank landing ship in the United States Navy. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS LST-869 was an LST-542-class tank landing ship in the United States Navy. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS LST-801 was an LST-542-class tank landing ship in the United States Navy. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS LST-1108 was an LST-542-class tank landing ship in the United States Navy. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS LST-1044 was an LST-542-class tank landing ship in the United States Navy. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS LST-1104 was an LST-542-class tank landing ship in the United States Navy. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS LST-734 was an LST-542-class tank landing ship in the United States Navy. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS LST-851 was an LST-542-class tank landing ship in the United States Navy. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS LST-849 was an LST-542-class tank landing ship in the United States Navy during World War II. Late in her U.S. Navy career, she was renamed Johnson County (LST-849)—after counties in Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Nebraska, Tennessee, Texas, and Wyoming—but never saw active service under that name.

USS LST-546 was a United States Navy LST-542-class tank landing ship in commission from 1944 to sometime between 1946 and 1952. From 1952 until 1972 she served in a non-commissioned status in the Military Sea Transportation Service and Military Sealift Command as USNS LST-546 (T-LST-546).

USS LST-566 was a United States Navy LST-542-class tank landing ship in commission from 1944 to 1946. From 1952 to 1973, she served in a non-commissioned status in the Military Sea Transportation Service and the Military Sealift Command as USNS LST-566 (T-LST-566).

USS LST-607 was a United States Navy LST-542-class tank landing ship in commission from 1944 to 1946. She later served in a non-commissioned status in the Military Sea Transportation Service as USNS LST-607 (T-LST-607).

USS LST-565 was a United States Navy LST-542-class tank landing ship in commission from 1944 to 1946.

USS LST-913 was an LST-542-class tank landing ship in the United States Navy. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.

USS LST-924 was an LST-542-class tank landing ship in the United States Navy. Like many of her class, she was not named and is properly referred to by her hull designation.


Accomac County in War Time: A Community History

"Accawmack," as it was anciently spelled, is the northern most of the two counties forming the Eastern Shore of Virginia as "Ye Antient Kingdome of Accawmack." The word means "land beyond the waters," and is the name of the tribe of Indians that inhabited the peninsula when Captain John Smith visited it. The county contains 252,945 acres and has a population of about 34,795.

On the ocean side a chain of islands acts as a breakwater to the mainland. One of the largest of these islands is Chincoteague , well known to the sportsmen of the North and of vast importance to the commercial life of the county because of its large fish industry. On Paramore's Beach, Cedar, Metompkin, Wallop's and Assateague Islands are United States life saving stations.

The climate of Accomac is mild and salubrious the soil is a light sandy loam, warm and easily tilled. Accomac and Northampton counties are shown by the census report of 1920 to be the richest agricultural counties in the Unites States. A co-operative marketing organization known as the Eastern Shore of Virginia Produce Exchange was formed in 1900, and since that time the farmers have gained steadily in wealth. In 1916 the gross sales of the organization amounted to $6,971,786.45, and in 1920 the gross sales were $10,465,667.13.

Onancock is one of the oldest towns in Virginia. Incorporated in 1880, records show that as early as 1670, Onancock, while still an Indian town, had four of five white families. Francis Makemie, the founder of organized Presbyterianism in America, lived there in 1682.

The records of Accomac and Northampton Counties are the oldest continuous records in the United States. The first play ever presented in English America, entitled "Ye Bare and Ye Cubb," was given at Pungoteague , Accomac county, in the year 1665.

Many interesting facts might be related concerning the early history of the country, but since this is a history of the World War period, the foregoing introductory statements must suffice.

EASTERN SHORE OF VIRGINIA CHAPTER, RED CROSS

The first World War agency organized in Accomac county was "the Eastern Shore of Virginia Chapter American Red Cross," and the following is quoted from a history of this chapter written by Frances L. Taylor:

On June 1, 1917, a meeting was held in the town hall, Onancock, to formulate plans for the organization of the Eastern Shore of Virginia Chapter American Red Cross.

The following officers were elected: Chairman, Mrs. J. S. Waples vice-chairman, Mrs. J. S. Tyler secretary, Mrs. J. P. L. Hopkins treasurer, G. H. Powell.

Executive committee: Mrs. W. H. Parker, Mrs. J. S. Mills, Mrs. E. D. F. Custis, Mrs. M. M. White, Mrs. George Borum, Mrs. Bessie Hopkins, Mrs. J. W. Robertson, Misses Frances and Constance Taylor and J. L. Parker.

Soon the different towns on the Shore began to enroll as branches, and by November the number had reached twenty-one, nearly every town in the county being represented. The total enrollment for the chapter and branches was 3,820.

As new phases of the work developed, the following committees were appointed:

Publicity -- Miss Frances L. Taylor.

School committee -- Miss Constance S. Taylor, chairman Miss Frances L. Taylor, Treasurer.

Home service -- Dr. J. W. Robertson, chairman, May, 1918-October,1918 R. T. Hearn, October, 1918, to the present.

War drive -- Stewart K. Powell, chairman J. S. Waples, treasurer.

Christmas roll call -- Rev. F. A. Ridout, chairman Warner Ames, vice-chairman.

In June, 1918, Mrs. Tyler declined re-election as vice chairman, and Mrs. J. S. Mills was selected. Both of these ladies entered heart and soul into the work, as is proven by the large amount of work accomplished. Valuable work has been done by Dr. John W. Robertson and Mr. H. R. Hearn in the home service section. Over a thousand hearts have been brightened by the self -sacrificing efforts of the above-named gentlemen.

Accomac was one of the first counties in the Potomac Division to organize a Junior Red Cross. Thirty-three of the forty schools in the county organized auxiliaries, the membership being 3,300. Two thousand dollars was contributed to the Child Welfare Fund, many refugee garments were made, also comfort-kits, scrap books, shot bags, etc.

Miss Constance Taylor was chosen out of the fifteen from the Potomac Division to consider plans for the peace program.
She was very proud when the announcement was made that the Accomac Juniors had raised more money, per school population, than any other county in the division. The principal work of the Juniors, during the session of 1919-20, was sending goodies to the shell-shocked patients in the Hampton Hospital.

That the Accomac people were alive to their duty, both to the soldiers and suffering humanity, is manifest, for $25,000 was raised by the chapter and its branches. The people of Accomac and Northampton counties gave $2,500 to buy an ambulance to be used in France.

Below is given some of the articles, made by the Accomac County Red Cross, in large numbers:

SURGICAL DRESSINGS: -- Gauze wipes, 82,405 gauze compresses, 1,025 gauze sponges, 3,250 laparotomy pads, 723 absorbent pads, 3,461 triangular bandages, 4,378 rolled muslin bandages, 985 T bandages, 254 many tailed bandages, 1,136 abdominal bandages, 487.

HOSPITAL GARMENTS AND SUPPLIES: -- Pajamas, 900 hospital bed shirts, 104 helpless case shirts, 281 bed socks, 108 pairs napkins, 761 shot bags, 14,306 pillows, 75.

KNITTED ARTICLES: -- Sweaters, 670 socks, 1,548 pairs helmets, 10 wristlets, 148 mufflers, 13 refugee garments, 2,500.

MISCELLANEOUS: -- Picture puzzles, 348 story books, 600 gun wipes, 55,860 comfort kits (furnished), 2,500 property bags, 1,447 Christmas packages for overseas, 300.

One cot with full equipment was sent to Camp Lee.

FRANCES L. TAYLOR, Publicity Committee Chairman.

An intensive food campaign was conducted in the county under the leadership of J. Brooks Mapp and Mrs. J. W. Stockley and with the aid of the Radford Chautauqua. The help of the housekeepers was whole-hearted. The "don't waste" of war time and the instruction in food values, the mission of the "calory," etc., proved of great help in this educational campaign among the housewives. As one housekeeper expressed it, "the war certainly taught us to serve less meat, more vegetables, fewer courses and the value of better cooked food, as nothing else could." The intelligent planning of meals, the wise selection of food, the interest in cooking, the clean plate and the proper use of leftovers during the war has meant better health and the saving of many dollars to our people. The teachers of the public schools, at the suggestion of Superintendent G. G. Joynes, brought the facts of food conservation and fuel saving into their daily lessons.

In the first four Liberty Loan drives the value of the bonds sold was $658,600, falling below the allotment of the extent of $141,000. But the county exceeded its quota by $16,950 in the Victory Loan drive, buying bonds to the value of $503,000. The First National Bank of Onancock sold $358,000 worth of bonds. Mrs. R. J. White was chairman of the committee for raising the Fourth and Fifth Liberty Loan quotas. Belle Haven led the Fourth drive by subscribing $19,050.00.

During the year 1918 War Savings and Thrift Stamps were sold in the county to the amount of $253,955, maturity value. The ladies of the county sold Thrift Stamps at all the county fairs.

Accomac's allotment in the United War Work drive was $9,000, but the committee decided to work for double that amount. So wonderfully was the drive conducted and so whole-heartedly were the people in sympathy with the cause, that they gave $24,000, and thus tripled the amount asked of them. Accomac won the State honor flag in this drive.

The Draft Board in Accomac county was composed of the following: Dr. John Hack Ayres, chairman John D. Grant and B. T. Melson. The following doctors in the county served as members of the Medical Advisory Board: Rooker J. White, William F. Kellam, D. L. DeCormis, John W. Robertson, William M. Burwell, R. R. Nevitte and Joseph Hart Hiden.

The Peninsula Enterprise , published at Accomac, Virginia, rendered a distinctive service to its patrons during the draft periods by publishing the registration numbers and the order in which each man registered in the county was called into service. It is claimed that no other county paper in Virginia rendered such a service to its readers. At the close of the war the Enterprise published a sketch on the life and record of each boy on the Gold Start list of Accomac county, together with a photograph of each.

There were 921 in service from Accomac county. The county boasts five Distinguished Service men and one woman who received special distinction. They are as follows:

Beverly Fielding Brown, brigadier general, 116th Field Artillery, Ninety-first Division -- Officer of the Legion of Honor. [Thought to have been the youngest Brigadier General in the United States Army -- thirty-eight.]

Dr. John Bowdoin Mears, attached to Marine Corps at Santo Domingo -- Cited. [This citation is not included among those verified by the War History Commission and published in Source Volume I. It is, however, thought to be authentic.]

Clarence Ames Martin, captain, Fifty-sixth Infantry, Seventh Division -- Cited by division commander.

Vernon Lee Somers (deceased), second lieutenant, Forty-ninth Company, Fifth Marines, Second Division -- Distinguished Service Cross and Navy Cross cited twice by division commander.

Miss Sarah Waples Crosley, Red Cross nurse -- French Croix de Guerre Serbian Cross of Mercy.

James Carroll Joynes (colored), private, Company D, 369th Infantry, Ninety-third Division -- French Croix de Guerre with bronze star.

The following commissioned officers, in addition to those mentioned above, have furnished their records to the community historian:

Dr. F. C. A. Kellam (deceased), lieutenant-colonel and commander of base hospital at Fort Sam Houston, Texas.

Dr. Claude Colonna, first lieutenant, Medical Corps, attached to U. S. S. Agamemnon.

Dr. Edward Critcher, served with British army (rank not given).

Joseph Hart Hiden, captain, U. S. Army, Medical Corps, on duty at debarkation hospital No. 5, New York City.

James C. Doughty, lieutenant, Medical Corps, attached to U. S. S. Baltimore later stationed on New England coast.

Robert Battaile Hiden, ensign, U. S. Navy.

John William Robertson, first lieutenant, Medical Corps.

John Wise Ross, captain, Dental Corps, 319th Infantry, Eightieth Division.

Dr. Ira Hurst, captain, M. R. C.

Dr. Edward T. Ames, first lieutenant, M. R. C.

B. D. Ayres, first lieutenant, Forty-seventh C. A. C.

H. Allen Westcott, first lieutenant, Reserve Corps.

N. P. Westcott, lieutenant, Forty-eighth Infantry.

The spirit of the boys of Accomac was expressed by Sam Mason, of Makemie Park , in the following conversation. When the call came, a friend said to Sam: "How about it, boy? Do you want to go?" He answered: "Well, Ma'am, I don't know that I do want to go, but I feel it is just as much my duty as the other fellow's, and I am going across happy, I told my folks to stop crying, I am going to get happy and stay happy doing my bit as long as 'Uncle Sam' needs me."

The Onancock service flag bears ninety-one stars, and three men from this city made the supreme sacrifice: Clayton Evans, Stewart Ashby and Allen Watson. Following is the Gold Star roster for the county:

Commander John S. Parsons, Accomac , Va.

Lieutenant Vernon Lee Somers, Bloxom , Va.

Corporal Jesse Thomas Shield, Locustville , Va.

Corporal Joseph Thomas Phillips, Keller , Va.

Corporal Byron C. Cugler, Tasley , Va.

Private Crisby Ray Bowden, Chincoteague, Va.

Private Ansley H. Holston, Chincoteague, Va.

Private Bagby Stuart Ashby, Jr., Accomac, Va.

Private Clayton Thomas Evans, Horntown , Va.

Private Isaac R. Daisey, Chincoteague, Va.

Private Coley Woodland Gardner, Melfa , Va.

Private Claud J. Matthews, New Church , Va.

Private Homer W. Hastings, Melfa, Va.

Private Tubman Lewis Crockett, Tangier , Va.

Private Augustus Drummond Bonniwell, Painter , Va.

Private Lawrence Summerfield Adams, Harborton , Va.

Private Edward W. Mears, Wachapreague , Va.

Private Burleigh Ray Chance, Locustville, Va.

Private William L. Crockett, Tangier, Va.

Private Allen Watson, Wachapreague, Va.

Private Eulas S. Ewell, Mappsville , Va.

Private Harry S. Birch, Chincoteague, Va.

Private Emanuel Joseph Halverson, Harborton, Va.

Private Lee D. Dennis, Quinby , Va.

Private Estel G. Bloxom, Makemie Park, Va.

Private Emory L. Ferguson, Guilford , Va.

Private Oscar C. Satchell, Makemie Park, Va.

Private William Andrew Spurley, Leemont , Va.

While we feel that every soldier, sailor and civilian of Accomac county is deserving of praise for the efforts put forth in the time of the country's great need, there are always some special deeds of sacrifice that stand out in bold relief against the horizon of every community's efforts along any particular line. For this reason we feel that the records of Rev. Frank A. Ridout and Miss Sarah Waples Crosley are deserving of special mention.

Before coming to Onancock as rector of Holy Trinity church , Rev. Frank A Ridout offered his services to the War Department as a chaplain, but was declared ineligible because of his age. But the spirit of patriotism continued to whisper to him, and in April, 1918, the vestries of Holy Trinity and St. George's churches granted him a leave of seven months to do Y. M. C. A. work in France. He was in charge of the Y. M. C. A. activities of the Seventh Division, and while serving in this capacity was badly wounded on the head and was also shell shocked.

As soon as Belgium was invaded by the Germans, Miss
Sarah W. Crosley, of Savageville , offered her services to the American Red Cross, and sailed with the first contingent that left this country in September, 1914. After working in a hospital in France for several months, she was sent to Belgium, where she remained until the last Red Cross unit was withdrawn. When America entered the war she was placed in charge of a large Red Cross hospital in Paris, remaining there until the Armistice was signed. Miss Crosley expected to return to America, but answered the call of the Near East instead. En route from Italy to Montenegro, she was robbed of all of her possessions, including all papers, and was under surveillance until duplicates could be procured from Washington. She describes her experiences on that journey as trying and dangerous beyond belief. As stated elsewhere in this narrative, Miss Crosley was decorated by both France and Serbia. Accomac is proud of her work, both in the field of honor and in the field of mercy.

The principal post-war activities in the country have centered around the Red Cross and the Near East Relief organizations. At the close of the war the local Red Cross engaged a nurse for six weeks who gave a course in home nursing and hygiene to six classes. In 1921 a health nurse, Miss Sarah Crosley, was engaged by the Red Cross and employed by that organization until May 14, 1923. At this time the health work in the country was taken over by the county and State. The Red Cross, however, continues to contribute $300 annually to the health unit in Accomac county. Hundreds of refugee garments have been made by the Red Cross yearly Christmas bags for soldiers on foreign duty and disabled soldiers in hospitals have been sent. The chapter always responds to calls sent from headquarters, and a month ago when a call came for six sweaters, seven were sent.

In 1921, 1922 and 1923 the Near East Relief committee raised $13,420.19, or $3,340.39 over the annual quota of $3,360. The committee is composed of Mrs. R. J. White, chairman J. C. W. Leatherbury, Onancock Mrs. L. H. Lord, Belle Haven Mrs. Sadie Savage, Onley Mrs. Edith Davis, Atlantic Rev. W. G. Boggs, Accomac.

In 1921 Accomac was second in the State for oversubscribed quotas in Near East Relief campaigns. Since 1923 contributions of clothing and canned milk have supplemented the quota. One year the county contributed 5,000 pounds of clothing valued at 75 cents per pound.


After shakedown, LST-1079 loaded pontoons and cargo at Davisville, Rhode Island, embarked Marines and took aboard ammunition at New York, and sailed 7 July 1945, for the Canal Zone. She arrived at Coco Solo 16 July, and then proceeded to Pearl Harbor where she was lying at anchor in West Loch when the war ended. [4]

On 21 August, she sailed for Guam via Eniwetok and off loaded cargo and passengers on arrival, sailing again 22 September, for Leyte. From Leyte she went to Subic Bay and then returned to Guam 6 November, to embark troops for "Magic Carpet" passage to San Francisco. [4]

She arrived San Francisco 28 December, was assigned to the 19th Fleet and subsequently made preparations for inactivation. LST-1079 decommissioned in March 1946, and was placed in reserve, berthed with the Columbia River Group of the Pacific Reserve Fleet at Puget Sound. [4]

Because of fleet requirements brought about by the Korean War. LST-1079 was recalled for active service and moved to the East Coast. She recommissioned in October 1950, and joined the US Atlantic Fleet. Her first assignment took her to Goose Bay, Labrador, in conjunction with services for the US Army. During this voyage she had a close brush with an iceberg which tore a hole in her bow. She was saved from sure disaster by the intentness to duty of her forward lookout during conditions of extremely heavy fog. Sighting the iceberg dead ahead he quickly gave the alarm, and enabled his ship to avoid a head-on-collision. [4]

She later moved to a more hospitable climate, operating off in Florida in shuttling general stores between Green Cove Springs and Norfolk, Virginia. During 1954�, in addition to her normal operations, she was involved in innovative exercises such as LST-helicopter operations, and the use of an LST as a rocket launching platform. On 1 July 1955, she was named Payette County (LST-1079) and operated with a civil service crew until 1 November 1959, when she was placed out of service and struck from the Naval Vessel Register. She was sold 18 May 1961, to Zidell Explorations, Inc., Astoria, Oregon. [4]


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Contents

World War II, 1945� [ edit | edit source ]

Between 1945 and 1960, LST-1126 deployed to the western Pacific eight times. Her first tour of duty there came in April 1945, when she departed New Orleans, transited the Panama Canal, stopped at San Diego, Seattle and Pearl Harbor, before continuing westward. As she continued her voyage, she visited Eniwetok Atoll Apra Harbor, Guam Saipan and Okinawa. In late September, she joined the post-World War II occupation forces in China.

Operating off the west coast of the United States out of San Diego when not in the western Pacific, LST-1126 returned to the Far East in 1948, 1953, during the winters of 1945-55, 1957, 1958 and 1959-60. The ship also made three Distant Early Warning Line re-supply runs to Alaska in 1949, 1950, and 1953. On 1 July 1955, just after her return from her fourth deployment to the western Pacific, the ship was renamed USS Snohomish County (LST-1126).

The permanent assignment of an LST squadron to United States Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan, made the 1959-60 deployment Snohomish County ' s last until the escalation of the Vietnam War. Until 1964, she operated out of San Diego and made two Mid-Pac cruises in 1961 and 1962. The second cruise was in support of Operation Dominic, a series of nuclear tests. Upon completion of this assignment, she returned to normal operations along the Pacific coast.

Vietnam War, 1965� [ edit | edit source ]

In 1965, the American buildup in South Vietnam began in earnest. Accordingly, the need for support ships grew, and Snohomish County returned to the Far East once more. She drew normal tours of duty (five to seven months at a time) in 1965, 1966, and 1967.

In July 1965 Snohomish County, was permanently assigned to support Coast Guard Squadron One Division 12 at Da Nang. On 16 July the ships of Division 12 formed around Snohomish County in U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay, Philippines for the transit to Da Nang where they arrived at 07:00 on 20 July 1965. Ώ]

In 1968, she was sent on an extended deployment which did not end until the spring of 1970, just before her decommissioning. On each of these last deployments, the ship made the circuit from Japan to South Vietnam to Subic Bay. For the most part, she hauled men and supplies from American bases in Japan and the Philippines to South Vietnam though, on occasion, she received other assignments, notably one with the Mobile Riverine Force in 1968. There were also ports-of-call such as Hong Kong and Keelung and Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Snohomish County resumed normal operations, exercises, drills, and upkeep in and around San Diego when not deployed to the Far East.

On 22 April 1970, Snohomish County returned to her WestPac homeport, Apra Harbor, Guam, and went through an inspection and survey. She was declared unfit for further naval service. On 1 July 1970, she decommissioned at Naval Station, Guam, and her name was struck from the Navy List. In January 1971, her hulk was sold to Chin Ho Fa Steel and Iron Co., Ltd., of Taiwan for scrapping.

Snohomish County earned eight battle stars for the Vietnam War.


Watch the video: LST-325 passing through Meldhal Lock