USS New York (BB 34)

USS New York (BB 34)

USS New York (BB 34)

The USS New York (BB 34) was the name ship of the New York class of battleships, and saw service in both world wars, operating with the British Grand Fleet in 1917-18 and taking part in Operation Torch and the invasions of Iwo Jima and Okinawa in the Second World War.

Despite being the name ship of her class, and being allocated a lower BB number, the USS New York was actually the second 14in gun battleship to be constructed for the US Navy. She was laid down on 11 September 1911, five months after her sister ship the Texas, launched on 30 October 1912 and commissioned on 15 April 1914, one month after the Texas.

The New York was almost immediately sent south to act as the flagship of the naval force at Veracruz, occupied by the United States to prevent an arms shipment reaching the Mexican dictator. She then served off the East Coast, before in November 1917 being chosen to serve as the flagship for Rear Admiral Hugh Rodman, commander of the battleship squadron sent to serve with the British Grand Fleet (as the 6th Battle Squadron). This squadron took part in a number of operations in the North Sea, although the only German ships encountered were U-boats. The New York was present when the German fleet sailed into interment on 21 November 1918.

The New York spent most of the inter-war years serving in the Pacific Fleet, from her home port of San Diego. After taking Admiral Rodman to the coronation of George VI she served on the east coast, working with the US Naval Academy.

In the mid 1920s her coal fired boilers were replaced with oil fired boilers. The cage masts were replaced with a tripod foremast and short tower rear mast. The original two funnels were replaced with a single funnel. Six of the 5in guns were moved up from their protected casemates to unprotected positions on the deck, to make space for anti-submarine blisters on her sides. During the Second World War her anti-aircraft armament was increased, and she ended the war with ten quad mountings for 40mm guns and thirty six 20mm guns.

In the summer of 1941 the New York became part of the American Neutrality Patrol, established to help the British escort convoys across the Atlantic. In July she was part of the naval force that escorted US troops to Iceland, where they replaced the British garrison. Her presence in the Atlantic meant that she was one of only seven US battleships left intact after the attack on Pearl Harbor (a figure that included at least one partially disarmed training ship, the Wyoming). The New York was used on convoy escort duty during most of 1942, although in November she and the Texas provided fire support for the Allied invasion of North Africa. The New York was used to bombard enemy positions at Safi on 8 November 1942.

After this spell of active service the New York was used as a gunnery training ship in Chesapeake Bay for the first half of 1944, while in the second half she conducted three training cruises to Trinidad.

Towards the end of 1944 the US Navy was short of 'old' battleships to use as shore bombardment ships in the Pacific. Most of the ships already in the Pacific were committed to the invasion of the Philippines, and so a new force had to be created from ships no longer needed in Europe or in training roles. The New York reached San Pedro on 6 December 1944, where she underwent a short training programme. She then sailed into the war zone, joining the fleet in time to take part in the invasion of Iwo Jima.

The New York formed part of Task Force 54, under Rear Admiral Rodgers (alongside the Tennessee, Idaho, Nevada, Texas and Arkansas). The bombardment of Iwo Jima began on 16 February, and lasted for three days. During this period the New York fired more rounds than any other ship in the bombardment force.

The ten available 'old' battleships came together as Task Force 54 (Rear Admiral Deyo) for the invasion of Okinawa. New Yorkformed part of Group 5, with the New Mexico (Group 1 contained Texas and Maryland, Group 2 Arkansas and Colorado, Group 3 Tennessee and Nevada and Group 4 Idaho and West Virginia).

The New York took part in the pre-invasion bombardment, starting on 27 March. This was the first of 76 consecutive days of action for the old battleship, in which she produced fire support to the troops on the island. During this period she was hit once by a kamikaze aircraft, but the Japanese aircraft bounced off after destroying the New York's spotting aircraft.

On 11 June the New York set sail for Pearl Harbor, where the barrels of some of her worn guns were replaced. She was allocated to the force being gathered for the proposed invasion of Japan, but the war ended before this operation was needed.

After the war the New York made one trip from Pearl Harbor to the US West Coast and one from Pearl to New York, on each occasion bringing troops home. She was then allocated to the fleet to be used as targets during the Bikini atomic tests. She survived both the air blast and the underwater blast, and was studied for two years, before being sunk deliberately during a battle exercise on 8 July 1948.

Displacement (standard)

27,000t

Displacement (loaded)

28,367t

Top Speed

21kts

Range

7,060nm at 10kts

Armour – belt

12-10in

- lower casemate

11in-9in

- upper casemate

6.5in

- armour deck

2in

- turret faces

14in

- turret tops

4in

- turret sides

2in

- turret rears

8in

- barbettes

10in and 12in

- coning tower

12in

- coning tower top

4in

Length

573ft

Width

95ft 6in

Armaments

Ten 14in guns in twin turrets
Twenty one 5in guns
Four submerged beam 21in torpedo tubes

Crew complement

1042

Laid down

11 September 1911

Launched

30 October 1912

Completed

15 April 1914

Fate

Sunk 8 July 1948


Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

The fifth New York (BB-34) was laid down 11 September 1911 by Brooklyn Navy Yard, New York launched 30 October 1912 sponsored by Miss Elsie Calder and commissioned 15 April 1914, Captain Thomas S. Rodgers in command.

Ordered south soon after commissioning, New York was flagship for Rear Admiral Frank Fletcher, commanding the fleet occupying and blockading Vera Cruz until resolution of the crisis with Mexico in July 1914. New York then headed north for fleet operations along the Atlantic coast as war broke out in Europe.

Upon the entry of the United States into the war, New York sailed as flagship with Battleship Division 9 commanded by Rear Admiral Hugh Rodman to strengthen the British Grand Fleet in the North Sea, arriving Scapa Flow 7 December 1917. Constituting a separate squadron in the Grand Fleet, the American ships joined in blockade and escort missions and by their very presence so weighted the Allies' preponderance of naval power as to inhibit the Germans from attempting any major fleet engagement's. New York twice encountered U-boats.

During her World War I service, New York was frequently visited by royal and other high-ranking representatives of the Allies, and she was present for one of the most dramatic moments of the war, the surrender of the German High Seas Fleet in the Firth of Forth 21 November 1918. As a last European mission, New York joined the ships escorting President Woodrow Wilson from an ocean rendezvous, to Brest en route the Versailles Conference.

Returning to a program which alternated individual and fleet exercises with necessary maintenance, New York trained in the Caribbean in spring 1919, and that summer joined the Pacific Fleet at San Diego, her home port for the next 16 years. She trained off Hawaii and the West Coast, occasionally returning to the Atlantic and Caribbean for brief missions or overhauls. In 1937, carrying Admiral Hugh Rodman, the President's personal representative for the coronation of King George VI of England, New York sailed to take part in the Grand Naval Review of 20 May 1937 as sole U.S. Navy representative.

For much of the following 3 years, New York trained Naval Academy midshipmen and other prospective officers with cruises to Europe, Canada, and the Caribbean, and in mid- 1941 she joined the Neutrality Patrol. She escorted troops to Iceland in July 1941, then served as station ship at Argentia, Newfoundland, protecting the new American base there. From America's entry into World War II, New York guarded Atlantic convoys to Iceland and Scotland when the U-boat menace was gravest, submarine contacts were numerous, but the convoys were brought to harbor intact.

New York brought her big guns to the invasion of North Africa, providing crucial gunfire support at Safi 8 November 1942. She then stood by at Casablanca and Fedhala before returning home for convoy duty escorting critically needed men and supplies to North Africa. She then took up important duty training gunners for battleships and destroyer escorts in Chesapeake Bay, rendering this vital service until 10 June 1944, when she began the first of 3 training cruises for the Naval Academy, voyaging to Trinidad on each.

New York sailed 21 November for the West Coast, arriving San Pedro 6 December for gunnery training in preparation for amphibious operations. She departed San Pedro 12 January 1945, called at Pearl Harbor, and was diverted to Eniwetok to survey screw damage. Nevertheless, despite impaired speed, she joined the Iwo Jima assault force in rehearsals at Saipan. She sailed well ahead of the main body to join in pre-invasion bombardment at Iwo Jima 16 February. During the next 3 days, she fired more rounds than any other ship present and, as if to show what an old-timer could do, made a spectacular direct 14"-hit on an enemy ammunition dump.

Leaving Iwo Jima, New York at last repaired her propellers at Manus, and had speed restored for the assault on Okinawa, which she reached 27 March to begin 76 consecutive days of action. She fired pre-invasion and diversionary bombardments, covered landings, and gave days and nights of close support to troops advancing ashore. She did not go unscathed a kamikaze grazed her 14 April, demolishing her spotting plane on its catapult. She left Okinawa 11 June to regun at Pearl Harbor.

New York prepared at Pearl Harbor for the planned invasion of Japan, and after war's end, made a voyage to the West Coast returning veterans and bringing out their replacements. She sailed from Pearl Harbor again 29 September with passengers for New York, arriving 19 October. Here she prepared to serve as target ship in operation "Crossroads," the Bikini atomic tests, sailing 4 March 1946 for the West Coast. She left San Francisco 1 May, and after calls in Pearl Harbor and Kwajalein, reached Bikini 15 June. Surviving the surface blast 1 July and the underwater explosion 25 July, she was taken into Kwajalein and decommissioned there 29 August 1946. Later towed to Pearl Harbor, she was studied during the next two years, and on 8 July 1948 was towed out to sea some 40 miles and there sunk after an 8-hour pounding by ships and planes carrying out full-scale battle maneuvers with new weapons.


USS New York (BB 34) - History

27,000 tons
573' x 95.2' x 28.5'
10 × 14" guns
21 × 5"
4 × 21' torpedo tubes

World War I
Upon the entry of the United States into World War I, under the command of Captain Edward L. Beach, Sr., New York sailed as flagship with Battleship Division 9 (BatDiv 9), commanded by Rear Admiral Hugh Rodman to strengthen the British Grand Fleet in the North Sea, arriving Scapa Flow on 7 December 1917. Constituting the 6th Battle Squadron in the Grand Fleet, the American ships joined in blockade and escort missions and by their very presence so weighted the Allies' preponderance of naval power as to inhibit the Germans from attempting any major fleet engagements. New York twice encountered U-boats.

During her World War I service, New York was frequently visited by royal and other high-ranking representatives of the Allies, and she was present for one of the most dramatic moments of the war, the surrender of the German High Seas Fleet in the Firth of Forth on 21 November 1918, after which the secondary battery was reduced to 16 5 in (130 mm)/51 cal guns.[1] As a last European mission, New York joined the ships escorting President Woodrow Wilson from an ocean rendezvous, to Brest, France en route to the Versailles Peace Conference.

Inter-War Period
Returning to a program which alternated individual and fleet exercises with necessary maintenance, New York trained in the Caribbean in spring 1919, and that summer joined the Pacific Fleet at San Diego, her home port for the next 16 years. She trained off Hawaii and the West Coast, occasionally returning to the Atlantic and Caribbean for brief missions or overhauls. By 1937, the anti-aircraft armament included eight 3 in (76 mm)/50 cal guns and eight 1.1 in (28 mm)/75 cal guns. In 1937, carrying Admiral Hugh Rodman, the President's personal representative for the coronation of King George VI, New York sailed to take part in the Grand Naval Review of 20 May 1937 as sole US Navy representative. New York was fitted with XAF RADAR in February, 1938, including the first United States duplexer so a single antenna could both send and receive.

For much of the following three years, New York trained United States Naval Academy midshipmen and other prospective officers with cruises to Europe, Canada, and the Caribbean, and in mid-1941 she joined the Neutrality Patrol. She escorted troops to Iceland in July 1941, then served as station ship at Naval Station Argentia, Newfoundland, protecting the new American base there.

World War II
After America entered the war, New York guarded Atlantic convoys to Iceland and Scotland against U-boats. In 1942, the secondary battery was reduced to six 5 in (130 mm) guns and the anti-aircraft armament was increased to ten 3" guns, 24 x Bofors 40mm guns, and 42 Oerlikon 20mm cannons.

New York participated in the pre-invasion bombardment of Safi, Morocco on November 8, 1942. She then stood by at Casablanca and Fedhala before returning home for convoy duty escorting men and supplies to North Africa. She then took up duty training gunners for battleships and destroyer escorts in Chesapeake Bay, rendering this service until 10 June 1944, when she began the first of three training cruises for the Naval Academy, voyaging to Trinidad.

Pacific Service
Departed for the Pacific on November 21, 1944 for the West Coast, arriving at San Pedro, California on December 6 for gunnery training in preparation for amphibious operations. Departed San Pedro on January 12, 1945 via Pearl Harbor. On the way, New York suffered screw damage and was diverted to Eniwetok to survey screw damage. Despite impaired speed, she joined the Iwo Jima assault force in rehearsals off Saipan.

New York participated in the pre-invasion bombardment of Iwo Jima beginning on February 16, 1945. During the next 3 days, she fired more rounds than any other ship present and made a spectacular direct 14" hit on an enemy ammunition dump.

Afterwards, proceeded to Seeadler Harbor and during late February 1945 dry docked in USS Auxiliary Floating Dry Dock 4 (AFDB-4) to repair her propellers until March 1945 then departed northward bound for Okinawa.

On March 27, 1945 the battleship began 76 consecutive days of action during the Battle of Okinawa including the bombardment of Okinawa before the U.S. Marines and U.S. Army landing on April 1, 1945 then fire support against targets on the island.

On April 14, 1945 a kamikaze grazed her demolishing her spotting plane on the catapult. On June 11, 1945 after 76 consecutive days on station, departed across the Pacific to Pearl Harbor to prepare for the invasion of Japan until the end of the Pacific War. For her World War II service, USS New York received three battle stars.

Postwar
At the end of the Pacific War, transported veterans to the west coast of the United States and embarked replacements and returned to Pearl Harbor. On September 29, 1945 departed with passengers embarked via the Panama Canal to New York arriving on October 19, 1945.

New York was selected as a target ship for "Operation Crossroads" the atomic tests, and departed on March 4, 1946 for the West Coast. On May 1, 1946 departed San Francisco steaming via Pearl Harbor and Kwajalein before arriving at Bikini Atoll on June 15, 1946 and was used as a target vessel for the atomic bomb tests.

On July 1, 1946 New York survived the "Test Able" surface blast. On July 25, 1946 survived "Test Baker" an underwater explosion. Afterwards, towed to Kwajalein and officially decommissioned on August 29, 1946. Afterwards, towed to Pearl Harbor and studied for the next two years until early July 1948.

Sinking History
On July 8, 1948 towed out to sea 40 miles used as a target for ships and planes carrying out full-scale battle maneuvers with new weapons for eight hours.

Naval Aviation News. October 1948. "Planes Sink Battleships" page 11:
"The ex-BB's New York and Nevada, having survived the tests at Bikini, were towed from Pearl Harbor to a spot south of Oahu, and there were subjected to an unmerciful pounding by fleet air and surface units. Planes led by the commanding officer of Fleet All Weather Training Unit Pacific (FAWTUPAC), Captain Paul H. Ramsey, USN, were in on both kills. On 7 July 1948 the New York was the first to feel the sting of the fighters and attack aircraft. Twenty-six planes, consisting of two F7F-4Ns, six F8F-1Ns, twelve F6F-5Ns, and six TBM-3Ns dropped a total of 48 500-pound bombs, 40 100-pound bombs, 98 5-inch HVARs and expended 4,100 rounds of .50 caliber ammunition. Twenty-one direct hits were scored with the 500-pound bombs, 20 direct hits were scored with the 100-pound bombs, and 56 direct hits were scored with the 5-inch HVARs. While surface units stood by and submarines waited to close in for the kill, the tired old battlewagon rolled over and sank as the last participating FAWTUPAC planes recovered from their bombing attacks."

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Wikipedia:WikiProject Military history/Assessment/USS New York (BB-34)

Hello all! I sincerely regret having sort of disappeared suddenly, and for my lame-duck stint as coord. Some unexpected life events happened in late 2013 that essentially eliminated my ability to edit with quantity or consistency. That said I wanted to push up the articles I had improved at the time but hadn't had the chance to put through FAC and ACR, starting with my contribution to the battleships project, here. — Ed! (talk) 22:40, 20 January 2015 (UTC)

Support Comments: G'day, Ed, nice work. I have a few observations/comments: AustralianRupert (talk) 13:31, 21 January 2015 (UTC)

  • a couple of the external links appear to be 404/dead now: [1]
    • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 22:42, 29 January 2015 (UTC)
    • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 22:42, 29 January 2015 (UTC)
    • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 22:42, 29 January 2015 (UTC)
    • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 22:42, 29 January 2015 (UTC)
    • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 20:22, 16 February 2015 (UTC)
    • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 20:22, 16 February 2015 (UTC)
    • Not sure how the rounding algorithm is affecting this or how to correct, but those are the same measurements. — Ed!(talk) 20:22, 16 February 2015 (UTC)
    • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 20:22, 16 February 2015 (UTC)
    • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 20:22, 16 February 2015 (UTC)
    • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 20:22, 16 February 2015 (UTC)
    • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 20:22, 16 February 2015 (UTC)
    • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 20:22, 16 February 2015 (UTC)
    • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 20:22, 16 February 2015 (UTC)
      • I believe most of my comments have been addressed. I will likely not be around much over the next couple of weeks to a month, so I will add my support now, so as to not hold the article up. Good luck taking it further and thank you for your hard work so far. Cheers, AustralianRupert (talk) 23:04, 14 March 2015 (UTC)

      Comments Edit

      • I see some use of tonnes, as a US ship everything should be in English units, not metric.
        • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 20:32, 16 February 2015 (UTC)
        • So, remove all convert templates after the first use of each? — Ed!(talk) 20:32, 16 February 2015 (UTC)
          • Yes, but only ones that have been converted once already.--Sturmvogel 66 (talk) 03:30, 19 February 2015 (UTC)
          • So would it be best to move stats into a second infobox? — Ed!(talk) 20:32, 16 February 2015 (UTC)
            • I think so, but only the changed stats. There's no requirement to do so if you prefer not to, but regardless you should only have two sets of stats in the infobox(es)--Sturmvogel 66 (talk) 03:30, 19 February 2015 (UTC)
              • Still remains to be done.--Sturmvogel 66 (talk) 02:50, 25 March 2015 (UTC)
              • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                • Not entirely. Boilers need to be added to the power line and the ihp figure needs to be converted.--Sturmvogel 66 (talk) 02:50, 25 March 2015 (UTC)
                • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                • That's the number I've seen. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                • Do you happen to know which magazine? — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                  • Naval Institute Proceedings, but remember that magazines use an ISSN, not an ISBN.--Sturmvogel 66 (talk) 02:50, 25 March 2015 (UTC)
                  • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                  • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                  • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                  • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                  • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                  • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                  • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                  • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                  • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 02:17, 4 March 2015 (UTC)
                  • Convert the displacement figures in the infobox.--Sturmvogel 66 (talk) 02:50, 25 March 2015 (UTC)
                  • I don't know that the stuff on the earlier New York (or at least the fate of the ship) is all that relevant to this article.
                    • Stuck that there because the Navy history makes such a big deal of the number of ship to bear the name. Thought it might be worth a mention to avoid confusion with other ships. — Ed!(talk) 00:00, 28 March 2015 (UTC)
                    • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 00:00, 28 March 2015 (UTC)
                    • Do you have a ref? I've been having a hard time finding anything on this. — Ed!(talk) 00:00, 28 March 2015 (UTC)
                      • I'll check Massie tomorrow and see if my memory is correct. Parsecboy (talk) 17:27, 2 April 2015 (UTC)
                      • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 00:00, 28 March 2015 (UTC)
                      • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 00:00, 28 March 2015 (UTC)
                      • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 00:00, 28 March 2015 (UTC)
                      • Probably better to link directly to Invasion_of_Iceland#United_States_occupation_force
                        • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 00:00, 28 March 2015 (UTC)
                        • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 00:00, 28 March 2015 (UTC)
                        • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 00:00, 28 March 2015 (UTC)
                        • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 00:00, 28 March 2015 (UTC)
                        • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 00:00, 28 March 2015 (UTC)
                        • Support
                          • No dab links (no action req'd).
                          • No issues with external links (no action req'd).
                          • Most of the images lack alt text so you might consider adding it (suggestion only, not an ACR requirement).
                            • Done. — Ed!(talk) 15:15, 19 April 2015 (UTC)
                            • Done. — Ed!(talk) 15:15, 19 April 2015 (UTC)
                            • Fixed. — Ed!(talk) 15:15, 19 April 2015 (UTC)
                            • Thanks! — Ed!(talk) 15:15, 19 April 2015 (UTC)

                            Comments by Peacemaker67 (crack. thump) 08:55, 18 April 2015 (UTC)


                            USS New York (BB-34) - Legends of Warfare

                            The battleship USS New York served the Navy from 1914 until just after WWII. New York was famously sent to reinforce the British Grand Fleet during WWI. Extensively rebuilt and modernized in 1927–28, New York continued to serve both in the Atlantic and the Pacific fleets and was in drydock being further modernized on December 7, 1941. It rejoined the fleet, first providing escort in the Atlantic, then providing gunfire support for Operation Torch, the Allied invasion of North Africa. Transferred to the Pacific Fleet in late 1944, New York turned its 14-inch guns on enemy positions at Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Following the war, New York was declared obsolete and used as a target for the 1946 atomic blasts at Bikini Atoll, survived the tests, and was eventually sunk by conventional weapons in July 1948. The hundreds of photographs in this volume trace the history of this warship from its launching in 1914, through two world wars, to atomic bomb testing. Part of the Legends of Warfare series.

                            Size: 9″ x 9″ | 241 b/w and color photos | 112 pp | Binding: hard cover


                            USS NEW YORK (BB-34)FROM WWI TO THE ATOMIC AGE

                            Monografie a cura di David Doyle con foto in gran parte inedite corredate da esaustive didascalie presentano il disegno, la costruzione, il varo e la carriera operativa della nave presa in esame.

                            The battleship USS New York served the Navy from 1914 until just after WWII. New York was famously sent to reinforce the British Grand Fleet during WWI. Extensively rebuilt and modernized in 1927â€28, New York continued to serve both in the Atlantic and the Pacific fleets and was in drydock being further modernized on December 7, 1941. It rejoined the fleet, first providing escort in the Atlantic, then providing gunfire support for Operation Torch, the Allied invasion of North Africa. Transferred to the Pacific Fleet in late 1944, New York turned its 14-inch guns on enemy positions at Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Following the war, New York was declared obsolete and used as a target for the 1946 atomic blasts at Bikini Atoll, survived the tests, and was eventually sunk by conventional weapons in July 1948. The hundreds of photographs in this volume trace the history of this warship from its launching in 1914, through two world wars, to atomic bomb testing. Part of the Legends of Warfare series.


                            USS New York (BB 34)


                            Interesting philatelic cover posted aboard the battleship that made its shakedown cruise to Mexican waters during the summer, 1914. Collector C.W. Haynes, Marion KY franked his request with imperforated pair of the one cent Washington (Sc #404), posted aboard USS NEW YORK on 14 JUN 1914 with the wording VERA CRUZ/ MEXICO in the killer bars. Haynes’s name appears in a trade advertisement in Stamp Herald looking to trade for pre-cancels from Kentucky (Jan 1919).

                            The 572-foot, 27,000 ton “Super Dreadnought” was launched at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on 30 OCT 1912 and commissioned on 15 APR 1914. She served as Flagship for Admiral Frank Fletcher, commanding the fleet occupying and blockading Vera Cruz (4 MAY-14 SEP 1914). She earned the nickname the “Christmas Ship” for hosting New York City orphans to a big dinner party in the days before World War I.

                            She served as Flag, Division 9 with the British Grand Fleet during the war and operated with the Pacific Fleet (1919-35) except where she underwent modernization at the Norfolk Navy Yard during 1926-27. She returned to the Atlantic Fleet to perform the Midshipman Cruises to Europe, including bringing FDR’s representative Admiral Hugh Rodman to King George’s coronation in May 1937. After performing Neutrality Patrols in 1939, NEW YORK underwent another refit and was there during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on 7 DEC 1941.

                            During World War II, she earned three battle stars participating in the invasion of North Africa, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. She survived as a “target ship” at Bikini Atoll and was decommissioned on 19 AUG 1946. Towed to sea, she was sunk on 8 JUL 1948.


                            USS New York (BB 34) - History

                            The New York class were the first U.S. Navy battleships armed with 14-inch guns, and the last to be built with intermediate weight side armor, coal-fired boilers and more than four main battery turrets. Their general arrangement was based on their immediate predecessors, the Wyoming Class, with a slightly enlarged "flush-deck" hull. In the new ships, five twin turrets for the heavier, harder-hitting 14"/45 guns replaced the six twin 12"/50 gun turrets of the Wyoming s. The two New York s also reverted to reciprocating engines due to a dispute between the Navy and the builders of steam turbines.

                            Both ships served with the Grand Fleet in the North Sea during World War I. Prior to and immediately after that conflict, they were assigned to the Atlantic Fleet and went to the Pacific in mid-1919. They were extensively modernized in 1925-27, becoming the first U.S. Navy battleships to be fitted with tripod masts to support more capable, and heavier, gunfire direction instruments. They received oil-fired boilers, a single smokestack in place of the previous two, and additional deck armor in recognition of increased probable combat ranges and the emerging threat from aircraft bombs. Some of their 5"/51 secondary battery guns were remounted higher above the waterline, and new anti-torpedo blisters increased their beam by more than ten feet, to 106'1" overall. Normal displacement went up to 28,700 tons and speed fell to below twenty knots.

                            In the mid-1930s, New York and Texas were transferred to the Atlantic where they were to spend most of the rest of their active service. Both participated in convoy operations during World War II and supported the North African landings in November 1942. Texas was also present for the invasions of Normandy and Southern France. They went to the Pacific in late 1944 and subsequently took part in the Iwo Jima and Okinawa operations. New York saw her final employment as a target in 1946-48, while Texas became a memorial, a mission she still performs as the last surviving U.S. World War I era battleship.

                            This page features a modest selection of photographs of New York class battleships, plus images related to these ships' basic design features, and provides links to more extensive pictorial coverage of the individual ships.

                            For coverage of other classes of U.S. Navy battleships, see: Battleships -- Overview and Special Image Selection.

                            If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

                            Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

                            Underway at high speed, 29 May 1915.

                            Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

                            Online Image: 63KB 740 x 605 pixels

                            Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

                            Dressed with flags for Navy Day, 27 October 1940.

                            Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

                            Online Image: 109KB 740 x 605 pixels

                            Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

                            Silhouetted against the sunset, while participating in North Atlantic convoy operations, circa summer 1941.
                            Photographed by Lieutenant Dayton A. Seiler, USN.

                            Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

                            Online Image: 63KB 740 x 505 pixels

                            Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

                            Off North Africa on 10 November 1942, just after the Battle of Casablanca.

                            Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

                            Online Image: 96KB 740 x 615 pixels

                            Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

                            At sea in the Hawaii area, while preparing for Pacific combat operations, 6 January 1945.

                            Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

                            Online Image: 104KB 740 x 610 pixels

                            Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

                            Firing her 14"/45 main battery guns, during long range battle practice, February 1928.

                            U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

                            Online Image: 118KB 740 x 580 pixels

                            Bombarding Japanese defenses on Iwo Jima, 16 February 1945.
                            She has just fired the left-hand 14"/45 gun of Number Four turret. View looks aft, on the starboard side.


                            USS New York (BB 34) - History

                            Doyle, David. USS Texas: Squadron at Sea. Carrollton: Squadron/Signal Publications

                            Friedman, Norman. U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated History. Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, 1984

                            Stern, Robert C. US Battleships in Action: Part 1. Carrollton: Squadron/Signal Publications

                            Terzlbaschitsch, Stefan. US Battleships of the US Navy in World War II. New York: Bonanza Books


                            USS New York (BB 34) - History

                            The New York class were the first U.S. Navy battleships armed with 14-inch guns, and the last to be built with intermediate weight side armor, coal-fired boilers and more than four main battery turrets. Their general arrangement was based on their immediate predecessors, the Wyoming Class, with a slightly enlarged "flush-deck" hull. In the new ships, five twin turrets for the heavier, harder-hitting 14"/45 guns replaced the six twin 12"/50 gun turrets of the Wyomings. The two New Yorks also reverted to reciprocating engines due to a dispute between the Navy and the builders of steam turbines.

                            The New York (BB-34) was laid down 11 September 1911 by Brooklyn Navy Yard, New York launched 30 October 1912 sponsored by Miss Elsie Calder and commissioned 15 April 1914, Captain Thomas S. Rodgers in command.

                            Both ships served with the Grand Fleet in the North Sea during World War I. Prior to and immediately after that conflict, they were assigned to the Atlantic Fleet and went to the Pacific in mid-1919. They were extensively modernized in 1925-27, becoming the first U.S. Navy battleships to be fitted with tripod masts to support more capable, and heavier, gunfire direction instruments. They received oil-fired boilers, a single smokestack in place of the previous two, and additional deck armor in recognition of increased probable combat ranges and the emerging threat from aircraft bombs. Some of their 5"/51 secondary battery guns were remounted higher above the waterline, and new anti-torpedo blisters increased their beam by more than ten feet, to 106'1" overall. Normal displacement went up to 28,700 tons and speed fell to below twenty knots.

                            In the mid-1930s, New York and Texas were transferred to the Atlantic where they were to spend most of the rest of their active service. Both participated in convoy operations during World War II and supported the North African landings in November 1942. Texas was also present for the invasions of Normandy and Southern France. They went to the Pacific in late 1944 and subsequently took part in the Iwo Jima and Okinawa operations. New York saw her final employment as a target in 1946-48, while Texas became a memorial, a mission she still performs as the last surviving U.S. World War I era battleship.

                            The New York class numbered two ships, both built on the east coast:

                            Keel of the New York (BB-34).

                            The New York (BB-34) rises above her scaffolding at New York Naval Ship Yard sometime in 1912.

                            New York (BB-34) before launch.

                            View of the New York (BB-34) showing her propeller-less stems from her stern.

                            The National Ensign is raised at the battleship's stern during her commissioning ceremonies, 15 April 1914, at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, N.Y.

                            A Navy Yard locomotive [0-4-0T switcher, possibly an H. K. Porter, one of seven produced for the US Navy in World War I] and freight cars are among the busy port scenes on display as the New York (BB-34) sits pier side nine days after being commissioned, 24 April 1914.

                            New York (BB-34) shortly after commissioning.

                            U.S. Atlantic Fleet battleships steaming toward Mexican waters in 1914.
                            The following battleships that were dispatched to Mexican waters included the:

                            Ohio (BB-12) Virginia (BB-13) Nebraska (BB-14)
                            Georgia (BB-15) New Jersey (BB-16) Rhode Island (BB-17)
                            Connecticut (BB-18) Louisiana (BB-19) Vermont (BB-20)
                            Kansas (BB-21) Minnesota (BB-22) Mississippi (BB-23)
                            Idaho (BB-24) New Hampshire (BB-25) South Carolina (BB-26)
                            Michigan (BB-27) Delaware (BB-28) North Dakota (BB-29)
                            Florida (BB-30) Utah (BB-31) Wyoming (BB-32)
                            Arkansas (BB-33) New York (BB-34) Texas (BB-35)
                            In insets are (left to right)
                            Rear Admiral Henry T. Mayo Rear Admiral Frank F. Fletcher Rear Admiral Charles J. Badger

                            Undated, probably right after launching in the early teens, New York (BB-34) at speed. Good image of hull mounted secondary armament.

                            "The fighting top of the New York (BB-34) photographed from the Manhattan Bridge as she steamed past for the Southern Drill Grounds and the formal opening of the Panama Canal."

                            New York (BB-34) returning to this city a week ago from for the Southern Drill Grounds. From one of the most remarkable photographs ever taken of a warship in the open sea, showing every foot of her deck."

                            In Hampton Roads, Virginia, 10 December 1916.

                            In Hampton Roads, Virginia, 10 December 1916.

                            "DR. David Jayne Hill, former Ambassador to Germany, on behalf of the American Defense Society. Presenting to Captain Charles F. Hughes, of the super dreadnought New York (BB-34), the Defense Society's trophy for the highest score in big gun and torpedo practice."

                            Christmas card and photo inset of the New York (BB-34) in European waters, 1918.

                            Christmas time for Captain Charles F. Hughes & the New York (BB-34).

                            Early teens post card of the New York (BB-34) passing through New York's East River.

                            New York (BB-34) with seven other Battleships of the Atlantic Fleet at Hampton Roads, 1917.
                            The ship in the foreground (first from the right) is the Arkansas (BB-33). The photo shows a total of 8 battleships sailing in 2 columns. The cage masts of a battleship is showing above the Arkansas' forward turrets and the ship on the far left is actually 2 ships (3 masts) [the right hand of these 2 appears to be bow on to the camera sailing on a different bearing thus only one mast is showing].
                            Given the probable date of the photo, the flag on the foremast of Arkansas is probably that of R. Adm. Winslow, which would suggest that the right hand column is probably Battleship Division 1. The New York does appear in the photo as the second ship in the right hand column (second closest in the photo) note the 2 forward casemate guns (verses 1 on 12" gunned BB's) and the 2 gun main turrets.
                            Assuming the the right hand column is division 1, the next 2 ships in that column would be Utah (BB-31) and the Florida (BB-30)(both funnels are between the masts) and the last ship in line (the bow on ship) may be Delaware (BB-28).

                            Marine Guard of the New York (BB-34), taken in 1917 by Enrique Muller, Jr. from N. Moser, NY.

                            Photo entitled "Ocean Spray" New York (BB-34).

                            "Arrival of the American Fleet at Scapa Flow, 7 December 1917." Oil on canvas by Bernard F. Gribble, depicting the U.S. Navy's Battleship Division Nine being greeted by British Admiral David Beatty and the crew of HMS Queen Elizabeth. Ships of the American column are (from front) New York (BB-34), Wyoming (BB-32), Florida (BB-30) and Delaware (BB-28).This rare oil painting by American artist Burnell Poole, "The 6th Battle Squadron of the Grand Fleet Leaving the Firth of Forth", is one of less than two dozen paintings owned by the Navy that depicts U.S. naval operations in World War One (WWI). After years of being considered a total loss by Navy Art Gallery curators it has been restored to near perfect condition. The entire process took several months, but the result is the total recovery of a painting that is sure to establish Burnell Poole's name among the best marine painters of the early 20th century.
                            The composition of the ships of the 6th Battle Squadron during their operational history, appearing in the painting in no particular order were: Delaware (BB-28), Florida (BB-30),Wyoming (BB-32), Arkansas (BB-33), New York (BB-34), Texas (BB-35), & Arizona (BB-39).

                            Front side of a postal card of the New York (BB-34) at Rosyth, Scotland, circa 1918.

                            Battleships of the Sixth Battle Squadron (anchored in column in the left half of the photograph): included the
                            Florida (BB-30)
                            Utah (BB-31)
                            Wyoming (BB-32)
                            Arkansas (BB-33)
                            New York (BB-34)
                            Texas (BB-35)
                            Nevada (BB-36)
                            Oklahoma (BB-37)
                            Pennsylvania (BB-38)
                            & Arizona (BB-39) at one time or another. There are only three of the battleships present in this photo at Brest, France, on 13 December 1918. George Washington (ID-3018), which had just carried President Woodrow Wilson from the United States to France, is in the right background. Photographed by Zimmer

                            Officers and men of the New York (BB-34) assembled on the ship's forward deck at an American Naval base in England, just before she left Europe for the Christmas rendezvous at New York. On the mast may be seen one of the latest American war secrets, an indicator used in controlling the fire of the big guns."

                            Detail shot of the ship off Brest, France in December, 1918 during her duty as President Wilson's carrier to the Versailles talks. Ship booms are out to tie up visiting launches and bare skids next to aft stack show that one or more of her boats are out too.

                            USS New York (Battleship BB-34), 1914-1948

                            USS New York, lead ship of a two-ship class of 27,000-ton battleships, was built at the New York Navy Yard. Commissioned in April 1914. Ordered south soon after commissioning, New York was flagship for Rear Admiral Frank Fletcher, commanding the fleet occupying and blockading Vera Cruz until resolution of the crisis with Mexico in July 1914.. After more than three years of operations off the east coast and in the Caribbean, in December 1917 New York crossed the Atlantic to join the British Grand Fleet. She was flagship of the U.S. battleships of the Sixth Battle Squadron during the remainder of the First World War.

                            Upon the entry of the United States into the war, New York sailed as flagship with Battleship Division 9 commanded by Rear Admiral Hugh Rodman to strengthen the British Grand Fleet in the North Sea, arriving Scapa Flow 7 December 1917. Constituting a separate squadron in the Grand Fleet, the American ships joined in blockade and escort missions and by their very presence so weighted the Allies' preponderance of naval power as to inhibit the Germans from attempting any major fleet engagement's. New York twice encountered U-boats.

                            During her World War I service, New York was frequently visited by royal and other high-ranking representatives of the Allies, and she was present for one of the most dramatic moments of the war, the surrender of the German High Seas Fleet in the Firth of Forth 21 November 1918. As a last European mission, New York joined the ships escorting President Woodrow Wilson from an ocean rendezvous, to Brest en route the Versailles Conference.

                            Returning to a program which alternated individual and fleet exercises with necessary maintenance, New York trained in the Caribbean in spring 1919, and that summer joined the Pacific Fleet at San Diego, her home port for the next 16 years. In mid-1919, New York transited the Panama Canal to the Pacific, where she was based during the next decade and a half. As a unit of the Battle Fleet, she took an active part in the exercises, drills and gunnery practices that were regularly held in the Pacific and Caribbean. She trained off Hawaii and the West Coast, occasionally returning to the Atlantic and Caribbean for brief missions or overhauls.

                            New York underwent modernization in 1925-27, receiving new oil-fired boilers, anti-torpedo bulges on her hull sides, heavier deck armor, up-to-date gunfire control mechanisms and many other improvements that enhanced her combat capabilities. After being transferred to the Atlantic in the mid-1930s, she visited England in 1937 as the U.S. representative to the British Coronation naval review. Over the next three years, the battleship was actively employed as a training ship.

                            In 1937, carrying Admiral Hugh Rodman, the President's personal representative for the coronation of King George VI of England, New York sailed to take part in the Grand Naval Review of 20 May 1937 as sole U.S. Navy representative.

                            For much of the following 3 years, New York trained Naval Academy midshipmen and other prospective officers with cruises to Europe, Canada, and the Caribbean, and in mid-1941 she joined the Neutrality Patrol. She escorted troops to Iceland in July 1941, then served as station ship at Argentina, Newfoundland, protecting the new American base there. From America's entry into World War II, New York guarded Atlantic convoys to Iceland and Scotland when the U-boat menace was gravest, submarine contacts were numerous, but the convoys were brought to harbor intact.

                            With the coming of war to Europe, New York participated in Neutrality Patrol operations, and, as the U.S. drew closer to the conflict in 1941, helped in the occupation of Iceland and in escorting convoys. Her convoy activities continued after the United States became a combatant in December 1941. In November 1942, New York also took part the North African invasion, providing gunfire support for landings at Safi, Morocco. She then stood by at Casablanca and Fedhala before returning home for convoy duty escorting critically needed men and supplies to North Africa. She then took up important duty training gunners for battleships and destroyer escorts in Chesapeake Bay, rendering this vital service until 10 June 1944, when she began the first of 3 training cruises for the Naval Academy, voyaging to Trinidad on each. She spent 1943 and most of 1944 on escort and training duties.

                            New York steamed to the Pacific war zone, sailing 21 November for the West Coast, arriving San Pedro 6 December for gunnery training in preparation for amphibious operations. She departed San Pedro 12 January 1945, called at Pearl Harbor, and was diverted to Eniwetok to survey screw damage. Nevertheless, despite impaired speed, she joined the Iwo Jima assault force in rehearsals at Saipan. She sailed well ahead of the main body to join in preinvasion bombardment at Iwo Jima 16 February. During the next 3 days, New York's big guns were active bombarding Iwo Jima before and during the Marines' assault on that island, firing more rounds than any other ship present and, as if to show what an old-timer could do, made a spectacular direct 14"-hit on an enemy ammunition dump.

                            Leaving Iwo Jima, New York at last repaired her propellers at Manus, and had speed restored for the assault on Okinawa, which she reached 27 March to begin 76 consecutive days of action. She fired preinvasion and diversionary bombardments, covered landings, and gave days and nights of close support to troops advancing ashore. She did not go unscathed a kamikaze grazed her 14 April 1945, demolishing her spotting plane on its catapult. She left Okinawa 11 June to regun at Pearl Harbor.

                            New York prepared at Pearl Harbor for the planned invasion of Japan, and after war's end, made a voyage to the West Coast returning veterans and bringing out their replacements. Following the Japanese capitulation in August 1945, New York moved back to the Atlantic and was at New York City for the Navy Day fleet review in late October. She sailed from Pearl Harbor again 29 September with passengers for New York, arriving 19 October. Here she prepared to serve as target ship in operation "Crossroads," the Bikini atomic tests, sailing 4 March 1946 for the West Coast. She left San Francisco 1 May, and after calls in Pearl Harbor and Kwajalein, reached Bikini 15 June.

                            Her last active service was as a target during the atomic bomb tests at Bikini, Marshall Islands, in July 1946. Surviving the surface blast 1 July and the underwater explosion 25 July, she was taken into Kwajalein and decommissioned there 29 August 1946. Later towed to Pearl Harbor, she was studied during the next two years. Too radioactive and far too old for further use, she decommissioned a month later. On 8 July 1948 she was towed out to sea some 40 miles and there sunk after an 8-hour pounding by ships and planes carrying out full-scale battle maneuvers with new weapons.


                            Watch the video: World Of Warships -. New York, BB-34