Douglas' Report [January 4, 1854] - History

Douglas' Report [January 4, 1854] - History

The principal amendments which your committee deem it their duty to commend to the favorable action of the Senate, in a special report, are those in which the principles established by the compromise measures of I850, So far as they are applicable to territorial organizations, are proposed to be affirmed and carried into practical operation within the limits of the new Territory.

The wisdom of those measures is attested, not less by their salutary and beneficial effects, in allaying sectional agitation and restoring peace and harmony to an irritated and distracted people, than by the cordial and almost universal, approbation with which they have been received and sanctioned by the whole country. In the judgment of your committee, those measures were intended to have a far more comprehensive and enduring effect than the mere adjustment of the difficulties arising out of the recent acquisition of Mexican territory. They were designed to establish certain great principles which would not only furnish adequate remedies for existing evils, but, in all time to come, avoid the perils of a similar agitation, by withdrawing the question of slavery from the halls of Congress and the political arena, and committing it to the arbitrament of those who were immediately interested in, and alone responsible for its consequences. With the view of conforming their action to what they regard the settled policy of the government, sanctioned by the approving voice of the American people, your committee have deemed it their duty to incorporate and perpetuate, in their territorial bill, the principles and spirit of those measures. If any other consideration were necessary, to render the propriety of this course imperative upon the committee, they may be found in the fact, that the Nebraska country occupies the same relative position to the slavery question, as did New Mexico and Utah, when those territories were organized.

It was a disputed point, whether slavery was prohibited by law in the country acquired from Mexico. On the one hand it was contended, as a legal proposition, that slavery having been prohibited by the enactments of Mexico, according to the laws of nations, we received the country with all its local laws and domestic institutions attached to the soil, so far as they did not conflict with the Constitution of the United States; and that a law, either protecting or prohibiting slavery, was not repugnant to that instrument, as was evidenced by the fact, that one-half of the States of the Union tolerated, while the other half prohibited, the institution of slavery On the other hand it was insisted that, by virtue of the Constitution of the United States, every citizen had a right to remove to any territory of the Union, and carry his property with him under the protection of law, whether that property consisted in persons or things....

. .. a similar question has arisen in regard to the right to hold slaves in the proposed territory of Nebraska when the Indian laws shall be withdrawn, and the country thrown open to emigration and settlement. [The report quotes the section of the Missouri Enabling Act (No. 7 7, ante) relating to slavery, and continued:

Under this section, as in the case of the Mexican law in New Mexico and Utah, it is a disputed point whether slavery is prohibited in the Nebraska country by valid enactment. The decision of this question involves the constitutional power of Congress to pass laws prescribing and regulating the domestic institutions of the various territories of the Union. In the opinion of those eminent statesmen, who hold that Congress is invested with no rightful authority to legislate upon the subject of slavery in the territories, the 8th section of the act preparatory to the admission of Missouri is null and void; while the prevailing sentiment in large portions of the Union sustains the doctrine that the Constitution of the United States secures to every citizen an inalienable right to move into any of the territories with his property, of whatever kind and description, and to hold and enjoy the same under the sanction of law. Your committee do not feel themselves called upon to enter into the discussion of these controverted questions. They involve the same grave issues which produced the agitation, the sectional strife, and the fearful struggle of I850. As Congress deemed it wise and prudent to refrain from deciding the matters in controversy then, either by affirming or repealing the Mexican laws, or by an act declaratory of the true intent of the Constitution and the extent of the protection afforded by it to slave property in the territories, so your committee are not prepared now to recommend a departure from the course pursued on that memorable occasion, either by affirming or repealing the 8th section of the Missouri act, or by any act declaratory of the meaning of the Constitution in respect to the legal points in dispute.

Your committee deem it fortunate for the peace of the country, and the security of the Union, that the controversy then resulted in the adoption of the compromise measures, which the two great political parties, with singular unanimity, have affirmed as a cardinal article of their faith, and proclaimed to the world, as a final settlement of the controversy and an end of the agitation. A due respect, therefore, for the avowed opinions of Senators, as well as a proper sense of patriotic duty, enjoins upon your committee the propriety and necessity of a strict adherence to the principles, and even a literal adoption of the enactments of that adjustment in all their territorial bills, so far as the same are not locally inapplicable. .

[The report here quotes various provisions of the compromise acts of I850, and concludes]: From these provisions it is apparent that the compromise measures of I850 affirm and rest upon the following propositions —First: That all questions pertaining to slavery in the territories. and in the new States to be formed therefrom, are to be left to the decision of the people residing therein, by their appropriate representatives, to be chosen by them for that purpose.

Second: That "all cases involving title to slaves," and "questions of personal freedom" are referred to the adjudication of the local tribunals, with the right of appeal to the Supreme Court of the United States.

Third: That the provisions of the Constitution of the United States, in respect to fugitives from service, is to be carried into faithful execution in all " the organized territories" the same as in the States. The substitute for the bill which your committee have prepared, and which is commended to the favorable action of the Senate, proposes to carry these propositions and principles into practical operation, in the precise language of the compromise measures of I850.


Douglas United Nuclear Inc. monthly report, January 1970

This document contains the details the activities of Douglas United Nuclear at the Hanford Reservation during the month of January 1970.

Physical Description

Creation Information

Creator: Unknown. February 18, 1970.

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This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to the UNT Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this report can be viewed below.

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Description

This document contains the details the activities of Douglas United Nuclear at the Hanford Reservation during the month of January 1970.

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  • Other: DE95012695
  • Report No.: DUN--6594
  • Grant Number: AC06-76RL01830
  • https://doi.org/10.2172/64307
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 64307
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc691879

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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Douglas United Nuclear, Inc. monthly report, December 1967

This report presents details of the activities of Douglas United Nuclear at the Hanford site during the month of December 1967.

Physical Description

Creation Information

Creator: Unknown. January 16, 1968.

Context

This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to the UNT Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 23 times. More information about this report can be viewed below.

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this report or its content.

Creator

Sponsor

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

Descriptive information to help identify this report. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

This report presents details of the activities of Douglas United Nuclear at the Hanford site during the month of December 1967.

Physical Description

Notes

Subjects

Keywords

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Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this report in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Other: DE95012673
  • Report No.: DUN--3181-Del.
  • Grant Number: AC06-76RL01830
  • https://doi.org/10.2172/64272
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 64272
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc689849

Collections

This report is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.


Records Division

The purpose of this unit is to maintain jail records, departmental investigative reports, criminal history investigation, traffic citations, served warrants and juvenile files and transmit appropriate paperwork to the court systems for prosecution.

The division operates Monday through Friday, from 8:00 am until 5:00 p.m.

Records Fee Schedule:

  • Accident & Complaint Reports $2.00
    Personal Report of Accident Form (SR13)
  • Incident Report (Other than victim) $2.00
  • Background checks $20.00
  • Record Expungement $25.00 (Form)
  • Open Records Request 1st 15 minutes are free after that $14.17 per hour and $.10 per page copy. Please fill out this request form and email it to [email protected]

Our Records Division only accepts cash payments.

Criminal Background Checks

Criminal background checks are simply a review of an individual to determine any criminal activity. Often times, an employer may require a criminal background check for employment purposes.

In order to obtain a criminal background check, you must:

  • Appear in person at the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office Records Division
  • Provide a government issued picture identification a Social Security Card is not acceptable
  • You must provide your name, date of birth, sex, race, and Social Security Number

Records Division Contact Information

Douglas County Sheriff’s Office
Records Division
8470 Earl D. Lee Blvd.
Douglasville, GA 30134
Main Phone: (770) 920-4920
Fax: (770) 920-3927
Email: [email protected]

Hours of Operation:
Monday thru Friday
8:00am – 5:00pm
(Not including county holidays)

Name Position Phone
Lt. Todd Vande Zande Division Commander 770-920-4901
Jillian Ridge Division Supervisor 770-920-7140
Linda Sewell Records Supervisor 678-486-1224

Observed Holidays

The Records Division will be closed in observance of the following holidays:


Finding past weather. Fast

Climate data, including past weather conditions and long-term averages, for specific observing stations around the United States is only a few clicks away.

Certified weather data for use in litigation is available only through the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C. Ordering instructions are located online at: https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/about/ncdcordering.html#CERTIFICATION or by phone at (828) 271-4800.

Preliminary, and therefore unofficial, data for other purposes can be found on the Web sites belonging to one of the nation&rsquos 122 Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs).

  • First, find the location you need climate data for on the following map: https://www.weather.gov/ and click on that region.
  • The Web site of the local WFO will then appear. On the left side of the page there will be a section called Climate in yellow-colored text. You may have to scroll down the page.
  • Several links may appear in the Climate section. Click on the one that applies to you. Some links may say: local climate past weather or list a specific segment of the state in which you&rsquore searching.
  • The page that follows will feature numerous categories and links. Climate data may be arranged on a daily, monthly and annual basis. Click the links and use any pull-down menus to navigate to the information you desire.

Month-to-date data likely will appear on this climate page and is among the most popular. This table, known as the preliminary Local Climatological Data (LCD) or F-6 form, lists the weather summary on a daily basis in each row. A summary of the month&rsquos weather to date is available at the bottom. Codes used on this form are explained here: https://www.erh.noaa.gov/lwx/f6.htm

It&rsquos important to double check the station name, month, and year listed at the top of the page to ensure you have the correct location and time that you&rsquore looking for. These stations are a specific point, typically an airport, and the data listed may not reflect the extreme weather reported nearby through radar estimates, storm spotters and emergency officials of which the media may broadcast.


Douglas' Report [January 4, 1854] - History

In 1858, Abraham Lincoln was running on the Republican ticket for U.S. Senator of Illinois. His opponent was Democrat Stephen Douglas. As part of the campaign, the two candidates agreed to a series of nine debates (one in each Congressional district) across Illinois. They ended up holding seven debates because Lincoln and Douglas spoke separately in Chicago and Springfield.

Different Times, Different Rules

At the time, U.S. Senators were not elected by popular vote of the people. Rather, Senators were appointed to their positions by the members of the state legislature. This meant that whichever party won the most seats at the state level would get its choice of who to send on to Washington.

Even so, debating before and appealing to the general public was still important for the Washington-level Senate candidates. The Lincoln-Douglas Debates drew gigantic crowds, even many people from out of state, because their focus was on the very hottest, most contentious issue of the day: Slavery.

The debate format was strenuous by today’s standard. The first speaker was given a full hour to speak uninterrupted. His opponent spoke next for 90 minutes. Then the first speaker was given an additional 30 minutes to rebut.

Freedom vs. Slavery

Lincoln made a passionate argument for the banishment of slavery. Douglas argued much the opposite. He favored a plan wherein each state should be allowed to form its own policy on slavery while Lincoln argued for a national ban that would include all states, and thus eliminate slavery from America.

Interest was so keen in the debates that local newspapers transcribed them word-for-word for the reading public. In those days, most newspapers were heavily partisan. Thus, a Republican paper would print cleaned up and well-edited versions of Lincoln’s speech, while printing the words of his opponent as they had been spoken, with all the common grammatical slips and mistakes of spoken language. Democratic newspapers did the same.

Free But Not Equal

It is interesting to note that while Lincoln favored freedom for black slaves, he also vigorously denied that he was an abolitionist. That is, he argued that while slaves would be free, they still might be considered inferior to whites. Lincoln said that he considered the white race superior to blacks, but that this was a non-issue in terms of whether black should be slaves or free.

He also said that he did not favor “a social and political equality” that would place blacks and white on an equal level. He did not favor the mixing of races in terms of marriage. Rather, he said that blacks should be free to live their lives as they please, and that white people could “ignore them” if they wanted to.

Douglas countered by attempting to paint Lincoln as a total abolitionist. Despite the distinctions he was making, Douglas said that Lincoln’s position on blacks and slavery would amount to making them equal to whites in all ways within American society.

Douglas Wins

After seven debates, the elections were conducted and Douglas and his Democrats won a very narrow majority of seats in the Illinois legislature, even though they lost slightly the overall popular vote. That meant Douglas was sent on to Washington as U.S. Senator. But Abraham Lincoln was to get the last laugh.

After the debates, Lincoln gathered the text of all his debate speeches, edited them and issued them in the form of a book. The book became popular reading throughout the United States. The book did much to bolster Lincoln’s image on a national scale. Upon losing his bid for the U.S. Senate, he ran for President of the United States successfully and was elected to that office in 1860.

Debates Lasting Influence

The Lincoln-Douglas debates have been studied ever since as examples of excellent debating. They are frequently cited as examples of rhetorical eloquence and use of style in language. Many of the central political and philosophical issues of American politics were more sharply defined as the result of the debates.

The Lincoln-Douglas debate also serve as a model for a specific kind of debate competition still taught in high schools, colleges and universities today. However, the format of speaking for an hour, then 90 minutes, followed by a 30-minute rebuttal is rarely used. Modern debates tend to involve more rigorous and frequent exchange between opponents who rebut each other point by point, each speaking for two or three minutes at a time.

The original Lincoln-Douglas debates remain today as a central aspect of American history. They mark a turning point for how political public discourse is conducted – the debates set a standard of excellence that has served as a model ever since.


Seven Debates, Seven Congressional Districts

Lincoln and Douglas met in seven debates between August and October 1858, located in different congressional districts around the state. In all, they traveled over 4,000 miles during the Senate campaign. While Lincoln traveled by railroad, carriage or boat, Douglas rode in a private train fitted with a cannon that fired a shot every time he arrived in a new location.

Each debate followed the same structure: an hour-long opening statement by one candidate, an hour and a half-long response by the other candidate and a half-hour rebuttal by the first candidate. Despite their length and often tedious format, the debates became a huge spectacle, attracting crowds of up to 20,000 people. Thanks to the many reporters and stenographers who attended, and new technologies such as the telegraph and the railroad, the candidates’ arguments drew national attention, and would fundamentally alter the national debate over slavery and the rights of Black Americans.


Nebraska State Records

The Nebraska Crime Commission collates crime data for all the counties in the state. The most recent annual crime report for Douglas County is for 2017. In that year, the county recorded 3,078 violent offenses and 18,396 property crimes. Compared to figures for 2013, these represent a 19.7% jump in violent crime rate and a 10.4% drop in property crime rate.

A closer look at the 2017 violent crime data reveals that there were 31 criminal homicides, 425 forcible rapes, 635 robberies, and 1,986 aggravated assaults in Douglas County. Incidences of property crimes include 2,333 burglaries, 12,380 larcenies, 3,620 motor vehicle thefts, and 63 arsons. The most recent five-year crime trend for the county reveals that rape (113.6%) and aggravated assault (24.2%) rates rose while homicide (31.1%) and robbery (12.8%) rates fell. Between 2013 and 2017, burglary (39%), larceny (7.7%), and arson (25%) rates fell while there were higher incidences of motor vehicle theft (12.8%).

Criminal Records

The Records Division of the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office provides background checks. Initiate a request by downloading, completing, and mailing a Background Check Request Form. Include a check covering the fee for the service. Make this check payable to Douglas County Sheriff’s Office. Send your request by mail to the Records Division located at:

1616 Leavenworth Street
Omaha, NE 68102

Requesters can also visit the Records Division and make their requests in-person. The Records Division is located at the address above. Credit and debit cards are accepted for in-person requests made over the counter. The Sheriff charges members of the public and businesses requesting background checks $10 per check. The service is free for law enforcement agencies.

The same fee structure applies to requests for Sheriff’s reports. Call the Records Division at (402) 599-2608 to ask about the availability of incident and accident reports. The Douglas County Sheriff accepts credit and debit card payments for report fees. To obtain these reports, visit the Records Division at 1616 Leavenworth Street or:

Douglas County Law Enforcement Center
3601 North 156th Street
Omaha, NE6 8116

While the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office registers and verifies sex offenders living in the county, their information goes to the central Nebraska Sex Offender Registry. Use the various search tools on the website to find registered sex offenders living in Nebraska County. The Name Search tool is for finding individual offenders by their first and/or last names. To see a list of all sex offenders in Douglas County, use the Region Search tool. The Location tool is for finding offenders living 1 – 3 miles around a specific address.

The Douglas County Department of Corrections operates the county jail. This location of the county jail is 710 South 17th Street, Omaha. To contact the jail, call the Operator’s desk at (402) 444-7400. The Department of Corrections provides a handy inmate locator tool online to help the public find persons incarcerated in the county jail.

Friends and family can deposit money into inmate accounts in person at the Public Teller Window located at 710 South 17th Street, Omaha between 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. every day. Accepted forms of payment include cash, money order, certified check, and cashier’s check. The Department of Corrections allows only one deposit per person per day.

Court Records

Here are the locations and contact information of all the courts in Douglas County:

Douglas County District Court
Hall of Justice
1701 Farnam Street, 5th Floor, Room 600
Omaha, NE 68183
(402) 444-7004

County Court of Douglas County – Criminal/Traffic Division
Hall of Justice
1701 Farnam Street, 2nd Floor
Omaha, NE 68183
(402) 444-5387

County Court of Douglas County – Probate Division
Hall of Justice
1701 Farnam Street, 3rd Floor
Omaha, NE 68183
(402) 444-7152

County Court of Douglas County – Civil/Small Claims Division
Douglas County Civic Center
1819 Farnam Street
Omaha, NE 68183
(402) 444-5424

The Douglas County District Court is also the Fourth District Court of Nebraska and incorporates the county’s Juvenile Court. The Clerk of the District Court maintains the records of this court and puts them online on the Justice Search portal of the website of the Nebraska Judicial Branch. Note that there is a $15 fee for each search conducted on this portal. To obtain copies of court records, visit or mail a written request to:

The Clerk of the District Court
300 Hall of Justice
1701 Farnam Street, 3rd Floor
Omaha, NE 68133

Call ahead before visiting the Clerk’s Office to ensure the records you want are available and retrieved from the archives. Contact the Clerk’s Office for copies. For photocopies of records, call (402) 444-7619 for price information. Call (402) 440-7613 to ask for the fees for certified and authenticated copies.

Contact the Clerk of the Douglas County Court to request records for that court. Visit the Clerk’s Office at 1701 Farnam Street, Omaha or call (402) 444-5387.

Vital Records

The Clerk of the District Court maintains all divorce decrees filed in Douglas County. To obtain copies of your divorce record, come to the Clerk’s office on the third floor of the Hall of Justice building located at 1701 Farnam Street, Omaha. You can also call the office at (402) 444-7018.

The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services also issues divorce certificates to qualifying individuals. Download a Divorce Certificate Application and send it to:

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services
Division of Public Health
Vital Records
P.O. Box 95065
Lincoln, NE 68509-5065

Make sure to include a photocopy of a government-issued photo ID and a check or money order for $16 payable to Vital Records.

The Douglas County Clerk/Comptroller’s Office maintains all marriage records for the county. Its records for marriage licenses issued from 1988 to the present are online. Use the Marriage License Search tool to find yours. If the record is unavailable online, call the Clerk’s Office at (402) 444-6080 or send an email to [email protected]

To obtain copies of marriage licenses, start by downloading the an Application Form. Complete and mail this to:

Douglas County Clerk
1819 Farnam Street, H-08
Omaha, NE 68183

Include a photocopy of a photo ID as well as cash, check, or money order for copy fees. Make check or money order payable to Douglas County Clerk. The fee for each certified copy of a marriage license is $9 while each non-certified copy is 25 cents.

The Douglas County Health Department issues birth and death certificates for events that occurred in the county. Qualified individuals can request for these records in person by visiting the Health Department office located at Room H-01 of the Omaha-Douglas Civic Center Building at 1819 Farnam Street.

To request for a birth or death certificate by mail, download, complete, and sign an Application for Certified Copy of Birth Certificate or Application for Certified Copy of Death Certificate. Mail this to:

Douglas County Health Department
Vital Statistics
H-01 Civic Center
1819 Farnam Street
Omaha, NE 68183

Include a stamped self-addressed envelope, photocopy of a government-issued photo ID, and a check or money order for fees made out to DCHD.

The fee for each certified copy of a birth certificate is $17. The Department of Health charges $16 for each certified copy of a death certificate. Amendments to these certificates also attract a $16 charge.

Douglas County Record Availability

Douglas County provides online access and/or physical copies of its crime data, police reports, sex offender information, jail information, court records, and vital records. Not all of these records are freely available. Some county divisions and departments charge nominal fees and require completed applications and valid IDs to release certain records. Overall, finding public records for Douglas County is easy. However, a few records may prove elusive. If you need help locating these, consider using an online record finder such as the search tools offered by State Records


The Virtual History Museum

To view items within the exhibit, click “View Exhibit”, which will open a new window, then click Start Exhibit. Click Next Record to view all records within the exhibit.

Allis Ranch, Greenland, Colorado A Pioneer Ranch on the Palmer Divide
View Exhibit

Who walked with the Columbian mammoth in Douglas County 13,000 years ago?
View Exhibit

Larkspur Bottle Collection – Larkspur History Through the Eyes of It’s Bottles
View Exhibit

Prehistoric occupation of Cherry Creek – 9000 Years on the Creek
View Exhibit

Ivan’s Blacksmith Shop: The Smithy, A Pioneer’s Best Friend
View Exhibit

The Big Dry Creek – Cheese Ranch 1879-1943
View Exhibit

The Kent and Mary Lou Brandebery Collection
Music and Instruments 1860s – 1900s
View Exhibit

Prehistoric Archaic Stage – 7500 BP – 1800 BP
View Exhibit

Prehistoric Stage: 150 – 1540
View Exhibit

Gold Rush to Settlement: 1858-1950
View Exhibit

Agriculture, Commerce, Government: Cattle, Lumber, Potatoes and Dynamite, 1860-1950
View Exhibit

Guns and Ammunition: Military and Civilian 1860-1950
View Exhibit

Louviers, Colorado – A Model for a Company Town
View Exhibit

Hidden Mesa – William Converse Ranch/Grange Property
View Exhibit


Check Now to Avoid Surprises

Screening potential tenants can be a stress point for landlords, but it can also be a stressful process for applicants. Getting this much scrutiny can leave you worrying what will come to light. Checking your rental history report, along with other relevant information like your credit report and score or criminal background, can at least take away some of the surprise. With your report in hand, you can see what landlords are likely to find out and prepare yourself&mdashand your application&mdashaccordingly.

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Watch the video: Donna Douglas: News Report of Her Death - January 1, 2015