Wyeth/Tootle Mansion

Wyeth/Tootle Mansion

The Wyeth/Tootle Mansion is located at 1100 Charles, in St. Joseph, Missouri. Wyeth, in 1879.The Wyeth/Tootle Mansion was designed by Eckel and Mann Architects in the Gothic style, with input from the Wyeths, who had gathered their own ideas about what they wanted, on a tour of Europe. The mansion is highlighted by its beautiful walnut woodwork in the main hall and the stained glass windows on the stair landings.The mansion was the home of the Wyeth family until 1887, when it was purchased by Mrs. Members of the Tootle family lived in the mansion until 1946.Recently, the Wyeth/Tootle Mansion was restored by the staff of the St. Joseph Museum. The majority of the first floor and a bedroom on the second floor was restored to its former Victorian elegance.


52 Trade Houses Part 2: The Wyeth Hardware Company

Over the course of the next year, we'll be detailing the history of 52 companies that sold branded fishing tackle. 52 trade houses in 52 weeks -- some obscure, some famous, and all available exclusively here on the Fishing for History Blog! If you have any items from the week's entry you'd like to share with us, please send it my way and I'll make sure it makes it on the blog.

For a discussion of what exactly trade tackle is, Click Here. Enjoy the 52 for 52!


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Trade House Tackle, Part 2:
The Wyeth Hardware Company

The Wyeth Hardware Company of St. Joseph, Missouri was one of the numerous wholesaling concerns that sprung up in the nineteenth century in the Mississippi Valley. This is because the river served as the demarcation point for Westward Migration, and firms like Wyeth, Blish-Mize & Silliman, and the many St. Louis wholesale hardware concerns got their start outfitting settlers.

This particular company was founded by William Wyeth in 1860. Wyeth moved to St. Joseph, Missouri in 1860 with his wife Elizabeth and founded W.M. Wyeth & Company. He grew wealthy very quickly, and notably commissioned in 1879 a 43-room Gothic mansion that stands today as a museum and as exemplary of this style of architecture. It is known today as the Wyeth Tootle Mansion.


Born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, William Maxwell Wyeth (1832-1901) had been in the dry goods business since the early 1850s, but got into the hardware line in 1856 with Lewis & Wyeth, a firm located in Chillicothe, Ohio. As an early Missouri history stated, "Wyeth settled in St. Joseph, Missouri, selecting it above the other localities which he inspected during…weeks of travel."

He chose St. Joseph because, as the magazine Do It Yourself Retailing declared in 1986, it was "the greatest wholesale outfitting point [for wagon trains] west of St. Louis. The wagon trains needed everything — pots, pans, tools, water barrels, lanterns." Wyeth supplied them with the goods needed to build the West.

After a disastrous fire in 1866, the company rebuilt in larger quarters and dealt specifically in hardware until 1872, when he expanded into saddle and harness making. In 1881, the company was incorporated as Wyeth Hardware and Manufacturing Company.

By this time the firm was one of the the most prosperous in the state, and joined by his son Huston Wyeth, the pair were two of the most prominent business men in the whole region. In 1901, when William Wyeth died and was replaced as president of the firm by Huston, it was one of the twenty leading wholesale hardware firms in the nation, with business in ten states and a massive saddle making subsidiary. In 1910, the company issued a Golden Anniversary history detailing its half century of growth.

(Left) William Wyeth (Right) Huston Wyeth.
Like most wholesale hardware concerns, the company sent out massive catalogs, often 1500-2000 pages in length. These show up occasionally for sale.



Wyeth Hardware had two major trade names. The first was WYCO, which was used on everything from hammers to shotguns. The second was the "Wyeth Shield Brand" which was sold with the pithy slogan, "Wyeth Shield Brand, the Goods in Demand." This was used on everything from household to hardware items.



What is not known is whether it was branded on any fishing tackle. I suspect if might have been, but I have not seen it to date.

What I have seen, the only actual branded piece of Wyeth tackle I've run across, is a great line spool marked "100th Anniversary Braided Nylon Casting Line." At some point, Wyeth began backdating the founding of the company to 1859, so this particular spool dates to 1959.



Wyeth Hardware and Manufacturing Company became The Wyeth Company after World War II, and managed to survive the 1960s, which put many such firms under. However, it did not survive the 1980s. The last reference I can find to it was 1986.

However, the company was in business for too long to have so few pieces of fishing tackle. There has to be more than just line spools. They clearly sold tackle for many of the 120+ years they were in business, and if they were like other similar firms, somewhere there must be a reel, rod, or other piece of tackle marked WYCO or Wyeth.

Have you seen any Wyeth fishing tackle?

UPDATE: This bottle of Wyeth "Shield Brand" rod varnish just showed up on eBay:


St. Joseph is known for an extensive collection of beautiful mansions built in the late 1800s, and the Wyeth Tootle Mansion at the corner of 11th and Charles Streets is a prime example. With three floors, a tower and more than 40 rooms, it stands today as one of the best examples of St. Joseph’s late 19th century wealth and opulence, featuring stunning woodwork, hand-painted ceilings and imported stained glass.

In 1879, William and Eliza Wyeth hired architect Edmond Eckel to design a mansion resembling the castles they had seen on the Rhine River as they were traveling in Germany. This 43-room Gothic style mansion combines an example of the homes of early prominent St. Joseph residents with exhibits on the history of St. Joseph.

The first floor of the Wyeth Tootle Mansion has been partially restored to its Victorian grandeur. Old photographs of each room help visitors visualize the interior as it was around 1900. Each room’s ceiling is impressively different, from the cherubs that float above the Louis XVI parlor to the dark rich colors that cover the Moorish room. Ornate parquet floors and walnut woodwork change from room to room.

History of the Wyeth-Tootle Mansion

William and Eliza Wyeth moved to St. Joseph in 1859, and William soon developed his small wholesale-retail business into the prosperous Wyeth Hardware and Manufacturing Company and Wyeth Saddle Factory. In 1879, the Wyeths moved into this mansion with a panoramic view of the city and the Missouri River. However, they only lived in the home for eight years.

In the spring of 1887, the Wyeths sold the home to Mrs. Katherine Tootle. Mrs. Tootle was the recent widow of Milton Tootle. Milton’s obituary identified him as “the builder of the prosperity of St. Joseph and the leader of its ‘Golden Age.’ His business interests included mercantile establishments, the Western Bank of Missouri, and the Tootle Opera House. At his death, he had amassed the largest fortune of any individual in the city. Mrs. Tootle continued with many of his business interests.

After purchasing the home, she hired the New York firm of Pottier and Stymus to redecorate the interior. The main hall featured a walnut paneled ceiling and an elaborately carved staircase. The parquet floors, in keeping with the style of the time, were almost entirely covered with area rugs and furniture. Two stained-glass windows were added on the stairway landings. One resembled a Renaissance-style painting, and the other is of beautifully cut, stained glass. The ceilings werehand painted on canvas by a European artist.

Katherine’s son, Milton Tootle Jr., was the next occupant of the house. He and his wife Lillian added a large porch to the south side and a family dining room on the southeast side. A 1932 newspaper article described Milton Tootle’s home: “The ceilings were painted in Europe, and the walls were lined with heavy draperies, nearly an inch thick, with elaborate handwork appliqués made of materials the manufacture of which has become a lost art. And charming objects of art on every side intrigue the imagination and aid in the creating of an esthetic atmosphere.”

The rooms on the first floor were the French Reception Room of black and gold woodwork, the Louis the XVI Sitting Room with angels painted on the ceiling, the Library, the formal Dining Room, the Moorish Room with its Middle Eastern decor, and the Early American Family Dining Room. At the rear of the first floor were the servants’ dining and food preparation room and a kitchen.

When Milton Tootle, Jr., died in 1946 the home became available for purchase. William Goetz, St. Joseph Museum board president, and the M. K. Goetz Brewing Company donated the money to purchase the building and the city matched the amount to adapt the private home into a public museum.

Edifice: The Architecture of E. J. Eckel. The architect of the Wyeth-Tootle Mansion and the founder of the firm responsible for 75 percent of the buildings in St. Joseph. The exhibit focuses on his life and the lasting impact of his accomplishments.

Intersections: Of Time and Buildings.This exhibit is housed in three renovated rooms on the second floor. The exhibit explores the intersections of history, art, architecture, and humanities as well as the past, present, and future of the City. Museum professionals, preservationists, scholars, and local artists all worked together on this innovative project. Intersections is a combination art exhibit, exploration of St. Joseph’s history, and imagining of the role of historic preservation in the City’s future. The exhibit was created by the St. Joseph Museum in partnership with the Missouri Humanities Council with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and Friends of St. Joseph.

Confluence: The Great Flood of 1993. An exhibit that chronicles flooding in the St. Joseph area, including the flood in 1952 that covered much of Lake Contrary Amusement Park. The details on the causes and impacts of the 1993 Flood will be included as a cathartic remembrance of those trying months in the summer of 1993 when much of the Midwest was under water. The name of the exhibit “Confluence” refers to the merging of rivers and flood waters, as well as the coming together of communities in the face of one of the costliest natural disasters in history.

History of the St. Joseph Museum.Step back in time through the extensive history of the St. Joseph Museum. Founded in 1927 as the Children's Museum, the St. Joseph Museum has called five locations its home over the near century it has been in existence. The items displayed in this exhibit are some of the earliest donations which were on display when the museum first opened in the annex of the St. Joseph Public Library. Come learn how our organization has grown and evolved over the years and what the future may hold.


Wyeth-Tootle Mansion

To get a taste of European architecture, make sure to visit the Wyeth-Tootle Mansion of the St. Joseph Museums, Inc. The Wyeth-Tootle Mansion, 1100 Charles Street, St. Joseph, Missouri, provides an accessible (and unforgettable) experience.

Not only does the Wyeth-Tootle Mansion celebrate Gothic architecture and Victorian-era interior design. It also houses exhibits that explore early local enterprises, natural history, cultural history, and even natural disasters that have shaped the region’s history.

Each of the three floors of the ornate 1879 mansion is dedicated to one or more historical exhibits, the newest of which is titled Confluence: The Great Flood of 1993. This third-floor exhibit is a permanent fixture for the museum that addresses the flood’s physical, economic, and social effects on the surrounding area.

The mansions commanding height, impressive tower, and remarkable view of the Missouri River region were inspired by the original owners’ trips to castles along the Rhine River in Germany. William and Eliza Wyeth commissioned architect E.J. Eckel to help them realize their grand vision. Eckel’s architectural vision and talent left a lasting mark on the St. Joseph community, as his firm designed 75% of St. Joseph’s outstanding historical buildings.

The first and second floors of the Wyeth-Tootle reflect the history of area architecture. The restoration highlights Victorian-era decor and period photographs to give guests an added visual of what it would have been like to visit the home at the turn of the 20th century. Visitors often experience a “wow” moment at the Mansion’s incredible woodwork, ornately patterned floors, and hand-painted ceilings, including images of cherubs and heavenly clouds.

Three of the Mansion’s 43 rooms are devoted to “Intersections: Of Time and Buildings,” an exhibit that examines the junctures of history, art, architecture, and humanities, along with St. Joseph’s past, present, and future. The “Edifice: The Architecture of E.J. Eckel” exhibit at the Wyeth-Tootle commemorates Eckel’s talent and contribution to St. Joseph’s architectural appeal. The third-floor children’s area views are some of the most sweeping and expansive in the city.

In addition to housing historical and cultural exhibits, Wyeth-Tootle Mansion hosts community events throughout the summer and fall, including Mah Jongg parties and Music at the Mansion. The Mansion also serves as a wedding, holiday party, and business meeting venue.

Whether you have a passion for history or architecture or want a better understanding of the development of the area, a trip to St. Joseph is sure to prove both educational and rewarding. To plan your visit to the Wyeth-Tootle Mansion, arrange a rental, or attend an event, find a list of dates and details on the St. Joseph Museums, Inc., website: stjosephmuseum.org.


Wyeth-Tootle Mansion

St. Joseph is known for an extensive collection of beautiful mansions built around the turn of the century, and the Wyeth Tootle Mansion at the corner of Eleventh and Charles Streets is a prime example. With three floors, a tower and more than 40 rooms, it stands today as one of the best examples of St. Joseph’s late 19th-century wealth and opulence, featuring stunning woodwork, hand-painted ceilings and imported stained glass. In 1879, William and Eliza Wyeth hired architect E. J. Eckel to design a mansion resembling the castles they had seen on the Rhine River as they were traveling in Germany. This 43-room Gothic style mansion combines an example of the homes of early prominent St. Joseph residents with exhibits on the history of St. Joseph. The first floor of the Wyeth Tootle Mansion has been restored to its Victorian grandeur. Old photographs of each room help visitors visualize the interior as it was around 1900. Each room’s ceiling is impressively different, from the cherubs that float above the Louis XVI parlor to the dark rich colors that cover the Moorish room. Ornate parquet floors and walnut woodwork change from room to room. Historical exhibits include portraits of prestigious St. Joseph citizens of the time, a timeline of the growth of St. Joseph in the 1800s, St. Joseph businesses like Aunt Jemima Pancake Flour that had national or international impact, the Civil War in St. Joseph, and Jesse James. One exhibit room features Edmund J. Eckel, the architect for the Wyeth-Tootle mansion and whose firm was responsible for the design of 75 percent of the buildings in St. Joseph. The exhibit focuses on his life and the lasting impact of his accomplishments on St. Joseph and includes his desk, drafting table, and sketches. Natural History fills the third floor of the Wyeth-Tootle. Visitors can see mounts of the mammals, birds, and fish that fill the northwest Missouri region, including a few animals that aren’t from this area including a full-size African Lion and Alaskan Brown Bear that a Wyeth family member brought home from hunting expeditions.


Paranormal Activity Investigators

St. Joseph is known for its quantity of beautiful mansions built around the turn of the 20th century, and the Wyeth-Tootle Mansion at the corner of Eleventh and Charles Streets is a prime example.

William and Eliza Wyeth moved to St. Joseph in 1859, and William soon developed his small wholesale-retail business into the prosperous Wyeth Hardware and Manufacturing Company and Wyeth Saddle Factory. In 1879, the Wyeths hired architect E.J. Eckel to design this 43-room, Gothic style mansion with a panoramic view of the city and the Missouri River. A unique feature was the turret on the north side, which made the mansion resemble a castle. Over one million bricks were used in the construction. The front of the building was covered with native sandstone. The Wyeths decorated the interior with ornate parquet floors and walnut woodwork. The front part of the house, which has the sandstone exterior, was the family residence. The rear extension with the brick exterior housed the kitchen, pantries, and servants' quarters. The first floor, with its large rooms opening onto a central hall, was mainly used for entertaining. The second floor contained bedroom suites, and the third floor served as servant workrooms and bedrooms. The tower contained an entrance on the north side of the house and a staircase to the first floor. The Wyeths lived in their castle-home for less than ten years. In the spring of 1887, they sold the home to Mrs. Kate Tootle.

Kate Tootle was the recent widow of Milton Tootle, Sr., Milton's obituary identified him as "the builder of the prosperity of St. Joseph and the leader of its 'Golden Age.'" His business interests included mercantile establishments, the Western Bank of Missouri, and the Tootle Opera House. At his death, he had amassed the largest fortune of any individual in the city. Kate continued with many of his business interests. After purchasing the home, she hired the New York firm of Pottier and Stymus to redecorate the interior. The main hall featured a walnut paneled ceiling and an elaborately carved staircase. The parquet floors, in keeping with the style of the time, were almost entirely covered with area rugs and furniture. Two stained glass windows were added on the stairway landings. One resembled a Renaissance-style painting, and the other is of beautifully cut stained glass. The ceilings were covered with canvases of Austrian artists. Kate's son, Milton Tootle, Jr., was the next occupant of the house. He and his wife, Lillian, added a large porch to the south side and a family dining room on the southeast side. A 1932 newspaper article described Milton Tootle's home: "The ceilings were painted in Europe, and the walls were lined with heavy draperies, nearly an inch thick, with elaborate handwork appliques made of materials the manufacture of which has become a lost art. And charming objects of art on every side intrigue the imagination and aid in the creation of an esthetic atmosphere."

The rooms on the first floor were the French Reception Room of black and gold woodwork, the Louis the XVI sitting room with cherubs painted on the ceiling, the library, the formal dining room, the Moorish Room with its Middle Eastern decor, and the Early American family dining room. At the rear of the first floor were the servants' dining and food preparation room, as well as a kitchen.

When Milton Tootle, Jr. died in 1946, the home became available for purchase. William Goetz, St. Joseph Museum board president, and the M.K. Goetz Brewing Company donated the money to purchase the building and the museum matched the amount to adapt the private home into a public museum. After sixty years as a museum, the first floor of the building is being restored to its Victorian grandeur and furnishings are being added. The formal dining room on the first floor is complete with Wyeth family china, furnishings, and portraits. Photographs of the home taken around 1900 are on exhibit throughout the building. The second floor features a restored Victorian bedroom and exhibits on the architecture of the famous St. Joseph architect E.J. Eckel. Eckel designed the 1879 Mansion and 75 percent of the structures in St. Joseph. Other featured exhibits include the impact of early St. Joseph businesses that had a national impact such as the Chase Candy Company, Hillyard Chemical Company, and the M.K. Goetz Brewing Company. The third floor contains exhibits on the natural history of the area.

Christina Anderson:As a person that spent a great deal of time in St. Joseph, I can recall the mansion&rsquos days as the St. Joseph Museum. It was wonderful to get to see the hard work and dedication that has gone into restoring this mansion to its former glory. Gone are the boarded up windows and nondescript, institutional rooms of days past. It was truly a pleasure to visit this important piece of St. Joseph&rsquos history.
We began the investigation on the first floor in what would have been a ladies&rsquo receiving room or parlor. Nothing of significance occurred here, although some shadow movement was seen in other rooms from this viewpoint.
The next location on this floor that we checked out was the large ballroom with the trompe l&rsquooeil parquet floor. The position I took in the room, near the main entry and several feet inside, was extremely cold, and I felt very uneasy here. I moved to other spots in the room, but each time I returned to this specific spot, it was very cold. During the time that I felt this cold spot, multiple team members came over, and confirmed that this area was indeed, cold. There was no explanation for this temperature difference, as the air surrounding this spot was warmer and any HVAC or ductwork would have impacted those areas as well.
In the doorway separating the dining room and the ballroom, as I stood with Jenny and Lisa, I smelled perfume that went away quickly. I checked both of them, and it was neither of them.
Upon returning to the ballroom, the spot I previously stood in was still extremely cold, and it felt like a person was there. Becky asked me if it felt like a child or an adult, and it definitely felt like an adult. I could not discern whether or not this was masculine or feminine energy. I did feel the sense that they were concerned with the state of the room as a whole, like they were concerned people were disturbing the room. Lisa joined me in this location, and was able to pick up on a feminine impression, and gave details regarding appearance, clothing, etc.
On the way up the stairs to the second floor, perfume was again smelled. On the next floor, several team members and I went into the room with the architectural displays and blueprints on the walls. Initially, there seemed to be an area of energy located right in the middle of the room that both Lisa and I felt, but it went away quickly.
As we moved from the prior room to the Victorian room at the front of the mansion, Sevren and I both felt that someone was watching us from the stairs behind us. I motioned for Lisa to come look, because this sensation was extremely intense. It was, in fact, strong enough that it made me stop in my tracks and say &ldquoThere is someone on the stairs.&rdquo Lisa stated that she saw something coming down the stairs, and that it had stopped. I turned and saw what appeared to be a wavy, dark mist, leaning over the banister with a vaguely human shape. After approximately 20 seconds, it either dissipated or moved away, as did the feeling of being watched.
While in the Victorian room, nothing of note occurred.
Footsteps or similar noises were heard coming from the first floor while standing in the main stairwell on the second floor. This may have been caused by people walking around on the second floor and echoes occurring below.
On the third floor, no experiences were recorded.
Overall, I believe that the mansion is active, but that the activity is varied and unpredictable. I will be reviewing my audio in the coming days and will share any findings.

Angela Hodge:Investigating the Wyeth-Tootle Mansion was very interesting. Enjoyed the architecture of the house and the history of the home, land, the family.
During our walk-thru the care taker was very informative. The house still feels like it has life running through it even though it is empty.
The 1st floor seem to be active at 1st, felt a lot of cold spots, but I am not fully sure if they had any meaning toward as the ventilation in the house comes in all directions at you.
The 2nd floor seemed active at the staircase. I thought I saw what appeared to be a shadow hanging over the rail from the 3rd floor. After staring at the area for a bit i went a bit closer and realized it was my eyes playing tricks on me.
3rd floor was not active for me at all. I felt the floor was just quiet.
All in all enjoyed the visit, hoped it was a bit more active but for me it was not.

Sevren Jacobs:This was my first time ever visiting the Wyeth-Tootle mansion. My primary tools for the night was my notebook, Truthcam35 motion sensor trail cam, Olympus digital voice recorder, and a Sony digital voice recorder.
Upon arrival, we were given a tour which included both inside and outside of the building with a verbal history of the families and the structure.
My IR trail cam and Sony voice recorder were placed next to each other on the second floor of the mansion at the beginning of our investigation. The notebook and Olympus voice recorder remained with me all night.
At approx 22:15 I witnessed the plastic table cloth move slightly, as if it was brushed against. This was on a small table near a fireplace mantle in a room on the first floor. This room also had a cash register and was used as a small gift shop. Upon closer inspection of the room, there is a good chance that a breeze from the ventilation system likely caused the tablecloth to move.
There were also reports from other investigators of a concentrated cold spot in the parlor room on the first floor. I was able to briefly feel a temperature change in the area they mentioned. A few of our group members stated they were sensing a sort of emotional charge in that same spot, with a mention of a strong sensation of sadness or concern. I was there to witness the incident but did not experience any emotional effects.
We eventually went to the second floor and our group split into two connected rooms. Some members were in a room that had blocks and indicated they felt a presence in there with them. Myself and a few other investigators stayed in the attached drafting room. Initially, it felt like there might have been a presence in there with us but the feeling didn't last for long. At approx 23:01 we exited the drafting room. Christina and I were still in the 2nd floor main room and immediately felt that something was watching us from the stairs. Our other teammate, Lisa, joined us and stated she could see some sort of a dark figure slowly descend the stairs coming down from the third floor. I was not able to see the figure, but it was described to us as slow moving and almost curious in nature. I did feel a very intense sense of being watched and my stomach felt as if it was in knots. It didn't feel intimidating or scary in nature, but the other sensations I mentioned were so strong I felt almost frozen where I stood. This incident only lasted a couple of minutes before the shadow and all sensations of being watched quickly dissipated.
While on the second floor, our group heard faint sounds coming from the first floor like someone was walking downstairs, and then a moving sound on the third floor near the stairs.
We continued our investigation and moved on to the third floor where the only exciting thing I encountered was a small bat in the room with the TeePee. Our group returned to the first floor where I didn't experience any additional activity. We concluded our investigation shortly before 1am.
Review of my audio and trail cam footage did not yield any unusual results. I thoroughly enjoyed being able to spend the evening at this location and am appreciative that our group had this opportunity. I would very much like to return to this location in the near future.

Jenny Kerr:When I first entered the house I felt more anxious than normal. My hands and arms were tingling, which is usually my signal that something paranormal is there.
While reviewing audio, a loud bang that resembled something being dropped or a single gunfire was heard at approximately 10:20 pm, but no one acknowledged hearing the sound at the time in question. Speaking with Becky it was determined her audio recorder had been knocked to the wood floor at some point and this is what, more than likely, caused the loud bang.
Shortly afterward Lisa began getting mental images of a woman who worked in the home. The following are my impressions of the same woman. I normally have words pop into my head like a mental voice, this is the first time I have ever been overwhelmed with information about one person. It was rather exhilarating and filled me with energy. It was not scary. But was as if I was recalling information about someone I knew.
At the point that Lisa says the air in her immediate area turned warm from cold, I then felt warm air move past me into the dining room. From that point on I was drawn to the dining room where the room felt very comfortable to be in. The woman is very inviting and would have us sit down and feed us, if she could. I feel like she's a governess or someone comparable to a male butler. She keeps everything in order and in it's place. She took pride in her work, especially the dining room. My impression was she has blue eyes and a turned up nose. She may be Irish. I then felt compelled to go underneath the rope, to the far end of the table by the windows and sit down in a chair in front of the windows which faced the dining table, where I was overwhelmed with information. Lisa asked me what thoughts I was having. I said, Thoughts about the table. She made sure it was set. I got up and walked around the table and said, She knew exactly where the silverware went, the dishes and the glasses and the chairs. She made sure it was perfect. She would walk around the table and make sure each place was perfect. She would stand back from the table and make sure it was perfect. And when she was satisfied she was done and left the dining room. She didn't set the table herself she oversaw the work of others.
On the 2nd floor:
As we all ascended the stairs to the 2nd floor the woman from downstairs followed us up. I felt her warm air go by me. I didn't feel her again until I went to the furnished Victorian style room. While on the 2nd floor in the main room with windows that stretched from floor to ceiling. I felt as if someone had been sick in that room and they often looked out the window.
In the Period Bedroom:
The woman from downstairs is in the room. The room is very comfortable and inviting. However the woman does not like the stroller in the room. She says it does not belong in the room. It belongs in another room. She says everything else is fine, but the stroller needs to go. It needs to be moved. I felt as those she was always cheerful, rarely in a bad mood, possibly had an Irish accent. I could pick her out of a photo. The children of the house liked her and thought of her like a grandmother. She was very loving towards the children. They loved to get hugs from her because they sank into her bosom.
On the 3rd floor:
I felt nothing.
I did not record any EVP's and had no anomalies in photos.

Tania Marg:Upon initial investigation of the house, I did find a few spots that intrigued me. The first was in the parquet floor room near the glass case containing Wedgewood teacups and saucers. There was a spot on the floor that made me feel very odd &ndash no chills or anything, just weird in general. Lisa confirmed that it made her dizzy. Also the threshold at the main doors felt very energetic, and I could tell there had been a lot of coming and going and energy there. Lisa showed me a spot to the direct right of the entrance that had a particularly interesting bit of energy held in it &ndash it felt much like the spot by the Wedgewood teacups and saucers. The entrance from the side of the Moroccan room also had a dizzying effect when I walked in from the threshold hallway. The second floor kids play room struck me as complete dizzying when I walked in. In fact, I felt almost like I was in a different place for a minute. It was a really weird effect, so I took note of it.
I didn&rsquot write down times, but when we were all sitting together initially in the center drawing room near the entrance, I did start to feel colder (could have been drafts) but my stomach also started to hurt. I don&rsquot have an explanation for it because it wasn&rsquot a regular type of stomach cramp you&rsquod experience from food, and I purposely ate a dinner of a salad, which I didn&rsquot think would upset my stomach - in the past, with me it mostly seems to be related to the taking of energy. This continued while we moved to the parquet room and eventually stopped at the point where the older lady was noticed by Christina and Lisa. I also agree with Lisa&rsquos ideas on her &ndash I was starting to feel like it was an older woman wearing black, and her shoes were particularly odd to me. They were black high-heeled shoes, circa 1890, but they had large white ribbons lacing them with black trim. I doubt we can find any historical record of that, but I kept coming back to her shoes. I wanted to keep quiet though because I wanted to see if Lisa was seeing what I was seeing, but I didn&rsquot want to interfere or alter what she was seeing with my ideas. I also remember that her hair was tucked up and curly around the edges and she had a very round, kind face.
I also didn&rsquot really know anything about Woodrow Wilson before this visit, however something kept sticking in my head about him, and I did some research later and he was the president that declared war for World War I. This might have left an imprint on residents of the house at the time.
On the second floor, initially walking in, there was not as much of a dizzying effect as there had been early, but there was still energy in the room that I recognized as being different from the other rooms on that floor, so I decided to check it out. I did keep seeing shadows over the blocks as well as in the corner where the children&rsquos table was. When I moved the magnets around towards the time when we left that room, I definitely freaked out for a moment because I saw very definite movement of a person about the size of a child in the corner of the room, coming towards me. It scared me because there was very definitely a note of interest in what I was doing, and perhaps an intention to move the magnets along with me. I kept sensing a little boy around the age of six or seven with very short hair, overalls, and a striped blue and green shirt in that room.
When everyone was hearing the noises on the stairs, I kept picturing a child bouncing a medium size blue ball down the stairs. It seemed like a little boy, possibly the one in the room nearby. There were noises I heard that sounded similar to a bouncing ball as well during the times we were hearing rustling and bouncing. The rustling might have even been from a bat we discovered on the third floor, however.

Becky Ray:This was a very interesting investigation. I personally did not capture anything out of the ordinary on video or audio, however I did experience a few things I could not explain including temperature changes and the smell of kerosene a few times.
One thing we did that seemed to increase activity was experiment with playing different audio including music and speeches from the past. While I was playing a turn of the century music box everyone seemed to notice sounds coming from throughout the house.
While on the second floor I sat with Jennifer and Tania in one of the rooms and definitely felt as though a child were in that room with us. In one corner I kept seeing slight shadow movements that I could not recreate from any of the light sources. Tania also saw this shadow movement from the other side of the room.
It should be noted I had shoulder surgery the day prior to this investigation and was on pain killers so I wasn't as observant as I normally am, which is why I'm looking forward to returning for a follow up to see if we can repeat some activity.


#GUMPTIOUS Wyeth Mansion and Huston Wyeth

DEFINITION: Takes initiative with attention, common sense, spunk and resourcefulness .

One of St. Joseph public schools earliest and most successful students, Huston Wyeth, built in 1918-1922 what was considered a very large country estate located northeast of central downtown. It was called Wyethwood.

HUSTON WYETH, THE MAN BEHIND WYETHWOOD

Wyeth was born on July 8, 1863, in St. Joseph, Mo. as the only son of William Maxwell Wyeth and Eliza Renick Wyeth, and was in the eighth generation from the founder of the Wyeth name in America. His only sibling was his older sister, Maud.

He attended St. Paul’s Academy and Racine Business College in Racine, Wisc. At the age of 17, he engaged in the cattle business, afterwards working in the offices, factories and warehouses of the retail hardware trade. In 1880, in recognition of his interest and ability, Wyeth was elected a director and vice president of the company his father founded, Wyeth Hardware & Manufacturing Co. in St. Joseph.

In addition to this post, he organized the St. Joseph Artesian Ice and Cold Storage Co. in 1892 and became its president and active head. In addition to these two companies, records show he was a businessman officially connected with a number of other corporations such as Blue Valley Creamery Co., Wyeth Realty and Investment Co., Leavenworth Terminal Railway and Bridge Co., National Bank of St. Joseph, Mo., Lyon & Judson Hardware Co., St. Joseph Gas Co., St. Joseph & Grand Island R.R. Co., and St. Joseph Water Co.

Wyeth married Leila Ballinger on April 4, 1883. She was also a St. Joseph native, a daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Kuechle Ballinger. Their first born was William Maxwell on May 12, 1884. They had three more children who grew to adulthood and marry: Maud, Alison, and John.

Wyeth was a globetrotter traveling extensively in both the United States and Europe. In addition to work and family, he served his country and the community in many ways. He organized United States Company C, Fourth Regiment of Missouri Volunteers, known as the Wyeth Guards, in the 1898 Spanish-American War.

His duty to country was lifelong as a Navy League life member, National Rifle Association life member, American Defense Society Life Member, and Sons of the Revolution and the Sons of 1812 War member.

In Masonry, Wyeth was a noble of the Ancient Order, St. Joseph Lodge Perfection, No. 6 Scottish Rite Moila Temple of the Mystic Shrine St. Joseph Lodge and others. He also socialized, sailed and golfed as a member of the St. Joseph Country Club, Highlands Golf Club, Benton Club, Rotary Club, Larchment Yacht Club, and more. For a western businessman immersed in St. Joseph’s late 19th century and early 20th century economic growth, he was also well established as a eastern seaboard yachtsman and enjoyed a winter home in Florida.

His sense of camaraderie and intuition about people and animals alike throughout his life contributed to his success, which in turn, gave him the financial freedom to enjoy the rare privilege of being involved in so many businesses and organizations. This full-circle character trait seemed to make him a leader at work, in all of his civic and social organizations, his military service, and in his race horse breeding stables and dog breeding kennels at home.

Huston Wyeth died on January 25, 1925, at the age of 61 at his winter home in Miami, Fla. He is buried in Mount Mora Cemetery, St. Joseph next to his wife, Leila, who lived another 30 years until the age of 89.

St. Joseph’s famous Wyeth-Tootle Mansion near downtown is the home of Huston’s father, William and his wife, Eliza. Much of the family’s history can be found in the home that is now open to the public as part of St. Joseph Museums.

REFERENCES:

Houses of Missouri 1870-1940 by Cydney Millstein and Carol Grove , Acanthus Press, New York, 2008.

Men of the South: A Work for the Newspaper Reference Library , by Daniel Decatur Moore, Souther Biographical Association, New Orleans, La., 1922.

The Book of Missourians: The Achievements and Personnel of Notable Living Men and Women of Missouri in the Opening Decade of the Twentieth Century , edited by M.L. Van Nada, T. J. Steele & Co., Chicago and St. Louis, 1906.

A History of Northwest Missouri, Volume 2 , edited by Walter Williams, The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago and New York, 1915.

#ORIGINAL

Amidst the chaos of a packed gymnasium… squeak, squeak. Bounce. Bounce. These are the only sounds that matter. Sneakers and a basketball against a polished gym floor.

#LUCKY

Games of chance and dining establishments have been a part of St. Joseph, Missouri’s uncommon character since the earliest settlers gathered to let off some steam and gamble on optimistic odds.

#NATURAL

As one of St. Joseph’s most unique, hands-on educational experiences, this award-winning museum and attraction has everything

#WANDERLUST

Starting in the 1910s organizations, communities, and even private individuals began developing the first paved highways to connect metropolitan areas which would collectively become known as the National Auto Trail system.

#FOUNDING

Born in 1783 to a St. Louis family of merchants and fur traders, Joseph Robidoux would become the founder of St. Joseph, MO.

RELOCATING? See this site for more info.
QUESTIONS? We'll connect you with answers.


Wyeth Tootle Mansion Ghost Hunt

Our Ghost Hunts at Wyeth Tootle Mansion in St. Joseph, Missouri satisfies the intriguing lure of one of the most haunted locations in St. Josephs.

This very foreboding haunted location maybe beautiful in the daylight, but as night draws in, it’s haunted inhabitants come out.

William Goetz, St Josephs Museum board president helped purchase this mansion, around 1946.

Some of the paranormal that has been captured are the full blown apparitions of two children playing in one of the bedrooms, others have captured EVP’s which relate back to Mrs Tootle.

Is Wyeth Tootle Mansion haunted by some of the former patients from Glore Psychiatric Museum?

With macabre devices and haunted objects on display, there is no doubt that the spirits are still lingering and just waiting to share their stories with you!

Your ghost hunt at Wyeth Tootle Mansion includes the following:

Ghost Hunt with experienced Ghost Hunting Team.

Use of our equipment which includes, trigger objects and EMF Meters.

Private time to explore this location and to undertake your very own private vigils.

Unlimited refreshments available throughout the night including: Coffee, Coca Cola, Diet Coke, and Bottled Water.

St. Joseph is known for an extensive collection of beautiful mansions built in the late 1800s, and the Wyeth Tootle Mansion at the corner of 11th and Charles Streets is a prime example. With three floors, a tower and more than 40 rooms, it stands today as one of the best examples of St. Joseph’s late 19th century wealth and opulence, featuring stunning woodwork, hand-painted ceilings and imported stained glass.

In 1879, William and Eliza Wyeth hired architect Edmond Eckel to design a mansion resembling the castles they had seen on the Rhine River as they were traveling in Germany. This 43-room Gothic style mansion combines an example of the homes of early prominent St. Joseph residents with exhibits on the history of St. Joseph.

The first floor of the Wyeth Tootle Mansion has been partially restored to its Victorian grandeur. Old photographs of each room help visitors visualize the interior as it was around 1900. Each room’s ceiling is impressively different, from the cherubs that float above the Louis XVI parlor to the dark rich colors that cover the Moorish room. Ornate parquet floors and walnut woodwork change from room to room.

William and Eliza Wyeth moved to St. Joseph in 1859, and William soon developed his small wholesale-retail business into the prosperous Wyeth Hardware and Manufacturing Company and Wyeth Saddle Factory. In 1879, the Wyeths moved into this mansion with a panoramic view of the city and the Missouri River. However, they only lived in the home for eight years.

In the spring of 1887, the Wyeths sold the home to Mrs. Katherine Tootle. Mrs. Tootle was the recent widow of Milton Tootle. Milton’s obituary identified him as “the builder of the prosperity of St. Joseph and the leader of its ‘Golden Age.’ His business interests included mercantile establishments, the Western Bank of Missouri, and the Tootle Opera House. At his death, he had amassed the largest fortune of any individual in the city. Mrs. Tootle continued with many of his business interests.

After purchasing the home, she hired the New York firm of Pottier and Stymus to redecorate the interior. The main hall featured a walnut paneled ceiling and an elaborately carved staircase. The parquet floors, in keeping with the style of the time, were almost entirely covered with area rugs and furniture. Two stained-glass windows were added on the stairway landings. One resembled a Renaissance-style painting, and the other is of beautifully cut, stained glass. The ceilings werehand painted on canvas by a European artist.

Katherine’s son, Milton Tootle Jr., was the next occupant of the house. He and his wife Lillian added a large porch to the south side and a family dining room on the southeast side. A 1932 newspaper article described Milton Tootle’s home: “The ceilings were painted in Europe, and the walls were lined with heavy draperies, nearly an inch thick, with elaborate handwork appliqués made of materials the manufacture of which has become a lost art. And charming objects of art on every side intrigue the imagination and aid in the creating of an esthetic atmosphere.”

The rooms on the first floor were the French Reception Room of black and gold woodwork, the Louis the XVI Sitting Room with angels painted on the ceiling, the Library, the formal Dining Room, the Moorish Room with its Middle Eastern decor, and the Early American Family Dining Room. At the rear of the first floor were the servants’ dining and food preparation room and a kitchen.

When Milton Tootle, Jr., died in 1946 the home became available for purchase. William Goetz, St. Joseph Museum board president, and the M. K. Goetz Brewing Company donated the money to purchase the building and the city matched the amount to adapt the private home into a public museum.


St. Joseph, MO

William and Eliza Wyeth moved to St. Joseph in 1860, and William soon developed his small wholesale-retail business into the prosperous Wyeth Hardware and Manufacturing Company and Wyeth Saddle Factory.

William and Eliza Wyeth hired architect E. J. Eckel to design a mansion resembling the castles they had seen on the Rhine River as they were traveling in Germany.

In the spring of 1887, the Wyeths sold the home to Mrs. Kate Tootle. Kate Tootle was the recent widow of Milton Tootle. Milton’s obituary identified him as “the builder of the prosperity of St. Joseph and the leader of its ‘Golden Age.’ His business interests included mercantile establishments, the Western Bank of Missouri, and the Tootle Opera House. At his death, he had amassed the largest fortune of any individual in the city. Kate continued with many of his business interests.

When Milton Tootle, Jr., died in 1946 the home became available for purchase. William Goetz, St. Joseph Museum board president, and the M. K. Goetz Brewing Company donated the money to purchase the building and the city matched the amount to adapt the private home into a public museum.

With three floors, a tower and more than 40 rooms, it stands today as one of the best examples of St. Joseph’s late 19th-century wealth and opulence, featuring stunning woodwork, hand-painted ceilings and imported stained glass.


Wyeth/Tootle Mansion - History

The St. Joseph Museums, Inc., encompasses four museums at two locations with an extensive collection of artifacts and stories in exciting, detailed exhibits you won't want to miss. The Glore Psychiatric Museum, the Black Archives Museum, and the St. Joseph Museum are located on Frederick Avenue in St. Joseph, Missouri. The Glore Psychiatric Museum, a unique and favorite destination, chronicles the 140-year history of what was once known as “State Lunatic Asylum No. 2.” The Museum uses full-sized replicas, interactive displays, audio-visuals, artifacts, and documents to illustrate how mental illness has been portrayed and treated. The Black Archives Museum showcases local African-American history with exhibits on such topics as the Civil Rights era in St. Joseph and the achievements and contributions of local community leaders. The St. Joseph Museum features one of the most extensive American Indian collections in the Midwest. Exhibits include clothing, accessories, fans, pottery, pipes, weapons, kachinas, jewelry, and archaeological artifacts from ten cultural regions.

The Wyeth-Tootle Mansion of the St. Joseph Museums, Inc., is located at 1100 Charles Street. This 1879 Gothic sandstone Mansion illustrates the cultural, architectural, and economic history of 19th century St. Joseph, Missouri. Designed by E. J. Eckel, the exterior features a unique north side turret, making the Mansion resemble a castle. The interior features oil-on-canvas paintings on the first floor ceilings, ornate walnut woodwork and staircase, and stained glass windows. Several rooms, such as the formal dining room, appear as they did when the Mansion was a private home. Exhibits at the Wyeth-Tootle Mansion include Fame and Politics: The Life of Ruth Warrick which showcases the story of St. Joseph native Ruth Warrick, her career, philanthropy, and political activism. Visitors can also explore the history of area architecture through the Intersection of Time and Buildings exhibit and the Architecture of E. J. Eckel exhibit. E. J. Eckel came to American from France in 1869. His 65 year career allowed him to make a permanent mark on the landscape with his architectural firm responsible for the design of 75 percent of the structures in the City.


Watch the video: The Wyeth Tootle Mansion Museum in St. Joseph, Missouri