Chance Vought F4U-5 Corsair

Chance Vought F4U-5 Corsair

Chance Vought F4U-5 Corsair

F4U-5

Development work on the Corsair continued after the war. Early jet fighters needed long runways and used their fuel very quickly, making them unsuited for use on carriers. The F4U-5 first flew in April 1946. It had a yet more powerful engine, the P&W R-2800-32W, providing 2,459 hp. This gave the dash five a top speed of 470 mph, twenty miles per hour quicker than the dash four. Standard armament was changed to four 20mm M-3 cannon, two in each wing. It retained the eight rocket stubs capable of carrying 5 inch HVAR rockets, and the wing root pylons, used to carry bombs, drop tanks or napalm. The F4U-5 was finally retired from US service in 1956. It saw active service during the Korean War, as did the final variant, the AU-1.

F4U-5N

This was a night fighter variant, carrying its radar in a similar radome to earlier Corsair night fighters. It used the AN/APS-19 radar system, capable of operating in four different modes, from short range “blind firing” mode to long range navigation mode.

F4U-5NL

The -5NL was a winterised version of the -5N, with the same radar and de-icing equipment. This was needed to cope with the freezing Korean winters. In total 315 of the two night fighter versions were built, making it them most common variant of the dash five. The two night fighter variants were more commonly used in Korea than the straight dash five.

F4U-5P

This was a photo reconnaissance version. It could carry three different types of camera, including the S-7S continuous-strip camera, used for aerial mapping.

Introduction - F4U-1 - F4U-2 - XF4U-3 - F4U-4 - F4U-5 - AU-1 - F4U-7 - American Service - British Service - Statistics


Vought

Vought was the name of several related American aerospace firms. These have included, in the past, Lewis and Vought Corporation, Chance Vought, Vought-Sikorsky, LTV Aerospace (part of Ling-Temco-Vought), Vought Aircraft Companies, and Vought Aircraft Industries. The first incarnation of Vought was established by Chance M. Vought and Birdseye Lewis in 1917. In 1928, it was acquired by United Aircraft and Transport Corporation, which a few years later became United Aircraft Corporation this was the first of many reorganizations and buyouts. During the 1920s and 1930s, Vought Aircraft and Chance Vought specialized in carrier-based aircraft for the United States Navy, by far its biggest customer. Chance Vought produced thousands of planes during World War II, including the F4U Corsair. Vought became independent again in 1954, and was purchased by Ling-Temco-Vought (LTV) in 1961. The company designed and produced a variety of planes and missiles throughout the Cold War. Vought was sold from LTV and owned in various degrees by the Carlyle Group and Northrop Grumman in the early 1990s. It was then fully bought by Carlyle, renamed Vought Aircraft Industries, with headquarters in Dallas, Texas. In June 2010, the Carlyle Group sold Vought to the Triumph Group.


Chance Vought F4U-5 Corsair - History

Mission: Night-capable fighter-bomber
Model Service Dates: 1942-1953
Manufacturer: Chance Vought Aircraft Co.
Bureau Number: 122189

Inside Loop Podcast Q & A
“Why the inverted gull wing on the Corsair?”

The Corsair was the Marine Corps’ workhorse fighter and arguably the best fighter in World War II. It was originally designed for carrier operations by Chance Vought which gave it a massive engine and propeller, making it faster and more powerful than its contemporaries. The inverted gull wing provided the propeller enough ground clearance and allowed the Corsair to have shorter landing gear, which were better for carrier landings. However, this did not come without a cost the longer engine reduced forward visibility, early design flaws caused stalls during landing approaches and the wheels tended to bounce during landings. As a result, early carrier tests were plagued with accidents (the source of its “Ensign Eliminator” nickname), and the Navy picked the more forgiving F4F Wildcat and F6F Hellcat as their primary carrier fighters instead.

The Navy gave its Corsairs to the Marine Corps, which eagerly accepted it. It was far superior to their other fighters, like the F4F Wildcat. The Marines operated them from improvised bases on Pacific islands with deadly results. Because the Corsair was faster and better armed than the nimbler Zero, it took air superiority back from the Japanese and helped turn the tide of the war. It also wreaked havoc on Japanese supply ships and ground forces. An important part of the Corsair’s success was the skill of its pilots. Every pilot in Gregory “Pappy” Boyington’s legendary “Black Sheep” squadron flew a Corsair. Some of the Marines’ most famous aces flew Corsairs, including Pappy Boyington, John Bolt, Robert Hanson, Edward Shaw, and Ken Walsh, the first Corsair ace.

The Corsair was so successful that 12,571 were manufactured. During the Korean War, the Corsair was one of the few World War II aircraft the Navy kept because it could carry more weapons than their jets. The Corsair could also loiter over an area longer when providing low-level close air support. As such, it was primarily used as a fighter-bomber, and it proved as capable as ever in this role.

The F4U-5N on display is a night-fighter variant of the F4U-5. As a night-fighter, the F4U-5N had an AN/APS-19 radar on the leading (front) edge of the right wing for tracking targets in the dark. The F4U-5 kept some of the F4U-4’s features, including a four-bladed propeller (earlier variants had only 3) and similar armament. It also included some modifications based on recommendations from pilots and mechanics. Spring tabs were added to the elevator and rudder to make them easier to control at high speeds. Automatic blower controls, cowl flaps, intercooler doors, and an oil cooler increased air flow to the engine and kept it from overheating. It also had a modernized and more comfortable cockpit. After the Korean War the F4U-5N was replaced by the F2H-3 Banshee.


1948 CHANCE-VOUGHT F4U-5NL “CORSAIR”

The F4U-5NL Corsair was manufactured by Chance-Vought in 1948 and delivered to the USMC in March of that year. The “Dash 5” was fitted with a Pratt & Whitney R-2800-32W engine with dual supercharger to provide 2,350 hp at altitude. The 32W engine also used a water-methanol injection system that could provide a “War Emergency” power boost to an astonishing 2,760 hp for short sprints.

This aircraft was equipped with four 20 millimeter cannons, four bomb/rocket racks under each wing, and could carry an additional drop fuel tank and two napalm tanks. It was modified as a “Night Fighter” with a radar dome mounted on the right wing (since removed) and had been “winterized” for use in low temperature environments, thus the designations N and L.

The original Corsair design specified use of the Pratt & Whitney R-2800, the most powerful production engine available at the time. Harnessing all this horsepower necessitated the use of the largest production propeller available, the 13 ft. 4 in. Hamilton Standard. A byproduct of this marriage was a lack of deck clearance for the massive propeller. Since carrier-based aircraft required short, stout landing gear capable of withstanding the pounding of carrier landings, the ingenious inverted gull-wing shape was employed to raise the propeller arc to a safe distance above the deck.

The aircraft on display flew in combat in the Korean War as part of VMF(N)513 and VMF 212 performing night interdiction missions in addition to night attacks on enemy vehicles moving down from the North. It also provided night scramble alerts to meet aircraft incursions from the North as well as close air support to front line units. After her Korean service and an Atlantic tour aboard the USS Tarawa, this Corsair was stricken from service with the U.S. Navy and sold to the government of Honduras in 1956.

During her 22 years of service in the Honduran Air Force, this Corsair flew in combat against Nicaragua in 1956 as well as in the so called “Football War” against El Salvador in 1969. These aerial engagements in 1969 proved to be the very last aerial combats between piston-powered propeller-driven aircraft in history.

This aircraft was returned to the United States in 1978 and underwent a complete rebuild by Ezell Aviation in Breckenridge, Texas, which included a change of livery back to the way she appeared when flying with the “Flying Nightmares” of VMF(N)513 during the Korean War. This aircraft was acquired by Jim Smith in 1992.


Chance Vought F4U-5 Corsair - History

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA274
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 19, 2016 in East Troy, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: CHANCE VOUGHT F4U 5, registration: N179PT
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Before the accident flight, the airplane's brakes were replaced with a custom brake system. Testing of the brake system after installation resulted in a failure of the right master cylinder. The cylinder was disassembled and the O-ring was found cut. The mechanic could not find any reason for the cut O-ring, so the O-rings on both master cylinders were replaced. The next brake test resulted in a brake fluid boil, and the brake builder informed the mechanic to change the type of hydraulic fluid. A subsequent ground brake test produced "no issues or hesitation with the brakes at all," to include "a full pressure pedal push to simulate a full locked brake to pressure test [the] system prior to taxi test." A maintenance flight was then conducted, and, during landing, the airplane began to drift to the right. The commercial pilot applied the left brake however, the brake failed and the pedal “went to the floor.” The airplane departed the runway and collided with a wind sock structure. Postaccident examination revealed that the left brake master cylinder O-ring was cut however, the reason for the cut could not be determined.

After the accident, the mechanic contacted the master cylinder manufacturer for guidance. The company replaced the master cylinders with an upgraded model. The new cylinders were installed on the airplane and the mechanic, with guidance from the custom brake manufacturer, conducted more testing. A second airplane flew with the newer brake system without issue.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A failure of the O-ring in the left brake master cylinder for reasons that could not be determined, which resulted in a loss of directional control during landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Fighters & Legends LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N179PT

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA274
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 19, 2016 in East Troy, WI
Aircraft: CHANCE VOUGHT F4U 5, registration: N179PT
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 19, 2016, about 1120 central daylight time, a Vought F4U-5 Corsair airplane, N179PT, departed the runway surface after landing at the East Troy Municipal Airport (57C), East Troy, Wisconsin. The pilot was not injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to Fighters & Legends LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight. The local flight departed 57C about 1115.

The pilot departed from 57C on a maintenance flight, in order to test the airplane brakes. He reported that the brake tested normal during the taxi. He applied the brakes several times in flight, and received positive pressure of the brake pedals. On the full stop landing to runway 8, the pilot applied the brakes and received normal braking action. As the airplane slowed, it slowly drifted to the right. The pilot applied a small amount of left brake to correct the drift and the pedal went to the floor pumping the pedal did not correct the problem. In order to avoid a ditch, the pilot applied the right brake however, the airplane's wing collided with the airfield's windsock. Substantial damage was sustained to the airplane's right wing.

Prior to the accident, the airplane's brakes were replaced with a custom brake system using Grove master cylinders. Testing of the brake system after installation resulted in a failure of the right master cylinder. The cylinder was disassembled and the O-ring was found cut. The mechanic could not find any reason for the cut O-ring, so the O-rings on both master cylinders were replaced with Viton O-rings and care was given to carefully place them into the cylinders. The next brake test resulted in a brake fluid boil, so the brake builder informed the mechanic to change the hydraulic fluid from MIL-PRF 5606 to MIL-PRF-83282. A subsequent ground brake test produced "no issues or hesitation with the brakes at all" to include "a full pressure pedal push to simulate a full locked brake to pressure test [the] system prior to taxi test."

After the accident, the mechanic contacted the master cylinder manufacturer (not the brake builder) for guidance. The company replaced the master cylinders with an upgraded model. The new cylinders were installed on the accident airplane and the mechanic, with guidance from the custom brake manufacturer, conducted more testing.

On February 6, 2017, a second Corsair flew with the newer brake system without issue.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA274
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 19, 2016 in East Troy, WI
Aircraft: CHANCE VOUGHT F4U 5, registration: N179PT
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 19, 2016, about 1050 central daylight time, a Vought F4U-5 Corsair airplane, N179PT, was substantially damage while landing at the East Troy Municipal Airport (57C), East Troy, Wisconsin. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to Fighters & Legends LLC and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which operated without a flight plan. The local flight departed 57C about 1030.

Preliminary information obtained by the Federal Aviation Administration indicated that during the landing roll, the airplane began drifting to the right. The pilot corrected with left brake, but was unable to command any braking with the left pedal and was unable to stop the drift. The airplane exited the right side of the runway and collided with a windsock. The airplane's right wing was substantially damaged.

The airplane had recently completed an annual inspection when components of its brake system were replaced. The accident flight was the first flight since the annual inspection.

NTSB Identification: CHI99FA266C
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Thursday, July 29, 1999 in OSHKOSH, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/22/2000
Aircraft: Chance Vought F4U-5, registration: N179PT
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The three airplanes were part of a formation demonstration flight of eight World War II Navy fighters, divided into four sections of two airplanes each, that had been cleared to takeoff from runway 18 at Wittman Regional Airport, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, during the annual Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) convention, 'AirVenture 99'. Air traffic control clearance for the departing aircraft had been relinquished from the FAA tower to a local 'air boss'. The air boss had cleared all of the airplanes to takeoff as a flight. Witnesses saw the lead airplane, a Bearcat, N14HP, and his wingman, taxi down runway 18 approximately 1,400 feet, turn toward the southwest and stop. Approximately 4 seconds later, the lead airplane in the second section, a Corsair, N712RD, collided into N14HP severing the Corsair's left wing, and the Bearcat's right wing. The Corsair continued down the runway, rolling over on it's left side, came apart, and burst into flames. The remains of the Corsair came to rest in a field east of the runway, approximately 2,000 feet down. The Bearcat was turned approximately 180 degrees and came to rest on the runway's east edge. A second Corsair, the wingman of N712RD, veered off of the west side of runway 18, sustaining substantial damage to it's left wing. Examination of all three airplanes revealed no anomalies.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot of the other airplane not following the instructions briefed by the formation leader, and the pilot's maneuvering his airplane to avoid the airplane in front of him.


Spotlighting lets you share this airplane with all of your followers. This is a great way to help new players get the recognition they deserve for their work.

Click the Spotlight button below and all of your followers will receive a notification.

Download Airplane

If you are on Mac, copy this airplane ID to the clipboard and press CMD+L while in the designer in SimplePlanes to download this airplane.

If you are on mobile, then try requesting the mobile version of the site. You can learn more about how to do that here. Otherwise, just click the Download for Mobile button below.

CHARACTERISTICS
  AG 1, 2,3,4 and 5: launch rockets
AG6: hook
AG7: cabin lights
AG8: fold / unfold wings
VTOL: Flaps

HISTORY
The Chance Vought F4U Corsair was an onboard fighter aircraft that was in service mainly during World War II and the Korean War. The demand for the plane soon surpassed the production capacity of the Vought company, so it was also produced by Goodyear and Brewster: the Goodyear Corsairs were designated FG and those of Brewster F3A. From the delivery of the first prototype to the United States Navy in 1940, until the last delivery made in 1953 to France, Vought produced 12 571 F4U Corsair aircraft, [1] in 16 different models, being the fighter with an internal combustion engine produced for the longest time in the history of the United States (1942-1953).


Super Corsair variants

In March 1944, Pratt & Whitney requested an F4U-1 Corsair from Vought Aircraft for evaluation of their new P&W R-4360, Wasp Major 4-row 28-cylinder “corncob” radial engine.

The F2G-1 and F2G-2 were significantly different aircraft. F2G-1 featured a manual folding wing and 14 ft (4.3 m) propeller, while the F2G-2 had hydraulic operated folding wings, 13 ft (4.0 m) propeller, and carrier arresting hook for carrier use.

  • There were five pre-production XF2G-1s BuNo 14691, 14692, 14693 (Race 94), 14694 (Race 18), and 14695.
  • There were ten production F2Gs: Five F2G-1s BuNo 88454 (Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington), 88455, 88456, 88457 (Race 84), and 88458 (Race 57) and five F2G-2s BuNo 88459, 88460, 88461, 88462, and 88463 (Race 74).
  • Five F2Gs were sold as surplus and went on to racing success after the war (indicated by the “Race” number after the BuNo), winning the Thompson trophy races in 1947 and 1949.
  • The only surviving F2G-1s are BuNos 88454 and 88458 (Race 57).
  • The only surviving F2G-2 was BuNo 88463 (Race 74). It was destroyed in a crash September 2012 after having a full restoration completed in July 2011.

Roaring through the blue-black North Korean sky,

Corsair Bureau Number (BuNo) 124692 skims past the top of a snowy mountain peak in search of adversarial aircraft. Below, thousands of UN soldiers fight against bitter-cold temperatures and advancing communist troops. Fifty years later. BuNo 124692 still takes to the skies, no longer fighting enemy forces, but helping to preserve history from a half century ago.

Widely regarded as the most capable carrier-based fighter of the Second World War, the F4U Corsair was designed to employ the largest engine and propeller ever fitted to a fighter up to that point. First flown on May of 1940, its entrance into the combat arena with the US Navy was delayed due to concerns about visibility and landing characteristics. In March of 1943, the land-based Marines were the first US forces to fly the Corsair in combat. It was not until the British proved that the Corsair could safely operate from carriers that the Navy put the type into service in January of 1944. Any doubt about the Corsair’s fighting ability was quickly eliminated as the plane succeeded in shooting down 2,140 enemy aircraft for the loss of only 189 F4Us. A total of 24 Corsair pilots became aces during the war.

While the end of the Second World War saw companies like North American and Republic lose their government contracts, Chance Vought saw continued orders for Corsair production. The plane that had proved so potent during WWII was deemed capable enough to warrant further production in the post war years. Subsequent designs saw the installation of more powerful engines, electric trim, radar, and other performance enhancing features.

In the years after 1945, the world gradually became engulfed in a new conflict, the Cold War. This simmering tension erupted in June of 1950 when North Korean troops poured over the 38th parallel into South Korea. By this time, jet technology had superceded the Corsair, but the WWII veteran fighter could still deliver potent ground attacks and was useful as a night fighter. Planes once bordering on obsolete were now recalled from reserve squadrons and storage depots. In addition, new examples were added to the Chance Vought production line. The production continued until December of 1952.

It was at this point in time that newly-built BuNo 124692 was transferred to VC-3, based aboard the carrier Essex. From November of 1951, through February of 1952. 124692 flew seventy-seven combat hours over Korea in some of the harshest conditions imaginable. Intense cold, frequent storms, and the dangers of combat made this tour extremely difficult. As a -5NL, 124692 saw most of its service as a night fighter, patrolling the black skies in search of enemy aircraft.

After this tour, 124692 served aboard the USS Leyte as well as the USS Tarawa and USS Boxer. After subsequent assignments with the Marines and Reserve Units, the plane was placed in storage and stricken from the naval inventory in 1956. The Collings Foundation has restored BuNo 124692 back to its VC-3 combat condition and is proud to fly the Corsair in honor of those who sacrificed so much, so many years ago.

*The Corsair is not at the American Heritage Museum. For a schedule of operation and more information please contact the office.

The American Heritage Museum at the Collings Foundation featuring the Jacques M. Littlefield Collection explores major conflicts ranging from the Revolutionary War until today. Visitors discover and interact with our American heritage through the history, the changing technology, and the Human Impact of America’s fight to preserve the freedom we all hold dear.

American Heritage Museum
568 Main Street
Hudson, MA 01749


Warbird and Classic Aircraft Broker


Watch the video: Chance Vought F4U-5 Corsair