Kern County Museum

Kern County Museum

Established in 1941, the Kern County Museum is located on a 16-acre site, north of downtown Bakersfield, California. It features more than 50 historic structures and buildings, and exhibitions showing the history of Kern County.The museum was started in a corner of the Chamber of Commerce building in Bakersfield. At present, it encompasses the entire Chamber of Commerce building.It boasts a rich collection of artifacts dating from prehistoric times to the present. It hosts temporary exhibitions and special events as well.The museum is managed by the Joint Powers Authority between Kern County and the Kern County Board of Education. The Kern County Museum Foundation, a not-for-profit foundation formed in 1991, supports the works of the museum.The Lori Brock Children's Discovery Center portion of the museum was opened in 1976, providing educational experiences for children.The museum store contains a large assortment of books, postcards, toys, educational souvenirs, and hand-crafted items.


File:The Kern County Museum, a history museum located in Bakersfield, California LCCN2013633100.tif

Physical description: 1 photograph : digital, tiff file, color.

Notes: Title, date, and keywords provided by the photographer. Credit line: The Jon B. Lovelace Collection of California Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith's America Project, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. Gift The Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation in memory of Jon B. Lovelace 2012 (DLC/PP-2012:063). Forms part of: Jon B. Lovelace Collection of California Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith's America Project in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive. The main focus of the museum is the history of Kern County, including Bakersfield. One prominent features is its Pioneer Village with over 50 original buildings from around the county.

Birth name: Carol Louise McKinney

No known restrictions on publication.


Photo, Print, Drawing The Kern County Museum, a history museum located in Bakersfield, California

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  • Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-highsm-22645 (original digital file)
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  • Access Advisory: ---

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Bakersfield Sound

In the 1950's and 60's Bakersfield became an unlikely birthplace for a new sound – The Bakersfield Sound.

Universally recognized as &lsquoThe Country Music Capital of the West Coast&rsquo and &lsquoNashville West&rsquo, Bakersfield is the birthplace for what would become known worldwide as the Bakersfield Sound. The sub genre of country music &ndash described as a mix of twangy guitars, drums, fiddle, and steel guitar &ndash was a defiant reaction to the string orchestras and the polished sound of albums being recorded in Nashville during the 1950&rsquos and 60&rsquos.

Many musicians and entertainers were involved in making the Bakersfield Sound a global phenomenon, however none were more well-known than Country Music Hall of Fame® members Buck Owens and Merle Haggard. Both artists cut their teeth at the bars and honkytonks around Bakersfield before gaining international prominence.

Owens would go on to have a extremely successful entertainment career, charting 21 number one hits including &ldquoAct Naturally&rdquo and "I've Got a Tiger By the Tail." Owens also spent nearly 17 years co-hosting the popular country-themed variety TV show Hee-Haw. Haggard, in trouble with the law in his early days, rose to fame with songs like "Okie From Muskogee" and &ldquoThe Fightin Side of Me&rdquo among his 38 number one songs. Both artists have local streets named in their honor.

Perhaps the most popular artist aside from Owens to be influenced by the Bakersfield Sound is Dwight Yoakam. In 1988 Owens and Yoakam collaborated on &ldquoThe Streets of Bakersfield,&rdquo a duet which became Yoakam&rsquos first number one singles hit. Yoakam&rsquos album, Dwight Sings Buck, is a tribute honoring the legacy of Owens and his lasting impact on country music.

Opening in 1996, Buck Owens&rsquo Crystal Palace is a must see for visitors to Bakersfield. The all-in-one restaurant, museum and music venue spotlights the rich history of the Bakersfield Sound and the career of Buck Owens. The Palace is home to countless items of memorabilia from Owens' early days to his time as co-host of Hee-Haw and his final years as a living legend. Until his passing in 2006 Owens would perform each weekend to fans that came from across the globe to pay homage to the star.

Many of today&rsquos biggest country stars interrupt world tours to play the intimate 550-seat venue. Visitors can experience live entertainment and dancing every Tuesday through Saturday night. The world famous Buckaroos entertain guests most Friday and Saturday evenings and occasionally are fronted by Buck&rsquos son, Buddy Owens.

The Palace is regularly nominated for Nightclub of the Year by the Academy of Country Music®. In 2005 country superstar Garth Brooks proposed to then country singer girlfriend Trisha Yearwood on the Palace stage.

For a comprehensive history of the Bakersfield Sound, a visit to the Kern County Museum is essential for visitors. The permanent exhibit is located inside the main museum building and features costumes, instruments, and memorabilia related to country music in Bakersfield.

Visitors wanting to experience one of the last of the original Bakersfield Honky Tonk&rsquos, should visit Trout&rsquos Nightclub, Dance Hall and Saloon . The venue offers live music seven nights a week and line dance lessons Tuesday through Friday nights. Trout&rsquos expanded in 2007 and opened the new Blackboard Stage on New Year&rsquos Eve in 2008. The walls inside the club are lined with Bakersfield Sound era memorabilia and portraits of key players in the development of the Bakersfield Sound are on display inside the club.

The Bakersfield Sound: Buck Owens, Merle Haggard and California Country was a featured exhibit at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville TN, March 24, 2012 &ndash December 31, 2014.


The 9 Most Haunted Places in Bakersfield, CA

Bakersfield, California is one town that has a very diverse range of paranormal activity. It seems as though there is just about every type of paranormal activity happening here that you could ask for. There are ghostly women lamenting their lost love, poltergeists throwing objects around, a statue with precognitive abilities and even a ghostly german shepherd dog!

Join us as we explore some of the most haunted places in Bakersfield, CA:

1. Central Park

Central Park, 500 19th St, Bakersfield, CA 93301

Central Park in Bakersfield is said to be home to a woman in white. The majority of reports from those who have seen her suggest that she is most likely to appear in the early hours of the morning, just before daybreak. She is usually seen walking along the canal.

There are rumors that a female corpse was discovered during renovation work at the nearby foundry, having been shot. Locals believe that this could be her spirit, wandering the park in search of help.

2. Garces Memorial Circle

According to local legend, the statue of Father Francisco Garces, which stands in Garces Memorial Circle, will offer a warning before any significant accidents!

The Garces Memorial Circle is, in fact, the spot where there are quite a large number of accidents. Still, many people have reported seeing the statue’s hands moving or hearing the Father uttering a prayer right before an accident.

3. Kern County Museum

Kern County Museum, 3801 Chester Ave, Bakersfield, CA 93301

Kern County Museum is one of the most haunted places in Bakersfield, thanks to several resident ghosts. It is actually home to several ghosts in the various areas of the museum. For example, The Pioneer Village is apparently the site of some residual haunting with visitors describing the sounds of some long-forgotten birthday party echoing inside the building!

There are also reports of unexplained sounds and apparitions close to Weill House. Finally, The Norris School, which is also a part of the museum, is apparently haunted by a former teacher who can be heard writing on the blackboard. Visitors have described the distinctive tapping of chalk on the board.

4. Gaslight Melodrama Theatre and Music Hall

The Gaslight Melodrama Theatre and Music Hall actually dates back to the 1970s, but it was originally a toy store when it was built. However, as the neighborhood began to get a little bit sketchy, the business started to trail off, and in a couple of years, he ended up losing his store. Distraught at losing the business he ended up hanging himself in the attic.

The building was later transformed into a theatre, but it has been haunted by his ghost ever since! People often report feeling someone brush past them on the stairs when there is nobody there!

He has also been blamed for breaking mirrors and messing around with costumes. Actors and audience members have reported seeing his apparition walking across the stage, and there have also been weird shadows reported in the female dressing room.

All of this combines to make the theatre one of the most haunted places in Bakersfield.

5. Bakersfield Californian Building

The Bakersfield Californian Building is home to the local newspaper and also a ghost dog! Apparently, the German Shepherd used to come to work with his owner nearly every day and remain by his side at all times.

The dog and his master are both long dead, but according to the current staff in the building, the dog has stuck around. The dog apparently wanders around the building, always searching for his master.

Staff members have also reported seeing other spirits in the building, including an old editor and a former security guard who are apparently still working even after their deaths.

6. The Padre Hotel BOOK A ROOM

The Padre Hotel, 1702 18th St, Bakersfield, CA 93301

Over the years, The Padre Hotel has earned the reputation of being one of Bakersfield’s most haunted places. The majority of the paranormal activity seems to be centered on the seventh floor of the hotel.

There have been reports of many different types of activity, and it seems that there are certainly more than just one or two spirits who have taken up residence here! Guests have reported being pushed by unseen hands, and some have even described actually seeing ghostly apparitions in the hotel.

One of the most commonly spotted apparitions is the ghost of a young girl dressed in the 1920s or 1930s clothing. She is known to giggle a great deal and often leaves small child-sized handprints on mirrors and doors. Different explanations have been offered up as reasons that the hotel might be haunted.

Some believe that most of the ghosts are people who perished in a fire at the hotel in the 1950s, while others say that some of the spirits are tied to the hotel after committing suicide by jumping from the roof.

During renovation work in 2008, the spirits seemed to get really stirred up. In fact, many of the workers said that they were touched and pushed or that they witnessed poltergeist activity!

7. Club Paradise

Club Paradise is a name that conjures up a pleasant location, but the story here is quite the opposite. Club Paradise was actually one of the most haunted places in Bakersfield, and it is all down to a somewhat malevolent spirit who seems to have an intense dislike for the staff!

The entity is well known for locking the storeroom doors, trapping employees inside. Employees have also seen items move across the bar, had things thrown at them, been pushed, and a few say some unseen being has inappropriately touched them! The club was eventually renamed Club 902, but that is gone now, and the Liberty Career College stands in its place.

8. Kern County Kids Shelter / Sinaloa Mexican

The Sinaloa Mexican Restaurant is housed in a more than 100-year-old building that was the Kern County Kids Shelter. It is considered a paranormal hotspot and one of the most haunted places in Bakersfield.

The building was originally constructed in 1901, and it is thought to be haunted by the ghosts of some of the children who lived and quite possibly died here.

9. Bakersfield High School

Bakersfield High School apparently has three different hot spots where paranormal activity occurs. The first area is the Quad, which, according to school legend, sits on top of what was once an unofficial graveyard.

There was once a hospital nearby, and when patients without families passed away, the employees would bury them in the ground where the quad is now. Some students have reported catching glimpses of ghostly figures wandering around the area. Could these be the ghosts of those buried beneath the ground?

Another of the hot spots in the Bakersfield High School is the Harvey Auditorium, which is haunted by a construction worker who was accidentally killed while the property was being built. He apparently fell from the rafters and ended up crashing through several floors. His apparition is now seen around the spot where he died.

The final haunting involves the ghosts of two former students of the school. It is not clear what exactly happened to this young couple, but they always appear together. The boy is usually wearing his letterman jacket while the girl is dressed in an old-fashioned formal gown. They are often seen standing on the bleachers, and students have also reported strange cold spots around the school.


Kern County Museum - History

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Carol M. Highsmith sells prints of her photographs at: http://photographsamerica.com/ .

Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.

As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)

No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.

Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.

No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.

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To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.


The Kern County Museum, a history museum located in Bakersfield, California

The main focus of the museum is the history of Kern County, including Bakersfield. One prominent features is its Pioneer Village with over 50 original buildings from around the county.
Title, date, and keywords provided by the photographer.
Credit line: The Jon B. Lovelace Collection of California Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith's America Project, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.
Gift The Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation in memory of Jon B. Lovelace 2012 (DLC/PP-2012:063).
Forms part of: Jon B. Lovelace Collection of California Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith's America Project in the Carol M. Highsmith Archive.

In 2015, documentary photographer Carol Highsmith received a letter from Getty Images accusing her of copyright infringement for featuring one of her own photographs on her own website. It demanded payment of $120. This was how Highsmith came to learn that stock photo agencies Getty and Alamy had been sending similar threat letters and charging fees to users of her images, which she had donated to the Library of Congress for use by the general public at no charge. In 2016, Highsmith has filed a $1 billion copyright infringement suit against both Alamy and Getty stating “gross misuse” of 18,755 of her photographs. “The defendants [Getty Images] have apparently misappropriated Ms. Highsmith’s generous gift to the American people,” the complaint reads. “[They] are not only unlawfully charging licensing fees … but are falsely and fraudulently holding themselves out as the exclusive copyright owner.” According to the lawsuit, Getty and Alamy, on their websites, have been selling licenses for thousands of Highsmith’s photographs, many without her name attached to them and stamped with “false watermarks.” (more: http://hyperallergic.com/314079/photographer-files-1-billion-suit-against-getty-for-licensing-her-public-domain-images/)

People keep searching online for one question: "Where can I find free high-resolution stock images that are cleared to use without any copyright restrictions? Where to find images for blog posts or social media?" Almost every image created in the last 70 years is still protected by copyright, but you can find a public domain photo, an image that does not need attribution, or image that has copyright expired. First, it helps to understand some copyright-related terms before using any free images. Always read the terms and conditions of the site you try to use to download free images and photos, so you know if, when, and what type of attribution is required. What is Creative Commons? Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools. There are various types of Creative Commons licenses that range from allowing any type of use with no attribution to allowing only certain uses and no changes. Most authors using Creative Commons require some sort of attribution. While relatively easy to use such free images in blogs, using such images for video might be problematic unless you create lengthy credits section. Even if you do, you still may breach the particular image Creative Commons license since it often requires backlinking. What is Public Domain? Works in the public domain are those whose copyrights have expired or never existed. The public domain status of official government works is sometimes difficult to determine but there are some easy cases: works of the United States federal government, for example, are not protected by copyright and are thus in the public domain. The same does not hold in general for the works of other governments or all 50 States of the United States. Determining whether a particular work of a particular government are in the public domain requires research and sometimes even legal advice. What is Royalty-Free? Most royalty-free images aren’t free. In most cases, you’ll have to pay a one-time fee to obtain the rights to use the image. Then you can use it as many times as you like. The term “free” in “royalty-free” means that you do not have to pay royalties to the owner of the image every time you use it. We've reviewed terms of few popular Free Image Websites below. 1. Unsplash Unsplash has its own license, which essentially lets you use the images for free, in any way you like, except for using them to create a competing website. 2. Pexels Pexels also has its own license, which states what you can and cannot do with the images. You can use and modify the images for free for both commercial and personal use without attribution. 3. Pixabay We love Pixabay. Images on Pixabay are licensed under Creative Commons Zero (CC0), which means you can use the images without asking for permission or giving credit to the artist. Pixabay also explains tricky legal language such as "model release". 4. Gratisography Gratisography also has its own free photo license, which lets you do “almost anything you can think of”. While they have not too many images, many are high-quality images that I would use. 5. Flickr Flickr is where you can find images that can be used and modified for commercial purposes. Select “Commercial use & mods allowed” under the “Any license” filter to find those images, and remember to check the license for each image as they vary. Be careful with Flickr images since as far as we can see, many images are labeled public domain wrongfully or without much research. 6. Google Image Search Google Advanced Image Search is a method of finding free-to-use images through Google’s own search tools. It is 100% automated, so you can't blindly trust the license cited. Use it with caution. Same as Flickr, Google bears no responsibility. When using free online images, always do your research.


The California Living Museum (CALM) is California's premier native zoo and garden. A visit to the beautiful grounds of CALM will take you through different animal exhibits and plant communities to give you and encapsulated glimpse at the diversity of our golden&hellip


Historic Bakersfield and Kern County

Much has been written about this region of Central California, but the histories on these pages deal with people and events that others overlooked or ignored. If you have corrections or questions, please email .

Although I've copyrighted these histories, download what you want for your own personal use. I only ask that you include a link back to this site. Teachers, these histories are free for your professional use.

Commercial interests: Honor my copyright by inquiring for permission to use.

The histories are in PDF format. Adobe Reader® works well, and it's free at https://get.adobe.com/reader/

Other Interests
About Gilbert P. Gia

I was raised in Bakersfield, taught 32 years in city schools and in 2002 turned my attention to local history. Without my wife's patience and understanding these histories would not exist. I am a past president of the Kern County Historical Society. My work has variously appeared in the Bakersfield Californian Bakersfield Magazine The Blackboard publications of the Kern County Historical Society Quarterly of the Kern Genealogical Society Quarterly of the Tulare County Historical Society newsletter of the Golden Empire Chapter, American Institute of Architects Levan Humanities Review at Bakersfield College and The Pulse, the monthly publication of Kern Division, California Retired Teachers' Association. I am co-author of _Peasant in a Paper Suit_ , the biography of local wrestling promoter Steve Strelich, ISBN 1466464941 . I'm author of Race, Sports, and Black Unity, 1875-1988: Voices From Chops Lawrence&rsquos Bakersfield , ISBN 978-1-7338860-0-0.

--The train logo in each of the histories is my acknowledgment of the impact that railroads brought to Kern County. --


Watch the video: 1339 Inside HANK SNOWs Famous RAINBOW RANCH Home u0026 Recording Studio ELVIS PRESLEY 72520