George Kay

George Kay

George Kay was born in Manchester on 21st September 1891. A centre-half he played for Eccles before signing for Bolton Wanderers in 1910. Kenny Davenport, who discovered Kay, claimed that "Kay was as strong as I've seen a lad of his years. Nothing passed him. He's a big chap, but fast and bright."

Kay only played in three first-team games until he joined the Royal Garrison Artillery on the outbreak of the First World War. During the conflict Kay played friendly games for several league clubs including West Ham United.

Kay was eventually sent to the Western Front and was both wounded and gassed. In 1917 Kay, who had been promoted to the rank of sergeant, was sent back to England suffering from shellshock.

Kay joined West Ham United in 1919 for a fee of £100. He made his debut for the Second Division side against Barnsley on 8th September 1919. Kay joined a team that included Syd Puddefoot, Jimmy Ruffell, Edward Hufton, George Kay, Billy Moore, Jack Tresadern, Vic Watson, Syd Bishop, Billy Brown, Dick Richards, Jack Young and Billy Henderson.

Kay retained his place in the side and in 1922 Syd King decided to appoint him as captain of the side. West Ham United enjoyed a good FA Cup run in the 1922-23 season beating Hull City (3-2), Brighton & Hove Albion (1-0), Plymouth Argyle (2-0), Southampton (1-0) and Derby County (5-2) to reach the final against Bolton Wanderers. The final took place at Wembley Stadium, only four days after the stadium had been completed.

The stadium had a capacity of 125,000 and so the Football Association did not consider making it an all-ticket match. After all, both teams only had an average attendance of around 20,000 for league games. However, it was rare for a club from London to make the final of the FA Cup and supporters of other clubs in the city saw it as a North v South game. It is estimated that 300,000 people attempted to get into the ground. Over a thousand people were injured getting in and out of the stadium.

Jimmy Ruffell was later interviewed about the final: "Most of the people at Wembley seemed to be Londoners. Well, the ones I saw seemed to be. As we tried to make our way out onto the field everyone was slapping us on the back and grabbing our hands to shake them. By the time I got to the centre of the pitch my poor shoulder was aching... It was a hard game for West Ham to play as the field had been churned up so bad by horses and the crowd that had been on the pitch well before the game. West Ham made a lot of the wings and you just couldn't run them for the crowd that were right up close to the line. Bolton had to play on the same field of course, but they didn't play so wide as West Ham." When the game eventually got started, Joe Smith and David Jack scored in Bolton's 2-0 victory over West Ham United.

In their next game West Ham United beat Sheffield Wednesday 2-0 to ensure promotion to the First Division. Top scorers were Vic Watson (22) and Billy Moore (15). However, the defence did very well only letting in 38 goals that season.

West Ham United finished in 13th place in their first season in the First Division. Kay played in 40 of the 42 games that season. The following season he only missed one league game. That year he became the first person to play more than 200 games for West Ham. When he left the club at the end of the 1925-26 season he had played in 237 league games for the club. Kay joined Stockport County but now aged 36 he only managed two games for the club.

The following year be became coach at Luton Town in the Third Division. In 1929 he became manager of the club. However, after two fairly unsuccessful season he became manager of Southampton in May 1931. As the Second Division club was in financial difficulties he spent a great deal of time developing his young players. This included Ted Drake who scored 48 goals in 74 appearances. In March 1934, Kay sold Drake to Arsenal for a fee of £6,500.

Considering the financial problems of Southampton, Kay did well to keep the club in the Second Division. In 1936 Kay became manager of the First Division side Liverpool. Kay did not have a very good start and in the 1936-37 season the club finished in 18th place. Kay made Matt Busby club captain. Later, Busby claimed that Kay showed him how to become a good manager. Liverpool finished in mid-table in the 1937-38 and 1938-39 seasons.

According to Tony Matthews, the author of Who's Who of Liverpool (2006), Kay was: "A man of fine mettle and a great talker, he never donned a track suit, always preferring to wear a collar and tie and a suit (or blazer and trousers) no matter what the circumstances. His bark was far worse than his bite and he certainly got the players wound up before a game."

The Football League was abandoned during the Second World War. Kay had developed an excellent team by the time football resumed after the war. Matt Busby had been forced into retirement but Kay had acquired players of the quality of Bob Paisley, Billy Liddell, Jack Balmer and Albert Stubbins.

Liverpool won the First Division championship in the 1946-47 season. Bob Paisley claimed that Kay "took Liverpool through the War to come out a bit like West Ham did after the First War ...He was one of the people who laid the ground for the way Liverpool teams would play in the future ...keeping the ball on the ground and passing it well ...but being strong on the ball as well." The club owed a great deal to Jack Balmer and Albert Stubbins who ended up joint top-scorers with 24 goals each. Liverpool also reached the semi-final of the FA Cup, but was unfortunately beaten by Burnley 1-0.

The club could only finish in mid-table for the next three seasons but they did reach the final of the 1950 FA Cup against Arsenal. As Brian Belton pointed out: "Kay's health began to deteriorate due to the stress of the run-up to the 1950 FA Cup final, during which time he lost weight and began chain smoking. He collapsed and required emergency medical attention. Although confined to his sick bed two days before Liverpool met Arsenal in the Reds' first Wembley final in 1950, Kay was not going to be denied the honour of leading his players onto the Wembley turf for the presentation to the King." Liverpool lost the game 2-0.

Kay's health continued to deteriorate and he retired as manager in January 1951. Billy Liddell commented: "He had no other thought but for the good of Liverpool during his waking hours, and also during many of his nights. He told me often of the times he had lain in bed, unable to sleep, pondering over the manifold problems that beset every manager, but which can be a curse to the oversensitive or excessively conscientious ones ...if any man gave his life for a club; George Kay did so for Liverpool."

George Kay died in Liverpool on 18th April 1954.

This fine centre-half was one of the first former West Ham players to make a mark in football management and could justifiably lay claim to being the pioneer behind the famous West Ham managerial "Academy".

A man of fine mettle and a great talker, he never donned a track suit, always preferring to wear a collar and tie and a suit (or blazer and trousers) no matter what the circumstances. His bark was far worse than his bite and he certainly got the players wound up before a game.

The new manager at Anfield, George Kay, was a man Matt came to admire - one of the finest men he had met in the game. They were kindred spirits, sharing common views and goals.

George was one of the first Hammers to make a mark in English management when he kept Southampton established in the Second Division for five seasons between 1931 and 1936. His time on the south coast wasn't entirely successful, with only 76 wins in 219 games in charge of the Saints. But he signed Vic Watson from West Ham, which was a big surprise at the time. Kay did well enough with the Saints to be offered the manager's job at Anfield in 1936.

The Liverpool side Kay inherited were thought of as a certainty for relegation and it was considered something of a miracle when he steered the side (featuring future Manchester United manager Matt Busby) to the relative safety of 19th place. Busby was the only real quality player at the club. In the year leading up to the Second World War, Kay signed the little-known Scottish winger Billy Liddell from Lochgelly Violet, snapping up the 17 year-old on a £3 a week contract. He also introduced reserve defender Jim Harley, and signed Willie Fagan from Preston. Liverpool reached 11th place, however war was declared shortly after the start of the new 1939-40 season; it was to be seven long years before Kay and Liverpool returned to League football.

George managed the wartime Reds in the regional competitions that sustained football during the years of conflict, recruiting the likes of Horace Cumner, Stan Cullis and Preston defender Bill Shankly to fill in for the likes of Berry Niewenhuys and newcomer Bob Paisley. One of the few positives of that era was Liddell; he was too young to be taken into the forces when the War started and he marked his wartime debut with a goal in the 1940 New Year's massacre over Crewe; his skills lit up a depressing time for Liverpudlians.

Kay guided the Liverpool Reds to victory in the initial post-war First Division championship in 1946-47, finishing just one point ahead of their most deadly of rivals Manchester United. He had planned the assault on the championship with brilliance; like all great managers he achieved success by drawing positives from a negative situation. Before the season started he took his team on a trip to the USA and Canada, where against mediocre opposition, but with tremendous support, he gave the Liverpool team time to gel and, very significantly, live, become re-acquainted with one another, play and regain fitness in an environment without the curse of food rationing; the Anfield lads had never eaten better. His team, fit, healthy and buoyed by ten wins in ten games managed to stand the strain of a season that ploughed on to July, the hard winter having delayed fixtures for weeks on end. Kay's men achieved a unique "quadruple" that term, winning the Liverpool Senior Cup (defeating Everton in the final) and two other local cups, the Lancashire County Combination Cup, and the Lancashire Senior Cup; all were significant trophies at that time.

The Championship was a marvellous feat and the following season Liverpool came so near to yet more glory; after a goalless tussle with Burnley, Kay's lads were narrowly beaten in the semi-final replay of the FA Cup at Maine Road by a single goal. However, George was to get his second FA Cup final just a few years later, after beating Everton in the last four of the competition. Kay's health began to deteriorate due to the stress of the run-up to the 1950 FA Cup final, during which time he lost weight and began chain smoking. Although confined to his sick bed two days before Liverpool met Arsenal in the Reds' first Wembley final in 1950, Kay was not going to be denied the honour of leading his players onto the Wembley turf for the presentation to the King. The final, for which the Anfield board dropped Paisley, was a close game, but it was sadly another 2-0 defeat for George Kay, bringing back memories of

his first Wembley final in 1923...

George retired from football in February 1951 on medical advice and Liverpool appointed Don Welsh as his successor. Kay died in April 1954. He was recognised as a deep, thoughtful man, very serious about his football. He analysed every decision no matter how small and was not afraid to revisit these same judgments after reflection. George was always pristine in his dress and devoted his work. He ate, drank, slept and lived for football but never allowed his heart to rule his head. He had a shrewd tactical knowledge and good motivational skills. To quote former Reds' striker Cyril Done, who worked closely with Kay, George was "the Shankly of his day". He was called one of the all-time great managers by Bob Paisley. Sir Matt Busby once said that Kay was his mentor, and that without his teaching, it is doubtful that he could have masterminded Manchester United's first European Cup win. George Kay turned a struggling Liverpool club into one of the best sides in the country.


George Kay Wiki, Biography, Net Worth, Age, Family, Facts and More

You will find all the basic Information about George Kay. Scroll down to get the complete details. We walk you through all about George. Checkout George Wiki Age, Biography, Career, Height, Weight, Family. Get updated with us about your Favorite Celebs.We update our data from time to time.

BIOGRAPHY

Former rugby player known for being married to pop star Kerry Katona. She filed for divorce in 2016 after he’d been arrested for assault and possession of a taser in late 2015. George Kay is a well known Rugby Player. George was born on November 20, 1980 in England..George is one of the famous and trending celeb who is popular for being a Rugby Player. As of 2018 George Kay is 37 years years old. George Kay is a member of famous Rugby Player list.

Wikifamouspeople has ranked George Kay as of the popular celebs list. George Kay is also listed along with people born on 20-Nov-80. One of the precious celeb listed in Rugby Player list.

Nothing much is known about George Education Background & Childhood. We will update you soon.

Details
Name George Kay
Age (as of 2018) 37 years
Profession Rugby Player
Birth Date 20-Nov-80
Birth Place England
Nationality England

George Kay Net Worth

George primary income source is Rugby Player. Currently We don’t have enough information about his family, relationships,childhood etc. We will update soon.

Estimated Net Worth in 2019: $100K-$1M (Approx.)

George Age, Height & Weight

George body measurements, Height and Weight are not Known yet but we will update soon.

Family & Relations

Not Much is known about George family and Relationships. All information about his private life is concealed. We will update you soon.

Facts

  • George Kay age is 37 years. as of 2018
  • George birthday is on 20-Nov-80.
  • Zodiac sign: Scorpio.

-------- Thank you --------

Influencer Opportunity

If you are a Model, Tiktoker, Instagram Influencer, Fashion Blogger, or any other Social Media Influencer, who is looking to get Amazing Collaborations. Then you can join our Facebook Group named "Influencers Meet Brands". It is a Platform where Influencers can meet up, Collaborate, Get Collaboration opportunities from Brands, and discuss common interests.

We connect brands with social media talent to create quality sponsored content


How To Use FameChain

With the 2020 election approaching see the Trump family tree.

About to send four astronauts to the ISS. See the Elon Musk family tree here at FameChain

Vice-president of the United States.

Meghan and Harry are now US based. FameChain has their amazing trees.

The Democratic party contender for President. See the Joe Biden family tree

Democratic candidate for the Vice-Presidency of the United States.

Set to be the next Supreme Court Judge. Discover the Coney Barret family tree

Follow us on

VIDEOS

All relationship and family history information shown on FameChain has been compiled from data in the public domain. From online or printed sources and from publicly accessible databases. It is believed to be correct at the time of inputting and is presented here in good faith. Should you have information that conflicts with anything shown please make us aware by email.

But do note that it is not possible to be certain of a person's genealogy without a family's cooperation (and/or DNA testing).


Kerry Katona’s ex-husband George Kay dies after suspected overdose

The 39-year-old former rugby star is said to have died on Friday after a suspected drug overdose he was found collapsed at home and taken to hospital where doctors were unable to resuscitate him.

Sources close to Kerry, 38, said the mum-of-five is ‘heartbroken’.

‘Kerry was told this afternoon that George suffered an overdose and was taken to hospital, but was declared dead on arrival,’ a family friend said.

‘No one yet knows what he overdosed on or whether it was intentional or an accident. Kerry is heartbroken, he’s DJ’s dad and she loved him once.’

George had a long history of drug abuse and had battled mental health issues for many years.

Speaking to The Mirror, the friend added: ‘She can’t bear the thought of explaining to her daughter what has happened.’

Kerry and George met in 2012 and married September 2014, five months after she gave birth to their daughter, Dylan-Jorge.

In October 2015 she confirmed that they had split, alleging he had assaulted her.

He was arrested by police but charges were later dropped due to lack of evidence Kerry had a restraining order out against him and it as thought he hadn’t seen his daughter in over a year.

In 2017 they split for good, with a source claiming that tensions had ‘reached breaking point’ and ‘it all came to head when George told Kerry that he was tired of acting as a nanny to her kids’.

Kerry has two daughters from her previous marriage to Westlife’s Brian McFadden, Molly, 16, Lilly-Sue, 14 and 10-year-old Heidi. She also has a nine-year-old Maxwell with second husband Mark Croft.


George Kay (1838 - 1926)

England and Wales Census, 1841- George (2) living in Leigh, Lancashire, England:

Samuel Kay M 27-31 Lancashire Mary Kay F 24-28 Lancashire John Kay M 3 Lancashire George Kay M 2 Lancashire [3]

England and Wales Census, 1851Geoge (12) living Tyldesley, Lancashire, England with his family, working as a Coal Miner:

Samuel Kay Head M 37 Tyldesley, Lancashire Mary Kay Wife F 35 Tyldesley, Lancashire John Kay Son M 13 Tyldesley, Lancashire George Kay Son M 12 Tyldesley, Lancashire Ellen Kay Daughter F 6 Tyldesley, Lancashire William Kay Son M 2 Tyldesley, Lancashire Mary Hannah Kay Daughter F 0 Tyldesley, Lancashire George Cook Father In Law M 59 Tyldesley, Lancashire [4]

Olive and George Kay married in 1861 at Ashton Under Lynn, Lancaster, England [5] [6]

George and Olive Kay left Lancashire on the Barque "Victory" sailing 28 June 1863, London arriving Timaru, New Zealand 13 Oct 1863 [7]

George and Olive had 5 children

Olive Kay died 4 Feb 1885 in Timaru, Canterbury, New Zealand


George re-married to Catherine Fraser 1886 [8]

George and Catherine had 9 children

George died Sept 1926 [9] He is buried in the Homeview Cemetery, Cheviot [10] [2]

New Zealand, Archives New Zealand, Probate Records [11]

A Pastoral Kingdom Divided: Cheviot, 1889–1894 By W. J. Gardner

In 1893 John McKenzie, as minister of lands, purchased the Cheviot Hills estate for the government as part of his policy of dividing up the great estates. The land was balloted under a variety of forms of tenure. Some was sold as grazing farms for pastoral purposes, as were the 2,089 acres (845 hectares) acquired by D. O. Brick (top). Some was leased in perpetuity, as was the 400-acre (162-hectare) farm acquired by J. S. Zuppicich in 1894 (middle). There were also village settlement sections of 10 acres (4 hectares), such as the land acquired by government labourer George Kay (bottom). [4]


Kerry Katona's ex George Kay was 'broke and living with his parents' before death

Kerry Katona&aposs ex husband George Kay was allegedly penniless and forced to move back in with his parents just months before his death.

The 39-year-old former rugby league star was sadly found dead at his home in Warrington at the weekend after a suspected cocaine overdose.

While Kerry has vehemently denied she stopped George seeing his daughter Dylan-Jorge, 5, Fathers4Justice founder Matt O&aposConnor controversially claimed otherwise.

"He had been cut off from his daughter and wasn&apost in a good place," he told The Sun.

Read More
Related Articles

"George was going through what is known as a &aposliving bereavement&apos, a sense of loss and having the most important thing in his life taken away.

"He was living with his parents and had run out of money to fight it.

"He was no saint and was clearly unwell but the situation made everything so much worse. He felt like his life was over."

Mirror online has contacted Kerry&aposs representative for comment.

Read More
Related Articles

It comes after Kerry&aposs eldest daughter hit back at the organisation for their "inaccurate and extremely insensitive" comments about George&aposs access to DJ, and sick claims that the former Atomic Kitten star "has blood on her hands".

In a post on Twitter , she wrote: "I suggest take this tweet down.

“How dare you make statements this disgusting at such a vulnerable time, your accusations are inaccurate and extremely insensitive.

“I truly hope you never find yourself in this kind of situation. Vile words from a vile person you should be ashamed.”

Kerry&aposs mum Sue added: "Well said Molly and so true.”

Kerry is yet to break her silence on the death of George, who she divorced in 2017.

A close family friend of Kerry said: “Kerry was told this afternoon that George suffered an overdose and was taken to hospital, but was declared dead on arrival.

“No one yet knows what he overdosed on or whether it was intentional or an accident.


Omar Sy and George Kay Break Down Creating a New Gentleman Thief in ‘Lupin’

When Netflix’s “Lupin” filmed its premiere episode heist sequence overnight in the Louvre, the cast and crew had ample time to roam around and take in the art in between setups and shots. Actor Omar Sy even found himself alone with the Mona Lisa for almost 20 minutes. It was an experience that gave him a new appreciation for a place he had previously visited as a child on a school trip, and one that he says he will “never forget.”

That sentiment doesn’t stop there, though. Working on “Lupin” also allowed Sy to re-experience and reflect on Maurice Leblanc’s Arsène Lupin novels that he read as a child. “Lupin is so French that you cannot grow up in France and not know who is Arsène Lupin,” Sy tells Variety. Between the books, the shows and the manga based on the character, Sy grew up with a great awareness of who Arsène Lupin was but says, “to be honest, I wasn’t a fan.”

It wasn’t until he was doing research for his new series, reading everything about the original character and Leblanc, that Sy says he gained a new understanding of both the character and the writer.

Sy was already working with Gaumont Télévision, which produces “Lupin,” and was asked, “What do you want to play?” which he admits is the “best” position in which to be as an actor. “My answer was Lupin,” he says. “If I was English I would say James Bond, but Lupin is the best character for that: he’s fun, funny, very elegant there is action. Lupin is just the perfect character to cross [off] everything on the bucket list. You can do everything with that character. It is the perfect role.”

In the end, though, Sy did not end up playing Lupin himself, but something of a disciple of the literary hero: Assane Diop, a gentleman thief in his own right whose father gifted him with an Arsène Lupin novel when he was at a formative age. “Lupin,” which was created by George Kay, is not a traditional adaptation of Leblanc’s 20th Century novels, but instead uses the original works as a source of inspiration for its own leading man, as well as the events and locations of the first 10 episodes. (The first five episodes launched Jan. 8, with the next five set to debut at a later date, but together those 10 episodes were built as “the origin of how Assane came to be here,” Kay says, “so it’s the first chapter of a bigger show.”)

Arsène Lupin’s story and character, within the world of “Lupin,” was a tether from Assane to his father, Babakar, who was accused of stealing Marie Antoinette’s necklace from the wealthy Pellegrini family, whose employ he was under as a chauffeur. Babakar was arrested and later found dead in his cell, leaving Assane on his own when he was just a teenager. Arsène Lupin also provided Assane a moral code, not unlike Robin Hood, in only stealing from those who have already done things wrong, as well as a road map to “justifiable revenge.”

“There’s this French establishment story [within] it, so you see in the first episode that Babakar takes the Arsène Lupin book off a quite traditional bookcase in a quite traditional house. He could have picked ‘The Count of Monte Cristo,’ he could have picked a lot of other French books, [but] that’s the one he chose for his son in that moment and it becomes a guidebook for an attitude for life,” Kay explains.

In bringing to life the style and tone of the Arsène Lupin novels for screen through a new character who happened to be a fan of the source material, Kay knew he wanted to keep the sense of “mischievous, adventurous crooks and criminals intersecting establishment,” but he felt it was equally important to “take everything we loved in the books, subvert it, update it and create a really modern story through the heart of it.”

“Technically he’s a criminal but he’s charismatic, he’s fun, he has winky ways to do his crimes,” Kay says about Assane. “You want him to steal stuff, and of course massively central to that is just Omar’s likability. His smile is king. Omar is a modern hero, someone that men and women and children all love in France, and he’s a diverse French actor in a country when there aren’t many of those figureheads. He’s charming and has all of the modern appeal that a modern Lupin should have.”

The heart of the story here is Assane not merely as a thief who decides to steal back Marie Antoinette’s necklace when it resurfaces for the first time in more than a decade, though. It is also him as a father. He has a son who is on the cusp of turning 14, and although he has mastered many criminal elements, such as disguises, he still struggles with how to parent, in great part because of how emotional that job is.

“The more he’s in danger, the more he’s going to be calm,” Sy says. But, when it comes to his family, “he cannot hide those feelings he cannot be someone else he cannot play.”

Assane isn’t entirely keeping his dual lives separate: He gives his son the Arsène Lupin novel ahead of his birthday as a way of trying to form a bond with him and, according to Sy, help his son “guess” who his father really is.

“The book itself, as an object, comes from his dad, so giving it to his son is him becoming a dad,” Sy says. “It’s opening a world to his son and sharing some knowledge, for sure, because what it is to be a dad is just to teach your kids what you know. The thing he knows the most is Lupin, so he wants to teach that to his son.”

But, bringing the two parts of his life closer together makes Assane vulnerable.

For the majority of the first five episodes, he was “always three steps ahead he’s untouchable in that way,” Kay points out about Assane’s life as a con man and a thief. Being able to compartmentalize the pieces of his life means he could trick common city criminals into thinking he is hard-up for cash and convince them to help him steal Marie Antoinette’s necklace, only to double cross them in the end. He also was able to infiltrate a prison kidnap the Pellegrini patriarch, who set up his father for the original necklace theft go on national television to call out the corruption involved in the case, and fight off everyone without using lethal force. (Assane took a page out of the Arsène Lupin books once again here, because Lupin never kills. “He has knowledge of martial arts and the martial art is hapkido, [in which] you use the force from your adversary, so you never give, you just send back. It’s very, very, very precise,” Sy says.)

In the fifth episode, when Assane realizes he is being tailed on the train his family is taking to his son’s birthday surprise, he is able to subdue and set up the man who wants to do him harm. But while he is focused on that, his son ends up going missing, and the lone police officer who has been drawing connections to Arsène Lupin because he, too, is a fan of the fictional thief, ends up right in front of Assane.

“He’s on the run but at the same time he’s primarily concerned to honor the fact that it’s his son’s birthday and he’s got a blind spot,” Kay says.

More than how Assane will handle coming face-to-face with the cop that has been chasing him, Kay says the cliffhanger of the first five episodes is really about where Raoul, his son, is. “That episode really is about the pledges you make when you realize you’re going to become a parent and then taking another reading of it when he’s 14 years old and how good are they on those pledges now? As he’s being brought into the world in the backstory, he’s being taken out of it in the present.”

Sy adds that in order to figure out where his son is, Assane will have to learn to approach problems in a new way. “His main tool is his head he has difficulties working with his feelings — his heart and belly. So now his son is in danger [and] he will have to work with his instinct, and he never did,” he explains. “It’s the same tool that you become a dad: You cannot be a dad just with your head. So, for me, it was a way for him to become a dad. He’s not really in the first episodes, but he will become it, and this is the way of it.”

This shift in perspective will also create a more reflective Assane in the next batch of episodes.

Through the character of Benjamin, who was first a school friend of Assane’s but has been his “sounding board” in his more recent years, as well, Assane will discuss “what’s important [and] where to go next,” Kay says. “These are pretty victimless crimes in the sense that he’s often stealing from very wealthy precincts that he’s trying to infiltrate — it’s all about pricking the bubble of establishment in France — but his criminal life catches up to undermine his family.”

From its episode-specific sub-genres to its larger anti-establishment theme and view of modern fatherhood, “Lupin” offers the audience a lot to think about. Sy also hopes the show inspires viewers to engage with the original source material, though, much in the way it did for him.

“I hope it will maybe invite people to read more,” he says. “Sometimes reading can change your life.”


How did Kerry Katona’s ex-husband George die?

Kerry Katona’s ex-husband George Kay died in July 2019.

Kerry and George first met when they were teenagers but only started dating after a chance encounter in Warrington in 2012.

Two years later they got married after welcoming their daughter Dylan-Jorge in May 2014.

The couple initially split in October 2015 but decided to separate formally and divorce in November 2017.

Speaking after learning about her ex-husband’s death Kerry wrote on Instagram: ‘My heart is broken and I am struggling to come to terms with all of this.’

‘These last few weeks have been the most painful and difficult time for me and my children!!’

The 39-year-old star went on to explain that George’s misuse of drugs had been problematic in their relationship and the star had sought to try and help her husband while they were together:

‘In the last 6 weeks of his life George was arrested and hospitalised several times it was inevitable that one day the drugs would get the better of him which I am completely broken about! More so for our beautiful baby girl who we created together and Who i will be completely and forever grateful to him for!

‘While we were together I did EVERYTHING in my power to help but you cannot help someone who doesn’t want it!!

‘I’d give anything for the outcome of George’s life to of been different, I wish he found the strength to sort his life out and be here today! But I am not responsible for his actions!!’

Kerry concluded the statement on social media by saying, ‘No about of words can express the pain we are all in! I know he will be at peace now more so then he ever was on this earth.’

The mum has spoken a number of times since George’s death about how she has struggled with social media trolls who have cruelly blamed her for her ex-husband’s death and taunted her with lies.

Writing in her column in new! Magazine last month Kerry confessed that taking her own life because of the intense trolling she received did ‘cross her mind’ but: ‘It was only the thought of leaving my kids without a mother that stopped me.’


George Kay - History

Kay was 44-years-old when he left Southampton for Liverpool in August 1936. He was born in Manchester and played for local club Eccles before joining Bolton Wanderers in 1911, with whom he had a very brief spell before moving across the Irish Sea to play in Belfast. When competitive soccer resumed after World War I, Kay joined West Ham United and was their skipper in the first FA Cup final to be staged at Wembley in 1923. The Hammers lost that day to Kay&rsquos former club Bolton, but had the ample consolation of a place in the top league as runners-up in the Second Division. Towards the end of the 1920&rsquos Kay moved to Stockport County as a player and then on to Luton Town, initially as their player-coach in 1928 before taking on the role of manager a year later at the age of 38. He held that post until the end of the 1930/31 season before being attracted by the opportunity of managing a club in a higher division, Southampton. The Saints had been promoted as Division Three South champions in 1922 and were anxious to taste life at the very top. But during the five full seasons that Kay was in charge at The Dell, the club never made the top-half of the table. All the same, Kay was respected within the game and was clearly knowledgeable and not afraid to try out new ideas. He was also experienced and probably a combination of all those qualities brought him to Liverpool&rsquos attention when it was clear that George Patterson would be unable to continue the managerial side of his role as secretary-manager. Although appointed on 6 August 1936 Kay stayed at Southampton to fulfill his duties and started working for Liverpool on 21 August 1936.

Kay had only been at Anfield a couple of years when another World War broke out, a conflict that would interrupt and in some cases end the careers of many a fine footballer. The League was on hiatus but regional competitions took their place. Many of the club's players served their country and Kay was hard at work to find men to represent Liverpool's eleven. Billy Liddell noted that "with players in the forces stationed all over the country, Mr. Kay wrote thousands of letters and must have spent many hours on the phone to Commanding officers. Such was his personality that his own players and guest players would willingly make long journeys to play for the Reds." One of those men was a certain Bill Shankly who was impressed by Kay: "I played for Liverpool against Everton during the war in the Liverpool Senior Cup, as a guest from Preston. All the players were in the passageway including Billy Liddell and myself. But George Kay, the Liverpool manager, didn't speak. He just went round touching people on the shoulder. If he touched you then you were playing." With the war over, the club took the unusual step of deciding to tour North America and Canada. It is quite likely that George Kay was the instigator of this trip certainly he was fully in favour of it because he felt that the climate and diet in a part of the world that hadn&rsquot been affected by food rationing the way European countries had would be extremely beneficial. The schedule was punishing ten matches at various venues between 12 May and 11 June, but it benefited the Reds who started the first post-war season in far better physical shape than many of their competitors as Kay claimed himself in a note to the Echo while in America: "The players are 25 percent above par in football, due in my opinion to the quality, quantity and variety of food."

Liverpool went on to win the championship in 1947 but it was a mighty close thing. A hard winter meant that a season which had begun at the end of August didn&rsquot finish until the start of June. Liverpool, Manchester United, Wolverhampton Wanderers and Stoke City were all in with a chance of taking the title as the season reached its climax. Liverpool&rsquos final fixture was against Wolves at Molineux. The hosts had 56 points, the visitors 55. Liverpool had to win and then wait and hope. They did their part of the job by winning 2-1, other results went their way and the Reds were champions of the Football League for a fifth time. It was George Kay&rsquos finest moment as a football manager. One of his key players was Albert Stubbins: "George Kay was a first-class manager and a very big influence on me. He was a lovely man, quiet and a deep thinker. He&rsquod read books about psychology and he knew how to get the best out of his players," the ginger-haired Geordie said. "George&rsquos first thought was always for his players. He&rsquod never tear a strip off us or criticise a Liverpool player in the press. That&rsquos were the psychology came into play. If we were trailing at half-time he&rsquod come into the dressing room and although he&rsquod point out our errors he&rsquod always say, &lsquoWell played, lads&rsquo. He knew and we knew, that we weren&rsquot playing well, but because he was so understanding we felt we had to play extra well to repay his faith in us."

The club didn&rsquot come close to another championship and the nearest it came to additional success was in 1950 when the Reds reached the FA Cup final for only the second time and the first for 36 years. Kay was intent on using his cup experience. "When I played in the first Cup final ever staged at Wembley, as captain of West Ham United, we did not win the trophy, but I am hoping that my second visit there, as manager of Liverpool will see us successful," Kay said enthusiastically. "We have a splendid lot of players, grand sportsmen every one of them. No manager ever had charge of a happier team." Sadly, the big day out at Wembley ended in disappointment with defeat to Arsenal. Kay travelled to London and led the team out but he was far from being a well man. Still his Liverpool contract was renewed for a further five years in June 1950. He retired in January 1951 a few months short of his sixtieth birthday, fought his continuing illness with strength and courage but died in Liverpool three years later on 18 April 1954. Liddell knew how much Kay's job had taken out of him: "He told me often of the times he had lain in bed, unable to sleep, pondering over the manifold problems that beset every manager. if any man gave his life for a club George Kay did so for Liverpool."

Bob Paisley was full of praise for George Kay and his importance in the club's history. "He took Liverpool through the War to come out a bit like West Ham did after the First War. He was one of the people who laid the ground for the way Liverpool teams would play in the future. keeping the ball on the ground and passing it well, but being strong on the ball as well."

Statistics
Competition Total Won Draw Lost Goals for Goals against
Grand totals 354 140 93 121 545 508
League 321 121 88 112 489 469
FA Cup 33 19 5 9 56 39
League Cup 0 0 0 0 0 0
Europe 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0
Matches that are won or lost in a penalty shoot-out are counted as a win/loss not as a draw.
Related Articles
‘Be my guest’ – George Kay keeping LFC afloat during World War II

“Well, that’s it, then!” said my mother. It is my earliest memory, and all I had to worry about was the horrified look on her face."

Related Quotes

"The manager, George Kay wasn't a bad fella either. You'd never hear him cursing and swearing. He was the type of manager you could talk to and I got along fine with him."

Stan Palk, former Liverpool player

He had no other thought but for the good of Liverpool during his waking hours, and also during many of his nights. He told me often of the times he had lain in bed, unable to sleep, pondering over the manifold problems that beset every manager, but which can be a curse to the oversensitive or excessively conscientious ones . if any man gave his life for a club George Kay did so for Liverpool.

Billy Liddell on manager George Kay

"George Kay was a first-class manager and a very big influence on me. He was a lovely man, quiet and a deep thinker. He’d read books about psychology and he knew how to get the best out of his players.

George’s first thought was always for his players. He’d never tear a strip off us or criticise a Liverpool player in the press. That’s were the psychology came into play. If we were trailing at half-time he’d come into the dressing room and although he’d point out our errors he’d always say, ‘Well played, lads’. He knew and we knew, that we weren’t playing well, but because he was so understanding we felt we had to play extra well to repay his faith in us.

I’ll always remember my first game at Anfield when I missed a penalty. Jack Balmer was the regular penalty-taker at Liverpool, but I was so used to taking the penalties at Newcastle that when I was first tripped in the area I automatically jumped up and placed the ball on the spot. I’d never missed one for Newcastle and the supporters were all expecting me to score my first home goal, but the keeper pulled off a tremendous save. He actually broke his arm in the process. Fortunately we won, but George Kay was so upset with afterwards that he took me out for tea after the game."

George Kay by Albert Stubbins

"When I played in the first Cup final ever staged at Wembley, as captain of West Ham United, we did not win the trophy, but I am hoping that my second visit there, as manager of Liverpool will see us successful. We have a splendid lot of players, grand sportsmen every one of them. No manager ever had charge of a happier team."

George Kay in 1950

"George was meticulous about drinking before a game. On the Friday night before a home game we’d stay at a hotel in Southport. I remember one occasion, we’d just signed a inside-left from Oldham called Ken Brierley. We sat down for lunch and Ken was there with a glass of beer. That was unheard off and we couldn’t believe it. Anyway, as we took our seat, Ken asked Jack Balmer, who was our captain, if it was okay. Jack replied, ‘Oh yes, we always have a pint before a game.’ When George Kay came in, he walked straight over to Ken and pulled the glass away. Ken was astonished and George told him straight, ‘When you are a Liverpool player, you do not drink before a game!’"

Albert Stubbins on a trick played on Ken Brierley

I played for Liverpool against Everton during the war in the Liverpool Senior Cup, as a guest from Preston. All the players were in the passageway including Billy Liddell and myself. But George Kay, the Liverpool manager, didn't speak. He just went round touching people on the shoulder. If he touched you then you were playing.

Bill Shankly on Liverpool manager George Kay

He took Liverpool through the War to come out a bit like West Ham did after the First War. He was one of the people who laid the ground for the way Liverpool teams would play in the future. keeping the ball on the ground and passing it well, but being strong on the ball as well.


The Tribune

A Texas oil billionaire has completed his multi-million dollar purchase of the Chub Cay resort development in the Berry Islands, its former administrator yesterday describing the property’s future as “bright”.

George H. Bishop, the 77 year-old founder and chief executive of GeoSouthern Energy Corporation, completed the deal with Scotiabank (Bahamas) within the last two weeks, potentially rescuing a development that has been in ‘limbo’ for the past five-six years.

Craig A. ‘Tony’ Gomez, the Baker Tilly Gomez accountant and partner appointed by the bank as Chub Cay’s administrator, confirmed to Tribune Business that the acquisition had closed and Mr Bishop’s team were now in effective charge of the property.

“The deal is pretty much done and has been consummated,” Mr Gomez said, when contacted by this newspaper.

“A few housekeeping matters are yet to be attended to, but the future at Chub is bright. It’s been a while in coming, but it’s good for the Bahamas and those employed on the cay. It’s a good opportunity, and the timing is good as the economy is headed north.”

Mr Gomez declined to comment further, but Tribune Business understands that almost all Chub Cay’s existing staff have been re-hired by the new owners.

Around 42-43 persons had been employed by Mr Gomez, acting on Scotiabank (Bahamas) behalf, and this newspaper understands that 40 of those have subsequently been employed by Mr Bishop and the company he has formed to own Chub Cay.

Brian Moree, the attorney acting for Scotiabank (Bahamas) in the deal, also confirmed that the sale had closed when contacted by Tribune Business.

The senior McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes partner said: “The transaction has been completed subject to a few outstanding issues, which are still being worked on.

“But the active transaction involving the sale of the property to the purchaser has been completed.” The purchase price was not disclosed.

Tribune Business understands from other sources that the “housekeeping matters” and “outstanding issues” referred to by Messrs Moree and Gomez relate to accounting factors, plus the payment of some outstanding taxes such as Stamp Duties, real property taxes and Port Authority fees.

However, all the necessary government approvals have been received. and Mr Bishop’s purchase represents positive news for the Government - and the Bahamas as a whole - on the foreign direct investment (FDI) front.

With this nation needing all the capital investment it can get, Mr Bishop seemingly represents exactly the type of investor the Bahamas needs.

It is also a key step in reviving once-promising Family Island resort developments that faltered during the 2008-2009 recession, their developers either ‘mothballing’ them, defaulting or seeking buyers.

Re-starting them has been a major priority for the Government, and several legal and business sources have suggested that Chub Cay’s sale could spark similar deals for properties such as the former Ginn development in Grand Bahama’s West End and Walker’s Cay in the north Abacos.

Chub Cay, under the first Christie administration, was billed as the ‘anchor project’ for the Berry Islands and north Andros under its original developers, the Florida-based trio of Walter McCrory, Bob Moss and Kaye Pearson.

But Scotiabank (Bahamas) took possession of the Chub Cay project in 2009, after they defaulted on the $45 million loan they received to finance the construction build-out.

The bank then appointed Mr Gomez to act for it as Chub Cay’s administrator. He has been working with Chub Cay’s existing homeowners to maintain the property, and keep it operational, during the search for a buyer.

The project’s collapse into effective receivership had a profound impact on the Berry Islands/north Andros, especially on employment and in the construction industry, and Mr Bishop would appear to have the means to see Chub Cay reach its full potential.

It is unclear what Mr Bishop’s precise plans for the project are, as Tribune Business was unable to reach him for comment.

Prime Minister Perry Christie, though, hinted at his designs during the 2014-20156 Budget speech, when he said the Government had approved recreational fishing in the South Berry Islands Marine Reserve subject to conditions.

Referring to Mr Bishop’s acquisition vehicle, Chub Cay Realty LLC, Mr Christie said the plan was “to redevelop it [Chub Cay] as a mixed use village consisting of hotel facilities, town houses, restaurants, shops, marina and recreational fishing amenities”.

He added: “Conditions have been imposed for recreational fishing to be allowed within the South Berry Islands Marine Reserve with catch limits as set out in the Fisheries regulations.

“The developer will contribute to the cost of managing the reserve, inclusive of providing vessels and manpower to ensure proper management and oversight of the Marine Reserve.

“This project will provide scores of jobs and entrepreneurial opportunities for Berry Islands and Androsians, and become the anchor property which will attract other developers to the Berry Islands.”

Tribune Business revealed Mr Bishop as Chub Cay’s purchaser in November 2013, around the same time that he hit the headlines with a $6 billion energy deal.

An article published in Forbes magazine last November estimated Mr Bishop’s net worth as being in excess of $4 billion, after he announced the sale of certain Texas-based oil and gas interests to Devon Energy for $6 billion in cash.

While some $1.5 billion of that sum is to go to private equity giant Blackstone, Forbes reported that the remaining $4.5 billion would be retained by Mr Bishop’s GeoSouthern Energy Corporation.

Mr Bishop founded the Woodlands, Texas-based firm in 1981, having started his career in the oil and gas business in the 1970s.

Tribune Business was told that he happened on Chub Cay, and its potential purchase, by chance. Sources said Mr Bishop was passing through the Bahamas on his private yacht/boat, when he stopped at the island to refuel.

A conversation with the refuelling/marina manager informed him that Chub Cay was for sale, and Mr Bishop asked to be taken on a tour of the 800-acre property and wider island.

His interest aroused, Mr Bishop reportedly asked who the vendor was, and he was told to speak to Scotiabank (Bahamas).

Tribune Business back in 2009 detailed how Scotiabank (Bahamas) initiated legal action in the south Florida courts to enforce its rights against Messrs McCrory, Pearson and Moss, specifically in regard to the $4 million personal guarantee they gave for the $45 million loan.

The action, which ultimately resulted in Scotiabank (Bahamas) taking possession of Chub Cay, noted that the project consisted of a 20,000 square foot clubhouse, 110-slip marina and vacation villas and other residences.

The bank alleged that the original developers ceased making payments on the loan facility in July 2007, with construction also ceasing that month.

And Scotiabank (Bahamas) further alleged that, at December 2008, the Florida-based trio owed it some $44.011 million in unpaid principal, plus interest, costs and expenses.

It estimated then that a further $38.6 million investment was needed to complete Chub Cay, which to this day remains an “unfinished” project.

Messrs McCrory, Moss and Pearson had aimed to refinance their $250 million project, bur ran headlong into the global ‘credit crunch’, which dashed their prospects of success.

Mr McCrory told this newspaper at the time that after pumping $16 million into Chub Cay, they had been relying on real estate pre-sales - a market that completely dried up - to finance the remaining build-out.

Mr Bishop, though, is likely to be seen as a man who can do just that, given the considerable means and ‘deep pockets’ he has access to.


Watch the video: με λενε Γιαννη και στ αρχιδια μου