Gillis DD-260 - History

Gillis DD-260 - History

Gillis

Gillis was named for two naval men.

John P. Gillis, born 6 September 1803 in Wilmington Del., was appointed Midshipman in 1825. He served with distinction in the Mexican War at the capture of Tuspan and in 1853-54 sailed with Commodore Perry's expedition to open Japan to the West. During the Civil War he commanded Monticello, Seminole, and Ossipoe in the Union blockade and subsequently was on duty at New York until retiring in 1866. Commodore Gillis died 25 February 1873 in the city of his birth.

James Henry Gillis, born 14 May 1831 in Ridgway, PA., graduated from the Naval Academy in 1854. Three years later, while serving in store ship Bapplu he rescued the crew of a floundered Argentine ship during a violent storm. During the Civil War he served with Union Squadrons blockading the Confederacy and subsequently commanded If Michigan, Franklin (Flagship European Station), Lackawanna, Minnesota, and Hartford (Flagship Pacific Station ) . Appointed Rear Admiral in 1888, he retired on 14 May 1893. Known as the "Sailor with a charmed life" because he never lost a man at sea, Rear Admiral Gillis died 6 December 1910 at Melbourne Beach, Fla.

(DD-260: dp. 1,190; 1. 314'5"; b. 31'8"; dr. 9'3"; s. 35 k;
cpl. 120; a. 4 4", 2 3", 4 21" tt.; cl. Belknap

Gillis (DD-260) was launched 29 May 1919 by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp., Quincy, Mass.; sponsored by Miss Helen Irvine Murray, granddaughter of Admiral Gillis; and Mrs. Josephine T. Smith, niece of Commodore Gillis- commissioned 3 September 1919, Lt. Comdr. Webb Trammell in command.

Gillis sailed from Newport, R.I., 17 December 1919 and moored at San Diego 20 January 1920. She joined the Pacific Fleet Destroyer Force in tactics and maneuvers along the West Coast until decommissioned at San Diego 26 May 1922. Recommissioned in ordinary 28 June 1940, she was reclassified 2 August as seaplane tender destroyer AVD-12. Following conversion she was placed in full commission at San Francisco, 25 March 1941.

Gillis was assigned as tender to Patrol Wing 4, Aircraft Scouting Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet. In the following months she performed plane guard patrol between San Diego and Seattle with time out for aircraft tending duties at Sitka, Alaska (14-17 June); Dutch Harbor and Kodiak (15-31 July). After overhaul in the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard she returned to Kodiak 16 October 1941 to resume tending of amphibious patrol planes in Alaskan waters. She was serving at Kodiak when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and returned to the Puget Souna Naval Shipyard 9 February 1942 for overhaul.

Gillis resumed tender duties at Kodiak 26 May 1942. She was stationed at Atka (11-13 June) tending amphibious patrol aircraft bombing the Japanese on Kiska Island. On air-sea rescue patrol 6 June 1942, she made three depth charge runs on an underwater sound contact. A Japanese submarine violently broached the surface revealing its conning tower and propeller, then disappeared. Gillis was unable to regain contact. She was credited with damaging this underseas raider in the combat area off Umak Island. She was attacked by three Japanese patrol bombers while at Adak 20 July. One bomb, fortunately a dud, splashed within 10 feet alongside. Other bombs rained about her ahead and astern. She was drenched by water thrown up by the explosions but escaped damage or casualties.

Gillis continued her varied duties as aircraft tender and air-sea rescue patrol ship throughout the Aleutian Campaign. Brief intervals of repair were accomplished in the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. She terminated this service 19 April 1944 when she departed Dutch Harbor for overhaul in the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. She arrived at San Diego 13 June and spent the following months as plane guard for aircraft carriers training along the California coast. She was then routed on to Pearl Harbor, arriving 8 December 1944. She operated in Hawaiian waters as plane guard for escort carrier Makassar Strait (CVE-91) until 20 February 1945. She then sailed with Rear Admiral M. L. Deyo's Gunfire and Covering Force, enroute via the Marshalls, Marianas and Ulithi for the Invasion of Okinawa.

Gillis arrived off Kerama Retto 25 March 1945. She guarded minesweepers to the west, then stood by underwater demolition teams clearing approaches to the western beaches of Okinawa. After invasion forces stormed ashore 1 April, she tended observation and patrol planes at Kerama Retto and performed air-sea rescue patrol. On 28 April she departed Okinawa in the screen of Uakassar Strait, bound via Guam to San Pedro Bay Philippine Islands. She returned by the same route in the escort screen of Wake Island (CVE-65). That carrier launched planes 29 June to land bases on Okinawa and Gillis helped escort her back to Guam 3 July 1945.

Gillis departed Guam for home 8 July 1945. She arrived at San Pedro, Calif., 28 July and decommissioned there 15 October 1945. Her name was struck from the Navy List 1 November 1945 She was sold for scrapping 29 January 1946.

Gillis received two battle stars for service in World War II.


GILLIS AVD 12

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Clemson Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid 27 December 1918 - Launched 29 May 1919

Naval Covers

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Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

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A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.

Postmark Type
---
Killer Bar Text

Post office reestablished 24 April 1941 - Disestablished 1 October 1945

As AVD-12. First Day of Postal Service, cachet by Al Cohen

As AVD-12. First Day of Postal Service, Registry receipt

As AVD-12. First Day Postal Service

Other Information

USS GILLIS earned the Combat Action Ribbon, the American Defense Service Medal, the American Campaign Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal w/ 2 Battle stars and the World War II Victory Medal during her Naval career.

NAMESAKES - John P. Gillis (September 8 1803 - February 25 1873) John Gillis was appointed Midshipman in 1825. He served with distinction in the Mexican War at the capture of Tuspan and in 1853-54 sailed with Commodore Perry's expedition to open Japan to the West. During the Civil War he commanded MONTICELLO, SEMINOLE, and OSSIPEE in the Union blockade and subsequently was on duty at New York until retiring in 1866. Commodore Gillis died February 25 1873 in Wilmington, Delaware.

James Henry Gillis (May 14 1831- December 6 1910)
James Gillis graduated from the Naval Academy in 1854. Three years later, while serving in Stores Ship SUPPLY he rescued the crew of a floundered Argentine ship during a violent storm. During the Civil War he served with Union Squadrons blockading the Confederacy and subsequently commanded MICHIGAN, FRANKLIN (Flagship European Station), LACKAWANNA, MINNESOTA, and HARTFORD (Flagship Pacific Station). Appointed Rear Admiral in 1888, he retired on May 14 1893. Known as the "Sailor with a charmed life" because he never lost a man at sea, Rear Admiral Gillis died December 6 1910 at Melbourne Beach, FL.

The ships sponsors were Miss Helen Irvine Murray, granddaughter of Admiral Gillis and Mrs. Josephine T. Smith, niece of Commodore Gillis.

If you have images or information to add to this page, then either contact the Curator or edit this page yourself and add it. See Editing Ship Pages for detailed information on editing this page.


Gillis khởi hành từ Newport, Rhode Island vào ngày 17 tháng 12 năm 1919, và đã thả neo tại San Diego, California vào ngày 20 tháng 1 năm 1920. Nó gia nhập Lực lượng Khu trục trực thuộc Hạm đội Thái Bình Dương, và đã tham gia các cuộc thực tập chiến thuật và cơ động dọc theo vùng bờ Tây cho đến khi được cho xuất biên chế tại San Diego vào ngày 26 tháng 5 năm 1922. Khi xung đột lại nổ ra ở Châu Âu, Gillis được cho nhập biên chế trở lại vào ngày 28 tháng 6 năm 1940, và đến ngày 2 tháng 8 được xếp lại lớp như một tàu tiếp liệu thủy phi cơ với ký hiệu lườn mới AVD-12. Sau khi hoàn tất việc cải biến, nó gia nhập hạm đội thường trực tại San Francisco, California vào ngày 25 tháng 3 năm 1941.

Gillis được phân công tiếp liệu cho Không đoàn Tuần tra 4 thuộc Lực lượng Máy bay Tuần tiễu Hạm đội Thái Bình Dương. Trong những tháng tiếp theo, nó hỗ trợ hoạt động tuần tra giữa San Diego và Seattle, Washington, cũng như nhiệm vụ tiếp liệu thủy phi cơ tại Sitka, Alaska từ ngày 14 đến ngày 17 tháng 6 và tại Dutch Harbor và Kodiak từ ngày 15 đến ngày 31 tháng 7. Sau khi được đại tu tại Xưởng hải quân Puget Sound, nó quay trở lại Kodiak vào ngày 16 tháng 10 năm 1941 để tiếp nối hoạt động tiếp liệu thủy phi cơ tại vùng biển Alaska. Nó đang phục vụ tại Kodiak khi Hải quân Nhật bất ngờ tấn công Trân Châu Cảng và nó đã quay trở về Xưởng hải quân Puget Sound vào ngày 9 tháng 2 năm 1942 để đại tu.

Gillis tiếp tục nhiệm vụ tiếp liệu tại Kodiak từ ngày 26 tháng 5 năm 1942. Nó đặt căn cứ tại Atka từ ngày 11 đến ngày 13 tháng 6 để tiếp liệu cho các thủy phi cơ làm nhiệm vụ ném bom vị trí quân Nhật trên đảo Kiska. Đang khi làm nhiệm vụ tuần tra-giải cứu vào ngày 6 tháng 6, nó đã thực hiện ba lượt tấn công bằng mìn sâu sau khi dò được tín hiệu sonar dưới nước. Một tàu ngầm Nhật bất ngờ nhô lên mặt nước, bộc lộ tháp chỉ huy và chân vịt, rồi lại biến mất dưới mặt nước Gillis không thể bắt lại được tín hiệu đối phương. Nó được ghi công đã gây hư hại tàu ngầm đối phương này tại khu vực ngoài khơi đảo Umak. Sau đó, nó bị ba máy bay ném bom Nhật Bản đang tuần tra tấn công tại Adak vào ngày 20 tháng 7. Một quả bom tịt ngòi đã ném xuống chỉ cách 10 foot (3,0 m) bên mạn tàu các quả khác ném suýt trúng phía mũi và phía đuôi tàu, tung một cơn mưa do nước dội lên nhưng nó không bị hư hại hay thương vong.

Gillis tiếp tục nhiệm vụ đa dạng như một tàu tàu tiếp liệu máy bay và tàu tuần tra tìm kiếm giải cứu trong suốt khu vực quần đảo Aleut, xen kẻ với những đợt sửa chữa tại Xưởng hải quân Puget Sound. Nó được cho tách khỏi nhiệm vụ này vào ngày 19 tháng 4 năm 1944, khi nó rời Dutch Harbor để đi đại tu tại Xưởng hải quân Puget Sound, rồi đi đến San Diego vào ngày 13 tháng 6. Nó trải qua những tháng tiếp theo hoạt động như tàu canh phòng máy bay cho việc huấn luyện tàu sân bay dọc theo bờ biển California. Sau đó nó lên đường đi Trân Châu Cảng, đến nơi vào ngày 8 tháng 12 năm 1944, và hoạt động như tàu canh phòng máy bay cho tàu sân bay hộ tống Makassar Strait (CVE-91) cho đến ngày 20 tháng 2 năm 1945. Nó lên đường cùng với Lực lượng Bắn phá và Bảo vệ dưới quyền Chuẩn đô đốc Morton L. Deyo, đi ngang qua Marshalls, Marianas và Ulithi cho chiến dịch nhằm chiếm đóng Okinawa.

Gillis đi đến ngoài khơi Kerama Retto vào ngày 25 tháng 3 năm 1945. Nó bảo vệ cho hoạt động của cảc tàu quét mìn về phía Tây, rồi canh phòng trong khi các đội phá hoạt dưới nước (UDT) dọn sạch các lối tiếp cận lên các bãi đổ bộ ở phía Tây Okinawa. Sau khi lực lượng đổ bộ tấn công lên bờ vào ngày 1 tháng 4, nó tiếp liệu cho các máy bay trinh sát và tuần tra tại Kerama Retto đồng thời thực hiện tuần tra tìm kiếm và giải cứu. Vào ngày 28 tháng 4, nó rời Okinawa để hộ tống cho Makassar Strait đi ngang qua Guam để đi đến vịnh San Pedro, Philippines. Nó quay trở lại cùng lộ trình này hộ tống cho Wake Island (CVE-65). Chiếc tàu sân bay hộ tống phóng máy bay ra vào ngày 29 tháng 6 để đi đến các căn cứ trên đất liền ở Okinawa, và Gillis đã giúp hộ tống nó quay trở lại Guam vào ngày 3 tháng 7 năm 1945.

Gillis khởi hành từ Guam vào ngày 8 tháng 7 năm 1945. Nó về đến San Pedro, California vào ngày 28 tháng 7, và được cho ngừng hoạt động tại đây vào ngày 15 tháng 10 năm 1945. Tên nó được cho rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 1 tháng 11 năm 1945 và nó bị bán để tháo dỡ vào ngày 29 tháng 1 năm 1946.


Gillis DD-260 - History


Lapwing class seaplane support tugs
Displacement: 1400 tons full load
Dimensions: 187 x 35.5 x 13.5 feet/57 x 10.8 x 4.1 meters
Propulsion: Reciprocating steam, 2 boilers, 1 shaft, 1400 hp, 14 knots
Crew: variable, approx. 180
Armor: none
Armament: 2 3/50 DP
Aircraft: one seaplane could be hoisted aboard

Concept/Program: WWI-era tug-type minesweepers adapted for seaplane support duties without major modifications. These were auxiliary tenders, meant primarily for duties such as seaplane towing, logistics, patrol and rescue, rather than fully-capable maintenance tenders.

Design/Conversion: Tug-type ships. There was no real conversion, just a re-outfitting done at the time of commissioning or recommissioning. The aft working deck was used for seaplane servicing the boat and salvage/towing hoisting booms were used for seaplane hoisting. Other facilities remained unchanged. They retained their ability as tugs, although minesweeping equipment was removed.

Modifications: No known modifications in seaplane service other than fitting of additional AA guns during WWII. Up to 4 20 mm AA, several MGs, and depth charge racks may have been fitted.

Classification: Most, probably all, designated "minesweeper for duty with aircraft" 30 April 1931. All reclassified as seaplane tenders (AVP) 22 January 1936. These designations were paperwork changes only the ships had operated in seaplane roles for many years prior to the changes.

Operational: Most had served as minesweepers, clearing the North Sea mine barrage, in WWI, but some served in seaplane roles from commissioning. Most decommissioned in the 1920's (many at Cavite and Pearl Harbor), then recommissioned a few years later as seaplane support ships were needed. Commonly operated with the larger seaplane tenders prior to WWII. Could hoist older, smaller seaplanes aboard, but could not hoist newer, larger flying boats. Before WWII, and especially during the war, many operated on non-seaplane duties on a temporary or permanent basis. Other duties typically included towing, salvage, target tug, transport and logistics, escort, patrol and rescue.

Departure from Service/Disposal: All were heavily worn by the end of WWII, and were discarded immediately postwar.

Lapwing
AM 1 - AVP 1
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Todd New York. Laid down 25 October 1917, launched 14 March 1918, commissioned 12 June 1919.

Initially operated as convoy escort, then as minesweeper, including clearing North Sea mine barrage. Decommissioned to reserve 11 April 1922. Recommissioned 1 September 1932 for aircraft support duties. Redesignated AVP 1 22 January 1936. Supported Atlantic seaplanes early in WWII, then served mostly in training after 1943.

Decommissioned 29 November 1945, stricken for disposal 1946. Sold 19 August 1946 and subsequently scrapped.

DANFS History

Built by Standard SB, New York. Laid down 26 August 1917, launched 18 May 1918, commissioned 30 October 1918.

Initially served as a minesweeper, including clearing the North Sea mine barrage. Decommissioned to reserve 6 April 1922. Recommissioned for seaplane duties 18 December 1924. Used in many roles, including patrol, survey and target towing, in addition to seaplane support. Redesignated AVP 2 22 January 1936.

Bombed by Japanese aircraft 31 December 1941 near the Philippines. Retreated to Australia early in the war, then advanced through the southwest Pacific with US invasion forces used as a salvage ship and fuels transport at times.

Decommissioned at Subic Bay 12 February 1946, stricken for disposal 1946. Transferred from Navy custody for overseas disposal 7/1947. Final fate unknown, but probably sold and scrapped.

DANFS History

Built by Pusey & Jones. Laid down 27 May 1918, launched 15 September 1918, commissioned 24 April 1919.

Initially used as a minesweeper, including clearing the North Sea mine barrage. Decommissioned to reserve 3 April 1922. Recommissioned for seaplane duties 31 October 1935 and outfitted at Mare Island Navy Yard. Redesignated AVP 3 22 January 1936. Served mainly as a seaplane tender, but was also employed in duties such salvage, towing, supply, survey and training.

Surveyed at Boston 11/1945 and found to be beyond economical repair decommissioned 23 November 1945, stricken for disposal 8 January 1946. Transferred to Maritime Commission 19 August 1946, sold into merchant service as Semper Paratus (probably as salvage tug) 21 August 1946. Renamed Cyrenaica I 1950. Sunk 10 March 1951.

DANFS History

Built by Baltimore SB. Laid down 13 September 1917, launched 9 March 1918, commissioned 17 September 1918.

Initially served as a minesweeper, including clearing the North Sea mine barrage. Laid up in reduced commission at San Pedro after 1 March 1920 subsqeuntly transferred to several other ports under tow, while remaining in reduced commission. Decommissioned to reserve 3 April 1922.

Recommissioned for seaplane duties 8 September 1925. Grounded in a typhoon 26 August 1928 refloated 29 August with minor damage. Designated "minesweeper for duty with aircraft" 30 April 1931. Redesignated AVP 4 22 January 1936. Throughout the 1920's and 1930's the ship carried out general support duties, including towing, salvage, transport, target towing, seaplane support, etc.

Was at Pearl Harbor 7 December 1941. Carried out general seaplane support duties throughout WWII. Surveyed at Seattle 11/1945 and found to be beyond economical repair decommissioned 10 December 1945, stricken for disposal 3 January 1946. Sold into merchant service as a hulk 12 December 1946 and survived through at least 1950 prior to being scrapped.

DANFS History

Built by Sun SB. Laid down 8 October 1917, launched 25 May 1918, commissioned 20 August 1918.

Initially used as a minesweeper, including clearing the North Sea mine barrage. Modified for seaplane duties 11/1919. Designated "minesweeper for duty with aircraft" 30 April 1931. Redesignated AVP 5 22 January 1936. Operated on general seaplane duties throughout the her career.

Decommissioned 25 August 1945, stricken for disposal 4 December 1945. Transferred to the Maritime Commission and sold 19 January 1948, and subsequently scrapped.

DANFS History

Built by Gas Engine Co. Laid down 10 November 1917, launched 15 June 1918, commissioned 10 October 1918.

Initially served as a minesweeper, including clearing the North Sea mine barrage. Severely damaged and nearly sunk by mines 20 April 1919 temporary repairs at Scapa Flow and permanent repairs at Newcastle-on-Tyne. Decommissioned to reserve 3 May 1922. Recommissioned for seaplane, escort and general auxiliary duties 17 August 1922, and performed these duties throughout her career. Redesignated AVP 6 22 January 1936.

Decommissioned 30 November 1945, stricken for disposal 19 December 1945. Sold 11/1946 and subsequently scrapped.

DANFS History

Built by Alabama SB. Laid down 10 December 1917, launched 4 July 1918, commissioned 31 January 1919.

Initially served as a minesweeper. Decommissioned to reserve 23 May 1922. Recommissioned 23 June 1923. Designated "minesweeper for duty with aircraft" 30 April 1931, but it is not clear if she actually served in aviation roles. Decommissioned to reserve 21 December 1933 but recommissioned for seaplane duties 2 April 1934. Redesignated AVP 7 22 January 1936.

Was on the marine railway at Pearl Harbor 7 December 1941, but was relaunched by the end of the day. Assisted in post-attack salvage, then served in general towing, salvage, transport and support roles throughout the war, especially in target towing. Surveyed at Boston 11/1945 and found to be unfit for service, decommissioned 13 December 1945, stricken for disposal 8 January 1946. Transferred to the Maritime Commission for disposal 12 October 1946. Final fate unknown but probably sold and scrapped.

DANFS History

Built by Todd, New York. Laid down 1 November 1918, launched 19 March 1919, commissioned 10 July 1919.

Assigned to seaplane duties immediately upon completion, but also served in towing, salvage, transport and general support duties. Designated "minesweeper for duty with aircraft" 30 April 1931. Redesignated AVP 8 22 January 1936.

Torpedoed and sunk by U-653 off Bermuda 7 June 1942 while searching for a torpedoed freighter.

DANFS History

Built by Philadelphia Navy Yard. Laid down 15 November 1918, launched 28 April 1919, commissioned 9 October 1919.

Assigned to seaplane duties immediately upon completion, but also served in towing, salvage, transport and general support duties. Redesignated AVP 9 22 January 1936.

Decommissioned 18 December 1945, stricken for disposal 17 April 1946. Transferred to the Maritime Commission for disposal 12 October 1946, subequently sold and scrapped.

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Childs class small destroyer-seaplane tenders
Displacement: approx. 1,190 tons
Dimensions: 314.5 x 31 x 9.25 feet/95.9 x 9.5 x 2.8 meters
Propulsion: Steam turbines, 2 boilers, 2 shafts, 13,500 shp,

25 knots nominal (some ships 4 boilers, 25,000 shp, 30+ knots nominal)
Crew: variable, approx. 180 nominal
Armor: none
Armament: 2 single 4/50 SP or 3/50 DP, 4 .50 cal MG (later typically 7-8 single 20 mm AA), 2 depth charge racks
Aircraft: none embarked

Concept/Program: Obsolete WWI-era "flush deck" destroyers converted to small seaplane tenders as an emergency measure pending availability of purpose-built ships. These ships were considered too old and too small to serve as effective front-line escorts. Following the commissioning of proper seaplane tenders, these vessels were redistributed in several different roles.

Class: These ships were drawn from several of the original "Flush Decker" classes.

Design/Conversion: Conversion typically involved removal of the forward two boilers and funnels, enlargement of the bridge superstructure to the rear, addition of aviation fuel tanks, spares and equipment storage, etc, and removal of the torpedo tubes. Aircraft servicing boats were carried aft. Two of the original 4/50 guns were removed, along with the original 3/23 AA. Some units retained the other two 4/50 guns, while others had them replaced by 3/50 DP guns. There were no facilities for hoisting seaplanes aboard for servicing.

Variations: These ships were of diverse backgrounds and the conversions were done on a rushed basis, so there were many variations, both major and minor. In at least one unit all four of the original boilers were retained. The light AA battery was highly variable.

Modifications: No modifications while in service as seaplane tenders, but extensive modifications when transferred to other roles.

Classification: Initially classed as small seaplane tenders (AVP), but changed to destroyer-seaplane tenders (AVD) 2 August 1920. This change reflected the fact that the ships were expected to undertake patrol and escort activities in addition to seaplane support duties.

Operational: Early in the war these ships operated throughout the Pacific, establishing, supporting and evacuating advance bases as needed. Later in the war they frequently operated with larger seaplane tenders (AV), and in those cases often served as utility, patrol and rescue vessels and established temporary advance bases.

Departure from Service/Disposal: Starting in 1943 these vessels were replaced as seaplane tenders and began to serve in other roles including convoy escort, offensive ASW, local patrol, plane guard and shakedown support for escort carriers, training, etc. Ships were re-outfitted for their new roles, but no major re-conversions were undertaken. Most were reclassified as destroyers (DD) in 1943. Several were again reclassified and converted as high speed transports (APD) in 1944, supporting amphibious operations. The APDs returned to auxiliary roles late in the war and most were again reclassified as destroyers in 1945. All were rapidly decommissioned at the end of hostilities and were sold for scrapping within a year.

DANFS History

Built by New York SB. Laid down 19 March 1919, launched 15 September 1920, commissioned 22 October 1920.

Redesignated AVP 14 1 July 1938 converted at Philadelphia Navy Yard 1938-39. Designation changed to AVD 1 2 August 1940. Conversion to APD cancelled 5/1944.

Served as a training ship after 9/44. Decommissioned 10 December 1945, stricken for disposal 3 January 1946. Sold 5/1946 and subsequently scrapped.

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Williamson
DD 244 - AVP 15 - AVD 2 - DD 244
Photos: [ Williamson as a seaplane tender].

DANFS History

Built by New York SB. Laid down 27 March 1919, launched 16 October 1919, commissioned 29 October 1920.

Redesignated AVP 15 1 July 1938 converted at Philadelphia Navy Yard 1938-39. Designation changed to AVD 2, 2 August 1940.

Served as a plane guard and trials escort ship starting 1/1943. Redesignated DD 244 1 December 1943. During 5/1944 ship was equipped for underway refueling of battleship and cruiser floatplanes in order to increase the operating endurance of gunfire spotting aircraft. Deployed in this role 5/1944 to 8/1944, then resumed plane guard and escort duties for the remainder of the war.

Decommissioned 8 November 1945, stricken for disposal 19 Decmeber 1945. Sold 17 October 1946 and scrapped at Philadelphia in 1948.

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George E. Badger
DD 196 - AVP 16 - AVD 3 - DD 196 - APD 33 - DD 196
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Newport News. Laid down 24 September 1918, launched 6 March 1920, completed 28 July 1920.

Decommissioned to reserve 11 August 1922. Reactivated and served with US Coast Guard 10/1930 to 21 May 1934 for Prohibition duty, then returned to reserve. Redesignated AVP 16 1 October 1939 converted at Philadelphia Navy Yard and recommissioned 8 January 1940. Designation changed to AVD 3 2 August 1940.

Re-outfitted as a destroyer at Norfolk Navy Yard and served as a convoy escort and offensive ASW ship starting 1/1943. Redesignated DD 196 4 November 1943. Redesignated APD 33 14 May 1944 converted at Charleston Navy Yard. Redesignated DD 196 20 July 1945 probably not refitted for destroyer roles.

Decommissioned 3 October 1945, stricken for disposal 24 October 1945. Sold and scrapped 6/1946.

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Clemson
DD 186 - AVP 17 - AVD 4 - DD 186 - APD 31 - DD 186
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Newport News. Laid down 11 May 1918, launched 5 September 1918, commissioned 29 December 1929.

Decommissioned to reserve 30 June 1922. Redesignated AVP 17 16 November 1939 converted (probably at Philadelphia Navy Yard) and recommissioned 12 July 1940. Designation changed to AVD 4 2 August 1920.

Refitted as a destroyer for ASW service 2/1943 redesignated DD 186 1 December 1943. Redesignated APD 31 1 May 1944 converted at Charleston Navy Yard. Redesignated DD 186 17 July 1945 and partially refitted as a destroyer but decommissioned 12 October 1945. Stricken for disposal 24 October 1945. Sold 21 November 1946 and subsequently scrapped.

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Goldsborough
DD 188 - AVP 18 - AVD 5 - DD 188 - APD 32 - DD 188
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Newport News. Laid down 8 June 1918, launched 20 November 1918, completed 26 January 1920.

Decommissioned to reserve 14 July 1922. Redesignated AVP 18 15 November 1939 converted at New York Navy Yard and recommissioned 1 July 1940. Designation changed to AVD 5 2 August 1920. Redesignated DD 188 1 December 1943 and served in offensive ASW groups. Redesignated APD 32 7 March 1944 converted at Charleston Navy Yard. Redesignated DD 188 10 July 1945 not refitted for destroyer duties. Decommissioned 11 October 1945, stricken for disposal 24 October 1945. Sold 21 November 1946 and subsequently scrapped.

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Hulbert
DD 342 - AVP 19 - AVD 6 - DD 342
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Norfolk Navy Yard. Laid down 18 Nov 1918, launched 28 June 1919, commissioned 27 October 1920.

Decommissioned to reserve 17 October 1934. Redesignated AVP 19 11/1939 converted at New York Navy Yard and recommissioned 14 June 1940. Designation changed to AVD 6 2 August 1920.

Redesignated DD 342 1 Dec 1943 served mostly in plane guard and trials escort roles. Decommissioned 2 November 1945, stricken for disposal 28 November 1945. Sold 10/1946 and subsequently scrapped.

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William B. Preston
DD 344 - AVP 20 - AVD 7
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Norfolk Navy Yard. Laid down 18 November 1918, launched 9 August 1919, commissioned 23 August 1920. Decommissioned to reserve 15 October 1934. Redesignated AVP 20 19 November 1939 converted at New York Navy Yard and recommissioned 14 June 1940. Designation changed to AVD 7 2 August 1920.

Conversion to APD cancelled 5/1944. Served as plane guard and trials escort ship from 11/1944 to the end of the war. Decommissioned 6 December 1945, stricken for disposal 3 January 1946. Sold 6 November 1946 and subsequently scrapped.

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Belknap
DD 251 - AVD 8 - DD 251 - APD 251
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Bethlehem Quincy. Laid down 3 September 1918, launched 14 January 1919, commissioned 28 April 1919. Decommissioned to reserve 28 June 1922. Redesignated AVD 8 2 August 1940 converted (probably at Philadelphia Navy Yard) and recommissioned 22 November 1940.

Served as a plane guard and trials escort ship 1943-44. Redesignated DD 251 14 November 1943. Redesignated APD 34 22 June 1944 and converted. Struck by Kamikaze off Okinawa 11 January 1945 resulting in serious damage and crippling the ship. Towed to port for temporary repairs, then returned to the US for decommissioning, as the damage was judged not worth repairing. Decommissioned 4 August 1945, stricken for disposal 13 August 1945. Sold 30 November 1945 and subsequently scrapped.

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Osmond Ingram
ex- Ingram
DD 255 - AVD 9 - DD 255 - APD 35
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Bethlehem Quincy. Laid down 15 October 1918, launched 28 February 1919, commissioned 28 June 1919. Renamed 11 November 1919.

Decommissioned to reserve 24 Juen 1922. Redesignated AVD 9 2 August 1940 converted (probably at Philadelphia Navy Yard) and recommissioned 22 November 1940. Served as an ASW escort in the Atlantic after 6/1942.

Redesignated DD 255 14 November 1943. Redesignated APD 35 22 June 1944 and converted at Charleston Navy Yard. Supported amphibious operations in the Mediterranean, then served as an escort in the Atlantic and later in the Pacific.

Decommissioned 8 January 1946, stricken for disposal 21 January 1946. Sold 17 June and subsequently scrapped.

DANFS History

Built by Bethlehem Squantum. Laid down 3 June 1918, launched 7 December 1919, commissioned 5 June 1919.

Decommissioned to reserve 17 July 1922. Recommissioned "in ordinary" 25 June 1940 for transfer to Bethlehem San Francisco for conversion. Redesignated AVD 10 2 August 1940 recommissioned 2 January 1941.

Served as a plane guard and trials escort ship from 12/1943 to the end of the war, except one combat deployment 5/1944-12/1944. Decommissioned 5 December 1945, stricken for disposal 1946. Sold 23 May 1946 and subsequently scrapped.

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Thornton
DD 270 - AVD 11
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Bethlehem Squantum. Laid down 3 June 1918, launched 22 March 1919, commissioned 15 July 1919.

Decommissioned to reserve 24 May 1940. Recommissioned "in ordinary" 24 June 1940 for transfer to Bethlehem San Francisco for conversion. Redesignated AVD 11 2 August 1940 recommissioned 5 March 1941. In major collision with oilers Ashtabula and Escalante off Okinawa 5 April 1945. Suffered very severe damage surveyed 14 April 1945 and recommended for immediate decommissioning. Beached and decommissioned 2 May 1945 stripped of all useable parts, stricken 13 August 1945 and abandoned. Hulk declared to be the property of the Ryukyu Islands 7/1957.

DANFS History

Built by Bethlehem Squantum. Laid down 27 December 1918, launched 29 May 1919, commissioned 3 September 1919.

Decommissioned to reserve 26 May 1922. Recommissioned "in ordinary" 28 June 1940 for transfer to shipyard (probably Bethlehem San Francisco) for conversion. Redesignated AVD 12 2 August 1940 recommissioned 25 March 1941. This ship retained all her boilers and funnels following conversion.

Served as a plane guard and trials escort ship starting 4/1944, but deployed to support amphibious operations 2/1945. Decommissioned 15 October 1945, stricken for disposal 1 November 1945. Sold 29 January 1946 and subsequently sold.

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Greene
DD 266 - AVD 13 - DD 266 - APD 36
Photos: [ Greene as AVD 13].

DANFS History

Built by Bethlehem Squantum. Laid down 3 June 1918, launched 2 November 1918, commissioned 9 May 1919.

Decommissioned to reserve 17 June 1922. Recommissioned "in ordinary" 28 June 1940 for transfer to shipyard (probably Bethlehem San Francisco) for conversion. Redesignated AVD 13 2 August 1940 recommissioned 6 April 1941.

Refitted for ASW service 7/1942. Redesignated DD 266 11/1943. Redesignated APD 36 1 Feb 1944 converted at Charleston Navy Yard. Served as an escort from 7/44 to the end of the war. Driven ashore near Okinawa by a typhoon 9 October 1945, destroyed. Decommissioned 23 November 1945, stripped of all usable materials, stricken 5 December 1945 and abandoned.

DANFS History

Built by New York SB. Laid down 31 July 1918, launched 30 March 1920, commissioned 30 September 1920.

Was out of commission, in reserve, during 1931. Redesignated AVD 14 2 August 1940 and converted, probably at Philadelphia Navy Yard recommissioned 5 October 1941. Early in WWII served as a patrol & ASW ship, and an evacuation transport, in the Pacific. Seriously damaged by Japanese aircraft 16 October 1942 in repairs through 3/1943. Was outfitted as a destroyer by 8/1943, probably during battle damage repairs fitted with 14 20 mm AA. Redesignated DD 237 1 December 1943. Served as a plane guard and trials escort ship for the rest of the war.

Decommissioned 8 November 1945, stricken for disposal 19 December 1945. Sold 29 October 1946 and subsequently scrapped.

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Barnegat class small seaplane tenders
Displacement: 2411-2619 tons full load
Dimensions: 310-312 x 42 x 11-12.5 feet/94.5-95 x 12.8 x 3.4-3.8 meters
Propulsion: Diesel-electric, 2 shafts, 6080 hp, 18.2 knots
Crew: 367
Armor: none
Armament: 1 5/38 DP, 1 quad & 2 dual 40 mm AA, 6-8 single 20 mm AA, depth charge racks and throwers (4 dual 20 mm AA in some units late in the war see notes)
Aircraft: none embarked

Concept/Program: First (and only) purpose-built small seaplane tenders in USN. They were meant to operate in small, forward-area harbors and atolls, so they were fast, heavily armed and of shallow draft. They were also meant to serve as escorts for heavy seaplane tenders while deploying to combat areas. These ships were exceptionally versatile, and served in a wide variety of roles during and after WWII.

Design: Relatively small, compact design with heavy armament, high speed, and extensive repair and supply facilities. A single heavy crane aft, intended to hoist seaplanes aboard, was replaced by a lighter boat crane in many units.

Variations: There were extensive variations in 5" gun armament units were completed with anywhere from 1 to 4 5/38 mounts. The original planned 5/38 armament was two guns, later increased to 4 mounts, but few carried so many heavy guns. As was typical during the war, the number of 20 mm guns fluctuated widely, but 6 or 8 single mounts, or 4 dual mounts, seems to have been a late-war standard.

Abescon was completed as a training ship for pilots of cruiser and battleship floatplanes. She had a catapult and two seaplane cranes taken from converted Cleveland class light cruisers fitted aft, in place of the normal seaplane servicing facilities.

Conversion, Reclassification, Modification and Disposal: Even during WWII there were more AVPs under construction than were needed in the fleet postwar all of these ships were surplus. Therefore they were used in an exceptionally wide variety of roles during and after WWII. These roles are listed below, regardless of whether they were seaplane-related.

Seaplane Tenders (AVP) The unconverted ships were surplus postwar, and almost all went into reserve in 1946. Several remained active in non-seaplane roles (see below), and many were reactivated for USCG service. A few remained in service as seaplane tenders.

Catapult Training Ship (AVP) One ship converted for training while building. Decommissioned in 1946 and later transferred to the Coast Guard with the other AVPs.

Torpedo Boat Tenders (AGP) Four ships converted to AGPs while building. All left service in 1946, and were transferred out of the Navy immediately (one returned to USN in 1949).

Amphibious Command Ship (AGC) One ship converted to the command role following completion. She was transferred to the Coast Guard in 1946.

Survey (AGS) and Oceanographic Research Ships (AGOR) Two ships converted to survey ships, and one to an oceanographic research ship, all postwar.

Command Ships (AVP/AGF) Three ships were converted as Mideast command ships post-WWII, but only one survived to be redesignated as a flagship (AGF).

Press Ships (AG) Three ships were designated for conversion to carry reporters covering the planned invasion of the Japanese home islands. This program was cancelled at the end of the war the partially-converted ships were returned to their original configuration and redesignated as seaplane tenders.

Ocean Station Cutters (Coast Guard) 14 "straight" AVPs and 4 converted ships (2 AGPs, 1 catapult training AVP, 1 AGC) were transferred to the Coast Guard soon after WWII. The AGPs and AGC were transferred upon decommissioning in 1946 and were renamed in USCG service. The AVPs had been decommissioned in 1946 they were reactivated and transferred 1948-1949, but were not re-named. The AGPs, AGC and one AVP were permanent transfers the other AVPs were on loan. These ships were first designated WAVP, then WHEC (high endurance cutters). All were converted to a standard configuration for Coast Guard service: 1 5/38 mount, 2 twin 40 mm AA, 2 twin 20 mm, Hedgehog, depth charge throwers cranes removed, new mast fitted aft, small hangar for weather balloons added aft. The 20 mm guns were removed in 1957 2 triple 12.75 inch ASW torpedo tubes were added during the 1960's. The WAVPs served primarily as ocean station cutters and offshore patrol ships.

Four ships were reclassified as training, oceanographic or weather cutters. All of these ships left service 1967-75: 5 returned to USN and expended as targets, 7 to South Vietnam, several to scrap, and one to reserve. Additional transfers to South Vietnam cancelled due to fall of that nation.

Coast & Geodetic Survey One AGP (ex-AVP) transferred to this organization immediately postwar and served as a survey ship.

Foreign Transfers One AGP (ex-AVP) to Italy as a special forces support ship, one AVP to Ethiopia (role unknown, possibly flagship), one AGOR (ex-AVP) to Greece as a research ship, and one AVP to Norway as a training ship. Seven ex-USCG units went to South Vietnam as patrol ships of these ships six escaped to the Philippines in 1975 and four joined that Navy, and one was captured and commissioned by the North Vietnamese.

Barnegat
AVP 10
Photos: [During WWII]

DANFS History

Built by Bremerton Navy Yard. Laid down 26 October 1939, launched 23 May 1941, commissioned 3 July 1941.

Operated on seaplane duties throughout the war, except the first half of 1943 as a transport. Inactive after 15 Janaury 1946, decommissioned to reserve 17 May 1946.

Stricken for disposal 23 May 1958. Sold into merchant service as Greek cruise ship Kentavros in 1962. Scrapped at Eleusis in 1986.

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Biscayne
AVP 11 - AGC 18 - WAVP 385 - WHEC 385
Photos: [During WWII].

DANFS History

Built by Bremerton Navy Yard. Laid down . launched 23 May 1941, commissioned 3 July 1941.

Served as seaplane tender until 26 April 1943 when she became the flagship of Commander, Landing Craft and Bases, Northwest African Waters. Outfitted as a command ship at Mers-el-Kebir 2 May 1943 - 31 May 1943 redesignated AGC 18 10 October 1944.

Served as a command ship through the remainder of WWII served as accomodations ship at Annapolis early in 1946. Decommissioned 29 June 1946 and transferred to USCG as Dexter (WAVP 385) 19 July 1946. Re-engined 1957, designation changed to WHEC 385 1 May 1966.

Returned to USN 1968 and sunk as a target.

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Casco
AVP 12 - WAVP 370 - WHEC 370
Photos: [ Casco during WWII].

DANFS History

Built by Bremerton Navy Yard. Laid down 30 May 1940, launched 15 November 1941, commissioned 27 December 1941. Had 3 5/38 mounts.

Torpedoed at Nazan Bay, Alaska, 30 August 1942 with severe damaged beached to prevent sinking. Salvaged 12 September 1942, temporary repairs at Dutch Harbor and Kodiak permanent repairs at Puget Sound through 3/1943. Served on seaplane duties throughout the war.

Decommissioned to reserve 10 April 1947. Loaned to USCG as WAVP 370 19 April 1949. Designation changed to WHEC 370 1 May 1966.

Returned to USN 1969 and sunk as a target.

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Mackinac
AVP 13 - WAVP 371 - WHEC 371
Photos: [ Mackinac during WWII].

DANFS History

Built by Bremerton Navy Yard. Laid down 29 May 1940, launched 15 November 1941, commissioned 24 January 1942.

Served on seaplane duties for most of WWII, and tender PT boats late in the war. Decommissioned to reserve 1/1947. Loaned to USCG as WAVP 371 19 April 1949. Designation changed to WHEC 371 1 May 1966.

Returned to USN 1968 and sunk as a target.

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Humbolt
AVP 21 - AG 121 - AVP 21 - WAVP 372 - WHEC 372
Photos: [During WWII]

DANFS History

Built by Boston Navy Yard. Laid down 6 September 1940, launched 17 March 1941, commissioned 7 October 1941.

Served in seaplane roles throughout the war, including extensive service as a trans-Atlantic transport for aviation supplies and parts. Conversion to press ship started at Philadelphia Navy Yard 16 July 1945, redesignated AG 121 30 July 1945. Conversion cancelled 25 August 1945 reconverted to seaplane tender and redesignated AVP 21, date unknown.

Apparently inactive after 22 November 1945, decommissioned to reserve 17 March 1947. Loaned to USCG as WAVP 372 24 January 1949. Designation changed to WHEC 372 1 May 1966.

Stricken for disposal 1970 sold and subsequently scrapped in Italy.

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Matagorda
AVP 22 - AG 122 - AVP 22 - WAVP 373 - WHEC 373
Photos: [During WWII]

DANFS History

Built by Boston Navy Yard. Laid down 6 September 1940, launched 18 March 1941, commissioned 16 December 1941. Had 2 5/38 mounts.

Served in seaplane roles throughout the war. Conversion to press ship started at New York Navy Yard 10 July 1945, redesignated AG 122 30 July 1945. Conversion cancelled 25 August 1945 reconverted to seaplane tender and redesignated AVP 22 10 September 1945.

Decommissioned to reserve 20 February 1946. Loaned to USCG as WAVP 373 7 March 1949. Designation changed to WHEC 373 1 May 1966.

Returned to USN 1968, stricken 1 July 1968, and sunk as a target.

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 23 July 1941, launched 8 March 1942, commissioned 28 January 1943.

Fitted with a seaplane catapult and two cruiser-type seaplane cranes. Had 2 5/38 mounts did not carry any 40 mm mounts. Served exclusively as a training ship for pilots of cruiser and battleship floatplanes.

Decommissioned to reserve 19 March 1947. Loaned to USCG as WAVP 374 5 January 1949. Designation changed to WHEC 374 1 May 1966.

Transferred to South Vietnam 15 June 1972 as Tham Ngu Lao (HQ 03). Captured by North Vietnam 5/1975, renamed Pham Ngu Lao (HQ 01) and recommissioned. Eventually fitted with 2 SS-N-2 SSM and Soviet light guns. Reported to be operational in 1995.

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 23 July 1941, launched 15 April 1942, commissioned 12 April 1943. Had 2 5/38 mounts.

Operated on seaplane duties throughout WWII. Seriously damaged by Japanese aircraft 16 July 1943 in the Santa Cruz Islands towed to Espiritu Santo for emergency repairs permanent repairs at San Francisco.

Decommissioned to reserve 21 December 1946. Loaned to USCG as WAVP 375 7 March 1949. Designation changed to WHEC 375 1 May 1966.

Transferred to South Vietnam 21 June 1972 as Ly Thoung Kiet (HQ 05). Fled to the Philippines 4/1975 and commissioned in Philippine service as Andres Bonifacio (PF 7) formally sold to the Philippines 5 April 1976. Decommissioned 6/1985 due to very poor condition, but reactivated as a fleet flagship. Was barely capable of getting underway in 1992 and apparently is no longer in commission.

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Coos Bay
AVP 25 - WAVP 376 - WHEC 376
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 15 August 1941, launched 15 May 1942, commissioned 15 May 1943. Had 4 5/38 mounts.

Served in seaplane roles throughout WWII. Decommissioned to reserve 30 April 1946. Loaned to USCG as WAVP 376 5 January 1949. Designation changed to WHEC 376 1 May 1966.

Returned to USN 1967 and sunk as a target 9 January 1968.

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Half Moon
AVP 26 - WAVP 378 - WHEC 378
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 15 August 1941, launched 12 July 1942, commissioned 15 June 1943. Had 3 5/38 mounts.

Served in seaplane roles throughout WWII. Apparently inactive after 1 December 1945, decommissioned to reserve 4 September 1946. Loaned to USCG as WAVP 378 14 Sept 1948. Designation changed to WHEC 378 1 May 1966.

Decommissioned 15 July 1969, sold 18 June 1970 and subsequently scrapped in Italy.

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Mobjack
AVP 27 - AGP 7
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 25 February 1942, launched 2 August 1942, redesignated AGP 7 11 May 1943 while building and commissioned 17 October 1943 as a torpedo boat tender.

Decommissioned, stricken and transferred to the Commerce Department 21 August 1946 for further transfer to Coast & Geodetic Survey (later National Geologic Survey) as Pioneer . Sold 4 May 1966 and subsequently scrapped.

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 17 April 1942, launched 23 May 1943, redesignated AGP 6 1 May 1943 while building, commissioned 17 November 1943 as a torpedo boat tender.

Decommissioned 26 March 1946, stricken for disposal 12 April 1946, transferred to the Maritime Commission 12 August 1946. Reacquired by the Navy 3 January 1949 and reinstated on the NVR as AVP 28 16 March 1949, laid up in reserve.

Transferred to Italy 23 October 1957 as Pietro Cavezale (A5301) served as support ship for special forces and tender to landing craft. Remained in service long past planned retirement date. Finally stricken for disposal 31 March 1994. Subsequently sold and scrapped.

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Rockaway
AVP 29 - AG 123 - AVP 29 - WAVP 377 - WHEC 377 - WAGO 377
Photos: [During WWII], [As a Coast Guard cutter].

DANFS History

Built by Associated. Laid down 30 June 1941, launched 14 February 1942, commissioned 6 January 1943.

Conversion to press ship (AG 123) at Boston Navy Yard cancelled 24 August 1945. Served in seaplane roles throughout the war. Conversion to press ship started at Boston Navy Yard mid-1945, redesignated AG 123 30 July 1945. Conversion cancelled 25 August 1945 reconverted to seaplane tender and redesignated AVP 27, date unknown.

Decommissioned to reserve 21 March 1946. Loaned to USCG as WAVP 377 24 December 1948. Designation changed to WHEC 377 1 May 1966. Converted to oceanographic cutter and redesignated WAGO 377 in 1966.

Sold 25 October 1973 and subsequently scrapped.

DANFS History

Built by Associated. Laid down 2 July 1941, launched 31 March 1942, commissioned 15 March 1942. Had 4 5/38 mounts.

Served in aviation duties throughout WWII. Inactive after 25 March 1946, decommissioned to reserve 13 January 1947.

Converted to survey ship, recommissioned 17 September 1948 redesignated AGS 30 25 August 1949. Decommissioned 29 May 1969, stricken for disposal 1 June 1969. Temporarily loaned to the Ocean Science Center of the Atlantic Commission, at Savannah, Georgia. Sold 14 September 1971 ultimate fate unknown.

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Unimak
AVP 31 - WAVP 379 - WHEC 379 - WTR 379 - WHEC 379
Photos: [As a Coast Guard cutter].

DANFS History

Built by Associated. Laid down 15 February 1942, launched 27 May 1942, commissioned 31 December 1943. Supported Atlantic seaplanes during 1943, then served as transport to return equipment from Europe, then went to the Pacific. Decommissioned to reserve 25 January 1946. Loaned to USCG as WAVP 379 14 September 1948. Designation changed to WHEC 379 1 May 1966. Converted to training ship 1966 and redesignated WTR 379 28 November 1969.

Planed for transfer to South Vietnam, but decommissioned to reserve 29 May 1975. Recommissioned 1977 as WHEC 379 to patrol the 200 mile Economic Exclusion Zone. Decommissioned 29 April 1988, returned to USN for disposal. Scuttled as a reef, date unknown. Was the last seaplane-type ship in US service.

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Yakutat
AVP 32 - WAVP 380 - WHEC 380
Photos: [As USCG WHEC 380].

DANFS History

Built by Associated. Laid down 1 April 1942, launched 2 July 1943, commissioned 31 March 1944. Had 3 5/38 mounts.

Served on seaplane duties throughout WWII. Decommissioned to reserve 17 April 1946. Loaned to USCG as WAVP 380 31 August 1948, refitted at Hunter's Point Naval Shipyard, recommissioned in USCG service 23 November 1948. Designation changed to WHEC 380 1 May 1966.

Operated off South Vietnam starting in 1967. Returned to USN 1970 and transferred to South Vietnam 1 January 1971 as Tran Nhat Duat (HQ 16). Fled to the Philippines April 1975 and acquired by the Philippine Navy 6 April 1976 as a parts hulk. Fate unknown.

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Barataria
AVP 33 - WAVP 381 - WHEC 381
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 19 April 1943, launched 2 October 1943, commissioned 13 August 1944.

Saw brief service as a seaplane tender during WWII. Decommissioned to reserve 24 July 1946. Loaned to USCG as WAVP 381 17 Sept 1948. Designation changed to WHEC 381 1 May 1966.

Stricken 12 November 1970 subsequently disposed of.

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Bering Strait
AVP 34 - WAVP 382 - WHEC 382
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 7 June 1943, launched 15 January 1944, commissioned 19 July 1944. Had 3 5/38 mounts.

Served in seaplane roles througout WWII. Decommissioned to reserve 21 June 1946. Loaned to USCG as WAVP 382 14 Sept 1948. Designation changed to WHEC 382 1 May 1966.

Transferred to South Vietnam 1 January 1971 as Tran Quang Khai (HQ 15). Fled to the Philippines 4/1975 and commissioned in Philippine service as Diego Silang (PF 9) formally sold to the Philippines 5 April 1976. Decommissioned 6/1985 due to very poor condition. May still exist as a hulk.

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Castle Rock
AVP 35 - WAVP 383 - WHEC 383
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 12 July 1943, launched 11 March 1944, commissioned 10 August 1944.

Served in seaplane and escort duties during WWII. Decommissioned to reserve 6 August 1946. Loaned to USCG as WAVP 383 16 September 1948. Designation changed to WHEC 383 1 May 1966.

Transferred to South Vietnam 21 December 1971 as Tran Binh Trong (HQ 17). Fled to the Philippines 4/1975 and commissioned in Philippine service as Francisco Dagohoy (PF 10) in 1979 formally sold to the Philippines 5 April 1976. Decommissioned 6/1985 due to very poor condition. May still exist as a hulk.

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Cook Inlet
AVP 36 - WAVP 384 - WHEC 384
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 23 August 1943, launched 13 May 1944, commissioned 5 November 1944.

Brief service in seaplane, escort and rescue duties during WWII. Decommissioned to reserve 31 March 1946. Transferred to USCG as WAVP 384 20 September 1948. Designation changed to WHEC 384 1 May 1966.

Transferred to South Vietnam 21 December 1971 as Tran Quoc Toan (HQ 02). Fled to the Philippines April 1975 and acquired by the Philippine Navy 6 April 1976 as a parts hulk. Fate unknown.

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Corson
AVP 37
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 5 October 1943, launched 15 July 1944, commissioned 3 December 1944.

Served in seaplane roles late in WWII. Decommissioned to reserve 21 June 1946 recommissioned 13 February 1951 as a seaplane tender in the western Pacific. Decommissioned to reserve 9 March 1956. Stricken for disposal 1 April 1966 and sunk as a target.

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 17 January 1944, launched 2 October 1944, commissioned 31 December 1944.

Served as general support and supply ship during WWII, and as a seaplane tender postwar. Serveda as Persian Gulf/Middle East command ship from 1950.

Decommissioned 30 April 1966, stricken for disposal 1 May 1966. Subsequently disposed of.

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Gardiners Bay
AVP 39
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 14 March 1944, launched 2 December 1944, commissioned 11 February 1945.

Served as a seaplane tender during and after WWII. Decommissioned 1 February 1958, stricken for transfer 1 May 1958. Transferred Norway 17 May 1958 as training ship Haakon VII (A537). Stricken for disposal 1974 subsequently sold and scrapped.

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 16 May 1944, launched 28 January 1945, commissioned 25 March 1945.

Served as a seaplane tender during and after WWII. Decommissioned to reserve 26 February 1960, stricken for disposal 1 March 1960. Sold 20 July 1960 subsequent fate unknown.

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 18 July 1944, launched 18 March 1945, commissioned 20 May 1945.

Operated as Persian Gulf/Middle East command ship after 1949. Decommissioned 1966, stricken 1 July 1966. Sold 21 June 1967 and subsequently scrapped.

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Cancelled ships
AVP 42 through AVP 47
AVP 42 Hatteras
AVP 43 Hempstead
AVP 44 Kamishak
AVP 45 Magothy
AVP 46 Matanzas
AVP 47 Metomkin

All cancelled 22 April 1943 due to shortage of diesel engines. Had been assigned to Lake Washington SY for construction but had not been laid down.

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 18 May 1942, launched 20 September 1942, commissioned 22 December 1943. Had 3 5/38 mounts.

Served in seaplane roles throughout WWII. Decommissioned to reserve June 1947 recommissioned January 1951 for Korea service. Decommissioned 22 April 1960, stricken for disposal 1 June 1960. Sold 18 October 1960 subsequent fate unknown.

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Orca
AVP 49
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 13 July 1942, launched 4 October 1942, commissioned 23 January 1944. Had 3 5/38 mounts.

Served in seaplane roles throughout WWII. Decommissioned 31 October 1947 recommissioned 15 December 1951 for Korea service. Decommissioned 3/1960. Transferred to Ethiopia 1/1962 as Ethiopia (A01). Role in Ethiopian service unknown, but may have been flagship. Fate unknown.

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 3 August 1942, launched 8 November 1942, commissioned 23 February 1944.

Served in seaplane roles throughout WWII. Decommissioned to reserve 30 June 1947. Converted to a survey ship , recommissioned 2 September 1948 Redesignated AGS 50 1 November 1949.

Decommissioned and stricken for disposal 15 April 1970. Subsequently disposed of.

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 17 September 1942, launched 20 December 1942, commissioned 21 March 1944. Had 3 5/38 mounts.

Served in seaplane roles throughout WWII. Decommissioned to reserve 30 June 1947. Taken out of reserve for conversion to oceanographic research ship 11 July 1958, converted at Mobile Ship Repair Co., Mobile, AL. Redesignated AGOR 1 and renamed Josiah Willard Gibbs 15 December 1958, placed in service 18 December 1958. Operated under MSTS/MSC as T-AGOR 1 with civilian crew.

Placed out of service and stricken 7 Dec 1971, transferred to Greece 15 December 1971 as Hephaistos (A413). Decommissioned in 1976 fate unknown.

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Shelikof
AVP 52
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 20 September 1942, launched 31 March 1943, commissioned 17 April 1944. Had 3 5/38 mounts.

Served in seaplane roles throughout WWII. Decommissioned to reserve 18 July 1954.

Stricken for disposal 1 May 1960, sold into merchant service as Greek cruise ship Kypros 20 December 1960. Renamed Myconos , then Artemis , then Artemis K. in 1974, then Princess in 1978, then Golden Princess . Sank at Perama, Greece, while laid up, 15 January 1981.

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Suisun
AVP 53
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 4 October 1942, launched 14 March 1943, commissioned 14 September 1944.

Served in seaplane roles during and after WWII. Place in reserve, in commission 10 May 1955, decommissioned to reserve 5 August 1955. Stricken for disposal 1 April 1966 and sunk as a target 10/1966.

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY, completed at Bremerton Navy Yard. Laid down 9 September 1942, launched 18 April 1943, commissioned 24 May 1946.

Tended Atlantic seaplanes throughout her career. Decommissioned to reserve 18 August 1954.

Stricken for disposal 1 May 1960, sold into merchant service as Greek cruise ship Rodos 20 December 1960. Scrapped at Eleusis, Greece in 1989.

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY, completed at Bremerton Navy Yard. Laid down 21 December 1942, launched 5 June 1943, commissioned 5 July 1946. Completion delayed by yard workload during WWII.

Served as Persian Gulf/Middle East command ship after 1949. Collided with merchant ship 14 May 1951 severe damage and fire resulted, and the ship nearly sank. Repaired at Norfolk Navy Yard through 4 December 1951 facilties upgraded for flagship role. Designation changed to AGF 1 15 December 1965. Became permanent Middle East flagship in 1971.

Decommissioned and stricken 15 January 1973 but retained for use as a test hulk. Sold 5/1977 and subsequently scrapped.

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Wachapreague
AVP 56 - AGP 8 - WAVP 386 - WHEC 386
Photos: [As USCG cutter McCulloch ].

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 1 February 1943, redesignated AGP 8 11 May 1943 while building, launched 10 July 1943, commissioned 17 May 1944 as torpedo boat tender.

Decommissioned 10 May 1946 and transferred to USCG as McCulloch (WAVP 386) 27 May 1946 stricken 5 June 1946. Designation changed to WHEC 386 1 May 1966.

Transferred to South Vietnam 21 June 1972 as Ngo Kuyen (HQ 06). Fled to the Philippines 4/1975 and commissioned in Philippine service as Gregorio de Pilar (PF 8) formally sold to the Philippines 5 April 1976. Decommissioned 6/1985 due to very poor condition. May still exist as a hulk.

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Willoughby
AVP 57 - AGP 9 - WAVP 387 - WHEC 387 - WAGW 387
Photos: [No photo available]

DANFS History

Built by Lake Washington SY. Laid down 15 March 1943, redesignated AGP 9 11 May 1943 while building, launched 21 August 1943, commissioned 18 June 1944 as torpedo boat tender.

Decommissioned 26 June 1946 and transferred to USCG as Gresham (WAVP 387) upon decommissioning stricken 19 July 1946. Designation changed to WHEC 387 1 May 1966. Converted to weather ship and redesignated WAGW 387 1969 5/38 mount removed.

Decommissioned, transferred to Maritime Administration 21 May 1973 for disposal, sold 25 October 1973 and subsequently scrapped.

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Names Not Assigned
AVP 58 through AVP 67
Suspended 19 October 1942.

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Information needed for Barnegat class

The following information has not been located in any references I can find. Most of this information pertains to disposal of the ships which were transferred to the Coast Guard recordkeeping on such ships does not seem to be as good as USN recordkeeping.

What: Date recommissioned in USCG service
Ships: All WAVP, and recommission date for WHEC 379's 1977 recommissioning.

What: Date reclassified
Ships: WAVP/WHEC 377 (to WAGO 377), WAVP/WHEC 387 (to WAGW 387)

What: Date decommissioned from USCG service
Ships: all WAVP/WHEC and derivatives (WTR, WAGW, WAGO)

What: Date decommissioned from USN/MSC service
Ships: AGOR 1, AVP 41

What: Date stricken from NVR
Ships: All WAVP/WHEC and derivatives, AGP 6/AVP 28 (second strike), AVP 49, AGOR 1

What: Date of transfer to foreign nation
Ships: AVP 49 (Ethiopia)

What: Final fate
Ships: AGS 50, AVP 21, 33, 38, 40

What: Fate after sale
Ships: AGS 30, AVP 38, 48

What: Date Returned to USN for disposal/transfer
Ships: WAVP/WHEC 370, 371, 373, 375, 376, 379, 380, 383, 384, 385, 386

What: Date sunk as targets
Ships: WAVP/WHEC 370, 371, 373, 376, 379, 385 AVP 37

What: Fate following foreign transfer
Ships: AGOR 1 (Greece), AVP 49 (Ethiopia)

What: Fate following transfer to Philippines
Ships: ex-WHEC 375, 380, 382, 384 383, 386
Notes: My best information is that these ships mays still exist as hulks.

What: Date of reclassification from AG back to AVP
Ships: AG 121 (AVP 21), AG 123 (AVP 29)


What Gillis family records will you find?

There are 115,000 census records available for the last name Gillis. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Gillis census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 19,000 immigration records available for the last name Gillis. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 21,000 military records available for the last name Gillis. For the veterans among your Gillis ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 115,000 census records available for the last name Gillis. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Gillis census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 19,000 immigration records available for the last name Gillis. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 21,000 military records available for the last name Gillis. For the veterans among your Gillis ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


Генеалогия и история семьи Gillis

My understanding is that the name Gillis is a shortened version (presumably shortened during immigration to the USA) of the name McGillis, which was hails from Scotland.

I believe there is even a Scottish plaid and a coat of arms associated with the Gillis name. I have a paper copy of this information back in the house where I grew up -- if I get the chance next visit I will locate that, scan it and upload that information here.

Gillis is also the name of Jewish families originating in western Lithuania, especially in the town of Kretinga.

Controversy exists over the origin of the name Gillis. Some suggest that it derives from the patronymic Hillel, while another proposal bases the name on the more unusual matronymic Geula.

The association of Gillis with Hillel, meaning 'praise' in Hebrew, is given credence by Alexander Beider in his important study of Jewish names in Russia. The transferal in Russian of the letter H to G here shifts Hillel to Gillel and then to Gillis.

Alternatively, Gillis may well be a name given in honour of the matriarch of the family as a derivative of Geula, meaning deliverance in Hebrew. This name is often given to girls born during Pesach, alluding to the deliverance of the People of Israel from the hands of the Egyptians. There is usually a compelling reason to name a family after a woman's given name. Matronymics may be traced to a Jewish mother of heroic proportions, who probably overshadowed her husband, or my denote that a woman was widowed while young and then raised the fatherless children without remarrying. So the literal meaning of Gillis, according to this explanation, is the 'descendents of Geula'.


DD-260 Gillis

Gillis (DD-260) was launched 29 May 1919 by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp., Quincy, Mass. sponsored by Miss Helen Irvine Murray, granddaughter of Admiral Gillis and Mrs. Josephine T. Smith, niece of Commodore Gillis- commissioned 3 Slept ember 1919, Lt. Comdr. Webb Trammell in command.

Gillis sailed from Newport, R.I., 17 December 1919 and moored at San Diego 20 January 1920. She joined the Pacific Fleet Destroyer Force in tactics and maneuvers along the West Coast until decommissioned at San Diego 26 May 1922. Recommissioned in ordinary 28 June 1940, she was reclassified 2 August as seaplane tender destroyer AVD-12. Following conversion she was placed in full commission at San Francisco, 25 March 1941.

Gillis was assigned as tender to Patrol Wing 4, Aircraft Scouting Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet. In the following months she performed plane guard patrol between San Diego and Seattle with time out for aircraft tending duties at Sitka, Alaska (14-17 June) Dutch Harbor and Kodiak (15-31 July). After overhaul in the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard she returned to Kodiak 16 October 1941 to resume tending of amphibious patrol planes in Alaskan waters. She was serving at Kodiak when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and returned to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard 9 February 1942 for overhaul.

Gillis resumed tender duties at Kodiak 26 May 1942. She was stationed at Atka (11-13 June) tending amphibious patrol aircraft bombing the Japanese on Kiska Island. On air-sea rescue patrol 6 June 1942, she made three depth charge runs on an underwater sound contact. A Japanese submarine violently broached the surface revealing its conning tower and propeller, then disappeared. Gillis was unable to regain contact. She was credited with damaging this underseas raider in the combat area off Umak Island. She was attacked by three Japanese patrol bombers while at Adak 20 July. One bomb, fortunately a dud, splashed within 10 feet alongside. Other bombs rained about her ahead and astern. She was drenched by water thrown up by the explosions but escaped damage or casualties.

Gillis continued her varied duties as aircraft tender and air-sea rescue patrol ship throughout the Aleutian Campaign. Brief intervals of repair were accomplished in the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. She terminated this service 19 April 1944 when she departed Dutch Harbor for overhaul in the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. She arrived at San Diego 13 June and spent the following months as plane guard for aircraft carriers training along the California coast. She was then routed on to Pearl Harbor, arriving 8 December 1944. She operated in Hawaiian waters as plane guard for escort carrier Makassar Strait (CVE-91) until 20 February 1945. She then sailed with Rear Admiral M. L. Deyo's Gunfire and Covering Force, enroute via the Marshalls, Marianas and Ulithi for the Invasion of Okinawa.

Gillis arrived off Kerama Retto 25 March 1945. She guarded minesweepers to the west, then stood by underwater demolition teams clearing approaches to the western beaches of Okinawa. After invasion forces stormed ashore 1 April, she tended observation and patrol planes at Kerama Retto and performed air-sea rescue patrol. On 28 April she departed Okinawa in the screen of Makassar Strait, bound via Guam to San Pedro Bay Philippine Islands. She returned by the same route in the escort screen of Wake Island (CVE-65). That carrier launched planes 29 June to land bases on Okinawa and Gillis helped escort her back to Guam 3 July 1945.

Gillis departed Guam for home 8 July 1945. She arrived at San Pedro, Calif., 28 July and decommissioned there 15 October 1945. Her name was struck from the Navy List 1 November 1945 She was sold for scrapping 29 January 1946.


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current09:36, 3 January 20171,350 × 900 (2 KB) 127.0.0.1 (talk) The Soviet Naval Ensign from 1950-1992, by <a href="//commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Zscout370" title="User:Zscout370">User:Zscout370</a> .


衣阿华级战列舰

1938年初,美国海军确定南达科他级战舰后续的4.5万吨级新型高速战列舰的设计方案——愛荷華级战列舰,最初的工作是在 THOMAS HART少將 ( 英语 : Thomas C. Hart ) 带领下进行的,最初计划装12门Mk 6 16英吋/45倍径或9门Mk 1 18英吋(457毫米)艦炮;但在1938年3月31日会谈决定了该舰还要更强的装甲和更强的主机以达到南达科他级的27节速度后,18英吋艦炮方案被废弃。 [2] 该项研究最终转成了蒙大拿级。另一方案是由 海軍整備局(Bureau of Construction and Repair) ( 英语 : Bureau of Construction and Repair ) 设计 [3] ,在 A.J. Chantry上校带领下进行的,提出了装12门16英吋艦炮或20门12英吋艦炮的“巡洋舰杀手”方案,能通过巴拿马运河,达到35节航速和15节下20,000海里航程的要求,最终确定排水量为50,940长吨(51,760吨),但是Chantry发现该方案的装甲只能承受203毫米口徑的炮弹攻擊。 [4] 最终提交出A、B、C三種改进方案,它们都加强了装甲并把副炮换成150毫米艦炮。"A" 方案最大,为59,060长吨(60,010 t),只有它还保留了4座炮塔装12门16英吋艦炮的特征。它的总功率达到277,000马力(shp)因而航速达到32.5节(60.2 km/h 37.4 mph)。"B"方案为最小的52,707长吨(53,553 t);用225,000马力就能达到32.5节,有9门16吋艦炮。 "C"方案则增大了75,000马力来达到35节的初始要求。增加主机和增长装甲带(156米,而B方案是151米),使它达到55,771长吨(56,666 t)。 [5] 1938年5月国会通过 第二次文森法案 ( 英语 : Naval Act of 1938 ) ,要求“将美国海军实力扩充两成”。它更新了34年的文森-特拉梅尔法案和36年的海军法案,为愛荷華级建造提供了资金。 [6] 战列舰设计总委员会要求新战列舰不应用南达科他级的Mk 6型 16英吋/45倍径艦炮,而应用上1920年代取消的列克星敦级战巡和南达科他级战列舰留下的Mk 2型 16英吋/50倍径艦炮 [7] 这时该舰已经超过了45,000吨的限制,达到了46,551长吨(47,298 t)当设计进入6月的最后阶段时,当海軍整備局正在实现原先的炮塔座设计时,而 軍械局 ( 英语 : Bureau of Ordnance ) 却提出了一个更大的炮塔座方案,它实际上不可能在现有的排水量下上舰。总委员会的一名成员惊讶地问軍械局“是否还有常识”幸而軍械局完成了重量更小的Mk 7型16英寸/50倍徑艦砲设计从而使得炮塔座维持原尺寸。 [8] [9]

動力 编辑

该级战列舰在保持南达科他级防护水平的基础上重点提高航速,搭载更大功率的动力装置。 巴布柯克 & 威爾科斯公司 ( 英语 : Babcock & Wilcox ) 的M型鍋爐可提供每平方英吋600磅的壓力(4,137 kPa 42 kgf/cm²)、過熱器提供最高溫度華氏875度(攝氏468度),愛荷華級的高壓鍋爐輸出的動力效益與穩定度是二戰戰艦中之首,在平常狀態僅需4具鍋爐便可達到27節航速,全功率下航速高达33节,是历史上主机功率最大、航速最高的战列舰。

船體 编辑

武備 编辑

武裝方面,安装3座三联装主炮塔,舰桥前呈背负式安装两座,煙囪后安装一座。采用Mk 7型16吋/50倍径艦炮,发射的穿甲弹为Mk 8型,在14.5海里的距离上可穿透570毫米的垂直装甲。该炮射速为2发/分,高于当时大多数战列舰主炮 [11] [12] 。副炮为10座雙联装Mk 12 5英寸/38倍径艦砲高平兩用炮,配备无线电近炸引信,对空射程6海里,由Mk.37 艦砲射控系統 (Mark 37 Fire Control System)指揮射擊。此外装备大量盟军制式的博福斯40毫米高射砲和厄利孔20毫米机炮。

1980年代的改造中 [13] ,4艘同型艦 装备上SPG-55F型127毫米炮瞄准雷达 [來源請求] [ 除中國大陸網路內容報導外,其他網路查無此型號相關報導,請其他編者幫助查證。查证请求 ] 、8座4联裝“戰斧”巡航導彈發射器、SLQ-32型电子战系统、衛星通信系統、4座四联装“鱼叉”反舰导弹发射器、4座方陣快砲等新武器配備與飛彈射控系統裝備。至於舊有武裝,3座三联裝Mk 7型16吋/50倍径艦炮全數保留,拆除4座雙联裝 Mk 12 5英吋高平兩用炮,移除全部博福斯40毫米高射砲和厄利孔20毫米机炮和移除防空射擊射控設備(Mk-37 防空射控系統4套)。 [1] 原來的水上飛機起重機及停放支架被拆除,換裝上无人驾驶飞机弹射器以装备5架以色列生产的“先锋”型无人驾驶飞机;新增直升机起降平台,可停放4架直升机。


The History

The Gillis Volleyball Tournament was started in 1971 by Steve and Dave Cressman at Gillis Beach, in Playa del Rey, California. That first year, 17 teams participated, playing on one court. At this year’s 40th tournament, there will be 170 teams with over 600 players, playing on 28 courts.

Gillis Beach was named after a one block-long street in Playa del Rey called Gillis Street that ended at the sand. Junior high and high schoolers from Westchester High and St. Bernards High learned what the Southern California beach lifestyle was all about. The beach shoreline community was wiped out though in 1974 by expansion of the LA Airport’s west runway. Although the neighborhood and homes were gone, The Gillis tournament continued there until 1980. It was that year when the city dredged the marina of sand and dumped it on Gillis Beach, destroying the 10 courts that had been built over the previous 10 years. The tournament was then forced to moved to Toes Beach, 1 mile north, for a run of 25 years. In 2005 the county forced another move on The Gillis to the southern-most point of Playa del rey called Dockweiler Beach. The history of Playa del Rey and of Gillis Beach is preserved through the tournament each year as a reunion for those that grew up here. This makes the Gillis a “locals” event like none other.

The many brackets that make up the tournament are designed to place each skill level alongside the same type players. This gets everyone up and playing, instead of sitting and watching.

The costumes and matching trunks, camps and skits that are part of today’s tournament came about over many years of evolution. What started as a contest in 1980 for the best homemade trunks, changed when one team crossed over that line into costumes. Then skits developed around those costumes, then camps to go with those skits. Friday night before the tournament has developed into a building event where teams prepare their camps for the weekend ahead.

Traditions are built over time, and the Gillis has many besides the costumes, etc.:

The Toast began in 1981 when Scott Arbanis and Vytas Karilius wrote a poem and brought a bag of toast, roasting their fellow players in the process of dousing them with bread. Every year since, the previous year’s winners have been given the same opportunity.

The King and Queen were there from the beginning, but crowns were never given out just for beauty’s sake. They were specifically for individuals who brought and gave a big part of themselves to the spirit of the Gillis.

Showtime developed out of a need to consolidate all of the skits that were happening throughout the day, into a performance contest where all players could stop, and appreciate all of the work and preparation some of the teams went through, as well as enjoy the show.

The “Gillis” is a Playa del Rey tradition that has taken on a life of its own through the personalities and efforts of the people who participate. It is an invitational, not open to the public at large, and manages to keep its obscurity by not seeking a larger audience. We hope to pass this tradition on to the next generations of Gillis kids.


Watch the video: भगवन शर कषण न कय कस क वध. Mahabharat Stories. B R Chopra. EP 17