They find off the coast of Norway a German cruiser sunk by a torpedo during World War II

They find off the coast of Norway a German cruiser sunk by a torpedo during World War II

Karlsruhe, a heavily armored Nazi German warship sunk by a torpedo during World War II, was found on the seabed, almost 500 meters deep, off the coast of Norway.

The operator of the Norwegian state power grid, Statnett, discovered the Nazi cruiser Karlsruhe, 174 meters long, sunk at a depth of 488 meters during the invasion of the country in April 1940, according to a statement issued by the company.

The German cruiser that led the attack on the southern Norwegian town of Kristiansand was set ablaze by Norwegian artillery, torpedoed by a British submarine, and finally sunk by the Germans themselves 80 years ago.

"With the main battery of nine guns in three triple turrets, this was the largest and most fearsome ship in the attack group against Kristiansand", the statement includes the words of Frode Kvalo, archaeologist and researcher at the Norwegian Maritime Museum.

When World War II broke out in September 1939, Norway declared itself neutral. Hitler ordered their invasion, along with Denmark, in April 1940 as part of the so-called Operation Weserübung. Although backed by allied troops, the small country could not resist and was finally occupied in June 1940 until liberation in April 1945.

A sonar from the Norwegian company detected the first signs of the wreckage of the ship three years ago during inspection work on an underwater power cable between Norway and Denmark. The ship was 15 meters from the wiring.

Then, in the summer of this year, Statnett engineer Ole Petter Hobberstad carried out further investigations from an offshore ship, the Olympic Taurus. He and his team used echo sounders and a remotely operated underwater drone to locate the ship.


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