They find remains of the Phoenician port of Gadir (Cádiz) during the works in a flamenco tavern

They find remains of the Phoenician port of Gadir (Cádiz) during the works in a flamenco tavern

The recovery project of one of the most important flamenco taverns in Spain –in which great figures of the genre such as Lola Flores and Camarón de la Isla gathered– has led to an unexpected discovery andgreater historical reach: While trying to rebuild the famous Cave of the Blue Bird, the workers have foundPhoenician remains of the port of Cádiz.

As the local press explains, the work began in the premises of the famous establishment, located next to the Cadiz Cathedral, and led to the discovery ofa harbor wall of the ancient Phoenician city of Gadirfive meters below ground, next to a series of harbor structures dug directly into the porous rock of the island formerly called Kotinoussa.

Archaeologists Juan Miguel Pajuelo and Francisco Javier Ramírez have already studied the wall, which measures1.80 meters high and 5.60 long and it presents four rows of ashlars. According to their first analysis, it is one of the cliffs of the port of Gadir between the4th and 3rd centuries BC.

The wall also consists of a ladder to go down to the water and a ramp to beach boats, as well as other structures that could beshipyards or storage elements from the port itself.

These Phoenician remains are the ones with the greatest historical importance, but during the excavation they have also appearedlater Roman and Islamic pieces, coins from the time of the Second Punic War and other evidence of the operation of the premises already in much more recent times.

In light of the value of these finds, the process has begun to convert the Blue Bird Cave intoAsset of Cultural Interest, a legal figure that in Spain serves to provide special protection to historical heritage.


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