Billingsley DD- 293 - History

Billingsley DD- 293 - History

Billingsley

Born in Winona, Miss., 24 April 1887, William Devotie Billingsley graduated from the Academy in 1909. One of the first Naval Aviators, Ensign Billingsley was killed in an airplane crash near Annapolis, Md., 20 June 1913.

(DD-293: dp. 1215; 1. 314'4"; b. 31'9"; dr. 9'10"; s. 35
k.; cpl. 122; a. 4 4", 13", 12 21" TT.; cl. Clemson)

Billingsley (DD-293) was launched 10 December 1919 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Squantum, Mass.; sponsored by

Miss Irene Billingsley, sister of Ensign Billingsley; and commissioned 1 March 1920, Commander H. D. Cooke In command.

Billingsley joined Destroyer Force, Atlantic Fleet, in operations along the east coast and in the Caribbean until the summer of 1920 when she made Naval Reserve training cruises. In reserve until June 1922 she then joined Division 26, Squadron 9, Destroyer Force, at Philadelphia. She cruised along the Atlantic coast until June 1924 when Division 26 joined U. S. Naval Forces, Europe. Bill- cruised in European and Mediterranean waters for the next year and assisted refugees in the Near East. In the spring of 1925 she acted as plane guard for the North Atlantic, crossing of the Army "Aroundthe-World Flight." Later in the year she returned home and resumed her routine activities along the east coast until the summer of 1929 when she again made Naval Reserve cruises. Billingsley reported to Philadelphia Navy Yard in September 1929; was decommissioned I May 1930; and sold 17 January 1931.


DD-293 Billingsley

Billingsley (DD-293) was launched 10 December 1919 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Squantum, Mass. sponsored by Miss Irene Billingsley, sister of Ensign Billingsley and commissioned 1 March 1920, Commander H. D. Cooke in command.

Billingsley joined Destroyer Force, Atlantic Fleet, in operations along the east coast and in the Caribbean until the summer of 1920 when she made Naval Reserve training cruises. In reserve until June 1922 she then joined Division 26, Squadron 9, Destroyer Force at Philadelphia. She cruised along the Atlantic coast until June 1924 when Division 26 joined U. S. Naval Forces, Europe. Billingsley cruised in European and Mediterranean waters for the next year and assisted refugees in the Near East. In the spring of 1926 she acted as plane guard for the North Atlantic crossing of the Army "Around-the-World Flight." Later in the year she returned home and resumed her routine activities along the east coast until the summer of 1929 when she again made Naval Reserve cruises. Billingsley reported to Philadelphia Navy Yard in September 1929 was decommissioned 1 May 1930 and sold 17 January 1931.


History

Billingsley was launched 10 December 1919 by Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Squantum, Massachusetts sponsored by Miss Irene Billingsley, sister of Ensign Billingsley and commissioned 1 March 1920, Commander H. D. Cooke in command.

Billingsley joined Destroyer Force, Atlantic Fleet, in operations along the east coast and in the Caribbean until the summer of 1920 when she made Naval Reserve training cruises. In reserve until June 1922, she then joined Division 26, Squadron 9, Destroyer Force, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She cruised along the Atlantic coast until June 1924, when Division 26 joined United States Naval Forces Europe. Billingsley cruised in European and Mediterranean waters for the next year and assisted refugees in the Near East. In the spring of 1925 she acted as plane guard for the North Atlantic crossing of the Army "Around-the-World Flight." Later in the year she returned home and resumed her routine activities along the east coast until the summer of 1929 when she again made Naval Reserve cruises.

Billingsley reported to Philadelphia Navy Yard in September 1929 was decommissioned 1 May 1930 and sold 17 January 1931.

As of 2005, no other ship in the United States Navy has been named Billingsley.


Kidnapping and Later Career

Seeking a life away from the spotlight, Lindbergh and his wife went to live on an estate in Hopewell, New Jersey. The couple started a family with the birth of their first child, Charles Augustus, Jr. At only 20 months old, the boy was kidnapped from their home in 1932. The crime made headlines around the world. The Lindberghs paid the $50,000 ransom, but their son&aposs dead body was found in the nearby woods weeks later.

The police traced the ransom money to Bruno Hauptmann, a carpenter with a criminal record, and arrested him for the crime. To compound Lindbergh&aposs grief, the ensuing trial of his son&aposs accused killer became a media frenzy. Hauptmann was convicted and later executed in 1936.

To escape the constant media attention, the couple moved to Europe, living in England and then France. Around this time, Lindbergh did some scientific research, inventing an early type of artificial heart with a French surgeon. He also continued his work in aviation, serving on the board of directors for Pan-American World Airways and acting as a special advisor at times. Lindbergh was invited to tour German aviation facilities by Nazi leader Hermann Göring and was impressed by what he saw.

Concerned that German air power was unbeatable, Lindbergh became involved with the America First Organization, which advocated that the United States stay neutral in the war in Europe. His position on the war eroded his public support, and some believed that he had Nazi sympathies. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, however, Lindbergh became active in the war effort, working with Henry Ford on bombers and acting as an advisor and test pilot for United Aircraft.


USS Rodman (DD 456)

Converted to High Speed Minesweeper DMS-21 on 15 November 1944.
Reclassified back to destroyer DD-456 16 January 1955.
Decommissioned 28 July 1955.
Transferred to Taiwan 28 July 1955 being renamed Hsuen Yang. Hsuen Yang was expended in 1976.

Commands listed for USS Rodman (DD 456)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Lt.Cdr. William Giers Michelet, USN27 Jan 19425 Dec 1942
2T/Cdr. Joseph Ferrall Foley, USN5 Dec 194214 Oct 1944
3T/Cdr. William Henderson Kirvan, USN14 Oct 194427 Oct 1945
4Robert Hastings White, USN27 Oct 1945Jun 1947

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Notable events involving Rodman include:

28 Aug 1943
USS Iowa (Capt. J.L. McCrea, USN) departed Boston for Argentia, Newfoundland. She was escorted by USS Ellyson (Lt.Cdr. E.W. Longton, USN), USS Rodman (Cdr. J.F. Foley, USN) and USS Emmons (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Billingsley, USN).

For the daily positions of USS Iowa during this passage see the map below.

6 Sep 1943
During 6 and 7 September 1943, USS Iowa (Capt. J.L. McCrea, USN), conducted exercises off Placentia Bay, Newfoundland. She was escorted by destroyers from DesRon 10 USS Ellyson (Lt.Cdr. E.W. Longton, USN), USS Rodman (Cdr. J.F. Foley, USN) and USS Emmons (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Billingsley, USN).

16 Sep 1943
From 16 to 20 September 1943, USS Iowa (Capt. J.L. McCrea, USN), conducted exercises off Placentia Bay, Newfoundland. She was escorted by destroyers from DesRon 10 USS Ellyson (Lt.Cdr. E.W. Longton, USN), USS Rodman (Cdr. J.F. Foley, USN) and USS Emmons (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Billingsley, USN).

28 Sep 1943
During 28 and 29 September 1943, USS Iowa (Capt. J.L. McCrea, USN), conducted exercises off Placentia Bay, Newfoundland. She was escorted by destroyers from DesRon 10 USS Ellyson (Lt.Cdr. E.W. Longton, USN), USS Rodman (Cdr. J.F. Foley, USN) and USS Emmons (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Billingsley, USN).

3 Oct 1943
USS Iowa (Capt. J.L. McCrea, USN) proceeded to sea to ride out a gale at sea. She was escorted by destroyers from DesRon 10 USS Ellyson (Lt.Cdr. E.W. Longton, USN), USS Rodman (Cdr. J.F. Foley, USN) and USS Emmons (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Billingsley, USN).

17 Nov 1943
Around 1345 hours, USS Ellyson (Lt.Cdr. E.W. Longton, USN), USS Rodman (Cdr. J.F. Foley, USN) and USS Emmons (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Billingsley, USN) took over the escort of USS Iowa (Capt. J.L. McCrea, USN).

19 Nov 1943
Around 1100 hours, USS Iowa (Capt. J.L. McCrea, USN) and her escort USS Ellyson (Lt.Cdr. E.W. Longton, USN), USS Rodman (Cdr. J.F. Foley, USN) and USS Emmons (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Billingsley, USN) joined USS Brooklyn (Capt. R.W. Cary, Jr., USN) and her escort USS Trippe (Lt.Cdr. R.C. Williams, USN), USS Edison (Lt.Cdr. H.A. Pearce, USN), HMS Troubridge (Capt. C.L. Firth, MVO, RN), HMS Teazer (Lt.Cdr. A.A.F. Talbot, DSO and Bar, RN) and HMS Tyrian (Cdr. C.W. Greening, RN). In the afternoon USS Ellson, USS Rodman and USS Emmons were detached.

21 Nov 1943
USS Iowa (Capt. J.L. McCrea, USN) passed Gibaltar Straits westbound into the Atlantic.

Around 0540 hours, HMS Sheffield, departed the formation.

Around 0820 hours, USS Ellyson (Lt.Cdr. E.W. Longton, USN), USS Rodman (Cdr. J.F. Foley, USN) and USS Emmons (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Billingsley, USN) arrived to take over the escort of USS Iowa and USS Brooklyn (Capt. R.W. Cary, Jr., USN) and her escort USS Trippe (Lt.Cdr. R.C. Williams, USN), USS Edison (Lt.Cdr. H.A. Pearce, USN), HMS Troubridge (Capt. C.L. Firth, MVO, RN), HMS Teazer (Lt.Cdr. A.A.F. Talbot, DSO and Bar, RN) and HMS Tyrian (Cdr. C.W. Greening, RN) departed the formation and set course for Gibraltar.

30 Nov 1943
USS Iowa (Capt. J.L. McCrea, USN) departed Bahia, Brazil for Freetown, Sierra Leone. Again she was escorted by ComDesRon 10 USS Ellyson (Lt.Cdr. E.W. Longton, USN), USS Rodman (Cdr. J.F. Foley, USN) and USS Emmons (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Billingsley, USN).

For the daily positions of USS Iowa during this passage see the map below.

6 Dec 1943
USS Iowa (Capt. J.L. McCrea, USN) departed Freetown, Sierra Leone for Dakar, Senegal, French West Africa. Yet again she was escorted by ComDesRon 10 USS Ellyson (Lt.Cdr. E.W. Longton, USN), USS Rodman (Cdr. J.F. Foley, USN) and USS Emmons (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Billingsley, USN).

For the daily positions of USS Iowa during this passage see the map below.

11 Dec 1943
Around 2230 hours USS Hall (Cdr. J.F. Delaney, Jr., USN), USS Halligan (Cdr. C.E. Cortner, USN) and USS Macomb (Cdr. J.C. South, USN) took over the escort of USS Iowa (Capt. J.L. McCrea, USN) from USS Ellyson (Lt.Cdr. E.W. Longton, USN), USS Rodman (Cdr. J.F. Foley, USN) and USS Emmons (Lt.Cdr. E.B. Billingsley, USN) which were then detached.

17 May 1944
German U-boat U-616 was sunk on 17 May 1944 in the Mediterranean Sea north-west of Ténès, Algeria, in position 36°46'N, 00°52'E, by depth charges from the US destroyers USS Nields, USS Gleaves, USS Ellyson, USS Macomb, USS Hambleton, USS Rodman, USS Emmons and USS Hilary P. Jones and by depth charges from a British Wellington aircraft (36 Sqn RAF/K) on 15 May.

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Kamikaze Images

On April 6, 1945, five kamikaze aircraft hit the high-speed minesweeper USS Emmons (DMS-22) in quick succession. The surviving crewmen soon abandoned the seriously damaged ship, and Emmons was intentionally sunk by another high-speed minesweeper in the early morning hours of April 7, 1945, since the ship had uncontrolled fires and was drifting toward enemy-held territory. Edward Baxter Billingsley, author of The Emmons Saga, served as the ship's third commanding officer from July 1943 to November 1944 and previously had served as Engineering Officer and Executive Officer since the commissioning of the destroyer in December 1941 (designated DD-457 at that time), two days prior to Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor. This book presents an extremely well-researched history of Emmons' entire career. However, other than some individual accounts of the kamikaze attack and its aftermath, the narrative generally lacks personal stories to make the crew come alive.

Billingsley spent eight years performing research for this thorough history. The primary sources included ship's logs, war diaries, and action reports. He also utilized recordings of survivors' memories taped at the October 1982 reunion of the Emmons Association and written accounts of the kamikaze attack prepared by surviving crewmen within four days after the sinking. The book includes 25 pages of personal accounts of the kamikaze attack from these reports, but they lose some of their impact as Billingsley has converted them from first to third person accounts. The Emmons Association privately published Billingsley's history in 1989. This subsequent edition published in 2005 includes two short additional chapters, one about the 2001 discovery of the Emmons wreck by divers and another about the special bond of Emmons' survivors and their reunion meetings.

The Emmons Saga chronologically covers the complete history of the destroyer (converted to a high-speed minesweeper in November and December 1944) from her commissioning to her sinking. The book lacks an index to quickly locate specific references and maps to follow the ship's numerous movements to relatively obscure places in both the Atlantic and Pacific. A 12-page Employment Schedule at the back of the book summarizes Emmons' actions during the war. The book has 25 photos that effectively supplement the narrative, but most are not that clear. The cover has a fine painting by Dwight Shepler, Navy Combat Artist aboard Emmons during the Allied landings on the beaches of Normandy. The painting on the cover is entitled "Target of Opportunity," which shows Emmons firing her guns at German gun emplacements on top of rugged cliffs to the east of Omaha beach.

After Emmons' commissioning and fitting out, the destroyer's shakedown cruise took her to South America for diplomatic reasons. Afterward, while Emmons served in the Atlantic and European theaters, she suffered no casualties and participated directly in few battles, which makes the first 13 chapters somewhat slow reading in places with many pages describing rather uninteresting patrol and escort missions. The tension increases with Emmons' participation in the Normandy landings in June 1944 and the invasion of southern France in August 1944, but even these events rarely put the ship in real danger. In late 1944, Emmons was one of 24 destroyers no longer needed in the Atlantic that the Navy decided to convert to high-speed minesweepers for use in the Pacific War. The conversion took six weeks. The new ship, designated DMS-22, still had the primary characteristics of a destroyer but with fewer guns and depth charges, and minesweeping equipment had been added to the stern.

After minesweeping training, Emmons went by way of Ulithi to the waters around Okinawa in preparation for the planned invasion on April 1, 1945. Early in the morning of March 24, Emmons and other destroyer minesweepers began sweeping assigned areas south and southwest of Okinawa. On April 6, the day of Japan's first and largest of ten mass kamikaze attacks called Kikusui (Floating Chrysanthemum), Emmons and her sister ship Rodman were assigned northwest of Okinawa to provide gunfire support for AM class minesweeper units. At 1532, three kamikaze planes attacked Rodman, with one crashing into the forecastle starting huge fires and another one hitting close aboard to starboard with a bomb rupturing the hull and causing flooding in several compartments. Emmons started to circle Rodman to provide fire support to the seriously damaged ship with an estimated 50 to 75 enemy aircraft heading their way. Combat Air Patrol (CAP) destroyed many Japanese planes, and Emmons shot down six. Another four planes crashed close aboard without causing serious damage. Finally, a kamikaze succeeded in crashing into Emmons at 1732, and four more kamikaze aircraft hit the ship within two minutes killing 60 and wounding 77 [1]. At about the same time, another suicide aircraft hit the damaged Rodman, which suffered casualties of 16 dead and 20 wounded [2] from a total of three kamikaze aircraft hits. About 1800, the decision was made aboard Emmons to abandon ship, and the drifting ship with uncontrolled files was sunk by gunfire from the high-speed minesweeper Ellyson (DMS-19) in the early morning of April 7, 1945.

Several officers and crewmen from Emmons received individual recognition for outstanding performance of duty on April 6, 1945, with awards of one Navy Cross, four Silver Stars, and eight Bronze Stars. All personnel serving on Emmons at the time of the sinking received a Navy Unit Commendation Ribbon from the Secretary of the Navy. The commendation reads as follows:

For outstanding heroism in action while attached to Mine Squadron TWENTY, operating under Commander Mine Force, Pacific Fleet, from March 24 to 31 and thereafter under the operational control of Commander Transport Screen, from April 1 to 6, 1945, during operations for the seizure of enemy-held Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands. Although lightly armed and highly vulnerable while operating in dangerous mined waters, the U.S.S. EMMONS rendered heroic service in minesweeping, fire support, radar picket, anti-suicide boat, antisubmarine and antiaircraft screen missions. A natural and frequent target for heavy Japanese aerial attack, she was constantly vigilant and ready for battle, fighting her guns valiantly against a group of Japanese suicide planes striking in force on April 6, and downing six of the attackers before five others crashed her in rapid succession, killing or wounding many personnel and inflicting damage which necessitated her sinking. By her own aggressiveness and the courage and skill of her officers and men, the U.S.S. EMMONS achieved a record of gallantry in combat reflecting the highest credit upon herself and the United States Naval Service.

Personnel who served on Emmons' sister ship Rodman (DD-456/DMS-21), which underwent temporary repairs at Kerama Rettō and then returned to the States, also received a Navy Unit Commendation for outstanding heroism during the Battle of Okinawa.


USS Emmons DD-457
during service in Atlantic

Notes

1. From Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (DANFS) entry for Emmons. Surprisingly, Billingsley never summarizes in the book the total number of casualties from the hits by five kamikaze aircraft. A photo of a plaque affixed to the Emmons wreck in 2003 lists 18 killed and 42 missing (p. 385), which agrees with the total of 60 dead in the DANFS entry.

Appendix B lists the names of officers and crew killed, missing in action and wounded in addition to showing the names of survivors. This list has 18 killed and 40 missing, which makes a total of 58 dead, two less than the DANFS entry. Appendix B lists 72 wounded, which also differs from the DANFS entry that indicates 77 wounded.


Billingsley DD- 293 - History

Uterine leiomyomas (also referred to as fibroids or myomas) are the most common pelvic tumor in females [1,2]. They are noncancerous monoclonal tumors arising from the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts of the myometrium. They arise in reproductive-age females and, when symptomatic, typically present with symptoms of abnormal uterine bleeding and/or pelvic pain/pressure. Uterine fibroids may also have reproductive effects (eg, infertility, adverse pregnancy outcomes).

The epidemiology, diagnosis, and natural history of uterine leiomyomas are reviewed here. Leiomyoma histology and pathogenesis, management of uterine leiomyomas, differentiating leiomyomas from uterine sarcomas, and leiomyoma variants are discussed separately. (See "Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas): Treatment overview" and "Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas): Histology and pathogenesis" and "Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas): Differentiating fibroids from uterine sarcomas" and "Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas): Variants and smooth muscle tumors of uncertain malignant potential".)

Uterine fibroids are described according to their location in the uterus although many fibroids have more than one location designation (figure 1 and picture 1A-B). The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) classification system for fibroid location is as follows (figure 2) [3]:

● Intramural myomas (FIGO type 3, 4, 5) – These leiomyomas are located within the uterine wall. They may enlarge sufficiently to distort the uterine cavity or serosal surface. Some fibroids may be transmural and extend from the serosal to the mucosal surface.

● Submucosal myomas (FIGO type 0, 1, 2) – These leiomyomas derive from myometrial cells just below the endometrium (lining of the uterine cavity). These neoplasms protrude into the uterine cavity. The extent of this protrusion is described by the FIGO/European Society of Hysteroscopy classification system and is clinically relevant for predicting outcomes of hysteroscopic myomectomy (figure 3) [4] (see "Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas): Hysteroscopic myomectomy", section on 'Leiomyoma characteristics'):


How to Re-enlist With a RE-4 Code

Re-enlistment eligibility (RE) codes characterize a veteran’s prior service. They can range from a full-blown welcome back any time (RE-1) to a brick wall that forever bars re-enlistment (RE-4). RE-4 is military shorthand indicating not only that you were trouble in your prior service but also that nobody wants you back. While any number of RE-3 re-entry codes also can supposedly block re-enlistment, most are eligible for a waiver that would make a return to uniform possible. Accordingly, a determined RE-4 has at least one shot at redemption.

Upgrade your discharge to an RE-3 through an appeal to the board charged with reviewing the discharges of your prior branch. Under federal law, each branch maintains a separate five-member tribunal to determine whether the earlier, more-severe discharge was appropriate under the circumstances or applied erroneously or improperly.

Download DD form 293, an Application for Review of Discharge from the Armed Forces of the United States. You lay out your case for a discharge upgrade on this form. Follow the directions and attach any statements, records or other evidence that support your petition. Mail the materials (addresses are on the DD 293) to the appropriate review board, which is the one overseeing records of your earlier service, not the one you’re seeking to enlist in.

Wait for the review board to act on your petition. If it upgrades the RE-4 discharge -- by no means a sure thing -- take the amended DD 214, your new record of discharge, and visit a recruiter for the branch of service you wish to enter. The recruiter will advise you what remaining steps must be taken to clear the way for your enlistment, including a waiver if still needed.


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201319-1.9South AlabamaSBCNCAA 57192168305152022371424.304.369.357.726600451
2015210.2South AlabamaSBCNCAA 552752324680942293043430.345.437.444.8811033450
2015211.0Yarmouth-DennisCCBLSmr 4319517426511121191031527.293.354.397.75169 2310
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Minors (4 seasons) Minors 38415891400189364697121137223147264.260.334.345.679483191418101
NCAA (3 seasons) NCAA 17676465611220726939264177295.316.385.396.78226098199
Other (1 season) Other 4319517426511121191031527.293.354.397.75169 2310
All Levels (6 Seasons) 60325482230327622106181622414643234386.279.351.364.715812282440201
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A- (1 season) Minors 532171922555613151412039.286.353.375.7287231220

How Do I Obtain a DD215?

The paperwork needed to correct a Certificate of Release of Discharge from Active Duty from the United States military is called a DD 215, and it can be obtained by submitting a request letter to the commander of the U.S. Army Human Resources Command. This request must include the reason a change is necessary.

All veterans who have been discharged from active duty have a certificate of their release. This is called a DD 214, and it is a very important official document that helps provide a proof of service and discharge for both the veteran and the U.S. military. However, in some instances, changes need to be made to this document. If a currently discharged veteran needs to amend his DD 214, he must submit a DD 215. Only changes that have occurred during a veteran's reserve services or a tour of active duty need to be made.

Retired military personnel are able to change their discharge information at any time, including documentation such as divorce and name changes as well as their certificate of discharge. However, all retirees must provide official proof of their identity and of the changes being made to their documentation before they will be made official.


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