7 June 1940

7 June 1940

7 June 1940

June

1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930

War in the Air

French aircraft bomb Berlin



Today in World War II History—June 7, 1940 & 1945

80 Years Ago—June 7, 1940: King Haakon VII of Norway, his family and government, evacuate from Norway to Britain as Germans advance.

RAF’s first ace of WWII, Flying Officer Edgar “Cobber” Kain of New Zealand (17 victories) is killed when buzzing an airfield in his Hurricane.

Eleven French bombers become the first Allied planes to bomb Berlin in the longest bombing mission to date.

Disney’s character Daisy Duck debuts in cartoon “Mr. Duck Steps Out.”

King Haakon and the royal family of Norway returning to Oslo, Norway on board HMS Norfolk, 7 June 1945 (Imperial War Museum: A 29155)

75 Years Ago—June 7, 1945: King Haakon VII of Norway returns to Oslo.


Today in World War II History—June 7, 1940 & 1945

80 Years Ago—June 7, 1940: King Haakon VII of Norway, his family and government, evacuate from Norway to Britain as Germans advance.

RAF’s first ace of WWII, Flying Officer Edgar “Cobber” Kain of New Zealand (17 victories) is killed when buzzing an airfield in his Hurricane.

Eleven French bombers become the first Allied planes to bomb Berlin in the longest bombing mission to date.

Disney’s character Daisy Duck debuts in cartoon “Mr. Duck Steps Out.”

King Haakon and the royal family of Norway returning to Oslo, Norway on board HMS Norfolk, 7 June 1945 (Imperial War Museum: A 29155)

75 Years Ago—June 7, 1945: King Haakon VII of Norway returns to Oslo.


Hitler incapacitated on 1 june 1940 (stroke/aphasia)

Even before a Barbarossa decision with a June 1st POD, Goering has already some important decisions to make, regarding:

Does he let the German public and the world know right away about Hitler's situation.
Terms to make with France, and dealing with Vichy going forward.
A meeting with Mussolini June 18th.
Decisions on how to prosecute the war further with England.
Dealing with the Balkan countries, i.e. the Vienna award and the consequences and fall out of that including motivating Mussolini to invade Greece.
Meetings with Molotov November 1940

Goering could mess up some of this or do better but there a lot of butterflies before Barbarossa..

Julian

Again, a lot of people missing here that Hitler was far more moderate toward the UK than most of his inner circle (Barring Hess I suppose). He believed that Germany/Britain had a "natural racial alignment" and after France was defeated the UK would recognize the benefits of dividing the world up between the two of them (British Empire + German Eurasia). He continuously insisted that the collapse of the British Empire would be a bad thing for Germany and desperately wanted an Anglo-German alliance. Man was completely delusional.

His compatriots, in contrast (Goering, OKH, and Raeder were particularly dismissive), were much more fixated on destroying the UK/its empire and wanted to force it to the table, not offer a "deal" and secure an alliance like Hitler. To that end, the consensus view among the Nazi leadership after an invasion/aerial bombardment provided impractical was that they needed to remove the UK's last mainland hope, the USSR. Even leaders who were hesitant about Barbarossa like Goering accepted prima facie that the UK was holding out hope for a Soviet intervention.

A political clique without Hitler is less likely, not more, to sacrifice most of their empire for peace with the UK. They don't have the same fixation on an alliance and strongly believe that they can crush the UK's hopes and force it to make peace on their terms.

Issei Uzumaki

Again, a lot of people missing here that Hitler was far more moderate toward the UK than most of his inner circle (Barring Hess I suppose). He believed that Germany/Britain had a "natural racial alignment" and after France was defeated the UK would recognize the benefits of dividing the world up between the two of them (British Empire + German Eurasia). He continuously insisted that the collapse of the British Empire would be a bad thing for Germany and desperately wanted an Anglo-German alliance. Man was completely delusional.

His compatriots, in contrast (Goering, OKH, and Raeder were particularly dismissive), were much more fixated on destroying the UK/its empire and wanted to force it to the table, not offer a "deal" and secure an alliance like Hitler. To that end, the consensus view among the Nazi leadership after an invasion/aerial bombardment provided impractical was that they needed to remove the UK's last mainland hope, the USSR. Even leaders who were hesitant about Barbarossa like Goering accepted prima facie that the UK was holding out hope for a Soviet intervention.

A political clique without Hitler is less likely, not more, to sacrifice most of their empire for peace with the UK. They don't have the same fixation on an alliance and strongly believe that they can crush the UK's hopes and force it to make peace on their terms.

I wonder if Goering takes over then with a focus on the UK and not Barbarossa, does that mean he would be more inclined to listen to suggestions to turn the Med into an Axis lake?

If you have a scenario where he still keeps UK occupied in home islands with Battle of Britain and in the meantime instead of planning to attack the Soviets, instead pushes Italy (and provided aid)to grab Malta first and secure a supply lane to north Africa, then funnel troops and stockpile supplies for a push against the British there. I mean the Afrika Korps wasnt created until Jan of '41, with most forces diverting for planning against the Soviets.

So UK shoots down peace offers from Goering, he starts Battle of Britain. Then over the rest of 1940 works with Italy to secure Malta and then begin building up not an Afrika Korps but and Afrika Army group with a stockpile of food and fuel built up for the push. It seems considering how far Rommel got in OTL with his much smaller force that with a large force and supplies available for an initial thrust, they should be able to make it far enough east with the British split between Balkans (as I'm sure Italy will still screw up and invade there) to capture necessary ports to help with future resupply, if not make it all the way over to Alexandria and / or the Suez by end of summer '41. The troop build up for Soviet invasion OTL would now be split between securing the Balkans and North Africa.

In that scenario, you have a realistic threat to the mid-east oil fields. Can't help but wonder if the UK might sue for a negotiated peace at this point or if it is successful enough, Goering just ignores them and drives own until he can secure Iraq and parts of Iran. That not only secures oil for them but would offer a southern pincer option for an eventual attack on the USSR if they do decide to attack at some point in the future.


In the World of Labor

From Socialist Appeal, Vol. IV No. 23, 8 June 1940, p. 4.
Transcribed & marked up by Einde O’ Callaghan for the Encyclopaedia of Trotskyism On-Line (ETOL).

Gestapo Seizes Our Comrades in the Occupied Countries

Our German comrades have been hard-hit by the advance of the Nazi war machine. Norway, Belgium, Holland &ndash these were centers from which our comrades were able to operate. They owed little thanks for that to the governments of these &ldquodemocracies,&rdquo which made life miserable for the German refugees and, above all, for the revolutionary refugees. Almost invariably our comrades had to operate in these countries under illegal conditions, concealing their identity.

When the Nazis came in, the Gestapo demonstrated its dread efficiency. Its stool pigeons appear to have had prepared lists of anti-Nazi Germans. In addition, however, they seem to have seized every German they could find. Let us hope that our comrades were seized primarily in the general dragnet and the Gestapo doesn&rsquot know just whom they have. Because of this hoped-for possibility it is necessary to conceal the names and number of comrades who were in those countries. All comrades and friends please take note.

French Trotskyists Sent to Prison by the &ldquoDemocratic&rdquo Government

The French press reports that nine Trotskyists who were arrested on the 13th of February, were brought before the 2nd military tribunal presided over by Colonel Jammes on May 7th.

The following sentences were passed, for &ldquoactivities of a nature to hinder national defense&rdquo:

Charles MARGNE, post office employee, 5 years prison, 5,000 fr. fine Pierre BOUSSEL, post office employee, 3 years prison, 1,000 fr. fine Bruno NARDINO, student, 3 years prison, 2,000 fr. fine Marie COSTS, post office employee, 3 years prison, 2,000 fr. fine Mineille FOIRIER, teacher of physical culture, 2 years prison, 1,000 fr. fine Suzanne SIMKHOVITCH, stenographer, 5 years prison, with reprieve Jerzy MILNYNARZ, tailor, 3 years prison, 100 fr. fine, with reprieve Andre CORSET, student, 3 years prison, 200 fr. fine Maurice GUIGNET, turner, 3 years prison with reprieve, 1,000 fr. fine.

Repressions, American apologists for the Allies have said, are being directed only against Russia&rsquos agents. This latest report, coupled with recent prosecutions of leaders of the PSOP &ndash Socialist Party of Workers and Peasants &ndash show what a fraud these apologies are. French &ldquodemocracy&rdquo ferociously persecutes all militant workers.

Canada Outlaws &ldquoCommunism&rdquo Our Comrades Fight On

A Canadian comrade has sent some clippings showing the lengths to which the war-time dictatorship in Canada has already gone. Dated from Ottawa, May 15th, one article states:

&ldquoCommunism came beyond the pale of the law throughout Canada today .

&ldquoUnder the broad powers of the Wartime Defense of Canada regulations, Mr. Justice E.R.E. Chevrier of the Ontario Supreme Court declared formally that the Communist Party of Canada is an illegal organization .

&ldquoThe regulation provides that once an organization has in such manner been declared illegal, not only are all persons continuing as members or officers deemed guilty of an offense against the regulations, but anybody advocating or defending the acts, principles and policies of such an organization is also guilty.

&ldquoThe ban on Communism followed conviction and imprisonment of three Ottawa men on indictments charging publication and circulation of anti-war pamphlets tending to prejudice the safety of the state and efficient prosecution of the war.&rdquo

The Socialist Workers League of Canada, section of the Fourth International, was unable to get a printer to publish its paper from the very first day of the war, and has been functioning on an illegal basis since then. But, despite all obstacles, they fight on.


7 June 1940 - History

With the fall of Paris it was only a matter of time until the French surrendered. Hitler was eager to reach a surrender agreement so that the French would not continue to fight on from their colonies. The French also possessed a potent navy whose help the Germans wanted to deny to the Allies. Hitler presented the French with terms: Germany would occupy two thirds of the country, France would pay for the occupation, meanwhile the French could have a rump state run from Vichy. The French were allowed to keep their overseas empire as well as their navy as long as the navy disarmed.

Hitler insisted that the armistice be signed in the Compiègne Forest in the same railroad car that the Germans had surrendered to the Allies at the end of World War I. When the French tried to modify some of the terms, General Kietel who had taken over the negotiations once Hitler had read the terms said it was take it or leave it. The French army was in no condition to continue to resist and so at 18:36 on June 22nd the French signed the agreement and surrendered. The Germans had lost 27,000 men dead and 111,000 wounded in the six weeks it took to capture France. The French lost 92,000 dead and 200,000 wounded. The British lost about 10,000 men.


1 of 7

June 2, 1951: Gilbert Baker, Designer of the Rainbow Flag, Is Born

In his memoir titled Rainbow Warrior: My Life in Color, Baker writes about how the earlier movement's pink triangle symbol needed to be replaced with something that represented their revolution in the late '70s more accurately.

"As a community, both local and international, gay people were in the midst of an upheaval, a battle for equal rights, a shift in status where we were now demanding power, taking it," he wrote. "This was our new revolution: a tribal, individualistic, and collective vision. It deserved a new symbol."

It was later at San Francisco's Winterland Ballroom when Baker had an epiphany, recalling, "A rainbow. That's the moment when I knew exactly what kind of flag I would make."

"A Rainbow Flag was a conscious choice, natural and necessary. The rainbow came from earliest recorded history as a symbol of hope," he continued, adding, "Now the rioters who claimed their freedom at the Stonewall Bar in 1969 would have their own symbol of liberation."

Baker died of natural causes in March of 2017.


Harbor History Museum Blog

Pt. Fosdick was used until the first Narrows Bridge was opened in July 1940. Deconstruction began a few months later with the expectation that it was unneeded. But, with Galloping Gertie collapsing on November 7, 1940, Washington Navigation Co, who ran the ferries, had to scramble. Owner Bill Skansie told his wife, "We're back in business again!" Ferries began to run the next morning, November 8.

Unfortunately, the ferry landing at Point Fosdick was unusable, so the service was only between Gig Harbor and Pt. Defiance for a few weeks while crews rebuilt the Pt. Fosdick Landing. Then all service shifted between Pt. Fosdick, Fox Island and Titlow Beach, Tacoma. The landing outside the harbor was closed forever.

With the opening of the 1950 bridge, Pt. Fosdick was permanently closed and dismantled. Today there is little trace of the landings or pilings beneath the beautiful homes that grace the hillside.

Linda McCowen, Historic Photo Editor
© 2012 Harbor History Museum. All rights reserved.


Why June 7th Matters in Rock History

It’s June 7th and here are some reasons why this day matters in rock history:

In 1969, Blind Faith made their live debut at London’s Hyde Park. 120-thousand people turned up to see the supergroup featuring Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood, Ginger Baker and Ric Grech strut their stuff at the free show.

In 2008, Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones made a surprise appearance to jam with the Foo Fighters during the band’s gig at London’s Wembley Stadium. They performed “Rock and Roll” and “Ramble On” together.

In 1975, Elton John made history when his album, Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboys, became the first record ever to debut at number one on the charts.

In 2008, 3 Doors Down had the number one album with their self-titled record.

In 2009, after performing the Poison hit “Nothin’ but a Good Time” at the Tony Awards, Bret Michaels got hit by a descending backdrop. It brought him to the ground and caused him to cut his lip and fracture his nose.

In 1990, The Black Crowes played their first-ever gig in the U-K, performing at London’s Marquee.

And in 1964, during their first American tour, the Rolling Stones were booed off stage in San Antonio, Texas. Performing monkeys, who were part of the opening act, were brought back out to the delight of the crowd.


7 June 1940 - History

The 42,784 acres which comprise Camp Roberts have long held the encampments of soldiers. The early Indian tribes of California hunted and lived on this land, and exploration detachments of the colonial Spanish Army mounted scouting parties throughout the area.

Camp Roberts is located on U.S. Highway 101, which follows the old Mission Trail. This is a highly recommended scenic drive for history buffs. The road is still referred to as "El Camino Real", which broadly translates from Spanish as "The Royal Road" or "The King's Highway". Camp Roberts is located north of the historic Mission San Miguel, which in its heyday was one of the best managed of the 21 missions established in Alta California by the Franciscans. It was one of the most productive in grain and livestock. The land which comprises Camp Roberts was, in fact, part of the original holdings of the mission that was founded in 1797.

Political upheavals in Spain and Mexico resulted in a declaration of independence by Mexico in 1826. Soon after, the Mexican government closed down the missions and distributed their vast land holdings to favored individuals and families. One of these land grants became "El Rancho Nacimiento", or "Ranch of the Nativity". Through a series of sub-grants, sales, and leases, "El Ranch Nacimiento" was reduced to about 44,000 acres (the original size of Camp Roberts). While all of these transactions were taking place, the Territory of California was admitted to the United States of America, formalizing American control over the area.

In the middle part of 1902, Congress authorized a study to locate and describe lands suitable for development of new military posts. Among the many sites examined was one referred to as the "Nacimiento Ranch". A board of inquiry was formed, headed by Lieutenant General Nelson A. Miles, who had a reputation as a great Indian fighter.. He reported that the ranch was suitable for one regiment of cavalry. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was ordered to make a detailed survey and report. Their document characterized the area as "healthy as any in the State of California, in addition to its mundane qualities and excellent range and training ground." The price was right, the land was at that time assessed at $5.76 per acre.

The next step would have been the official designation of the surveyed area as a military post undoubtedly that would have been the case, except for a Salinas physician who felt called upon to write to President Theodore Roosevelt. He described the area in most unfavorable terms, writing of alkaline water, wind storms, epidemics and desert heat. He pleaded not to subject U.S. soldiers to such "inhumane conditions." Ironically, the doctor's surname was Roberts, not related to the soldier for whom the site would one day be named. The battle was thus joined correspondence, surveys, charges and countercharges flew back and forth between California and Washington, DC. The original Corps of Engineers report was ultimately sustained, but by then other posts had been established in less controversial areas.

The Army met its training needs through World War I with out the benefit of Camp Roberts. However, the 1902 Corps of Engineers report remained, and the assets the area had to offer for military training were just too obvious to over look. With another world war looming in the horizon, Congress authorized funds for the purchase of land and building of training sites in 1940. The land which is now Camp Roberts was acquired by leasing six adjoining ranches, including Rancho Nacimiento, in 1940. The Army eventually purchased all of the leased parcels plus additional lands, concluding the final purchase in 1943.

Construction of the Main, or West, Garrison cantonment area began 15 November 1940, the first commanding officer was Lieutenant Colonel Oliver Martson, who had rented office space in the Bank of America building in Paso Robles. His "command" consisted of the office, plans and specifications for the construction of the facilities, and a few tents. From these humble beginnings the operation grew to ultimately involve of 8,000 workers in the construction of a training station capable of housing 30,000 trainees at one time.

It was while the site was still under construction that the original name of Camp Nacimiento Replacement Training Center was changed to Camp Roberts, in honor of Corporal Harold W. Roberts, a tank driver in World War I. Corporal Roberts lost his life driving his tank in action in the Montrebeau Forest in northeastern France. The tank fell into a shell crater filled with rainwater while maneuvering to aid another tank. While the tank rapidly filled with water, Corporal Roberts shoved the gunner out, but was unable to get himself out and drowned. For his selfless act, he was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously. In seeking an appropriate name twenty-two years later for a camp with a primary purpose of training new soldiers, the Army remembered Harold Roberts, who was only 19 years old when he laid his life down for his country. Camp Roberts is one of only a few military posts named for an enlisted man, and it is the only such site still in operation.

Camp Roberts officially began it mission as a replacement training center in March 1941. At that time it ranked with the world's largest military training facilities. It may still be so in terms of training capacity, and so far as it is known features the largest parade ground (the length of fourteen football fields) on any military facility.

Camp Roberts military police "escorting" Bob Hope from an on post stage, 1942. (Camp Roberts Historical Museum)

The main Garrison was constructed to accommodate 23,000 officers and troops. The East Garrison, across the Salinas River, could accommodate 6,000 troops. The 26th Field Artillery Brigade was the first unit to occupy the East Garrison.

436,000 World War II Infantry and Field Artillery troops passed through an intensive seventeen week training cycle. Both the Infantry and Field Artillery Replacement Training Centers achieved enviable proficiency records where it counted, in the combat zones around the world to which their graduates were sent. A peak population was reached in 1945 when 45,000 troops were quartered in large tent cities located at the fringes of the Main Garrison

Besides the two Training Centers, Camp Roberts also had a 750-bed hospital complex (also supplemented with tent cities), and internment compounds for Italian and German prisoners of war. Many of the Italian POWs joined a special Army Service Unit after the surrender of Italy, and spent the remainder of the war as workers at Camp Roberts.

It was a different scene on 1 July 1946. With the out processing of returning soldiers from World War II complete, Camp Roberts went from busy city to ghost town literally overnight. The site was inactivated as a training base and reverted to "caretaker" status denoting a skeleton crew of maintenance personnel as the only permanent residents. During the summertime, National Guard and Army Reserve troops conducted fifteen day training cycles throughout the garrison. While retaining all of its value as a military training site, the camp remained inactive remainder of the year, until the onset of the Korean Conflict.

In June 1950, the People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) crossed over a demilitarized zone and invaded the Republic of Korea (South Korea). United Nations (UN) forces quickly responded, and in July 1950 Camp Roberts was again activated for troop training. The 321st Signal Base Depot had the honor of being the first unit to return for training. Camp Roberts chalked up another "first" with the addition of the Armor Replacement Training Center to the Infantry and Field Artillery centers established in World War II. The establishment of the new Armor center made it possible to training replacements for all three combat arms at Camp Roberts. Additionally, the terrain resembled that found in Korea, increasing it value for training for that combat area. The 7th Armored Division was the leading division at Camp Roberts during this period, and its patch was a familiar site in the area. By the end of the fighting in September 1953 approximately 300,000 men completed training there. Upon completion of returnee out processing in 1954, the site reverted once again to "caretaker" status, continuing to train National Guard and Army Reserve units in the summer cycles.

Little activity was sustained at this site from the end of the Korean War to the Vietnam War. During the Vietnam era, Camp Roberts once again bustled with activity, though not on as grand a scale as World War II or the Korean War. The installation was not officially opened, and thus earned the title, "most active 'inactive' post in the U.S.". Camp Roberts supported a variety of operation, including the construction of a satellite communications station as part of a worldwide strategic communications network (the first station of its kind in the world). Additionally, the Army's Combat Development Experimentation Command (CDEC) used the site for weapons testing, and the Navy used one of the live-fire ranges to train gunners for river patrol boats.

Camp Roberts was officially closed by the Army in April 1970. On 2 April 1971, the California Army National Guard received control of the site, under a license from the Army, to establish a Reserve Component Training Center. The site continues to operate in this fashion today, and while reserve component units have priority under National Guard management, military forces from all service branches (and some foreign countries) have trained there. The qualities in the original Army Corps of Engineers study still serve the training needs of the military today, and will continue for the foreseeable future.

To view postcards of Camp Roberts during World War II, CLICK HERE

Army Center of Military Historical Data Card - Camp Roberts Prisoner of War Camp


Watch the video: Jamiroquai - Seven Days In Sunny June