Duke of Edinburgh Class first class armoured cruisers

Duke of Edinburgh Class first class armoured cruisers

Duke of Edinburgh Class first class armoured cruisers

The Duke of Edinburgh class first class cruisers were the first ships of that type designed by Phillip Watts, the designer of HMS Dreadnaught. Like that ship, the Duke of Edinburgh class featured a significant rise in firepower compared to earlier cruisers. Earlier cruisers had been armed with at most two 9.2in guns.

These ships were given six 9.2in guns, each mounted in a separate turret. Two of these turrets were placed fore and aft on the centre line, while the remaining four were placed in wing positions, at each end of the middle third of the ship. Three could be fired at targets to the front or rear, and four in the broadside.

The armoured casemates that had been a feature of British cruisers for some time were abandoned on these ships, and the ten 6in guns were carried in a central armoured battery, five on each side, in the centre of the ship. Unfortunately these ships were not high sides, and so despite being only just below main deck level, these guns were too close to the water and were very hard to use in any even slightly rough weather. In March 1916 they were removed and replaced by three shielded 6in guns on each side of the ship, located on the main deck between the main guns.

These ships also carried a large number of 3pdr guns, designed for use against torpedoes and smaller ships. These had also been used on the previous Devonshire class ships, and were retained on the upcoming Warrior class ships, but were not a particular success.

Both HMS Black Prince and HMS Duke of Edinburgh began the First World War in the Red Sea, before joining the Grand Fleet (December 1914). The Black Prince was sunk with all hands at the battle of Jutland (31 May 1916). The Duke of Edinburgh was also present at Jutland. In 1917 she performed convoy escort duty, and in 1918 was posted to the North America and West Indies Station.

Displacement (loaded)

13,550t

Top Speed

23kts

Armour – deck

1.5in over steering gear
1in main deck
1in over battery
0.75in lower deck

- belt

6in amidships
4in forward

- bulkheads

2in

- 6in battery

6in

- barbettes

6in

- turrets

7.5in front
5.5in sides
4.5in back

- ammo tubes

3in

- conning tower

10in

Length

505ft 6in

Armaments

Six 9.2in guns
Ten 6in quick firing guns
Twenty two 3pdr quick firing guns
Three 18in submerged torpedoes.

Crew complement

790

Launched

1904

Completed

1906

Ships in class

HMS Black Prince
HMS Duke of Edinburgh

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ROYAL NAVY - UNITED KINGDOM

Project history: Provided under the 1902/03 Programme, these ships were the first RN vessels to be designed under the direction of Phillip Watts and showed a substantial change in style over earlier types. In addition, attempts to restrict the size of first class cruisers was finally abandoned and displacement increased to allow for improvements in armament, protection and machinery power. The 234mm gun was re-adopted and fitted in single turrets arranged similarly to those in the Devonshire class except that wing positions were provided abreast the mainmast as well as the foremast. As in the King Edward VII class battleships the 152mm gun casemate protection of earlier ships was abandoned in favour of a central armoured battery on the main deck with ports for five guns on each side the aftermost ports were embrasured, to allow astern fire, but not those forward, presumably to avoid spray problems. Unfortunately the 152mm guns were so close to the waterline that they were unworkable in anything but very calm weather. The reduction of shell-bursting structures reached its final stage in these ships which had clear upper decks without the traditional high bulwarks, but this, combined with a low freeboard, resulted in their being wet amidships although the high forecastle allowed them to maintain a high speed in a seaway.
The 47mm guns were virtually useless as anti-torpedo weapons and their adoption in this and the following class is inexplicable. Eight were mounted on the forward and after superstructures and one on each 234mm turret. Despite the apparent improvements over earlier classes the ineffective secondary battery reduced the value of these ships considerably and they did not enjoy a high reputation.

Ship protection: They had a full length waterline belt which was 152mm thick over 79.3m amidships reducing to 102mm forward and 76mm aft. The central battery had 152mm sides and bulkheads and effectively increased the height of the side armour amidships to the level of the upper deck. The engine room hatch between the lower and main decks was protected by 51mm plating and 51mm screens were provided between the 152mm guns in the battery. The wing barbettes reduced to 76mm behind the battery armour and the turrets had 190mm faces, 140mm sides and 114mm backs. Deck protection was very weak with a 19mm lower deck increasing to 38mm over the steering gear, a 25mm main deck reducing to 19mm under the central battery, and a 25mm upper deck over the battery.

Modernizations: 3.1916, both: - 10 x 1 - 152/50 + 6 x 1 - 152/50 BL Mk XI (in shields between the main deck 234mm turrets).

5/1917, Duke of Edinburgh: - 14 x 1 - 47/50 + 2 x 1 - 152/50 BL Mk XI (in embrasures on the forecastle deck), 1 x 1 - 76/45 20cwt QF Mk I, foremast became tripod.

Naval service: Black Prince was sunk by gunfire from German battleships during the night action at Jutland 31.5.1916, all hands lost.

Many thanks to Wolfgang Stöhr for additional information on this page.


In 1907, these ships, along with the earlier Powerful, Drake, Cressy, and Monmouth classes and battleships of the Majestic, Canopus, London, and Duncan classes, were to land their searchlights from their tops and obtain two additional 24-inch models from their dockyards for placement on the shelter or boat deck. These were to be augmented by (or further upgraded to?) a pair of 36-in searchlights when they became available. [2]

In early 1913, new pattern G. 329 trainer's telescopes of 2.5 power and 20 degree field were issued to these and many other capital ships, to replace the 5/12, 5/15 and 5/21 variable power G.S. telescopes that had previously been in use. [3]

During the war, along with those of other older ships, the four 6-inch guns casemated on the main deck proved of little use in practical sea states, an issue which was also recognized at design stage when the proposed main deck 6-inch deck guns forward had been suppressed and replaced with additional 7.5-inch turrets. The main deck casemates were therefore vacated and plated over, with ships taken in hand as they came in for refits, commencing in September, 1915. The work was expected to take 18 days per ship, although it was hoped this could be reduced to 10 days (G.37973/15). [4] [5] The guns were placed in spray shields, one deck higher on the upper deck abaft the 7.5-in turrets, photographic evidence showing that they replaced numbers three and six 3-pdr Upper Deck guns that previously occupied these positions. [6]

Main Battery

These ships carried a mixed main battery armament:

  • Four 7.5-in Mark I B.L. guns on Mark I mountings with 180 rounds per gun, in single turrets, fore, aft, and each side forward on the beam. [7] Elevation 15 degrees, depression 5 degrees, with range dial graduation limited to 14 degrees 50 seconds for a range of 13,800 yards. [8]
  • Six 6-in Mark VII B.L. guns, on P. III mountings with 200 rounds per gun initially all arranged in casemates, three on each side, with one aft at upper deck level and two at main deck level. 29-lb charges were provided to increase the muzzle velocity of the guns compared to the standard charge. Each pair of guns was also provided with a 3-pdr sub-calibre gun for firing practice. [9] Elevation 15 degrees, depression 7 degrees, with range dial graduation limited to 14 degrees for a range of 11,900 yards. [10]

The 6-in sights were similar to those in Albemarle and Cornwall, but sturdier. Range gearing constant was 51.41 with one knot of deflection being 2.77 arc minutes. Range dials were provided for 2730 fps, 1970 fps, 3-pdr sub-caliber, 1-in aiming rifle and .303-in aiming rifle. MV correction by adjustable pointer for +/- 50 fps. Deflection dial graduated for 2730 fps at 3000 yards. Drift correction by inclining the sight 1.5 degrees. The sights were 14.45 inches above the bore and 13.1 inches to the side. [11]

In February, 1913, these 6-in mountings, along with many other 4-in and 6-in mountings in various capital ships and cruisers were to have illumination added for their training index racers. [12]

Secondary Battery

  • Twenty 3-pdr Vickers Mark I Q.F. semi-automatic guns, on Mark II mountings with 250 rounds per gun, two guns on top of the 7.5-in turrets, seven down each side of the upper deck and four mounted on the shelter deck aft. [13] Elevation 20 degrees, depression 20 degrees, with range dial graduation limited to 11 degrees 45 seconds for a range of 6,000 yards. The sight travel was also limited to 12.5 degrees. These guns were also provided with blank charges for saluting. [14]

Other Guns

By 1914 the minor armament was:

  • One 12-pdr 8 cwt Q.F. Gun on G.I Mounting for use in a sailing launch, with alternative field carriage for landing parties, [15] allocated 300 rounds. [16]
  • Five Maxim Guns for use in the boats, with two alternative field stands for landing parties. [17][18]

Torpedoes

  • Two 18-in submerged broadside tubes forward, depressed three degrees and bearing abeam axis of tube was 7 foot 6 inches below load water line and 1 feet 6 inches above deck. [19] By 1914 nine torpedoes were carried. In addition four 14-in torpedoes were carried. These were for use with dropping gear from the boats. [20]

Contents

The four armoured cruisers of the 1903–1904 Naval Programme were originally intended to be repeats of the preceding Duke of Edinburgh class, but complaints from the fleet that the low placement of the secondary armament of earlier ships of this type meant that the guns could not be fought in anything other than a dead calm sea caused the issue to be reviewed by the Board of Admiralty in late 1903 and early 1904. Based on the Duke of Edinburghs, the Warriors were expected to be lighter, which allowed weight to be used for changing the secondary armament. Officers from the fleet suggested changing the armament to four 7.5-inch (191 mm) guns in single-gun turrets raised to the upper deck. As the ships had only just begun construction, the change would cost a total of £250,000 for all four ships and the Admiralty approved the change on 30 March 1904. [1]

The Warrior-class ships were designed to displace 13,550 long tons (13,770 t), but they proved to be lighter as built, even after the change in armament, displacing 13,200–13,350 long tons (13,410–13,560 t) at normal load and 14,500 long tons (14,700 t) (fully loaded). [2] The ships had an overall length of 505 feet 6 inches (154.1 m) and a length between perpendiculars of 480 ft (146.3 m). They had a beam of 73 feet 6 inches (22.4 m) and a deep draught of 26 feet 6 inches (8.1 m) forward and 27 feet 6 inches (8.4 m) aft. [3]

The ships' complement was 770 officers and enlisted men. [3] They were much steadier gun platforms than their predecessors with a metacentric height of 2.75 feet (0.8 m) [4] So much so that Achilles and Natal were the best-shooting ships in the fleet in 1907 and 1909 respectively. Very good sea boats, according to naval historian Oscar Parkes, "they gained the reputation of being the best cruisers we (the British) ever built." [5]

The cruisers were powered by two 4-cylinder triple-expansion steam engines, each driving one shaft, which produced a total of 23,500 indicated horsepower (17,520 kW) and gave a maximum speed of 23 knots (43 km/h 26 mph). The engines were powered by steam from 19 Yarrow boilers and six cylindrical boilers that had a working pressure of 225 psi (1,551 kPa 16 kgf/cm 2 ). [6] The ships carried a maximum of 2,050 long tons (2,080 t) of coal [7] and an additional 600 long tons (610 t) of fuel oil that was sprayed on the coal to increase its burn rate. At full capacity, they could steam for 7,960 nautical miles (14,740 km 9,160 mi) at a speed of 10 knots (19 km/h 12 mph). [8]

Armament Edit

The Warriors' main armament consisted of six 45-calibre BL 9.2-inch Mk X guns in single-gun turrets. The guns were distributed in two centreline turrets, one each fore and one aft of the superstructure, and four wing turrets disposed in the corners about the funnels. The centreline turrets could traverse a total of 285° while the wing turrets were limited to 120° on the broadside due to muzzle blast. [9] The gun had an elevation range of −5° to +15°. The 9.2-inch (234 mm) shell weighed 380 pounds (172.4 kg) and was fired at a maximum muzzle velocity of 2,778 ft/s (847 m/s). This gave it a range of 15,500 yards (14,200 m) at maximum elevation. The gun's rate of fire was about three rounds per minute [10] and the ships carried 100 rounds for each gun. [3]

Their secondary armament of four 50-calibre BL 7.5-inch Mk II guns was arranged in four turrets amidships. The guns could only traverse about 110° on the broadside. [9] They had an elevation range of −7.5° to +15° that gave them a range of 14,238 yards (13,019 m) at an elevation with their 200-pound (90.7 kg) shell. The guns had a rate of fire of about four rounds per minute [11] and each gun was provided with 100 rounds. [3]

Twenty-four Vickers quick-firing (QF) 3-pounder guns were fitted for defence against torpedo boats, six on turret roofs and eighteen in the superstructure, all on pivot mounts. These guns were too small to be useful against the torpedo boats before they got within torpedo range. [12] They fired a 47-millimetre (1.9 in) shell that weighed 3.3 pounds (1.5 kg) and was fired at a maximum muzzle velocity of 2,587 ft/s (789 m/s). This gave it a range of 7,550 yards (6,900 m) at an elevation of +20°. [13] 250 rounds were carried for each gun. [3]

The ships also mounted three submerged 18-inch torpedo tubes. [7] [Note 1] They carried a total of eighteen torpedoes in addition to the six 14-inch (356 mm) torpedoes that could be used by the two 45-foot (13.7 m) steam pinnaces. [15]

Armour Edit

The Warrior-class ships had a 6-inch (152 mm) waterline armour belt of Krupp cemented armour that covered 260 feet (79.2 m) of the hull amidships. [7] It covered the side of the ship up to the upper deck, a height of 14 feet 6 inches (4.42 m) above the waterline and reached 4 feet 10 inches (1.47 m) below it. Between the central citadel and the bow, the belt armour was 4 inches (102 mm) thick and it extended to the stern with a thickness of 3 inches (76 mm). Transverse bulkheads six inches thick protected the citadel from raking fire. [16]

The faces of the main gun turrets were 7.5 inches thick with 5.5-inch (140 mm) sides and a 2-inch (51 mm) roof. [17] The secondary gun turrets were a newer design and had armour 6–8-inch (152–203 mm) thick and the same roof thickness as the other turrets. [11] The barbettes were protected by six inches of armour as were the ammunition hoists, although the armour for those thinned to three inches between the armour belt. The thickness of the lower deck was only .75 inches (19 mm) except for a patch of 1.5-inch (38 mm) armour over the steering gear and another 2 inches (51 mm) thick over the engine cylinders. [7] The sides of the conning tower were 10 inches (254 mm) thick. [2]

Modifications Edit

Only the modifications for Cochrane are known in detail, but it is likely that her sisters received the same modifications at some point. The funnels proved to be too short in service and they were raised around 1912 to keep the superstructure free of smoke in a following wind. A single Hotchkiss QF 6-pounder anti-aircraft gun on a high-angle mounting was mounted on the quarterdeck in 1915. [18] It had a maximum depression of 8° and a maximum elevation of 60°. The gun fired a 6-pound (2.7 kg) shell at a muzzle velocity of 1,765 ft/s (538 m/s) at a rate of fire of 20 rounds per minute. They had a maximum ceiling of 10,000 ft (3,000 m), but an effective range of only 1,200 yards (1,100 m). [19] It was replaced by a QF 3 inch 20 cwt [Note 2] guns on a high-angle mount in 1916. [18] This gun had a maximum depression of 10° and a maximum elevation of 90°. It fired a 12.5-pound (5.7 kg) shell at a muzzle velocity of 2,500 ft/s (760 m/s) at a rate of 12–14 rounds per minute. It had a maximum effective ceiling of 23,500 ft (7,200 m). [20] A pair of Vickers QF three-pounders on high-angle mountings were probably installed amidships during 1915–16. [18] They could elevate to +80° and depress to -5°. This gun had a rate of fire of 25 rounds per minute and a maximum ceiling of 15,000 ft (4,600 m), but an effective range of only 2,000 yards (1,800 m). [21]

The guns on top of Cochrane ' s centreline 9.2-inch turrets were removed in 1915–16. The aftermost 3-pounder guns on the superstructure were removed during 1917 as well as the guns on top of the forward 9.2-inch wing turrets. This reduced her total to twenty 3-pounder guns, excluding the AA guns. Cochrane ' s foremast was converted to a tripod mast to support the weight of a fire-control director in 1917, but the director was not actually fitted until August 1918. [18]

Construction data
Ship Builder Laid down [22] Launched [22] Completed [22] Cost
(including armament) [2]
Warrior HM Dockyard, Pembroke 5 Nov 1903 25 Nov 1905 12 Dec 1906 £1,186,395
Cochrane Fairfield Shipping and Engineering, Govan 24 Mar 1904 20 May 1905 18 Feb 1907 £1,193,121
Achilles Armstrong Whitworth, Elswick 22 Feb 1904 17 Jun 1905 22 Apr 1907 £1,191,103
Natal Vickers, Barrow-in-Furness 6 Jan 1904 30 Sep 1905 5 Mar 1907 £1,218,244

After completion, the four sisters were assigned to the cruiser squadrons of the Channel and Home Fleets. Natal and Cochrane escorted the royal yacht in 1911–12 for the newly crowned King George V's trip to India to attend the Delhi Durbar [23] and Natal carried the body of the U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, Whitelaw Reid, back to New York City in December 1912. [24] Warrior was transferred to the 1st Cruiser Squadron of the Mediterranean Fleet in 1913. [25]

At the beginning of World War I, Natal, Achilles and Cochrane were assigned to the 2nd Cruiser Squadron of the Grand Fleet and Warrior was in the Mediterranean. The latter ship was involved in the pursuit of the Goeben and Breslau, but the squadron commander, Rear Admiral Ernest Troubridge, declined to engage the German ships. Warrior remained in the Mediterranean until she was assigned the Grand Fleet in December 1914 [23] and rejoined the 1st Cruiser Squadron. The other three ships remained with the 2nd Cruiser Squadron for most of their careers and did not participate in any of the early naval battles of the war. [25] Natal was sunk by a magazine explosion near Cromarty on 30 December 1915, killing an estimated 390–421 persons on board. Most of her wreck was slowly salvaged over the decades until the remnants were demolished in the 1970s so they were no longer a hazard to navigation. [26]

Achilles was refitting in May 1916 and did not participate in the Battle of Jutland although both of her surviving sisters did. [23] Warrior was heavily damaged by German capital ships during the battle, [27] losing 71 crewmen killed and 36 wounded. She took on a lot of water and foundered the following morning after her crew was evacuated. [28] The 2nd Cruiser Squadron was not engaged during the battle and did not fire a shot. [29] Achilles was assigned blockade duties in the North Sea after the battle and sank the German raider Leopard in early 1917. [30] Both of the surviving ships were briefly transferred to the North America and West Indies Station in late 1917 for convoy escort duties before returning home in early 1918. [18] [31] Achilles began a lengthy refit in February 1918 [25] while Cochrane was based in Murmansk in mid-1918 during the Allied intervention in the Russian Civil War. She became stranded in the Mersey on 14 November 1918 and broke in two. The wreck was broken up in place by June 1919. [18] Achilles, the last surviving sister, became a training ship in late 1918 and was sold for scrap in May 1921. [32]


British cruiser bad history, featuring the amazing time (and space) traveller, Joseph Conrad

That popular game of nautical nonsense, World of Warships, has recently announced the addition of several Royal Navy ships to the game in an upcoming patch. As a massive fan of the RN, I of course had to search out details of this, and found this video by Youtube's The Mighty Jingles. While it's a good rundown of the ships to be added to the game, it's full of bad history.

Our first bit of badhistory comes at 5:00 minutes in, when discussing HMS Danae. (A transcript from the video follows)

What I can tell you about the Danae is that in 1944 she was transferred to the Polish Navy as the ORP Conrad, and commissioned at a ceremony in the shipyard of Gdansk. Her Captain went by the name of Joseph Konrad Korzeniowski although he was more commonly known after WW2 by his penname of Joseph Conrad.

This contains two main inaccuracies. While Danae was transferred to the Polish Navy in 1944, this didn't happen at Gdansk. Gdansk was still under the control of the Germans in October 1944, when this transferral happened. Additionally, she wouldn't have been given over to the Poles at Gdansk even if it had been under the control of an Allied power for two main reasons. Firstly, the Germans still controlled the only routes into the Baltic from the North Sea, as they would hold Denmark and Norway right up until VE Day. This made it exceptionally difficult for the RN to operate within the Baltic - the only ships that did were blockade runners converted from fast motor gunboats. A cruiser wouldn't have stood a chance. Secondly, the only Allied power that could have captured Gdansk would have been the Soviet Union. They wouldn't have looked favourably on the transferral of an RN ship to the London-sponsored Polish government-in-exile occurring in a shipyard under their control. The Soviets had their own puppet Polish government, the Polish Committee of National Liberation, which they viewed as the only legal government of Poland. They wouldn't have wanted to legitimise the London Polish government in such a way. Danae was actually transferred to the Polish Navy at the British port of Portsmouth.

The second major inaccuracy is that Joseph Conrad had absolutely no involvement with HMS Danae. By the time Danae had taken his name, he had been dead for 20 years. He never served in either the Royal Navy or Polish Navy, spending his entire career at sea in the merchant marine. He had retired from this career in 1894, 22 years before HMS Danae was even laid down.

The second section to which I take objection comes when he discusses HMS Edinburgh, at about 11:45 minutes in.

Most of her duties involved escorting convoys to and from the USSR via the perilous North Atlantic Convoy Route, and it was while returning from one of these convoys that she was hit and sunk by a torpedo fired by a German U-boat.

This massively oversimplifies the loss of Edinburgh. Firstly, it implies that she was sailing alone when hit. In fact, she was escorting QP11, a convoy travelling the return route from Murmansk to the UK. Secondly, the submarine, U-456, hit her with two torpedoes, not one. Both struck on the starboard side, with one causing major flooding, and the other effectively blowing her stern off. However, despite the heavy damage done to her, she would stay afloat for two more days, from the 30th April 1942 to the 2nd May 1942. During this period, several British destroyers and minesweepers attempted to tow her back to Murmansk for repairs. However, on the 2nd, this operation would be interrupted by the arrival of three German destroyers. Her escort engaged them, as did Edinburgh, even though she was still effectively crippled. She managed to sink one, the Hermann Schoemann, but was struck by another torpedo, almost directly opposite her first torpedo hit. This scuppered all attempts to salvage her, with heavy flooding forwards, the power cut to the forward section of the ship, and her boiler rooms beginning to flood. Her crew was taken off, and she was scuttled by torpedoes from HMS Foresight.

Our third inaccuracy comes at about 15:30 minutes in. Here, he's discussing the Tier X, which is HMS Minotaur. He correctly identifies that the ship Wargaming (WoWS's developers) have released screenshots of is not one of the ships so named that were actually completed, and nor is she HMS Newcastle (which he claims have been named Minotaur before the name-change - though actually this honour went to HMS Southampton). He then incorrectly concludes that "Wargaming have made this one up". This is incorrect. The Minotaur Wargaming are developing is a post-war design, planned as a replacement for the cancelled Neptune class from 1946. It was heavily inspired by the American Worcester class of cruisers, which had a heavy armament of 6in dual purpose guns. The design was to use a similar hull to the previously designed Neptunes, mounting five twin 6in turrets rather than the four triples on the Neptune class. The twin mounts to be used were the Mark XXVI mountings later used on the Tiger-class cruisers. Fully automatic, and theoretically capable of a rate of fire of 20 rounds/minute, they were an excellent dual-purpose mount, though somewhat affected by technical issues. Their secondary armament was to be eight twin 3in/70cal Mark VI mounts, again as later used on the Tiger class ( The gun was a joint American/British development, though both nations used their own designs for the mountings). The planned displacement of the Minotaur class was 15,280 tonnes, and a speed of 31.5 knots was planned. While they would have been very capable ships, they were also expensive. The weak post-war British economy could not afford such extravagant spending, and they were cancelled by 1949, (though as noted above, the work done on their armament was reused on the Tigers). Their cancellation really marked the end of British all-gun cruiser construction - the Tigers were a simple modernisation and completion of ships left uncompleted at the end of WW2, and while designs were forthcoming in the future, no more would be as heavily worked out. The final death knell to the British gun cruiser came in 1959, when the first missile armed County-class destroyers were laid down.

The fourth thing I feel is bad history comes at about 17 and a half minutes in, when discussing British heavy cruisers. While Jingles is correct that the RN only built three classes of heavy cruiser, this doesn't mean that Wargaming couldn't put together enough heavy cruisers to build a separate line. Firstly, the County class was composed of three separate sub-classes. While the differences were rather minor, it's possible that Wargaming could work with them - HMS London received a major refit, setting her completely apart from her sister ships, for example. Secondly, this ignores older British cruisers - the old armoured cruisers of the 1890s and 1900s. These ships have been included in the game before, with ships like the St Louis, a contemporary of the British Duke of Edinburgh and Warrior classes. Finally, it ignores several cancelled designs. The Atlantic Cruiser designs of 1913 represent a missing link between the older concept of the separate light and armoured cruiser to the post-war Hawkins class, arguably the first heavy cruiser. Itɽ be great to see one of them in game. There were also several designs for heavy cruisers produced during the war, with three main designs being produced in 1939, 1940 and 1941, all with nine 8in guns in triple turrets (though a 22,000 tonne monster armed with 12 9.2in guns was also investigated). The RN produced plenty of ships and designs that could fit into a heavy cruiser branch in WoWS, especially since Wargaming have shown themselves to be no stranger to paper designs.

The final thing I want to complain about comes throughout the video. There is a constant assumption that 8in/203mm guns are a better armament for cruisers than 6in/152mm guns. While this may be true in the game, it was not true in real life. The 8in gun had an advantage over the 6in in range and armour penetration. However, the 6in had an advantage in rate of fire, and in throw weight. A twin 8in turret could fit into the same amount of space as a triple 6in turret, so a ship with four turrets would have four extra barrels if armed with 6in guns over 8in. The typical rate of fire for a British 8in gun was 3-4 rounds/min, compared to 6-8 for a 6in gun. War experience showed that the range and armour penetration advantages of the 8in mattered little in real-life situations. The 6in could reach the limit of effective fire control - the longer range of the 8in gave little advantage, as its shells couldn't be accurately placed at such range. In any case, most battles were fought well within the range of the 8in, neutralising its advantage. There were very few targets sufficiently well armoured that a 6in gun couldn't penetrate, but an 8in gun could. However, I recognise that WoWS really doesn't represent naval warfare well, and so these factors may not be taken into account. Given this, it is possible that Jingles is correct within the narrow context of the game.

Nelson to Vanguard: Warship Design and Development 1923-1945, David K. Brown, Seaforth, 2012

Rebuilding the Royal Navy: Warship Design Since 1945, David K Brown, George Moore, Seaforth 2012

British Cruisers: Two World Wars and After, Norman Friedman, Seaforth 2010


Devonshire-class cruisers (1903)

The Devonshire - class cruiser was a group of six armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. All ships of the class
HMS Devonshire was the lead ship of her class of six armoured cruiser built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. She was assigned
was a Devonshire - class armoured cruiser built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. She was assigned to the 1st Cruiser Squadron
of six Devonshire - class armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. She was assigned to the 3rd Cruiser Squadron
Two classes of cruiser of the Royal Navy are known as the Devonshire class The Devonshire class of six ships launched in 1903 1904. A subclass of four
the term first class cruiser being used instead for both armoured cruisers and large protected cruisers Thus, the first class cruisers built between the
of six Devonshire - class armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. She was assigned to the 1st Cruiser Squadron
The Monmouth class was a ten - ship class of 10, 000 - ton armoured cruisers built around 1901 to 1903 for the Royal Navy and designed specifically for commerce
The Duke of Edinburgh - class cruiser was a class of two armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. They were the
of six Devonshire - class armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. She was assigned to the 1st Cruiser Squadron
of six Devonshire - class armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. She was assigned to the 1st Cruiser Squadron
HMS Amethyst was a third - class protected cruiser of the Topaze class of the Royal Navy. She was launched in 1903 served during World War I at the Dardanelles

County Antrim in Northern Ireland: HMS Antrim 1903 was a Devonshire - class armoured cruiser launched in 1903 She served in World War I and was broken up
HMS Hampshire 1903 was a Devonshire - class armoured cruiser launched in 1903 and sunk by a mine in 1916. HMS Hampshire D06 was a County - class guided missile
of the 1920s were originally classed as light cruisers until the London Treaty forced their redesignation. Heavy cruisers continued in use until after
HMS Powerful was the lead ship of her class of two protected cruisers built for the Royal Navy RN in the 1890s. She was initially assigned to the China
design was significantly larger than the previous Monmouth and Devonshire - class cruisers mounting a heavier main armament of six 9.2 in 234 mm guns
stern. Natal was ordered as part of the 1903 04 naval construction programme as the second of four armoured cruisers She was laid down on 6 January 1904
ISBN 0 - 7136 - 2670 - 4 Transactions of the Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, Literature and Art, vol. 19 Devonshire Press, 1887 p. 40 William
SMS Erzherzog Karl 912, 500 Armoured Cruisers SMS Kaiser Karl VI 429, 000 SMS Sankt Georg 581, 585 Light Cruisers SMS Zenta 143, 780 Pre - dreadnoughts Bouvet
Launches Trial Trips The Marine Engineer. 25: 109. June 1, 1903 Aran class coast defence ships 1902 - 1904 - Swedish Navy Sweden www.navypedia
The TB 114 - class was a class of four 160 - foot torpedo boats built for the British Royal Navy in 1903 1905 by the shipbuilder J. Samuel White. All four

First World War, Holbrook was serving as a gunnery officer aboard HMS Devonshire He was promoted commander on 31 December 1914, and then served successively
the cruiser HMS Devonshire and the Second Cruiser Squadron represented Great Britain s Royal Navy, battleships Tsesarevich and Slava with cruisers Admiral
Norwegian Government were evacuated from Tromso on 7 June aboard HMS Devonshire with a total of 461 passengers. This evacuation became extremely costly
Angeles - class SSN in Crash Dive, 1996 Deep Quest DSV in Raise the Titanic, 1980 HMS Defiant frigate in H.M.S. Defiant, 1962 HMS Devonshire British
Cancelled 1863. Warrior class broadside ironclads Warrior 1860 preserved Portsmouth Black Prince 1861 renamed Emerald 1903 renamed Impregnable III
Reina del Pacifico. The County - class heavy cruisers HMS Devonshire and Norfolk led an escort that included two light cruisers two RN destroyers and four
Squadron Warspite, Barham, and Malaya 1st Cruiser Squadron Devonshire Shropshire, and Sussex 3rd Cruiser Squadron Arethusa, Penelope, Galatea Rear
including the latest class of fleet submarines currently under construction by BAE Systems Submarine Solutions, utilising the massive Devonshire Dock Hall. Some

  • The Devonshire - class cruiser was a group of six armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. All ships of the class
  • HMS Devonshire was the lead ship of her class of six armoured cruiser built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. She was assigned
  • was a Devonshire - class armoured cruiser built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. She was assigned to the 1st Cruiser Squadron
  • of six Devonshire - class armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. She was assigned to the 3rd Cruiser Squadron
  • Two classes of cruiser of the Royal Navy are known as the Devonshire class The Devonshire class of six ships launched in 1903 1904. A subclass of four
  • the term first class cruiser being used instead for both armoured cruisers and large protected cruisers Thus, the first class cruisers built between the
  • of six Devonshire - class armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. She was assigned to the 1st Cruiser Squadron
  • The Monmouth class was a ten - ship class of 10, 000 - ton armoured cruisers built around 1901 to 1903 for the Royal Navy and designed specifically for commerce
  • The Duke of Edinburgh - class cruiser was a class of two armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. They were the
  • of six Devonshire - class armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. She was assigned to the 1st Cruiser Squadron
  • of six Devonshire - class armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. She was assigned to the 1st Cruiser Squadron
  • HMS Amethyst was a third - class protected cruiser of the Topaze class of the Royal Navy. She was launched in 1903 served during World War I at the Dardanelles
  • County Antrim in Northern Ireland: HMS Antrim 1903 was a Devonshire - class armoured cruiser launched in 1903 She served in World War I and was broken up
  • HMS Hampshire 1903 was a Devonshire - class armoured cruiser launched in 1903 and sunk by a mine in 1916. HMS Hampshire D06 was a County - class guided missile
  • of the 1920s were originally classed as light cruisers until the London Treaty forced their redesignation. Heavy cruisers continued in use until after
  • HMS Powerful was the lead ship of her class of two protected cruisers built for the Royal Navy RN in the 1890s. She was initially assigned to the China
  • design was significantly larger than the previous Monmouth and Devonshire - class cruisers mounting a heavier main armament of six 9.2 in 234 mm guns
  • stern. Natal was ordered as part of the 1903 04 naval construction programme as the second of four armoured cruisers She was laid down on 6 January 1904
  • ISBN 0 - 7136 - 2670 - 4 Transactions of the Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, Literature and Art, vol. 19 Devonshire Press, 1887 p. 40 William
  • SMS Erzherzog Karl 912, 500 Armoured Cruisers SMS Kaiser Karl VI 429, 000 SMS Sankt Georg 581, 585 Light Cruisers SMS Zenta 143, 780 Pre - dreadnoughts Bouvet
  • Launches Trial Trips The Marine Engineer. 25: 109. June 1, 1903 Aran class coast defence ships 1902 - 1904 - Swedish Navy Sweden www.navypedia
  • The TB 114 - class was a class of four 160 - foot torpedo boats built for the British Royal Navy in 1903 1905 by the shipbuilder J. Samuel White. All four
  • First World War, Holbrook was serving as a gunnery officer aboard HMS Devonshire He was promoted commander on 31 December 1914, and then served successively
  • the cruiser HMS Devonshire and the Second Cruiser Squadron represented Great Britain s Royal Navy, battleships Tsesarevich and Slava with cruisers Admiral
  • Norwegian Government were evacuated from Tromso on 7 June aboard HMS Devonshire with a total of 461 passengers. This evacuation became extremely costly
  • Angeles - class SSN in Crash Dive, 1996 Deep Quest DSV in Raise the Titanic, 1980 HMS Defiant frigate in H.M.S. Defiant, 1962 HMS Devonshire British
  • Cancelled 1863. Warrior class broadside ironclads Warrior 1860 preserved Portsmouth Black Prince 1861 renamed Emerald 1903 renamed Impregnable III
  • Reina del Pacifico. The County - class heavy cruisers HMS Devonshire and Norfolk led an escort that included two light cruisers two RN destroyers and four
  • Squadron Warspite, Barham, and Malaya 1st Cruiser Squadron Devonshire Shropshire, and Sussex 3rd Cruiser Squadron Arethusa, Penelope, Galatea Rear
  • including the latest class of fleet submarines currently under construction by BAE Systems Submarine Solutions, utilising the massive Devonshire Dock Hall. Some

Devonshire class cruiser 1903 pedia.

Figure 3.10: Devonshire class cruiser deck plan and side elevation. 174 Map 4.3: Naval Station boundaries from August 1903 including submarine and. Full text of Commercial and Financial Chronicle October 31, 1903. The Ehrenfels class Hilfskreuzer is a German auxiliary cruiser. the heavy cruiser HMS Devonshire was eventually able to intercept her when she met a EHRENFELS Type: Cargo Ship Launched: 24 07 1903 Completed:. Daily capital journal. Salem, Or. 1903 1919, September 25, 1914. Succeeded by: Devonshire class. In commission: 1903–1921. Completed: 10. Lost: 2. Scrapped: 8. General characteristics. Type: Armoured cruiser. Congressional record sen ate. US Government Publishing Office. Two classes of cruiser of the Royal Navy are known as the Devonshire class: The Devonshire class of six ships launched in 1903–1904. A subclass of four ships.

Image 9 of The New York herald New York, August 4, 1903.

1st Class Cruisers Edgar Blake switched, Devonshire Powerful its after you upgrade the main armament as per the 1903 04 refit to a. Medals, Orders and Decorations Morton and Eden. 28 71 Where and when were the NEW ORLEANS class US Heavy cruisers 4​ When Cunningham1 s force for the evacuation of Namsos YORK, DEVONSHIRE, By 1903 the armament was 3 170mm and 6 150mm guns un changed. Britain 7.45 19 cm Mark I NavWeaps. An inboard cruiser that is longer than 15 m 50 feet is usually called a motor In 1904 the American Power Boat Association founded 1903 instituted the Each division has a number of classes, depending mostly on piston displacement. a race from Cowes on the Isle of Wight to Torquay in Devonshire after 1969 the.

Improve Britains cruiser destroyer fleet 1900 to 1918 Page 4.

Category:Devonshire class cruisers 1903. media category. In more languages. Spanish. No label defined. categoria de media. Traditional Chinese. Cruiser Page 2 Mili. The Superb was a Bellerophon class battleship. On 27 January 1914 Robert joined HMS Hampshire, a Devonshire class armoured cruiser, on the China another Armstrong Whitworth vessel, launched on 24 September 1903 at Elswick​. HMS Roxburgh 1904 Project Gutenberg Self Publishing eBooks. The Devonshire class cruiser was a group of six armoured cruisers. HMS Vanguard, one of the British Audacious class. The wrought iron and wood armor of. Page 6 Indianapolis Journal 23 October 1903 Hoosier State. TIIE INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1903. eas 2 with the Duke of Devonshires vase the largest Blue John vase ever made which is The second class pro tected cruiser Denver was given her official trial this afternoon. HMS Hampshire 1903. Builder: Armstrong Whitworth, Elswick. Laid. All about British Cruisers of the Victorian Era by Norman Friedman. LibraryThing is a cataloging Devonshire class cruiser 1903. Drake class cruiser. Duke of.

Category:Devonshire class cruiser 1903 media Commons.

Devonshire class cruiser Броненосные крейсера типа Девоншир. Joseph chamberlain. HMS Hampshire 1903. For other ships with the same name, see HMS Hampshire. HMS Hampshire was one of six Devonshire class armoured cruisers built for. British First Class Cruiser Development 1884 CiteSeerX. Cartoon: A CoNSTITUTIONAL FEAST, 29 June 1903. 307. Cartoon: THE whole Working Class waited with mounting impatience for the grant of Old Age it should remain British, and that at least one half of the ships built, in the future, for the Later that same evening, Balfour saw the Duke of Devonshire, still the titular. Leading Stoker Frederick Frank Bean Kent In WW1. Continued: he was awarded a $20.00 scholarship in January 1903 for overall performance. Hampshire, a Devonshire class armed cruiser. He was on board​.

Henry Burrell and the SAGE Journals.

HMS Lynx 1913 HMS Lynx was an Acasta class destroyer of the Royal Navy. 58 11 Jul, 1899 – 1 Oct, 1899 Captain of H.M.S. Hasty 21 Jul, 1903 – 18 Aug. Devon husband of Emily Dorothea Cole, of The Cedars, Sidmouth, Devon. to Rear Admiral Sir Christopher Cradock, K.C.V.O., C.B., 4th Cruiser Squadron. Operation of the Admiral Scheer. 31.01.1903. 31.12.1903. UK on one side and a first class cruiser on the other. Devonshire Gardens in Glasgows west end, where he lived with his mother. Commander John Francis Herbert Cole Royal Navy, HMS Lynx. The Devonshire class cruiser was a group of six armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. All ships of the class served in​.

Motorboat Britannica.

No. No. Marmora armed merchant cruiser. 10509 sunk by submarine off S coast of Ireland sunk. Ireland. 16.07.1918. 1903. No. No. Strathmore. Hms black prince Lifestyle Property Management. In May 1904 became KUBAN Russian military cruiser. Scrapped 1907. Resumed Liverpool NY route Apr. 1903 2nd and 3rd class only la Devonshire, 1848, Swallowtail Line, 1.150 tons, 3 masts. Dominion, 1894. Devonshire class cruiser 1903. George Ansons voyage, appallingly costly in men and ships, did not result in new course, making for the heart of the Caroline Islands. This led to a FRANCIS DRAKE was born near Tavistock, in Devonshire, in the 1540s. ​possibly as 1903. Staniukovich. MIKHAIL. NIKOLAEVICH. STANIUKOVICH. The sinking of HMS Hampshire and death of Lord Kitchener Our. HMS Hampshire was one of six Devonshireclass armoured cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century She was.

Devonshire class cruiser pedia.

Ships and Shipping Handbook 1903 Free download as PDF File.pdf, established, and has resulted in producing a class of ships which, ton for instrumental in drawing the declaration from the Duke of Devonshire,. Devonshire class cruiser D R Period. Since the exact route and course of the convoy was not known, this alone the ​Devonshire, Dorsetshire, Shropshire and two light cruisers,. WW2 ROYAL NAVY Cruiser HMS Devonshire forward Guns 3. Cruisers In this version of history the number of cruisers built for the Royal cruisers carried the Monmouth class armament in a Devonshire class hull. say in 1902 1903 and for him to go TURBINES ON EVERYTHING!. British Cruisers of the Victorian Era by Norman Friedman. HMS Cambrian 2nd Class Cruiser 1 August 1903 – 25 May 1904. HMS St. George 1st Class Cruiser 26 May 1904 – 23 January 1905. HMS Devonshire.

HMS Antrim devonshire class armoured cruiser of the royal navy.

HMS Black Prince was a Dido class light cruiser of the Royal Navy, of the Bellona subgroup. Companylta Blackwallista, missa koli laskettiin 3. kesakuuta 1903. previous Monmouth and Devonshireclass cruisers, mounting a heavier main. Ships and Shipping Handbook 1903 Tonnage Mast Sailing. The ten ships of the Lancaster class, 1903 4, had 6 inch. twin. turret mounts with The six vessels of the Devonshire class, 1904 5, carry four single. 7.5 incb​. Prelude to Dreadnought ETD OhioLINK. O Bloomington Quincy Week ending October at 1903. Of course we cannot make any ket. late are the real instruments of the and including: Tliree battleships and one cruiser for the United States Government INVESTMENT BROKERS, HI6HM8T GRADE RAILROAD 29 Wall Street Devonshire Street, BOSTON. CO.

Drake Class Cruiser 1901 The Dreadnought Project.

Historic Oregon News. Следующая Войти Настройки. Devonshire class Distant Guns: Jutland Fandom. 1925 SUFFREN Leader of a class of four heavy cruisers which entered service with were four armored cruisers built for the United States Navy between 1903 and 1906. 1927 HMS DEVONSHIRE One of the second class of cruisers to be​. Ships starting with V Historical RFA. People also search for.

Select Bibliography Cambridge University Press.

09 01 1903. 1903. States cruisers Brooklyn and San tne week for DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE TO vv RETIRE enough to exclude the latter class in branches aa follows: either case​. Tiering Experiment: 30 Tiers 1870 to 1950 Revived Battleship. Britain Suffolk AC 1903 Kent 3rd Cruiser 4 Armored Cruisers: Devonshire Class 11 Cruiser 4 old 3rd Class Cruisers: Eclipse Class. 9780824883942 ScholarSpace. HMS Hampshire was one of six Devonshire class armoured cruisers shipyard on 1 September 1902 and launched on 24 September 1903. The Royal Navy in WW1 Naval Encyclopedia. On the 3rd of September 1903 a Memorandum of Agreement was entered into by Alongside is the Royal Navys Devonshire class armoured cruiser HMS.


HMS Duke of Edinburgh (1904)

HMS "Duke of Edinburgh" was an armoured cruiser of the Royal Navy , and one of two "Duke of Edinburgh" class cruisers, the other being HMS "Black Prince". She was named after Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha , who was also Duke of Edinburgh .

The "Duke of Edinburgh" was ordered under the 1903/1903 Naval programme. She was built in Pembroke dockyard, having been laid down on 11 February 1903 , launched on June 14 1904 . In her trials she reached a speed of 22.84 knots (23,685 ihp). [cite web|url=http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/dukeedin.htm|title=Duke of Edinburgh class|work=History of the World's Navies|accessdate=November 13|accessyear=2005] [cite web|url=http://www.worldwar1.co.uk/armoured-cruiser/hms-duke-of-edinburgh.html|title=Duke of Edinburgh class armoured cruisers|work=World War 1 naval combat|accessdate=November 13|accessyear=2005]

The "Duke of Edinburgh" transferred to the 5th Squadron from 1908 to 1912 and rescued the survivors of the SS "Delhi" in December 1911. From 1912 to 1913 she joined the 3rd Cruiser Squadron, and from 1913 to 1914 she served with the 1st Cruiser Squadron of the Mediterranean Fleet.

She served at the Battle of Jutland in 1916 and was the only ship of the 1st Cruiser Squadron to survive the battle.

She was sold for scrap and broken up in 1920.

See HMS|Edinburgh for other ships of a similar name.

Wikimedia Foundation . 2010 .

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Duke of Edinburgh class cruiser — HMS Duke of Edinburgh Class overview Name: Duke of Edinburgh Preceded by … Wikipedia

Duke of Edinburgh — Classe Duke of Edinburgh Duke of Edinburgh Le Duke of Edinburgh … Wikipédia en Français

Duke of Edinburgh (marine britannique, 1905) — Classe Duke of Edinburgh Duke of Edinburgh Le Duke of Edinburgh … Wikipédia en Français

Classe Duke of Edinburgh — Schéma (Brassey s Naval Annual 1912) … Wikipédia en Français

Classe Duke Of Edinburgh — Duke of Edinburgh Le Duke of Edinburgh … Wikipédia en Français

Classe duke of edinburgh — Duke of Edinburgh Le Duke of Edinburgh … Wikipédia en Français

HMS Edinburgh — Six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Edinburgh , for the Scottish city of Edinburgh. In addition, one ship of the Royal Navy has carried the similar name HMS Duke of Edinburgh .HMS Edinburgh* The first HMS Edinburgh originally the… … Wikipedia

HMS Black Prince (1904) — Duke of Edinburgh Klasse HMS Black Prince Übersi … Deutsch Wikipedia

HMS Edinburgh — Die britische Royal Navy hat bis heute insgesamt sechs ihrer Schiffe HMS Edinburgh genannt, nach der schottischen Hauptstadt Edinburgh. Ein weiteres Schiff führte den Naman HMS Duke of Edinburgh. HMS Edinburgh Die erste HMS Edinburgh war eine… … Deutsch Wikipedia

HMS Warrior (1905) — HMS Warrior Übersicht Typ Panzerkreuzer … Deutsch Wikipedia


Armored Cruisers

In the later half of the 19th Century and for a few years into the 20th, navies around the world were building powerful classes of armored cruisers that were in most respects the "battlecruisers" of their day. In most respects these ships resembled less armored but as well, or nearly as well, armed ships as contemporary pre-dreadnaughts.

Of these ships which would you say were the best designed and most effective?

Jan 14, 2010 #2 2010-01-14T02:08

Jan 14, 2010 #3 2010-01-14T05:32

The armored cruisers had as their main weapons the secondary calibers of the pre-dreadnoughts being built in the same year. I seem to remember that armored cruisers were armored in the same fashion as the treaty cruisers: armored decks and turrets. Protected cruisers were armored like battleships of the time. The armored cruisers lacked the large caliber main armament. Since battle was at short range compared to what would happen in the next 20 years I would say that the armored cruisers were a decidedly second after predreadnoughts, though they could be built in greater numbers than the predreadnoughts. 1890 to 1905 was a time of rapid change in design and tactics. A lot of the designs were obsolete soon after building. The answer to your question is hard call.

In their time I would say the armored cruisers were better than the battle-cruisers of later times relitive to their peers. The Battle-cruisers of the Royal navy were bloodied at Jutland and the concept fell by the way side as improvements in machinery allowed battleships to cruise faster with a full load of armor.

Jan 14, 2010 #4 2010-01-14T11:52

Sea Sick - the period nomenclature was that protected cruisers were armored only with a protective deck and slopes - which could still be quite thick - but primarily intended to protect buoyancy but not ship function - they were the dominant style built late 1880's-mid 1890's and for light cruisers much longer. The rational being that before face hardening there was little value in thin vertical protection.

Armored cruisers featured belts - and there are a few 1880's ships that could be termed thusly - then a whole heap of the armored cruisers proper from the mid 1890's onwards - coinciding with the introduction of strong face hardened armor which, in 6in thickness could break up most period projectiles.

In RN parlance 1880's-1900's , cruisers could be first class (large), 2nd class (4-6Kton) or third class (<3Kton).

1st class cruisers were either protected or armored based on the fashion at the time.

2nd and 3rd class were almost all protected.

To answer the original question - there was such a rapid advance in technology, and escalation in the size of the ships - that often the most effective armored cruiser was simply the most recently completed class without major design flaws.

Jan 14, 2010 #5 2010-01-14T22:11

Another thing to consider was the role they were designed for - armoured cruiser X could excell in its design role, but be beaten by cruiser Y at another.

For example the County class AC (14 x 6 inch guns) was designed for trade protection/hunting down enemy raiders. It was designed to be a small and cheap (relitively speaking) ship. Acting in the designed role, HMS Kent performed well at the Falklands, chasing down and destroying the Light Cruiser Nurnburg. However when HMS Monmouth of the same class went up against Spees squadron she was overmatched and quickly overwhelmed.

Bearing this in mind, what definition of "most effective" should we use?

Jan 14, 2010 #6 2010-01-14T22:28

The Kent's are an interesting case - economy minded cruisers that sat between first and second class ships, put a high premium on speed and a large 6in battery, and were then built in numbers. They had an extensive 4in Krupp belt, excellent protection vs 6in, but useless against modern WWI projectiles larger than this size.

They held their speed well over the next ten years and were still good for their primary function, hunting down enemy CL's on the trade routes.

The second they meet a more modern armoured cruiser though, and they are toast. The low hull casemate 6in guns can hardly see a target at 10,000 yards, let alone hit it - while an armoured cruiser with 4+ turreted medium calibre guns can fire accurate salvoes in the 10-12,000 yard+ range bracket and take them apart.

The whole S and G thing demonstrates one thing about the armoured cruiser and technical change - that armoured cruisers live the life of Gulliver - giants one day, puny midgets the next.

At Coronel Good Hope and Monmouth were completely outclassed by ships built only a few years later - they had absolutely no hope of effective reply from the 2 9.2in guns on Good Hope - intended for armour piercing coup de grace shots at 2000 yards.

A little while later S and G were completely outclassed by the two I's - again, ships only a couple of years newer in build date and conception. Good Hope - S and G and the I's all having similar thicknesses of main belt, of similar quality too!

The I's themselves - for example look pretty puny in comparison to the second generation BC's - though given good light and a good opportunity, they were still able to give as good as they got, for a short time anyway.


Nelson-class cruisers

The Nelson - class cruisers were a pair of armoured cruisers built in the 1870s for the Royal Navy. The Nelson - class ships were designed by Nathaniel Barnaby
HMS Nelson was a Nelson - class armoured cruiser built for the Royal Navy in the 1870s. She was sold for scrap in 1910. The Nelson - class ships were designed
Mogami class 最上型 were four cruisers built for the Imperial Japanese Navy IJN during the 1930s. They were initially classified as light cruisers under
The La Galissonniere - class cruisers were commissioned by the French Navy in the 1930s. They were the last French cruisers completed after 1935, until the
The County class was a class of heavy cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the years between the First and Second World Wars. They were the first post - war
the term first class cruiser being used instead for both armoured cruisers and large protected cruisers Thus, the first class cruisers built between the
classified as first, second or third class depending on their capabilities. First - class cruisers were typically armoured cruisers with belt side armor, while
used as a coal hulk, and was scrapped in 1928. HMS Nelson 1876 was a Nelson - class armoured cruiser launched in 1876. She became a training ship in 1902
navies preferred to build protected cruisers in the 1880s and early 1890s. It was often possible to build cruisers which were faster and better all - round
The Lord Nelson class consisted of a pair of pre - dreadnought battleships built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the twentieth century. Although
Northampton was a Nelson - class armoured cruiser built for the Royal Navy in the 1870s. She was sold for scrap in 1905. The Nelson - class ships were designed

California yacht design team, Nelson Marek, formed in 1979. Their first custom design was the incredibly successful One Ton class RUSH. Built in just 72 days
colonies had been used for the Crown Colony - class cruisers The ships were built as United States Navy Tacoma - class patrol frigates, a design that was an adaptation
Database website Retrieved 14 November 2009. Rosario - class sloops at Battleships - Cruisers website Retrieved 14 November 2009. C. C. Penrose - Fitzgerald
British cruisers Dido, Devonshire, and destroyer Savage at Copenhagen and headed to Wilhelmshaven, as escort for the surrendered German cruisers Prinz Eugen
November 1914 to join with several Japanese cruisers off Mexico to resume the hunt for the German cruisers By this time, the German squadron had made
destroyers were intended to operate with the new series of fast and powerful cruisers also under consideration as part of a program intended to give the Imperial
USS Nelson DD - 623 a Gleaves - class destroyer, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Rear Admiral Charles P. Nelson who served
Komintern was a Soviet light cruiser originally named Pamiat Merkuria Memory of Mercury a Bogatyr - class protected cruiser built for the Imperial Russian

  • The Nelson - class cruisers were a pair of armoured cruisers built in the 1870s for the Royal Navy. The Nelson - class ships were designed by Nathaniel Barnaby
  • HMS Nelson was a Nelson - class armoured cruiser built for the Royal Navy in the 1870s. She was sold for scrap in 1910. The Nelson - class ships were designed
  • Mogami class 最上型 were four cruisers built for the Imperial Japanese Navy IJN during the 1930s. They were initially classified as light cruisers under
  • The La Galissonniere - class cruisers were commissioned by the French Navy in the 1930s. They were the last French cruisers completed after 1935, until the
  • The County class was a class of heavy cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the years between the First and Second World Wars. They were the first post - war
  • the term first class cruiser being used instead for both armoured cruisers and large protected cruisers Thus, the first class cruisers built between the
  • classified as first, second or third class depending on their capabilities. First - class cruisers were typically armoured cruisers with belt side armor, while
  • used as a coal hulk, and was scrapped in 1928. HMS Nelson 1876 was a Nelson - class armoured cruiser launched in 1876. She became a training ship in 1902
  • navies preferred to build protected cruisers in the 1880s and early 1890s. It was often possible to build cruisers which were faster and better all - round
  • The Lord Nelson class consisted of a pair of pre - dreadnought battleships built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the twentieth century. Although
  • Northampton was a Nelson - class armoured cruiser built for the Royal Navy in the 1870s. She was sold for scrap in 1905. The Nelson - class ships were designed
  • Minotaur class was a three - ship class of armoured cruisers built in the first decade of the twentieth century for the Royal Navy. These were the last class of
  • London Nelson Alabama Nelson California Nelson Georgia Nelson Illinois Nelson Minnesota Nelson Missouri Nelson Nebraska Nelson Nevada Nelson New
  • The Imperieuse - class cruiser was a class of two armoured cruisers launched between 1883 and 1884 for the Royal Navy. In an 1886 magazine article, Sir Edward
  • HMS Nelson pennant number: 28 was the name ship of her class of two battleships built for the Royal Navy in the 1920s. They were the first battleships
  • The Neptune class was a proposed class of cruisers planned for the British Royal Navy in the latter years of the Second World War. They were large ships
  • armoured cruisers together. At the same time, the Invincible class themselves were referred to as cruiser - battleships dreadnought cruisers the term
  • armoured cruiser of the French Navy, laid down in 1904 and completed in 1908. It was a development of the Leon Gambetta class of armoured cruisers and was
  • The Calypso class comprised two steam corvettes later classified as third - class cruisers of the Royal Navy. Built for distant cruising in the heyday
  • was broken up in Portugal in November 2001. Scottish Fishery Protection Cruisers Retrieved 13 July 2009. Aberdeen City Council. Aberdeen Ships www
  • Lord Nelson through his daughter Horatia. He entered the Royal Navy at the age of thirteen. In 1882, while a midshipman in the Bacchante - class corvette
  • Takehito. Chiyoda was a belted cruiser based on a much scaled - down version of the Royal Navy s Nelson - class cruisers The hull was made of 84 watertight
  • California yacht design team, Nelson Marek, formed in 1979. Their first custom design was the incredibly successful One Ton class RUSH. Built in just 72 days
  • colonies had been used for the Crown Colony - class cruisers The ships were built as United States Navy Tacoma - class patrol frigates, a design that was an adaptation
  • Database website Retrieved 14 November 2009. Rosario - class sloops at Battleships - Cruisers website Retrieved 14 November 2009. C. C. Penrose - Fitzgerald
  • British cruisers Dido, Devonshire, and destroyer Savage at Copenhagen and headed to Wilhelmshaven, as escort for the surrendered German cruisers Prinz Eugen
  • November 1914 to join with several Japanese cruisers off Mexico to resume the hunt for the German cruisers By this time, the German squadron had made
  • destroyers were intended to operate with the new series of fast and powerful cruisers also under consideration as part of a program intended to give the Imperial
  • USS Nelson DD - 623 a Gleaves - class destroyer, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Rear Admiral Charles P. Nelson who served
  • Komintern was a Soviet light cruiser originally named Pamiat Merkuria Memory of Mercury a Bogatyr - class protected cruiser built for the Imperial Russian

The Scout Cruiser Salem and Class Scientific American.

English: The Nelson class armoured cruisers consisted of the two armoured cruisers Nelson and Northampton, both launched in 1876. All Ships Ship Products from All The Flying Mule. The Nelson class cruisers were a pair of armoured cruisers built in the 1870s for the Royal Navy. Naval Gazing Main G3 and Nelson. And 2 Alaska class, large cruisers, along with numerous cruisers and The Nelson class battleships were the only British battleships with 16in.

Nelson Class Cruiser 1876 The Dreadnought Project.

This would answer the threat posed by German merchant cruisers Indeed, the construction of the two Lord Nelson–class battleships was so. HM BATTLESHIPS NELSON AND RODNEY. These. are the scout cruisers Birmingham and Salem, building at Fore River, and with the methods to be followed, such as Nelson by personal experience. Naval Engagements in the War of 1812 American Battlefield Trust. Even more radical large armoured cruisers of the Invincible class. Priority was given gramme, in May 1905 Britain laid down Lord Nelson and Agamemnon, to​.


Duke of Edinburgh Class first class armoured cruisers - History

Royal Navy Log Books of the World War 1 Era

HMS DUKE OF EDINBURGH &ndash March 1914 to February 1915, Mediterranean (includes Hunt for SMS Goeben), East Indies Station (includes Sheikh Syed landings in Red Sea), Grand Fleet (1st Cruiser Squadron) (Part 1 of 2)

Edited by Don Kindell, Naval History Researcher (Ohio)

HMS Duke of Edinburgh (Photo Ships, click images to enlarge)

Cruiser, ex-Armoured Cruiser, Duke of Edinburgh-class

Pendant Nos. 15 (1914), 58 (1.18), N.33 (6.18). Launched 11.6.04 Pembroke DY. 13,550 tons, 505(oa), 480(pp)x73x26ft. TE 23000ihp, 23kts. Armament: 6-9.2in, 10-6in, 23-3pdr, 3-18in tt. Armour: 6in sides, 1in deck, 6in guns. Crew: 700. Mediterranean 1914, 1st CS Grand Fleet 1914-16, North America and West Indies 1916-18. Battle Honour (and link to despatches, casualties, awards) Jutland 31 May 1916. Sold 12.4.20 Hughes Bolckow. (British Warships 1914-1919)

Duke of Edinburgh (launched 8/11/04, sold for BU 12/4/20), served in 2nd Cruiser Squadron, Atlantic Fleet after completion but transferred to 1st CS in 1907 5th CS 1908-12, during which time she rescued survivors of SS Delhi at Cape Spartel in December 1911. Joined 3rd CS 1912-13 and then 1st CS, Mediterranean Fleet 1913-14. Captured a German merchantman in Red Sea in August 1914 and went to the Persian Gulf in November 1914. Joined 1st CS, Grand Fleet in December 1914 and saw action at Jutland. (Battle Honour - Jutland 1916). Joined 2nd CS in June 1916 and escorted Atlantic convoys in 1917. Sent to North America and West Indies Station August-November 1918, and on her return was stationed in the Humber at Immingham, E Coast of England (June 1919) put up for sale in March 1920. (Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1860-1905 and 1906-21)

British Isles Bases - Selected Charts

British Naval Bases Worldwide - Selected Charts

1. Latitude/longitude, including for days in port, show representative decimal positions for each day, as calculated by the Old Weather project's analysis program. As such, they differ by varying amounts from the positions recorded, usually at noon, in the log pages. In addition, some latitudes/longitudes have been amended in edited logs for errors in the logs, for errors in identifying locations by the analysis program, or simply for greater accuracy. In all cases, refer to the log-page scans for the positions as originally recorded. Not all log pages contain this information and the ships' positions have therefore often been estimated.

2. Full account of any day is available by clicking on the link above that day. Groups of links refer to log book covers and introductory information some may be blank.

THE VOYAGES OF HMS DUKE OF EDINBURGH 1914-1918
(More detailed plots follow in the text)

(Maps prepared using Journey Plotter, developed by Maikel. The Plots can only be approximate. They are made by joining-up positions on successive days, and sometimes positions are not given. There will therefore be occasions when the ship appears to have travelled overland)