Jones, William - History

Jones, William - History

Jones, William (1760-1831) Secretary of the Navy: William Jones was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1760. At the age of 16, he joined a volunteer company, and was present at the Battles of Trenton and Princeton. He later entered the Continental Navy, serving under Com. Truxtun on the James River. After entering the merchant service, he lived in Charleston, South Carolina, from 1790 to 1793. He returned to Philadelphia in 1793, and was elected to the US Congress as a Democratic-Republican from 1801 to 1803. President Madison appointed Jones Secretary of the Navy in 1813, a position he held until December of 1814. He later became president of the US Bank, and collector of the port of Philadelphia. Jones was a member of the American Philosophical Society, and published a work called "Winter Navigation on the Delaware." He died on September 5, 1831, in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.


William Jones

William Jones' father was Siôn Siôr. An obvious question would be: why was his father not named 'Jones'? The answer is simple, he was named Jones since this is the English version of the Welsh Siôn. William's mother was Elizabeth Rowland who was from Llanddeusant in the island of Anglesey. William was born on a farm in Anglesey and the family moved to Llanbabo on Anglesey, then moved again after the death of William's father. The family were poor and William attended a charity school at Llanfechell about 3 km from the north coast of Anglesey. There his mathematical talents were spotted by the local landowner who arranged for him to be given a job in London working in a merchant's counting-house.

This job saw Jones serving at sea on a voyage to the West Indies, and he taught mathematics and navigation on board ships between 1695 and 1702 . He was serving on a navy vessel which was part of the British-Dutch fleet under Sir George Rooke and James Butler, Duke of Ormonde, which destroyed a Franco-Spanish fleet in Vigo bay off northwestern Spain in 1702 . Navigation was a topic which greatly interested Jones and his first published work was A New Compendium of the Whole Art of Navigation published in 1702 . In this work he applied mathematics to navigation, studying methods to calculate position at sea.

After the battle of Vigo, Jones left the navy and became a teacher of mathematics in the coffee houses of London. This may seems strange but in fact at this time coffee houses were sometimes called the Penny Universities because of the cheap education they provided. They would charge an entrance fee of one penny and then while customers drank coffee they could listen to lectures. Different coffee houses catered to specific interests such as art, business, law and mathematics. Jones was able to make a living lecturing in coffee houses such as Child's Coffee House in St Paul's Churchyard.

Soon he was employed to tutor Philip Yorke, who was later to become Baron Hardwicke of Hardwicke. This was an important position for Jones since Yorke, after a legal career, entered parliament becoming solicitor general (1720) , attorney general (1724) , lord chief justice (1733) , and lord chancellor (1737) . Jones tutored Yorke for about three years. He published Synopsis palmariorum mathesios Ⓣ in 1706 , a book based on his teaching notes intended for beginners. It included the differential calculus, infinite series, and is also famed since the symbol π is used in it with its modern meaning. In 1709 he applied for the position of master of Christ's Hospital Mathematical School and supplied references written by Newton and Halley. He failed to obtain the position so continued lecturing in the coffee houses of London.

Although of little importance as a research mathematician, William Jones is well known to historians of mathematics since he corresponded with many 17 th century mathematicians, including Newton. He was, however, elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1711 . Jones then served on the Royal Society committee set up in 1712 to decide who had invented the infinitesimal calculus, Newton or Leibniz. We should now describe how Jones came to be considered an important Newton supporter in the dispute. ( The Royal Society made sure that only strong Newton supporters served on their committee! )

Through lecturing in the coffee houses, Jones came in contact with leading scientists of the day such as Brook Taylor and Roger Cotes. John Collins, famed for his correspondence with a wide range of scientists, had died in 1683 and in 1708 Jones acquired his mathematical papers. These included transcripts of Newton's manuscripts, letters and results obtained with the method of infinite series which Newton had discovered in about 1664 . Newton had written up these results in De analysi Ⓣ but they had not been published. With assistance from Newton himself, Jones produced Analysis per quantitatum series, fluxiones, ac differentia Ⓣ in 1711 although it should be noted that this first edition of 1711 did not record either Newton's name nor that of Jones. As an appendix to this work Jones added Newton's Tractatus de quadratura curvarum Ⓣ which was a shortened version of the work on analytical calculus which Newton had written in 1691 . The second edition of Analysis per quantitatum Ⓣ published in 1723 did contain a preface written by Jones. Another contribution made by Jones towards publishing Newton's work relates to the Methods fluxionum Ⓣ , written by Newton in 1671 . Newton had tried to get it printed over a period of five years but finally gave up in 1676 when Cambridge University Press rejected it. Jones made a copy of the original Latin, giving it the title Artis analyticae specimina sive geometria analytic Ⓣ and it was this version which was eventually published. In 1731 Jones published Discourses of the Natural Philosophy of the Elements.

We left our description of the events in Jones' life after he was unsuccessful in obtaining the mastership of Christ's Hospital Mathematical School. He had, before this, married the widow of his employer in the merchant's counting-house. In addition to his coffee house role he also acted as a tutor to George Parker, son of the future earl of Macclesfield, a position he obtained since his former pupil Philip Yorke was a friend of George Parker's father. Jones was long associated with the Parker family and lived for long spells at their castle at Shirburn. He was greatly helped by his friendship of Philip Yorke and George Parker, particularly after he lost all his money when the bank in which his money was invested collapsed. His two former pupils were by this time men of great influence and were able to obtain various positions for Jones which provided him with an income without requiring any real work.

Jones' first wife died and he remarried several years later to Mary Nix on 17 April 1731 . She was 25 years old and Jones was 56 at the time of their marriage. They had three children, two of whom survived to adulthood: Mary born in 1736 and William born 10 years later. On his death Jones left a large collection of manuscripts and correspondence which it appears he had intended to publish as a major piece of work. There are many notes and copied parts of original manuscripts to which he had access. Wallis writes in [ 2 ] :-


Attended Oxford

Jones entered University College, Oxford, in 1764. He had already developed a reputation for his impressive scholarship, and college enabled him to increase his knowledge of Middle Eastern studies, philosophy, Oriental literature, and Greek and Hebrew. In addition, he learned Spanish and Portuguese, and also mastered the Chinese language.

He supported himself through college with scholarships and by serving as a tutor to Earl Spencer, the seven-year-old son of Lord Althorp, who was the brother of Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire.

Jones earned his bachelor of arts degree in 1768. By then he had already become a well-known Orientalist, despite being only 22 years old. That same year, Jones was asked by Christian VII of Denmark to translate a Persian manuscript about the life of Nadir Shah into French. The Danish king had brought the manuscript with him on a visit to England. The task was considerable: the Persian manuscript was a difficult one and, at one point Jones was forced to interrupt his own postgraduate studies for a year to complete the translation. It was eventually published in 1770 as Histoire de Nader Chah , and it included an introduction that contained descriptions of Asia and a history of Persia.


Jones, William E. (1808&ndash1871)

William E. "Fiery" Jones, legislator, lawyer, judge, and Unionist Republican, was born in 1808 in Georgia. Nothing is known of his family or early life, but he edited the Augusta Chronicle and Sentinel and the Constitutionalist and served in the Georgia legislature before moving to Gonzales County, Texas, in 1839. He quickly became active in politics and represented Gonzales County in the Sixth Congress of the Republic of Texas during 1841–42. In September 1842, while attending a session of the district court in Bexar County, Jones was among those captured by the invading Mexican army commanded by Gen. Adrián Woll. He served as one of the commissioners who arranged the surrender of San Antonio. Jones and other Texans attending the court session were marched to Perote Prison in Mexico, where they arrived on December 22, 1842. In late March 1843, Waddy Thompson, United States minister to Mexico, arranged the release of Jones, Samuel A. Maverick, and district judge Anderson Hutchinson.

Jones returned to Texas and represented Gonzales County in the Eighth Congress in 1843–44. He considered running for the vice presidency of the republic in 1844 but chose instead to accept an appointment in February of that year as judge of the fourth district court. Under the Constitution of the Republic of Texas, district judges also served as associate justices of the Supreme Court, so Jones held that position as well until annexation. In April 1846 Governor James Pinckney Henderson continued Jones's career on the bench by appointing him to a six-year term as judge of the Second Judicial District. Jones moved from Gonzales to Guadalupe County in 1845 and lived there until 1851. He was a founder and trustee of Guadalupe College and a trustee of the Guadalupe High School Association. The Census of 1850 reported that he and his twenty-seven-year-old wife, Kezziah, had two young sons, and that he was moderately prosperous, owning nine slaves and $6,800 in real property. Jones moved to Comal County in 1851 and apparently as a consequence of that move resigned his district judgeship. In 1858 the region of Comal County in which Jones lived became part of Blanco County, and the state legislature named him the commissioner to hold the first elections and organize the new county. Jones's county of residence changed again in 1862 when Kendall County was formed in part from Blanco County.

Jones supported the American (Know-Nothing) party during the mid-1850s, probably because he agreed with its Unionism. He opposed secession in 1860–61, but served toward the end of the Civil War as captain of a company of state troops defending the Texas frontier. Following the war Jones remained politically active, first as a Unionist and then as a member of the new Republican party. The Radical Union Caucus of the Constitutional Convention of 1866 nominated him for the state Supreme Court, but he did not win election. In 1870 Governor Edmund J. Davis appointed him judge of the Thirty-second Judicial District, which included a large number of counties to the northwest of Austin. Jones died of "paralysis" at Llano on April 18, 1871, having won the respect of conservatives as one of Davis's "best" appointments. His family at the last census before his death (1870) consisted of his wife, four sons, and a nine-year-old daughter. Jones's oldest son, William, was a postmaster in Kendall County in 1870.


Jones History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

While the ancestors of the bearers of Jones came from ancient Welsh-Celtic origins, the name itself has its roots in Christianity. This surname comes from the personal name John, which is derived from the Latin Johannes, meaning "Yahweh is gracious."

This name has always been common in Britain, rivaling William in popularity by the beginning of the 14th century. The feminine form Joan, or Johanna in Latin, was also popular, and the surname Jones may be derived from either the male or female name. "Though its origins are in England, the surname is predominately held by people of Welsh extraction due to the overwhelming use of patronymics in Wales from the 16th century and the prevalence of the name John at that time." [1] "Next to John Smith, John Jones is probably the most common combination of names in Britain." [2]

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Early Origins of the Jones family

The surname Jones was first found in Denbighshire (Welsh: Sir Ddinbych), a historic county in Northeast Wales created by the Laws in Wales Act 1536, where their ancient family seat was at Llanerchrugog.

The name Jones, currently one of the most prolific in the world, descends from three main sources: from Gwaithvoed, Lord Cardigan, Chief of one of the 15 noble tribes of North Wales in 921 from Bleddyn Ap Cynfyn, King of Powys and from Dyffryn Clwyd, a Chieftain of Denbighland.

All three lines merged in Denbighshire about the 11th century and it is not known which of the three can be considered the main branch of the family. Later some of the family ventured into England. "[The parish of Astall in Oxfordshire] was formerly the residence of Sir Richard Jones, one of the judges of the court of common pleas in the reign of Charles I. and there are still some remains of the ancient manor-house near the church, which are now converted into a farmhouse." [3]

"Llanarth Court [in Monmouthshire], the admired seat of John Jones, Esq., is a handsome and spacious mansion, the front ornamented with an elegant portico resembling that of the temple of Pæstum." [3]

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Early History of the Jones family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Jones research. Another 58 words (4 lines of text) covering the years 1578, 1658, 1638, 1712, 1610, 1673, 1656, 1660, 1618, 1674, 1650, 1656, 1605, 1681, 1645, 1637, 1649, 1628, 1697, 1550, 1619, 1589, 1643, 1669, 1640, 1643 and are included under the topic Early Jones History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Jones Spelling Variations

Welsh surnames are relatively few in number, but they have an inordinately large number of spelling variations. There are many factors that explain the preponderance of Welsh variants, but the earliest is found during the Middle Ages when Welsh surnames came into use. Scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, which often resulted in a single person's name being inconsistently recorded over his lifetime. The transliteration of Welsh names into English also accounts for many of the spelling variations: the unique Brythonic Celtic language of the Welsh had many sounds the English language was incapable of accurately reproducing. It was also common for members of a same surname to change their names slightly, in order to signify a branch loyalty within the family, a religious adherence, or even patriotic affiliations. For all of these reasons, the many spelling variations of particular Welsh names are very important. The surname Jones has occasionally been spelled Jones, Jonas, Jone, Joness and others.

Early Notables of the Jones family (pre 1700)

Prominent amongst the family during the late Middle Ages was Gwaithvoed Lord Cardigan, Bleddyn Ap Cynfyn, and Dyffryn Clwyd Jones, the three patriarchs of the Jones family John Jones of Gellilyfdy (c. 1578-c.1658), a Welsh lawyer, antiquary, calligrapher, manuscript collector and scribe Richard Jones (1638-1712), first Earl of Ranelagh Sir Samuel Jones (1610-1673), an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1656 and 1660 Colonel Philip Jones (1618-1674), a Welsh military.
Another 74 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Jones Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Jones family to Ireland

Some of the Jones family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 143 words (10 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Jones migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Jones Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Chadwallader Jones, who landed in Virginia in 1623 [4]
  • Alexander Jones, who arrived in New England in 1631 [4]
  • Alice Jones, who arrived in Boston in 1635
  • Charles Jones and Humphrey Jones, who both settled in Virginia in 1636
  • Anne Jones, who settled in Virginia in 1648
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Jones Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • David Jones, who arrived in Boston, Massachusetts in 1712 [4]
  • Arthur Jones, who arrived in Virginia in 1724 [4]
  • Cornelius Jones, who arrived in Georgia in 1732 [4]
  • Roger Jones, who arrived in South Carolina in 1738
Jones Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Christian Jones, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1801 [4]
  • William Jones, who landed in New York in 1815 [4]
  • James Jones, who arrived in Puerto Rico in 1816 [4]
  • Sarah Jones, who settled in New York in 1821
  • Caroline Jones, who landed in New York in 1824 [4]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Jones migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Jones Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Mr. Ebenezer Jones Jr., U.E. (b. 1720) from New York, USA who settled in Home District, Saltfleet Township [Hamilton], Ontario c. 1780 he served in the Orange Rangers, married to Sarah Lockwood they had 5 children [5]
  • Capt. John Jones U.E., aka "Mahogany Jones" born in Maine, USA from Pownalborough, who settled in Grand Manan Island, Charlotte County, New Brunswick c. 1780 he served in the Rangers, member of the Port Matoon association as well as Penobscot Association [5]
  • Mr. Garret Jones U.E. who settled in Belle Vue, Beaver Harbour, New Brunswick c. 1783 [5]
  • Mr. Thomas Jones U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on October 26, 1783 was passenger number 290 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on September 28, 1783 at Staten Island, New York [5]
  • Mrs. Hannah Jones U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on October 26, 1783 was passenger number 319 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on September 28, 1783 at Staten Island, New York [5]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Jones Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Ty. Jones, aged 50, a farmer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the ship "John" from Liverpool, England
  • John Jones, aged 24, a farmer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the ship "John" from Liverpool, England
  • Robert Jones, aged 20, a labourer, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Billow" in 1833
  • Richard Jones, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Protector" in 1834
  • William Jones, aged 19, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Highlander" in 1834
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Jones migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Jones Settlers in Australia in the 18th Century
  • Miss Ann Jones, English convict who was convicted in Shropshire, England for 7 years , transported aboard the "Britannia III" on 18th July 1798, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[6]
  • Miss Elizabeth Jones, English convict who was convicted in Hereford, Herefordshire, England for 7 years , transported aboard the "Britannia III" on 18th July 1798, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[6]
Jones Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. George Jones, British convict who was convicted in Middlesex, England for life, transported aboard the "Calcutta" in February 1803, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[7]
  • Mr. John Jones, (Hughes), British convict who was convicted in Bedford, Bedfordshire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Calcutta" in February 1803, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[7]
  • Mr. John Jones, British convict who was convicted in Shropshire, England for life, transported aboard the "Calcutta" in February 1803, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[7]
  • Mr. Thomas Jones, British convict who was convicted in Sussex, England for life, transported aboard the "Calcutta" in February 1803, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[7]
  • Mr. William Jones, British convict who was convicted in Middlesex, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Calcutta" in February 1803, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[7]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Jones migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Jones Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Andrew Jones, Australian settler travelling from Hobart, Tasmania, Australia aboard the ship "Bee" arriving in New Zealand in 1831 [8]
  • Mr. Stephen Jones, Australian settler travelling from Port of Hobart, Tasmania, Australia on board the ship "David Owen" arriving in New Zealand in 1832 [8]
  • Thomas Jones, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1839 aboard the ship Success
  • Thomas Jones, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Success" in 1839
  • Joseph Jones, aged 21, a gardener, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Martha Ridgeway" in 1840
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Jones Settlers in New Zealand in the 20th Century

Contemporary Notables of the name Jones (post 1700) +

  • John Walter Jones (1946-2020), Welsh civil servant, Chief Executive of the Welsh Language Board (1993�)
  • Mr. Terence Graham Parry Jones (1942-2020), born in Colwyn Bay, Denbighshire, Welsh Actor, Writer, Comedian known as Terry Jones, helped create Monty Python's Flying Circus
  • Aneurin M. Jones (1930-2017), Welsh painter who exhibited regularly at the National Eisteddfod of Wales
  • David Huw Jones (1934-2016), Welsh Anglican bishop, Bishop of St. David's from 1996 to 2001
  • Huw Jones (1700-1782), well-known Welsh poet
  • Peter Rees Jones (1843-1905), the son of a hat maker, from Wales and founder of the Peter Jones department store
  • Sir Edgar Rees Jones (1878-1962), Welsh barrister and Liberal Party politician
  • William Ronald Rhys Jones (1915-1987), Welsh literary journalist and editor
  • Tom Jones (b. 1940), born Thomas Jones Woodward, popular Welsh singer and actor particularly noted for his powerful voice
  • Catherine Zeta- Jones CBE (b. 1969), WelshAcademy Award-winning actress [9]
  • . (Another 147 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the Jones family +

Arrow Air Flight 1285
  • Mr. Joseph A Jones (b. 1963), American Sergeant from Knoxville, Tennessee, USA who died in the crash [10]
Empress of Ireland
  • Mr. Edward John Jones, British First Officer from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and survived the sinking [11]
  • Mr. John Mackenzie Jones, British Junior 2nd Engineer from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [11]
  • Mrs. Miriam Jones, née Roberts British Matron from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [11]
  • Mr. Henry Andrew Jones, British Saloon Steward from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [11]
  • Mr. Daniel Henry Jones, British Seaman from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and survived the sinking [11]
  • . (Another 11 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Flight TWA 800
  • Mrs. Ramona U. Jones (1932-1996), aged 64, from West Hartford, Connecticut, USA, American passenger flying aboard flight TWA 800 from J.F.K. Airport, New York to Leonardo da Vinci Airport, Rome when the plane crashed after takeoff she died in the crash [12]
Halifax Explosion
  • Mr. Robert  Jones (1877-1917), Canadian Engine Room Artificer aboard the HMS Highflyer from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [13]
  • Mr. Robert  Jones (1887-1917), Welsh Carpenter aboard the SS Picton from Port Madoc, Wales, United Kingdom who died in the explosion [13]
Hillsborough disaster
  • Richard Jones (1963-1989), English chemistry graduate who was attending the FA Cup semi-final at Hillsborough Stadium, in Sheffield, Yorkshire when the stand allocated area became overcrowded and 96 people were crushed in what became known as the Hillsborough disaster and he died from his injuries [14]
  • Gary Philip Jones (1790-1989), English student who was attending the FA Cup semi-final at Hillsborough Stadium, in Sheffield, Yorkshire when the stand allocated area became overcrowded and 96 people were crushed in what became known as the Hillsborough disaster and he died from his injuries [14]
  • Christine Anne Jones (1961-1989), English senior radiographer and Sunday school teacher who was attending the FA Cup semi-final at Hillsborough Stadium, in Sheffield, Yorkshire when the stand allocated area became overcrowded and 96 people were crushed in what became known as the Hillsborough disaster and she died from her injuries [14]
HMAS Sydney II
  • Mr. Wilfred George Jones (1895-1941), Australian Chief Shipwright from Naremburn, New South Wales, Australia, who sailed into battle aboard HMAS Sydney II and died in the sinking [15]
  • Mr. Ivan David Jones (1918-1941), Australian Acting Engine Room Artificer 4th Class from Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia, who sailed into battle aboard HMAS Sydney II and died in the sinking [15]
  • Mr. Philip Trevor Jones (1897-1941), Australian Chief Petty Officer from Frankston, Victoria, Australia, who sailed into battle aboard HMAS Sydney II and died in the sinking [15]
  • Mr. Donald Edgar Jones (1920-1941), Australian Able Seaman from West Ryde, New South Wales, Australia, who sailed into battle aboard HMAS Sydney II and died in the sinking [15]
  • Mr. David James Jones (1914-1941), Australian Acting Stoker Petty Officer from Glebe Point, New South Wales, Australia, who sailed into battle aboard HMAS Sydney II and died in the sinking [15]
  • . (Another 1 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
HMS Cornwall
  • Edward John Jones (d. 1942), British Able Seaman aboard the HMS Cornwall when she was struck by air bombers and sunk he died in the sinking [16]
HMS Dorsetshire
  • Norman Jones, British aboard the HMS Dorsetshire when she was struck by air bombers and sunk he survived the sinking [17]
  • William James Jones (d. 1945), British Able Seaman aboard the HMS Dorsetshire when she was struck by air bombers and sunk he died in the sinking [17]
HMS Hood
  • Mr. Richard Jones (b. 1919), Welsh Able Seaman serving for the Royal Navy Reserve from Holyhead, Anglesey, Wales, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [18]
  • Mr. Roy T R Jones (b. 1924), English Boy 1st Class serving for the Royal Navy from Southend-on-Sea, Sussex, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [18]
  • Mr. Ronald G S Jones (b. 1919), Welsh Ordinary Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Tonpandy, Glamorgan, Wales, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [18]
  • Mr. Robert W Jones (b. 1924), English Boy 1st Class serving for the Royal Navy from Barton-upon-Irwell, Lancashire, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [18]
  • Mr. Kenneth Jones (b. 1923), English Ordinary Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Northallerton, Yorkshire, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [18]
  • . (Another 10 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
HMS Prince of Wales
  • Mr. Stanley Jones, British sailor, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [19]
  • Mr. John Emyr Jones, British Marine, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [19]
  • Mr. Bernard Jones, British Boy, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [19]
  • Mr. Thomas Jones, British Able Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [19]
  • Mr. Stanley Jones, British Marine, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and died in the sinking [19]
  • . (Another 11 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
HMS Repulse
  • Mr. Selwyn Jones, British Steward, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [20]
  • Mr. Howard Wynn Jones, British Able Bodied Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and died in the sinking [20]
  • Mr. Hugh W Jones, British sailor, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [20]
  • Mr. Maldwyn Price Jones, British Able Bodied Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and died in the sinking [20]
  • Mr. Henry Norman Jones, British Ordinary Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and died in the sinking [20]
  • . (Another 10 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
HMS Royal Oak
  • Raymond Herbert S. Jones, British Leading Telegraphist with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he survived the sinking [21]
  • Thomas H. Jones, British Leading Stoker with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he survived the sinking [21]
  • Thomas John Jones (1922-1939), British Boy 1st Class with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he died in the sinking [21]
  • Sydney Walter Jones (d. 1939), British Seaman with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he died in the sinking [21]
  • Henry George Jones (1918-1939), British Able Seaman with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he died in the sinking [21]
  • . (Another 2 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Pan Am Flight 103 (Lockerbie)
  • Christopher Andrew Jones (1968-1988), American Student from Claverack, New York, America, who flew aboard the Pan Am Flight 103 from Frankfurt to Detroit, known as the Lockerbie bombing in 1988 and died [22]
RMS Lusitania
  • Mr. William Ewart Gladstone Jones, English Third Electrician from West Kirkby, Liverpool, England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and survived the sinking [23]
  • Mr. Michael Jones, English Trimmer from England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and survived the sinking [23]
  • Miss Mary Elizabeth Jones, English Stewardess from Bishopston, Bristol, England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking and was recovered [23]
  • Mr. Arthur Rowland Jones, English First Officer from England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and survived the sinking by escaping in life boat 15 [23]
  • Mr. Hugh Jones, English Greaser from Liverpool, England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [23]
  • . (Another 16 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
RMS Titanic
  • Mr. Albert Jones (d. 1912), aged 17, English Saloon Steward from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [24]
  • Mr. Arthur Ernest Jones (d. 1912), aged 38, English Plate Steward from Woolston, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [24]
  • Mr. H. Jones (d. 1912), aged 29, English Roast Cook from Alresford, Essex who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [24]
  • Mr. Reginald V. Jones (d. 1912), aged 20, English Saloon Steward from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [24]
  • Mr. Thomas William Jones, aged 32, English Able Seaman from Liverpool, Lancashire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and survived the sinking escaping on life boat 8 [24]
  • . (Another 1 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
USS Arizona
  • Mr. Hubert H. Jones, American Chief Water tender working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he survived the sinking [25]
  • Mr. Willard Worth Jones, American Seaman First Class from Tennessee, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [25]
  • Mr. Woodrow Wilson Jones, American Seaman Second Class from Alabama, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [25]
  • Mr. Leland Jones, American Seaman First Class from Tennessee, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [25]
  • Mr. Quincy Eugene Jones, American Private First Class from Texas, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [25]
  • . (Another 9 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Related Stories +

The Jones Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Heb dduw, heb ddim
Motto Translation: Without God, without anything.


William B. Jones

Legend has it that in 1881, The Jones Brewing Co. was founded when William B. "Stoney" Jones, a Welsh immigrant, won the brewery in a friendly game of poker in Sutersville, PA. Originally, Jones Brewing Co. was Eureka Brewing Company, and the beer brewed was Eureka Gold Crown Beer. Incidentally, the growing population of immigrants of the area found it hard to pronounce "Eureka", so they began asking for "Stoney's" beer, referencing the owner's nickname instead. Thus, Stoney's Beer was born.

The Brewery operated in Sutersville, PA until 1907 when it moved south down the Youghiogheny River to Smithton, PA. There, not only was the popular beer brewed, but it was also the place where Smithton and the surrounding communities received most of its water and ice. This helped keep the doors of Jones Brewing Co. open during the prohibition era of the 1930's. Post prohibition, due to public outcry and lack of tax money generated, Jones Brewing Co. devoted itself to the brewing and distributing of the distinct brands of "Stoney's" beers.

Stoney's Beer is an "Old World" brew, as it was modeled after the beer styles of many of the immigrants that came to the United States. Stoney's Beer has always represented the ideals of the American Dream and relishes in the fact that many of its loyal customers are hardworking, "Blue Collar" citizens. Stoney Jones, with these ideals in mind, produced the brewing process for his beers. A little unknown fact was that Stoney was a diabetic and his special brewing process left out added sugars and preservatives. That being unique enough, Jones Brewing was also the first to create an American Dry Beer.

Jones Brewing Company's marketing success relies primarily on "grass roots" initiatives. This means that the company relies on its loyal customers and the products' visibility in the local Western Pennsylvania community. For instance, one of the company's high priorities is to support local bands, festivals, fairs, and an array of the community's causes. Jones Brewing Co. is proud to claim that they are a true, neighborhood beer, which advertises locally, and never promotes any other city's sport's teams. They are loyal to their region's hockey, football, and baseball players. Jones Brewing also supports local businesses, fire halls, ethnic clubs and fraternal orders specific to Western Pennsylvania.

Although Jones Brewing Company's roots run deep in Western Pennsylvania, its brands have made an impression throughout the country. Stoney's Beer and Stoney's Light Beer have been featured in many television shows and movies such as Three Rivers starring Bruce Willis, My Name is Earl, and the award winning show, Northern Exposure. Jones Brewing Co. has other ties to Hollywood, most notably with Shirley Jones, the actress of the show The Partridge Family. She is the granddaughter of Stoney Jones and occasionally still visits the brewery in Smithton.

Not only popular in Hollywood, the brands of Jones Brewing Co. have been recognized for their quality at many beer competitions. They have won select awards such as the silver medal at the International beer Tasting Contest, the silver medal for Best American Lager at the Great American Beer Festival, and the bronze medal for the Greatest American Lager at the Great American Beer Festival.

Throughout the years, Stoney's beers have been a staple of the local community, a representative of the hardworking, "Blue Collar" men and women, and an example of the American Dream. They pride themselves in the quality, consistency, and the loyalty to the Western Pennsylvanian region. Currently, Jones Brewing products are proudly produced at CHC Latrobe, which was previously The Latrobe Brewing Co. Producing at the plant in Latrobe causes the brands to return to their roots and the company couldn't be happier about this fact. Jones Brewing Company, your true local beer is owned, brewed, and packaged in Westmoreland County and is distributed throughout Western Pennsylvania and the Tri-State area.

William B Jones By Daniel Jones October 07, 2007 at 10:46:26 My 3rd Great Grandfather was William Benjamin Jones who was born in Breconshire, Wales in July of 1821. He had married Anne Thomas born in Wales.

My 2nd Great Grandfather was Benjamin William Jones who was born 11 Oct 1848 in Glasgow, , Lanark, Scotland. He was a Guard to Queen Victoria in the 1870's.


William B. Jones (1928- )

On July 26, 1977, President Jimmy Carter nominated William B. Jones as the United States Ambassador to Haiti. The U.S. Senate confirmed Jones and soon after he took up his post in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Born on May 2, 1928, to Bill and LaVelle Jones in Los Angeles, California, Ambassador Jones grew up in a racially integrated neighborhood.

In 1945 Jones entered the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and graduated in 1949 with an A.B. degree in political science with a history minor. From June until September 1, 1949, he studied abroad on a scholarship at University College in Southampton, England. Jones returned to Los Angeles and enrolled in the University of Southern California (USC) School of Law, graduating in 1952 with a Juris Doctor degree.

Jones practiced law in Los Angeles from 1953 to 1962. He joined the U.S. Foreign Service within the U.S. State Department in Washington, D.C., in 1962 and for the next two years worked within the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs as Chief of West Coast and Mali Programs. From 1964 to 1967 he was Deputy Director of the Office of African Programs, and from 1967 to 1969, Director of Programs Evaluation and Analysis Staff. Jones then served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs from 1969 to 1973.

William Jones’s first overseas assignment came in 1973 when he was stationed at the U.S. Embassy in Paris, France, serving as the United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural and Organization (UNESCO). He remained in that post until 1977.

Jones next served as U.S. Ambassador to Haiti from 1977 to 1980. During his ambassadorship, Jean-Claude Duvalier (“Baby Doc”) reigned as dictator of Haiti. Jones’s principal responsibility was to make sure during that tumultuous period that Haiti would transition peacefully from two decades of dictatorship under the Duvaliers (Francois “Papa Doc” and Jean-Claude “Baby Doc”) peacefully into a democracy.

Following his ambassadorship, Jones was the Diplomat in Residence at Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia, from 1980 to 1981. He returned to the State Department within the Bureau of Intelligence and Research (1981-1982). Here, Jones applied his legal skills to the development of the 1982 Law of the Sea Treaty. From 1983 to 1984 Jones was the Ambassador in Residence at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Jones left the Foreign Service in 1984 after 22 years of service. He then went to work for Congressman George Crockett of Michigan. Jones was Crockett’s Staff Director with the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee. From 1988 to 1989, Jones practiced law in Washington, D.C. and in 1988 he was also a Visiting Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Foundation of Princeton, New Jersey. In addition, Jones served as Ambassador in Residence and the Johns Professor of Political Science at Hampden-Sydney College in Hampden-Sydney, Virginia (1993-2007) and as Distinguished Visiting Professor at Pepperdine University in Malibu, California (1993-2004).

Ambassador William B. Jones, a member of Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity, is married to Joanne Jones. They have three children.


The Mystery of William Jones, An Enslaved Man Owned by Ulysses S. Grant

On March 29, 1859, Ulysses S. Grant went to the St. Louis Courthouse to attend to a pressing legal matter. That day Grant signed a manumission paper freeing William Jones, an enslaved African American man that he had previously acquired from his father-in-law, “Colonel” Frederick F. Dent. Described as being “of Mullatto [sic] complexion,” five foot seven in height, and aged about thirty-five years, Jones now faced an exciting, but arduous life journey in freedom.[1] As fate would have it, William Jones would become the last enslaved person ever owned by a U.S. president, while Ulysses S. Grant holds the strange distinction of being the last of twelve presidents in U.S. history to have been a slaveholder.

The manumission of William Jones written in Ulysses S. Grant’s handwriting on March 29, 1859. Photo courtesy of the Missouri Historical Society.

From 1854 to 1859, Grant struggled to support his family as a hardscrabble farmer in St. Louis, Missouri. During this time he grew fruits, vegetables, grains, and oats at White Haven, an 850-acre plantation that was the childhood home of his wife, Julia Dent Grant, and owned by his father-in-law. Enslaved labor did most of the work at White Haven, and at some point Grant acquired ownership of William Jones.[2] Beyond these basic facts, the relationship between Grant and Jones is riddled with ambiguity. When did Grant acquire Jones? Did he pay money for Jones, or was he a “gift” from his father-in-law? Why did Grant feel the need to acquire a slave in the first place? Why did he free him? What sort of work did Jones do for Grant and his family? What was the relationship between the two men like? Unfortunately the single primary source document for historians to analyze—the manumission paper written in Grant’s own hand—fails to convey reliable answers to these questions. Further complicating matters, Grant never mentioned Jones again in any of his existing papers or in his famed Personal Memoirs. And perhaps the biggest question looming over the entire discussion is “what happened to William Jones after he was freed?”

As an interpreter at Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site, I face visitor questions about William Jones on a daily basis. While I often struggle to give satisfactory answers to these questions, I have taken a great interest in trying to provide some sort of answer to the last one. After all, Jones should not exist simply as a footnote in Ulysses S. Grant’s life story (as he is so often depicted in popular Grant biographies) but as an individual with his own thoughts, experiences, and struggles both in slavery and in freedom. To that end I have endeavored over the past year to research what may have happened to Jones after his manumission. In the course of my work I have made two important, but very tenuous, discoveries about William Jones.

The first concerns where Jones may have settled once he became free. In a time before the invention of the telephone, major cities throughout the United States published city directories that listed residents’ names, home addresses, and occupation. In the course of looking through the 1860 St. Louis city directory online I found a listing for “Jones William (Col’d)” in the directory. His listing states that he worked as a horse driver and was living at rear 100 Myrtle Street, which was very close to the St. Louis riverfront and is now part of the grounds at Gateway Arch National Park. (“Rear” refers to an outbuilding or small home in a back alley.) Further research in the directory found that Jones was living with five other free people of color in the same house, while a man named Herman Charles who worked in the furniture business was living at the main home. He was most likely renting out the rear home to Jones and his cohorts.[3]

A screenshot of the William Jones listing in the 1860 St. Louis City Directory. Photo Courtesy of Rollanet.

Does this listing represent the same William Jones that was freed by Ulysses S. Grant? Unfortunately, there is no listing in the 1860 federal census for a William Jones of African American descent living in downtown St. Louis. On the one hand, it was common—both then and now—for census-takers to miss residents during the surveying process.[4] Moreover, it is entirely plausible that Jones would have opted to stay in St. Louis. Only two percent of the city’s population was enslaved by 1860, and a small but thriving community of 1,500 free blacks lived and worked in St. Louis as barbers, blacksmiths, cooks, dockworkers, hotel and restaurant workers, and laborers.[5] Where else would Jones have been able to quickly settle and start working, especially if he had any other family to support? St. Louis may have been his best option at the time. On the other hand, a census listing would have confirmed the age of the William Jones listed in the directory and helped confirm if he was the same person previously owned by Grant. That “William Jones” is such a common name further complicates matters. Without a census record the city directory listing is therefore compelling but inconclusive.

A map of St. Louis in 1857. The red square notes where 100 Myrtle Street was located at the time. Today it is part of the grounds at Gateway Arch National Park. Photo courtesy of the author.

The second insight concerns court records from the St. Louis Courthouse. On May 6, 1861, the court records indicate that a “William Jones (Col’d)” was arrested with several other free blacks for not having their freedom papers. Like other slave states throughout the South, Missouri law assumed that African Americans were enslaved unless proven otherwise. When African Americans received their freedom in Missouri, they were required to apply for a “freedom license,” post a bond between 100 dollars and 1,000 dollars, and demonstrate to the court that they were “of good character and behavior, and capable of supporting [themselves] by lawful employment.”[6] Sometimes a benevolent slaveholder would pay the bond, but often the person being freed was held responsible. Grant’s financial troubles while living in St. Louis would have most likely prevented him from posting Jones’s bond in 1859. In any case, the William Jones arrested in 1861 was publicly whipped on the steps of the courthouse for his indiscretion and ordered to leave Missouri within three days. Gateway Arch National Park Historian Bob Moore originally found this court record and stated in an email to staff at Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site that he believes it was the same William Jones that was freed by Grant, but nevertheless staff at both sites recognize that the evidence once again cannot fully corroborate the claim one way or the other.[7]

Other research I conducted proved frustrating and led to dead ends. I looked at the military records of more than 250 black soldiers named “William Jones” who served in United States Colored Infantry units during the Civil War without finding one who matched the description for height, complexion, and age listed in the 1859 manumission paper. Likewise, while there are multiple listings for “William Jones (Col’d)” in St. Louis City Directories from 1861 to 1865, it is nearly impossible to confirm if they are the same one previously listed in 1860. Furthermore, there is no William Jones of African American descent listed in the 1870 federal census for St. Louis. My research continues in earnest, but like many enslaved African Americans, the story of William Jones’s life in freedom is shrouded in mystery. As Fredrick Douglass once stated, “genealogical tress [sic] do not flourish among slaves.”[8]

Where else should I look for information on William Jones? What research have you done on enslaved African Americans and their transition to freedom? Let me know your thoughts in the comment section below.

[1] The original manumission paper is housed at the Missouri Historical Society. A transcription of the document is located in John Y. Simon, ed., The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant, Volume 1:1837-1861 (Southern Illinois University Press, 1967), 347.

[2] National Park Service, “Slavery at White Haven,” Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site, April 2, 2018, accessed October 26, 2018, https://www.nps.gov/ulsg/learn/historyculture/slaveryatwh.htm.

[3] “Kennedy’s 1860 St. Louis City Directory,” Rollanet, 2007, accessed October 24, 2018, https://www.rollanet.org/

[4] Pew Research Center, “Imputation: Adding People to the Census,” Pew Research Center, May 4, 2011, accessed October 20, 2018, http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2011/05/04/imputation-adding-people-to-the-census/.

[5] National Park Service, “African-American Life in St. Louis, 1804-1865,” Gateway Arch National Park, 2018, accessed October 26, 2018, https://www.nps.gov/jeff/learn/historyculture/african-american-life-in-saint-louis-1804-through-1865.htm Lorenzo J. Greene, Gary Kremer, and Antonio F. Holland, Missouri’s Black Heritage, Revised Edition (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1993).

[6] The mention of William Jones is in the St. Louis County Record Book 10, “May 6, 1861,” 333, Gateway Arch National Park Archives, St. Louis Ebony Jenkins, “Freedom Licenses in St. Louis City and County, 1835-1865,” Gateway Arch National Park, 2008, accessed October 26, 2018, https://www.nps.gov/jeff/learn/historyculture/loader.cfm?csModule=security/getfile&PageID=3120173 Kelly Kennington, In the Shadow of Dred Scott: St. Louis Freedom Suits and the Legal Culture of Slavery in Antebellum America (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2017).

[7] Robert Moore, email to Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site Staff, November 10, 2017.

[8] Frederick Douglass, My Bondage and My Freedom (New York: Miller, Orton, & Mulligan, 1855), 34.


Benjamin Franklin Jones

The obituary of his daughter Sarah Eason Jones Johnson, indicates that her family moved from Brownsville, TN to White Co, AR in 1845. Mary Garland Goodwin's brother Edmund Chisman Goodwin also made the move with his family. (During his Arkansas sojourn he used the name John W. Goodwin.) The Jones family lost two of their children to typhoid fever. Sarah Eason Jones relayed to her granddaughter Sue that her mother grieved for those lost children and refused to walk after their death, having to be carried around by the servants. By 1880 Mary Garland Goodwin had died and her husband Benjamin Franklin Jones was living in the West Point, AR household of his daughter's husband. Per family information he died in that house July 1885. He is buried in Riverside Cemetery, West Point, AR. Mary Garland Goodwin and the children are reported to be buried in a White Co, AR cemetery that was once called "Walkers". This author has not located a record of their burial.

Descendants of William Jones
of York & Brunswick Co, VA & Northampton Co, NC

1. William 1 Jones died Aft. 30 Oct 1784 in Northampton Co, NC 1 . He married Martha.

Children of William Jones and Martha are:

4 iii. Richard Jones. He married Sarah.

6 v. Lucy Jones. She married Gardener Harvel.

2. Mary 2 Jones (William 1 ) She married Moses Johnson, son of Moses Johnson and Ann Clanton. He died Bef. Sep 1796 in Greensville Co, VA 2 .

Children of Mary Jones and Moses Johnson are:

7 i. Phillip 3 Johnson, born Bet. 1784 - 1790 in Greensville Co, VA 3,4 died Bef. Jan 1840 in Greensville Co, VA. He married Jincy born Bet. 1784 - 1794 4 .

8 ii. Col. Moses Jones Johnson, born Abt. 1785 in Virginia 5,6 died 14 Aug 1857 in Marshall Co, MS 7,8 .


William Arthur Jones

A photo created by Stanford Studio. View the original source document: WHI 30865

With his brothers, David Benton Jones and Thomas Davies Jones, both of whom were Princeton graduates and prominent Illinois attorneys, William purchased the Mineral Point Zinc Co. in 1883. The company was reorganized with David Jones as president, Thomas as vice-president, and William as secretary-treasurer, and soon was established on a paying basis. In 1897 the company became affiliated with the New Jersey Zinc Co., one of the largest zinc producers in the U.S., and made extensive land purchases in southwestern Wisconsin for mining purposes. Although William&rsquos brothers moved to Chicago, he remained a resident of Mineral Point. He was secretary-treasurer of the Mineral Point Zinc Co. from 1887 to 1897.

In 1897 he was appointed U.S. Commissioner of Indian Affairs by President McKinley, and served in this capacity until January 1905. Then he was general manager of the Mineral Point Zinc Co. (1905-1912), served as western manager of the New Jersey Zinc Co., and was also superintendent and general manager of the Mineral Point and Northern R.R. (1905-1912).

Late in 1906 the family moved into a grand new home at 215 Ridge Street in Mineral Point. William A. Jones died there 17 September 1912 at age 68. After a few years his wife and children moved to Chicago, leaving the mansion unoccupied and well-maintained by a family trust until it was sold in 1985, in pristine condition. Today it is a popular Bed & Breakfast and Retreat Center.


Watch the video: ENG 491 How William Jones Discovered Indo-European