Stoddard DD- 566 - History

Stoddard DD- 566 - History

Stoddard
(DD-566: dp. 2,050; 1. 376'5; b. 39'7"; dr. 17'9; s. 35.2 k. (tl.); cpl, 329; a. 5 5, 10 40mm., 10 21" tt.;cl. Fletcher)

Stoddard (DD-566) was laid down at Seattle, Wash., by the Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp. on 10 March 1944, launched on 19 November 1944, sponsored by Mrs. Mildred Gould Holcomb; and commissioned on 15 April 1945, Comdr. Horace Meyers in command.

Following shakedown training out of San Diego and an availability at Seattle, Stoddard screened a convoy to Pearl Harbor, departing the west coast on 16 July and reaching Hawaii on the 29th. She entered another brief availability period at Pearl Harbor, then headed north. On 8 August, she arrived in Adak, Alaska, and joined Task Force (TF) 94, made up of Trenton (C-11), Concord. (C-10), Richmond (CL-9), and the destroyers of Destroyer Division (DesDiv) 57.

The mission of TF 94 was to harass Japanese outposts in the Kuril Islands, located to the northeast of Japan proper and west of the Aleutian Islands. On 14 August, Stoddard sailed with the task force to make her first offensive sweep of those forward enemy positions. Poor weather conditions forced the ships to abandon the mission. Task Force 94 was redesignated TF 92 between that first abortive mission and the second one, begun on 26 August. Foul weather again foiled the American attack, and the task force put into Attu. The storms were so bad and came so often that TF 92 did not pull off a raid until late November.

During the evening hours of 21 November, the cruisers and destroyers pounded the Japanese installations at Matsuwa, damaging the airfields and other installations heavily. Heavy winds and seas slowed TF 92's retirement to nine knots, but, at the same time stopped enemy air pursuit. The warships returner safely to Attu on the 25th.

From Adak, DesDiv 113, including Stoddard, was routed to the submarine base at Dutch Harbor. After spending the first two weeks in December at Dutch Harbor, the destroyers put to sea on the 13th and rejoined TF 92. On 3 January 1945, the task force embarked upon another sweep of Japan's Kuril defenses. Two days later, under the cover of snow squalls but with calm seas, the task force bombarded the Surabachi Wan area of Paramushiro, severely damaging canning installations and airfields. TF 92 retired to Attu at high speed and returned to Dutch Harbor on the 13th for a ten-day recreation period.

On 16 January, Stoddard and Rowe (DD-564) headed south for operational training in the Hawaiian Islands. They arrived at Pearl Harbor on the 22d and departed on 7 February to return to Attu. They reached Massacre Bay on 13 February, just in time to join the group headed for the bombardment of Kuabu Zaki. The ships put to sea on 16 February and arrived off Paramushiro just after sunset on the 18th. They bombarded the island until midnight and then retired to Attu, where they arrived on the 20th. Three days later, they shifted to Adak for supplies and repairs. They returned to Attu on 8 March. On 15 March, they hit Matsuwa again. From 1 to 17 April, Stoddard joined the task force in exercises in the vicinity of Adak. On the 18th, she and the rest of DesDiv 13 bade farewell to the cold winds and waters of the Aleutians chain.

Stoddard entered Pearl Harbor for the third time on 24 April. For almost a month, her crew enjoyed recreation in the islands and conducted operational training in preparation for assignment to Okinawa and the Fast Carrier Task Force. Stoddard sailed from Pearl Harbor on 11 May, in the screen of Ticonderoga (CV 14), bound for Ulithi. Along the way, Ticonderoga's air group got in a little live ammunition practice on 17 May, when they struck the Japanese forces isolated on Taroa and the other islets of Maleolap Atoll. The task group reached the lagoon at Ulithi on 22 May. A week later, Stoddard departed the atoll to take up station off Okinawa.

On 2 June, she arrived off Okinawa and took up radar picket station. Though the Okinawa campaign was rapidly nearing its conclusion, the proximity of airfields in Japan and on Formosa allowed enemy air power to continue to make life unpleasant for the ships around the island. True, the deluge of kamikazes had abated, but the skies continued to shower significant numbers of suicide planes. Stoddard covered the withdrawal of several cargo ships on 4 June during a typhoon-evasion maneuver; then returned to her station. At sunset on 7 June, two planes attacked, but both were sent hurtling into the sea before they could reach the ships. During her tour of duty on the picket line, Stoddard claimed two Japanese planes for herself, two assists, and one probable kill.

She cleared Okinawa on 17 June in the screen of Mississippi (BB-41). Three days later, she passed through Surigao Strait into Leyte Gulf. For the remainder of the month, she underwent repairs and took on provisions at San Pedro Bay. She put to sea again on 1 July, this time in the screen of TF 38, the Fast Carrier Task Force. For the next 45 days, she guarded the carriers as their planes made repeated strikes on the Japanese home islands. Stoddard was detached once during that period of time, on 23 July to join DesDiv 113 in a bombardment of Chi Chi Jima in the Bonins. After the cessation of hostilities on 15 August, she continued to cruise the waters near Japan with TF 38 to cover the occupation forces She cleare Japanese waters from 21 September until 7 October while she underwent availability at Eniwetok, then returned for training exercises until November.

On 18 November, she departed Japan for the United States. She transited the Panama Canal a month later and arrived at Philadelphia two days before Christmas, Stoddard went through a yard overhaul until late March, then ferried personnel to Charleston, S.C., in April. She began inactivation overhaul at Charleston on 8 July and was placed out of commission in January of 1947.

Stoddard remained inactive, berthed with the Charleston Group of the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, until November 1950 when she was reactivated. She fitted out at Charleston and Newport, R.I., and then conducted shakedown cruises at Newport and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Stoddard alternated deployments with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean Sea with overhauls at Philadelphia and operations along the Atlantic seaboard of the United States until December of 1954, when she transited the Panama Canal and joined the Pacific Fleet.

In January 1955, she embarked upon her first deployment to the western Pacific since World War II. Soon after her arrival, she participated in the evacuation of Chinese Nationalists from the Tachen Islands. Following that operation, she served on the Taiwan Strait patrol. Stoddard followed a schedule of deployments to the Far East alternated with west coast operations throughout the remainder of her career. However, during the first 10 years, she concentrated on the South China Sea-Taiwan Strait area because that was the major trouble spot for the United States in the western Pacific. Although in 1961, the Laotian crisis brought her to the southeast Asia area, where she would soon concentrate all her efforts.

On 4 June 1965, Stoddard departed from San Diego to begin her annual tour of duty in Asian waters; but this deployment was different. By mid-June, she was operating along the coast of Vietnam, principally in the Danang area, giving gunfire support to American and South Vietnamese troops operating ashore against the forces of the Viet Cong insurgents and their allies the North Vietnamese regulars. After upkeep in Japan and a rest and relaxation period in Hong Kong, the destroyer joined Independence (CVA-61) on Yankee Station to serve as plane guard for the pilots flying missions inland and as screening unit for the carrier herself. By early November, she was back in Japan, preparing to return to America. She departed Sasebo on the 5th and reached San Diego on the 24th.

Stoddard spent the next twelve months operating with the 1st Fleet in the waters off the western coast of the United States. Her primary mission was to maintain operational readiness through training, which ran the gamut from antisubmarine warfare exercises to bombardment drills. On 5 November 1966, the destroyer stood out of San Diego for Pearl Harbor and the western Pacific. She spent two days, 10 and 11 November, in port at Pearl Harbor before continuing on to Japan. She reached Yokosuka on 20 November and remained there until the 26th, when she got underway for Subic Bay in the Philippines.

Like the previous one, this deployment was given over entirely to naval support for the American and South Vietnamese forces struggling against Viet Cong and North Vietnamese communists. Stoddard did three tours of duty off Vietnam during this deployment. The first lasted from 2 December 1966 to 4 January 1967 and consisted entirely of plane guard duty with Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) in the Gulf of Tonkin. After repairs and upkeep at Subic Bay, Stoddard returned to Yankee Station on 17 January. For almost a month, she cruised on Tet Holiday patrol and participated in Operation "Sea Dragon," the interdiction of enemy waterborne and coastal logistics operations. During that month, she sank 26 small waterborne logistics craft and duelled with shore batteries a number of times.

On 16 February, she returned to Subic Bay for upkeep and, after four days, got underway for a rest and relaxation period at Hong Kong. The destroyer returned to Yankee Station on 3 March for her third and final line period of this deployment. Following five days of plane-guard duty for Kitty Hawk, Stoddard resumed "Sea Dragon" operations. This line period brought about a change in the focus of Operation "Sea Dragon." Not only did it become more important to the war effort, but a subtle shift in target emphasis required an ever-increasing amount of shore bombardment and counterbattery fire. Stodard destroyed radar installations and ammunition dumps, pounded staging areas, and silenced shore batteries. The latter however, scored some minor success on 17 March, when Stoddard assisted in the rescue of a downed American near the mouth of the Song Giap River. She came under intense fire from a battery ashore and sustained one direct hit. She spent the last five days of this line period plane-guarding for Hancock (CVA-19).

After stopping at Sasebo and Yokosuka, Stoddard got underway on 20 April to return to the United States. Heading via Midway Island and Pearl Harbor she arrived at San Diego on 5 May. She spent the remainder of May and the month of June training Naval Academy midshipmen; then resumed local operations until 22 September, when she entered Long Beach Naval Shipyard for overhaul. She completed overhaul on 19 December and returned to local operations out of San Diego on the following day.

Stoddard served the Navy actively until September 1969. During the last 21 months of her active career she made one more cruise to the western Pacific, from 10 June to 7 December 1968. She operated with the 1st Fleet along the west coast during the remainder. In September 1969, she was decommissioned and placed in the Pacific Reserve Fleet at Mare Island, Calif., where she remains as of March 1975.

Stoddard earned three battle stars for World War II and three battle stars for the Vietnam War.


Departing Seattle on July 16, the Stoddard steamed forth to Pearl Harbor and then on to Alaska to join Task Force 94. Her first duty with Task Force 94 was to harass Japanese outposts located between Japan and the Aleutian Islands. The attack was set for August, but inclement weather kept delaying the task and the feat was not accomplished until November of that year.

From January 16 until the end of May, 1945, the Stoddard spent most of her time completing patrols in and around Hawaii. On May 29, the Stoddard was sent to Okinawa. The Okinawa Campaign was well underway when she arrived. She immediately took up picket patrol when entering the area and provided gun support and escort services. The destroyer claimed two confirmed Kamikaze kills, two assists and one probable kill of an enemy aircraft during this mission. On June 17, the Stoddard left Okinawa and arrived in San Pedro Bay for supplies and repairs. For the next month and a half she performed patrols as a guard for aircraft carriers and made many strikes against the Japanese islands. She continued to patrol Japanese waters after the surrender. The Stoddard returned to the U.S. on December 23 and began an immediate overhaul. She was decommissioned in January 1947 and added to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. The Stoddard was reactivated in 1950 and joined the 6th fleet for maneuvers in the Caribbean and the Mediterranean. In 1954 she was sent to join the Pacific Fleet. From 1955 to 1966 the Stoddard performed duties in and around the Pacific, with most duties centered around Hawaii. In November 1966 the Stoddard left for her first tour in Vietnam. The ship completed three tours in Vietnam and was an important part of the Sea Dragon Campaign. During this campaign the ship had 26 confirmed small vessel kills. On her last tour she was struck by a direct enemy hit when she stopped to rescue an American. The ship, however, was able to continue protecting the aircraft carrier she was with until the end of the battle.


Stoddard DD- 566 - History

The Square-Bridge Fletcher-class Destroyers in 1943-1945 configuration.

We now have prints of the Fletcher-class destroyers in the following configuration: Modified, square-faced bridge five single 5-inch gun mounts (two forward and three aft) five twin 40-mm gun mounts seven single 20-mm gun mounts two quintuple 21-inch torpedo tube mounts and a pole foremast with SC and SG radar. This configuration is applicable only to the ships listed on this page from 1943 to 1945.

USS Brownson (DD-518)
USS Daly (DD-519)
USS Isherwood (DD-520)
USS Kimberly (DD-521)
USS Luce (DD-522)
USS Abner Read (DD-526)
USS Ammen (DD-527)
USS Mullany (DD-528)
USS Bush (DD-529)
USS Trathen (DD-530)
USS Hazelwood (DD-531)
USS Heermann (DD-532)
USS Hoel (DD-533)
USS McCord (DD-534)
USS Miller (DD-535)
USS Owen (DD-536)
USS The Sullivans (DD-537)
USS Stephen Potter (DD-538)
USS Tingey (DD-539)
USS Twining (DD-540)
USS Yarnall (DD-541)
USS Boyd (DD-544)
USS Bradford (DD-545)
USS Brown (DD-546)
USS Cowell (DD-547)
USS Franks (DD-554)
USS Haggard (DD-555)
USS Hailey (DD-556)
USS Johnston (DD-557)
USS Laws (DD-558)
USS Longshaw (DD-559)
USS Morrison (DD-560)
USS Prichett (DD-561)
USS Robinson (DD-562)
USS Ross (DD-563)
USS Rowe (DD-564)
USS Smalley (DD-565)
USS Stoddard (DD-566)
USS Watts (DD-567)
USS Wren (DD-568)
USS Charrette (DD-581)
USS Conner (DD-582)
USS Hall (DD-583)
USS Halligan (DD-584)
USS Haraden (DD-585)
USS Newcomb (DD-586)
USS Bell (DD-587)
USS Burns (DD-588)
USS Izard (DD-589)
USS Paul Hamilton (DD-590)
USS Twiggs (DD-591)
USS Hart (DD-594)
USS Metcalf (DD-595)
USS Shields (DD-596)
USS Wiley (DD-597)
USS Abbot (DD-629)
USS Braine (DD-630)
USS Erben (DD-631)
USS Hale (DD-642)
USS Sigourney (DD-643)
USS Stembel (DD-644)
USS Albert W. Grant (DD-649)
USS Caperton (DD-650)
USS Cogswell (DD-651)
USS Ingersoll (DD-652)
USS Knapp (DD-653)
USS Bearss (DD-654)
USS John Hood (DD-655)
USS Van Valkenburgh (DD-656)
USS Charles J. Badger (DD-657)
USS Colahan (DD-658)
USS Dashiell (DD-659)
USS Bullard (DD-660)
USS Kidd (DD-661)
USS Bennion (DD-662)
USS Heywood L. Edwards (DD-663)
USS Richard P. Leary (DD-664)
USS Bryant (DD-665)
USS Black (DD-666)
USS Chauncey (DD-667)
USS Clarence K. Bronson (DD-668)
USS Cotten (DD-669)
USS Dortch (DD-670)
USS Gatling (DD-671)
USS Healy (DD-672)
USS Hickox (DD-673)
USS Hunt (DD-674)
USS Lewis Hancock (DD-675)
USS Marshall (DD-676)
USS McDermut (DD-677)
USS McGowan (DD-678)
USS McNair (DD-679)
USS Melvin (DD-680)
USS Hopewell (DD-681)
USS Porterfield (DD-682)
USS Stockham (DD-683)
USS Wedderburn (DD-684)
USS Picking (DD-685)
USS Halsey Powell (DD-686)
USS Uhlmann (DD-687)
USS Remey (DD-688)
USS Wadleigh (DD-689)
USS Norman Scott (DD-690)
USS Mertz (DD-691)
USS Callaghan (DD-792)
USS Cassin Young (DD-793)
USS Irwin (DD-794)
USS Preston (DD-795)
USS Benham (DD-796)
USS Cushing (DD-797)
USS Monssen (DD-798)
USS Jarvis (DD-799)
USS Porter (DD-800)
USS Colhoun (DD-801)
USS Gregory (DD-802)
USS Little (DD-803)
USS Rooks (DD-804)


Stoddard DD- 566 - History

(DD-566: dp. 2,060 1. 376'6" b. 39'8" dr. 17'9" s. 37 k. cpl. 319 a. 5 6", 10 40mm., 7 20mm., 10 21"tt., 6 dcp., 2 dct. cl. Fletcher)

Smalley (DD-565) was laid down on 14 February 1943 by the Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp., Seattle, Wash. launched on 27 October 1943, sponsored by Miss Lina A. Mayo and commissioned on 31 March 1944, Comdr. P. H. Horn in command.

Following shakedown, the ship and one destroyer got underway on 7 June 1944 to escort three troop transports to Hawaii. The convoy arrived at Pearl Harbor on 11 July 1944. On the 28th, the ship's complement manned the rail for President Franklin D. Roosevelt when he steamed into Pearl Harbor on board cruiser, Baltimore ( CA-68) .

On 3 August, Smalley sailed for the Aleutians. On 21 November 1944, the destroyer fired on buildings, tents, machine gun emplacements, and an airstrip on Matsuwa Island in the Japanese Kurils. In the bombardment, she fired 466 rounds. She later made three more similar bombardment missions during her Aleutian tour. On 18 April 1945, Smalley received orders back to Hawaii.

On 11 May, she joined Rowe (DD-564) and Stoddard (DD-566) in screening aircraft carrier, Ticonderoga (CV-14), to Ulithi Atoll. A week later, planes from Ticonderoga struck Taroa Island. During this raid, Smalley rescued a crewman from a downed torpedo plane.

On 4 June 1945, Smalley arrived off Okinawa to help the Allied struggle for that bitterly contested island. Smalley was assigned close support radar picket duty. Her duty was twofold: antisubmarine patrolling and air defense of the transport area. Following this mission, she participated in the final assault on the Japanese home islands by offensive surface sweeps, control of Combat Air Patrol, reconnaissance missions, and shore bombardment. Her final shore bombardment occurred on 23 July 1945 when she shelled Chichi Jima.

Smalley returned to the United States in October 1945 and, a little over two years later, in January 1947, she was decommissioned. The ship was placed in the United States Atlantic Reserve Fleet at the Charleston ( S.C. ) Naval Shipyard.

The Korean conflict prompted the recommissioning of Smalley on 3 July 1951. After refresher training at Guantanamo Bay, Smalley sailed to Newport, R.I., arriving at her new home port on 10 December 1951. Smalley spent all of 1952 on additional training coupled with maintenance and calibration of equipment and, after a yard period in Boston in the spring of 1953, she sailed on 19 May for Korea. On 2 July, Smalley entered the Korean Combat Zone acting as plane guard for Princeton (CVA-37). Smalley continued operating with TF 77 as the carriers of the force carried out the famous "Cherokee" strikes until the signing of the armistice on 27 JuIy 1953.

Smalley remained in the former combat zone until early November. She performed such diverse tasks as ferrying 110 Marines from Sasebo, Japan, to Pusan, Korea, and assisting a South Korean fishing vessel in distress. In the latter case, she took on board the vessel's 29 men.

Smalley departed the Far East in November 1953 and returned to Newport on 15 January 1954. Her route homeward included calls at Hong Kong, Singapore, Ceylon, Saudi Arabia, Aden, Port Said, Piraeus, Cannes, and Gibraltar.

Smalley remained homeported in Newport, R.I., until July 1955 when she got underway for a northern Europe and a Mediterranean cruise. She visited England, Denmark, Finland, Scotland, Spain, France, and Turkey and worked with units of both the Danish and the British Fleets. Smalley sailed for home on 15 November and arrived in Newport on the 28th.

The year 1956 saw a cruise in Caribbean waters followed by a yard period. Then, in 1957, Smalley left Newport on what was to be her last operational assignment: a cruise with the Mideast Force showing the flag in ports along the eastern coast of Africa and along the shores of the Persian Gulf. En route to her new assignment, Smalley visited Sierra Leone, Capetown, and Mombasa (Kenya) before arriving at Karachi, Pakistan, on 10 February. Following two return trips to Bahrein in the Persian Gulf, she departed the area in April and, after calling once again at Mombasa, Capetown, Freetown, and Sierra Leone, Smalley returned home. On 12 June, Smalley went into drydock at the Charleston Naval Shipyard, and, on 23 August 1957, Smalley departed her homeport for the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. She was decommissioned there and entered the United States Atlantic Reserve Fleet where she remained until she was struck from the Navy list on 1 April 1965 and sold to the Norfolk Shipbuilding and Drydock Corporation.

Smalley was awarded three battle stars for her World War II operations and one star for Korea .


Description

We are happy to offer a classic style 5 panel custom US Navy destroyer DD 566 USS Stoddard embroidered hat.

For an additional (and optional) charge of $7.00, our hats can be personalized with up to 2 lines of text of 14 characters each (including spaces), such as with a veteran’s last name and rate and rank on the first line, and years of service on the second line.

Our DD 566 USS Stoddard embroidered hat comes in two styles for your choosing. A traditional “high profile” flat bill snap back style (with an authentic green under visor on the bottom of the flat bill), or a modern “medium profile” curved bill velcro back “baseball cap” style. Both styles are “one size fits all”. Our hats are made of durable 100% cotton for breathability and comfort.

Given high embroidery demands on these “made to order” hats, please allow 4 weeks for shipment.

If you have any questions about our hat offerings, please contact us at 904-425-1204 or e-mail us at [email protected] , and we will be happy to speak to you!


USS STODDARD DD-566 South Vietnam' Вьетнам Ветеран Лента Винил / Шелкография Рубашка или свитшоты

Покупатели оплачивают все взимаемые таможенные сборы и импортные пошлины. Продавец не несет ответственности за задержку доставки по вине таможни.

Варианты оплаты

Возврат и обмен

В магазине осуществляется обмен товаров и отмена заказа

Просто свяжитесь со мной в течение: 14 дней с момента доставки

Товары будут возвращены мне в течение: 21 с момента доставки

Запрос отмены в течение: 2 дней после покупки

Магазин не осуществляет возврат товаров

Однако прошу связаться со мной, если у вас возникнут какие-либо проблемы с заказом.

Следующие товары обмену и возврату не подлежат

В связи с особенностями этих товаров, если они доставлены без повреждений или не имеют дефектов, магазин не осуществляет возврат следующих товаров:

  • Индивидуальные и персональные заказы
  • Скоропортящиеся продукты (например, продукты питания или цветы)
  • Скачивание электронных материалов
  • Товары интимного характера (товары для здоровья/гигиены)
  • Товары со скидкой

Условия возврата

Покупатель оплачивает стоимость доставки товара при его возврате. Если товар возвращен не в первоначальном состоянии, покупатель несет ответственность за любое снижение ценности такого товара.


Vietnam War, 1965 – 1968

On 4 June 1965, Stoddard departed from San Diego to begin her annual tour of duty in Asian waters but this deployment was different. By mid-June, she was operating along the coast of Vietnam, principally in the dangerous area, giving gunfire support to American and South Vietnamese troops operating ashore against the forces of the Viet Cong insurgents and their allies, the North Vietnamese regulars. After upkeep in Japan and a rest and relaxation period in Hong Kong, the destroyer joined Independence (CVA-61) on Yankee Station to serve as plane-guard for the pilots flying missions inland and as screening unit for the carrier herself. By early November, she was back in Japan, preparing to return to America. She departed Sasebo on the 5th and reached San Diego on the 24th.

Stoddard spent the next twelve months operating with the 1st Fleet in the waters off the western coast of the United States. Her primary mission was to maintain operational readiness through training, which ran the gamut from antisubmarine warfare exercises to bombardment drills. On 5 November 1966, the destroyer stood out of San Diego for Pearl Harbor and the western Pacific. She spent two days, 10 and 11 November, in port at Pearl Harbor before continuing on to Japan. She reached Yokosuka on 20 November and remained there until the 26th, when she got underway for Subic Bay in the Philippines.

Like the previous one, this deployment was given over entirely to naval support for the American and South Vietnamese forces struggling against Viet Cong and North Vietnamese communists. Stoddard did three tours of duty off Vietnam during this deployment. The first lasted from 2 December 1966 to 4 January 1967 and consisted entirely of plane guard duty with Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) in the Gulf of Tonkin. After repairs and upkeep at Subic Bay, Stoddard returned to Yankee Station on 17 January. For almost a month, she cruised on Tết Holiday patrol and participated in Operation Sea Dragon, the interdiction of enemy waterborne and coastal logistics operations. During that month, she sank 26 small waterborne logistics craft and duelled with shore batteries a number of times.

On 16 February 1967, she returned to Subic Bay for upkeep and, after four days, got underway for a rest and relaxation period at Hong Kong. The destroyer returned to Yankee Station on 3 March for her third and final line period of this deployment. Following five days of plane-guard duty for Kitty Hawk, Stoddard resumed “Sea Dragon” operations. This line period brought about a change in the focus of Operation “Sea Dragon”. Not only did it become more important to the war effort, but a subtle shift in target emphasis required an ever-increasing amount of shore bombardment and counterbattery fire. Stoddard destroyed radar installations and ammunition dumps, pounded staging areas, and silenced shore batteries. The latter, however, scored some minor success on 17 March, when Stoddard assisted in the rescue of a downed American near the mouth of the Song Giap River. She came under intense fire from a battery ashore and sustained one direct hit. She spent the last five days of this line period plane guarding for Hancock (CVA-19).

After stopping at Sasebo and Yokosuka, Stoddard got underway on 20 April to return to the United States. Heading via Midway Island and Pearl Harbor, she arrived at San Diego on 5 May. She spent the remainder of May and the month of June training U.S. Naval Academy midshipmen then resumed local operations until 22 September, when she entered Long Beach Naval Shipyard for overhaul. She completed overhaul on 19 December 1967 and returned to local operations out of San Diego on the following day.

Stoddard served the Navy actively until September 1969. During the last 21 months of her active career, she made one more cruise to the western Pacific, from 10 June to 7 December 1968. She operated with the 1st Fleet along the west coast during the remainder. In September 1969, she was decommissioned and placed in the Pacific Reserve Fleet at Mare Island, Calif.

Stoddard was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register 1 June 1975—the last of the Fletcher-class destroyers to be stricken. She continued to serve as a test platform for the Pacific Missile Range until 1992, and finally was sunk by Navy SEALS NW of Hawaii 22 July 1997. [ 1 ]


More from this collection

USS Stoddard DD-566 Art Print

Regular price $ 89.99 Sale price $ 59.99

USS Stoddard DD-566 Box Framed Canvas Art

Regular price $ 169.99 Sale price $ 119.99

USS Stoddard DD-566 Coffee Cup Mug

Regular price $ 29.99 From $ 24.99

USS Stoddard DD-566 Navy Ship Plaque

Regular price $ 89.99 Sale price $ 59.99

Links

Follow Us

Contact

Navy Emporium
10120 W FLAMINGO RD
STE 4-196
LAS VEGAS 89147-8392


Contents

Following shakedown training out of San Diego and an availability at Seattle, Stoddard screened a convoy to Pearl Harbor, departing the west coast on 16 July and reaching Hawaii on the 29th. She entered another brief availability period at Pearl Harbor, then headed north. On 8 August, she arrived in Adak, Alaska, and joined Task Force 94 (TF㻞), made up of light cruisers Trenton (CL-11), Concord (CL-10), Richmond (CL-9), and the destroyers of Destroyer Division 57 (DesDiv㺹).


This photo of USS Stoddard DD 566 personalized print is exactly as you see it with the matte printed around it. You will have the choice of two print sizes, either 8″x10″ or 11″x14″. The print will be ready for framing, or you can add an additional matte of your own choosing then you can mount it in a larger frame. Your personalized print will look awesome when you frame it.

We PERSONALIZE your print of the USS Stoddard DD 566 with your name, rank and years served and there is NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE for this option. After you place your order you can simply email us or indicate in the notes section of your payment what you would like printed. For example:

United States Navy Sailor
YOUR NAME HERE
Proudly Served: Your Years Here

This would make a nice gift for yourself or that special Navy veteran you may know, therefore, it would be fantastic for decorating the home or office wall.

The watermark “Great Naval Images” will NOT be on your print.

Media Type Used:

The USS Stoddard DD 566 photo is printed on Archival-Safe Acid-Free canvas using a high-resolution printer and should last many years. The unique natural woven texture canvas offers a special and distinctive look that can only be captured on canvas. Most sailors loved his ship. It was his life. Where he had tremendous responsibility and lived with his closest shipmates. As one gets older, the appreciation for the ship and the Navy experience will get stronger. The personalized print shows ownership, accomplishment and an emotion that never goes away. When you walk by the print you will feel the person or the Navy experience in your heart.

We have been in business since 2005 and our reputation for having great products and customer satisfaction is indeed exceptional. You will, therefore, enjoy this product guaranteed.


Watch the video: USS Stoddard DD-566