USS Antaeus AS-21 - History

USS Antaeus AS-21 - History

Antaeus

The son of Neptune, the god of the sea in Roman mythology.

(AS-21: dp. 8,350; 1. 403'; b. 61'; dr. 21'6"; s. 20 k.; cpl. 440; a. 1
4", 2 3", 4 20mm.)

St. John was built in 1932 by the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Va.; operated as a passenger liner by the Eastern Steam Ship Co.; acquired by the Navy on 24 April 1941; renamed Antaeus (AS-21): and placed in commission on 17 May 1941, Comdr. R. S. Morse in command.

Following her commissioning, the submarine tender operated in the Caribbean. She took part in traini exercises and made repairs to the American submarines patrolling in those waters. Antaeus finished this task in September 1942, when she was assigned to transport duties and was redesignated AG-67. The ship then began shuttling troops to points in the Caribbean, the Canal Zone, and to Argentia, Newfoundland, from bases at New York City and Davisville, R.I.

Antaeus entered the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, N.Y., on 28 December 1944. There, she underwent conversion to a hospital ship. On 18 January 1945, the vessel was renamed Resew an redesignated (AH-18). Following a period of sea trials, the new hospital ship got underway for the Pacific theater of action. She arrived off Okinawa on 13 June, embarked men wounded in the fighting ashore, survived unscathed despite almost constant Japanese air attack against Allied shipping in the area, and safely delivered her patients to a hospital on Guam.

After a short upkeep period, Rescue joined the 3d Fleet on 5 July. She supported 3d Fleet ships conducting carrier strikes an bombardment of the Japanese home islands. The ship would rendezvous with the combatant vessels and take on casualties by breeches buoy both at night and under battle conditions. Upon the conclusion of World War II, Rescue sailed into Tokyo Bay
with the 3d Fleet and began the medical screening of Allied prisoners of war and shuttling them from various prison camps to the base at Yokohama.

In late September, the ship arrived at Guam where she discharged a few former prisoners whose home had been on that island. Rescue then proceeded to San Francisco, Calif. She was decommissioned on 29 June 1946 and was transferred to the Maritime Administration. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 15 August 1946. The vessel was subsequently refitted as a merchant ship and saw service as such from 1946 into 1959, in which year she was scrapped.

Rescue earned two battle stars for her World War 11 service.


USS Antaeus AS-21 - History

USS Antaeus (AS-21) on 30 June 1941
Click on this photograph for links to larger images of this class.

Class: ANTAEUS (AS-21)
Design: Pass. & Cargo, 1932
Displacement (tons): 5,518 light, 7,800 lim.
Dimensions (feet): 403.0' oa x 61.0' e x 20.2' lim.
Original Armament: 1-4"/50 2-3"/23 (1941)
Later armaments: 1-4"/50 2-3"/23 8-20mm (1942)
1-4"/50 4-3"/50 16-20mm (1943)
1-4"/50 2-3"/50 4-20mm (1944)
none as hospital ship (1945)
Complement: 409 (as AG, 1944)
Speed (kts.): 20
Propulsion (HP): 13,000
Machinery: Newport News turbines, 2 screws

Construction:

AS Name Acq. Builder Keel Launch Commiss.
21 ANTAEUS 24 Apr 41 Newport News SB & DD -- 9 Jan 32 21 Jun 41

Disposition:
AS Name Decomm. Strike Disposal Fate MA Sale
21 ANTAEUS 29 Apr 46 15 Aug 46 29 Jun 46 MC 9 Oct 58

Class Notes:
FY 1941. In 1932 the Eastern Steamship Lines took delivery of two new coastal passenger ships, SAINT JOHN and ACADIA for its service between New York, New England, and the Canadian Maritimes. They joined two similar ships, EVANGELINE and YARMOUTH, which had been built for this firm by Cramp in 1927. All four ships entered military service in 1941-42, SAINT JOHN with the Navy and ACADIA, EVANGELINE and YARMOUTH with the Army.

On 19 Mar 41 the Chief of the Bureau of Ships informed the CNO that, under existing acts, there was enough authorized tonnage and funds for one more large auxiliary. He pointed out that these had been earmarked for an AV but, since all the needed AVs had been otherwise provided for, he suggested that the Navy might want to acquire and convert another type of auxiliary in its place. On 16 Apr 41 the Auxiliary Vessels Board recommended that a suitable merchant vessel be acquired and immediately converted to a submarine tender. SAINT JOHN was selected and became ANTAEUS (AS-21).

This coastal passenger liner appears to have been only marginally suitable as a submarine tender. When operating in the Atlantic with Submarine Squadron 5 in 1941 ANTAEUS was described as an "accommodation vessel," suggesting that for this relatively small tender repair was a secondary function. After September 1942 she appears to have operated primarily as a coastal transport, carrying troops from the east coast to the Caribbean and to Argentia, Newfoundland, although the ship was not formally reassigned to Service Forces, Atlantic, and reclassified a miscellaneous auxiliary (AG) until September 1943. In December 1944 the JCS levied a requirement for six additional hospital ships, and the Navy chose ANTAEUS and REPUBLIC (AP-33) as its contribution. Between December 1944 and March 1945 ANTAEUS was converted at the New York Navy Yard from a transport to a hospital ship and was renamed RESCUE. Her sister, ACADIA, became an Army transport in late 1941, a "hospital transport" for the North African campaign in mid-1942, and a hospital ship in mid-1943.

After the Japanese surrender RESCUE was employed bringing troops home as part of Operation Magic Carpet. On 8 November 1945 CNO authorized Commander, Pacific Fleet to use Navy hospital ships in general transport service without changing their special markings but their designation was to be changed to APH. They would revert to the AH designation upon termination of this duty. At this time CNO made the temporary designation of APH-118 effective for RESCUE. RESCUE was released from Magic Carpet duty on 17 Jan 46, having been replaced by TRANQUILLITY on the Hawaii-San Francisco run.


USS Antaeus AS-21 - History

Following her commissioning, the submarine tender operated in the Caribbean. She took part in training exercises and made repairs to the American submarines patrolling in those waters.

Antaeus finished this task in September 1942, when she was assigned to transport duties and was redesignated AG-67. The ship then began shuttling troops to points in the Caribbean, the Canal Zone, and to Argentia, New Foundland, from bases at York City and Davisville, R.I.

Antaeus entered the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, N.Y. on 28 December 1944. There, she underwent conversion to a hospital ship. On 18 January 1945, the vessel was renamed Rescue and redesignated (AH-18). Following a period of sea trials, the new hospital ship got underway for the Pacific theater of action.

She arrived off Okinawa on 13 June, embarked men wounded in the fighting ashore, survived unscathed despite almost constant Japanese air attack against Allied shipping in the area, and safely delivered her patients to a hospital on Guam.

After a short upkeep period, Rescue joined the 3d Fleet on 5 July. She supported 3d Fleet ships conducting carrier strikes and bombardment of the Japanese home islands. The ship would rendezvous with the combatant vessels and take on casualties by breeches buoy both at night and under battle conditions.

Upon the conclusion of World War II, Rescue sailed into Tokyo Bay with the 3d Fleet and began the medical screening of Allied prisoners of war and shuttling them from various prison camps to the base at Yokohama. In late September, the ship arrived at Guam where she discharged a few former prisoners whose home had been on that island. Rescue then proceeded to San Francisco, Calif.

She was decommissioned on 29 June 1946 and was transferred to the Maritime Administration. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 15 August 1946. The vessel was subsequently refitted as a merchant ship and saw service as such from 1946 into 1959, in which year she was scrapped. Rescue earned two battle stars for her World War II service.


World War II service [ edit | edit source ]

Operations as USS Antaeus [ edit | edit source ]

Following her commissioning, the submarine tender operated in the Caribbean. She took part in training exercises and made repairs to the American submarines patrolling in those waters. Antaeus finished this task in September 1942, when she was assigned to transport duties and was redesignated AG-67. The ship then began shuttling troops to points in the Caribbean, the Panama Canal Zone, and to Argentia, Newfoundland, from bases at New York City and Davisville, Rhode Island.

Conversion to hospital ship USS Rescue [ edit | edit source ]

Antaeus entered the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York, on 28 December 1944. There, she underwent conversion to a hospital ship. On 18 January 1945, the vessel was renamed Rescue and redesignated (AH-18). Following a period of sea trials, the new hospital ship got underway for the Pacific Ocean theater of action.

She arrived off Okinawa on 13 June, embarked men wounded in the fighting ashore, survived unscathed despite almost constant Japanese air attack against Allied shipping in the area, and safely delivered her patients to a hospital on Guam.

With a bed capacity of 792 and a complement of 440, Rescue provided hospital services, consultation, preventative medicine, and casualty evacuation.

After a short upkeep period, Rescue joined the U.S. 3d Fleet on 5 July. She supported 3d Fleet ships conducting carrier strikes and bombardment of the Japanese home islands. The ship would rendezvous with the combatant vessels and take on casualties by breeches buoy both at night and under battle conditions. Upon the conclusion of World War II, Rescue sailed into Tokyo Bay with the 3d Fleet and began the medical screening of Allied prisoners of war and shuttling them from various prison camps to the base at Yokohama.


New Jersey Scuba Diving

This photo is signed by Admiral Chester W Nimitz. Type: shipwreck, submarine, U.S. Navy Built: 1924, Portsmouth Navy Yard, NH USA Specs: ( 341 x 28 ft ) 2000 displacement tons, no crew Sunk: Monday March 12, 1945
deliberate – weapons test Depth: 155 ft – sand 140 ft – deck 120 ft – conning tower

The Bass was an unsuccessful design. Her three-ship class was envisioned as long-range, long-endurance attack craft, designed to patrol in distant waters, and sported a number of very advanced features for their day. However, many of these features did not work as well as hoped, and the boats were plagued with mechanical difficulties, unreliable propulsion systems, and poor handling characteristics, both at the surface and submerged.

The Bass and her two sisters were huge – 340 ft, 2000 tons – over twice the size of most contemporary boats. For some idea of her size, the Bass dwarfs the nearby U-853 of almost twenty years later – 251 ft, 1051 tons. In fact, the U-853 would probably fit inside the Bass. The Gato class submarines that were the WWII workhorses of the US Navy in the Pacific were actually smaller than the Bass, at 311 ft, 1816 tons. Even the modern Los Angeles class nuclear attack submarines, largest of their type, are only some 20 ft longer, although considerably heavier.

Bass (right) and a sistership. Evidently, the forward diving planes retract into the hull, which explains their absence on the wreck.

Because of her shortcomings, the Bass was forced into early retirement less than 15 years old, but called out again for wartime service in 1940. Her duties were mostly patrol and training, and she never saw combat. After a devastating internal fire, she was converted to cargo duties, and was eventually used as a test target, a fate similar to several previous submarines.

The first Bass (SF-5) was launched as V-2, 27 December 1924 by Portsmouth Navy Yard, sponsored by Mrs. Douglas E. Dismukes, wife of Captain Dismukes, and commissioned 26 September 1925, Lieutenant Commander G. A. Rood in command.

V-2 was assigned to Submarine Division 20 and cruised along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean through November 1927 when the Division sailed for San Diego arriving 3 December 1927. V-2 operated with the fleet on the west coast, in the Hawaiian Islands, and in the Caribbean until December 1932. V-2 was renamed Bass 9 March 1931 and in April was assigned to Division 12. On 1 July 1931 her designation was changed from SF-5 to SS-164. On 2 January 1933 she was assigned to Rotating Reserve Submarine Division 15, San Diego. Bass rejoined the fleet again in July 1933 and cruised along the west coast, in the Canal Zone, and in the Hawaiian Islands until January 1937. She then departed the west coast and arrived at Philadelphia 18 February 1937 where she went out of commission in reserve 9 June.

Bass was recommissioned at Portsmouth, N. H., 5 September 1940 and assigned to Submarine Division 9 Atlantic Fleet. Between February and November 1941 she operated along the New England coast and made two trips to St. Georges, Bermuda. She arrived at Coco Solo, C.Z., 24 November and was on duty there when hostilities broke out with Japan.

During 1942 Bass was attached to Submarine Division 31, Squadron 3, Atlantic Fleet. Between March and August, while based at Coco Solo, she made four war patrols in the Pacific, off Balboa. On 17 August 1942, while at sea, a fire broke out in the after battery room and quickly spread to the after torpedo room and starboard main motor, resulting in the death of 25 enlisted men by asphyxiation. The following day Antaeus (AS-21) arrived to assist the submarine and escorted her into the Gulf of Dulce, Costa Rica. Both vessels then proceeded to Balboa.

Bass remained In the Canal Zone until October 1942 when she departed for Philadelphia, arriving on the 19th. After undergoing repairs at Philadelphia Navy Yard Bass proceeded to New London, Conn., where she conducted secret experiments off Block Island in December 1943. She was again in Philadelphia Yard for repairs from January to March 1944. During the remainder of the year she was attached to Submarine Squadron 1, Atlantic Fleet, and operated out of New London in the area between Long Island and Block Island. Bass was decommissioned at the Submarine Base New London 3 March 1945 and “destroyed” 12 March 1945.

— from Navy historical records

The periscope sheers

Today the Bass lies in two pieces. The forward third of the hull broke off during sinking, and lies about 50 ft south of the main wreckage, skewed off at an angle and listing 45 degrees to port. There is usually a rope between the two pieces. The break occurred just forward of an internal bulkhead, so the bow section is wide open for penetration. The forward diving planes are not evident, but the torpedo doors are large and obvious. The anchor bit in the bow is of an odd shape that gave the boat a distinctive forward profile, and is worth a look.

A diver swims above the port propeller. The aft escape trunk.

The upright aft section, with the conning tower intact, is more interesting. Penetration of the hull at the break is possible through the hatches in the bulkhead. Penetration of the conning tower is also possible. Most of the decking has rusted away, revealing a maze of pipes below, and the cylindrical pressure hull beneath. Swimming back to the stern, you will find the most interesting area of the wreck. The dual propellers lie half buried in the sand, with the aft diving planes just behind, set permanently at a hard down angle. Above these are the large frames that guarded against entanglement, and behind and mostly buried is the rudder.

Large schools of Ling swarm over the bottom around the wreck. Higher up, cunners are dominant. Owing to the depth, this is usually a dark dive, with little ambient light.

NOAA


Pollux Crew

The USS Pollux (AKS-2) was a supply ship in the United States Navy. It was commissioned on May 6, 1941 and assigned to the Navy's Atlantic Fleet. During the Second World War, the Pollux transported troops, equipment, food, and other goods to Allied ports on both sides of the North Atlantic. Like all supply ships, the Pollux had to be constantly on guard against enemy attack - German U-boats patrolled shipping lanes and torpedoed vessels carrying imports to Allied ports. As a result, destroyers usually accompanied supply ships for protection.

On February 15, 1942, the Pollux departed Maine for Argentia, Newfoundland, where a large US air-naval base existed. It was carrying a cargo of bombs, radio equipment, aircraft engines, and other supplies, and was under the escort of the destroyers USS Truxtun and USS Wilkes. Onboard the Pollux was its usual complement of 143 enlisted men, 16 officers, and the single alley cat that served as mascot. The crew was one of the most tightly knit in the fleet - a good number of the men had trained together in boot camp and had grown up in New York City or surrounding areas. By the time the Pollux steamed into Newfoundland waters, most of its crewmembers had served together for about eight months. Also present on that voyage were 58 new recruits travelling to Argentia for training and 16 passengers on their way to the USS Prairie.

As the convoy approached Newfoundland, a severe winter storm developed and reduced visibility to zero. The Pollux lost contact with its destroyer escorts and was pushed dangerously close to shore by giant waves and powerful ocean currents. At 4:17 in the morning of February 18, the Pollux ran aground on the jagged rocks at Lawn Point, on Newfoundland's south coast. All of the 233 men onboard realized that the vessel would not remain afloat for long - cracks had appeared throughout much of the hull and some of its forward holds were filling with water.

A desperate attempt to reach land filled the coming hours. The men first had to cross the violent seas that lay between them and shore, then they had to scale 100-feet-tall ice-covered cliffs to reach safe ground. Ninety three men died that day at Lawn Point, but 103 made it to safety. They owe their lives in large part to eight men from the nearby community of Lawn, as well as to the townsfolk of St. Lawrence, who travelled to the wreck site through a winter storm and spent hours pulling sailors over the cliff and then transporting them to safety. The disaster remains one of the worst in US naval history.


Contents

Between 18 January and 5 June Laramie made six runs to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to transport fuel oil to Norfolk and Bermuda. She sailed from Norfolk to Bahia Bay, Brazil, via Guantanamo Bay 24 June to 21 July operated along the Brazilian coast until 13 August then returned to Norfolk 1 September for overhaul. Departing 11 October, she carried fuel oil via Boston and St. John's, Newfoundland, to Narsarsuaq, Greenland, site of a United States air base known as Bluie West One, where she arrived 25 October.

When the United States entered the war against the Axis powers, Laramie was operating along the southwestern coast of Greenland carrying oil and gasoline. She steamed from Narsarsuaq to Norfolk via Sydney, Nova Scotia, 11 to 23 December and, after completing two fueling runs to Baton Rouge, she cleared Casco Bay, Maine, 8 March 1942 with a cargo of gasoline and oil for Army bases in Greenland. Throughout the remainder of 1942 and during 1943 she plied the stormy North Atlantic, transporting liquid and dry cargo to Greenland from Boston New York Sydney, Nova Scotia and NS Argentia and St. John's, Newfoundland. [2]

Torpedoed in the Belle Isle Strait Edit

Loaded with 361,000 gallons of aviation gasoline, 55,000 barrels of oil, and with general cargo, including depth charges. Laramie departed Sydney for Greenland 26 August 1942 as part of convoy SG-6. [3] On the evening of the 27th she was torpedoed while steaming in convoy at the eastern end of Belle Isle Strait during a part of the Battle of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. [4] Hit on the port side forward by a torpedo fired by U-165 commanded by Eberhard Hoffman, [3] she immediately listed to port and went down by the bow some 37 feet. The blast demolished the forward crew's quarters, killing four men [5] opened a hole 41 feet long and 34 feet high, [6] causing extensive flooding forward and ruptured the port gasoline tank, spraying the ship with volatile liquid and explosive fumes.

Despite flooding and imminent danger of explosion, the captain, Comdr. P. M. Moncy, took immediate and effective action to save Laramie. Although gasoline ran ankle-deep over the forward gun platforms, no fires broke out, and a steam-smothering system protected unruptured holds. Prompt pumping of liquid cargo corrected the list and reduced the forward draft.

Return to Sydney for repairs Edit

Escorted by U.S. Coast Guard cutter Mohawk, Laramie returned to Sydney 30 August before steaming to Boston 2 to 5 September for damage repairs. Commander Moncy later received the Navy Cross for directing the saving of Laramie under extremely hazardous conditions.

After a run to Aruba, Netherlands West Indies, from 21 February to 2 March 1944 for a cargo of gasoline, Laramie resumed voyages to Greenland out of Boston 25 March. She returned to Aruba 28 August carried fuel to Newfoundland via Guantanamo and Boston 7 to 27 September then returned to the Caribbean 17 October to shuttle liquid cargo between Aruba and Guantanamo. Steaming to New York via Bermuda 9 to 20 November, she resumed shuttle runs along the eastern seaboard to Newfoundland and Greenland.

On 8 August 1945 Laramie arrived in Boston from Grønnedal, Greenland. Steaming to Norfolk 4 to 6 September, she decommissioned 16 November 1945. She was transferred to the Maritime Commission 11 June 1946 and on 1 July 1947 was delivered to Boston Metals Co., Baltimore


USS Antaeus AS-21 - History

Originally designated V-2, Bass was launched on 27 December 1924 at Portsmouth Navy Yard. She was commissioned on 26 September 1925, with Lieutenant Commander G.A. Rood in command.

Assigned to SubDiv 20, V-2 operated along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean through November 1927, when the division was shifted to San Diego. V-2 continued to operate with her division on the west coast, in the Hawaiian Islands, and in the Caribbean.

On 9 March 1931, V-2 was renamed Bass, and in the following month was assigned to SubDiv 12. On 1 July her designation was changed from SF-5 to SS-164.

Bass was assigned to Rotating Reserve SubDiv 15 at San Diego at the beginning of 1933. She rejoined the active fleet again in July 1933, cruising on the west coast, in the Canal Zone, and in the Hawaiian Islands until January 1937. At that time she was sent to Philadelphia, arriving on 18 February 1937, where she was decommissioned and placed in reserve on 9 June.

Bass was recommissioned at Portsmouth on 5 September 1940 and assigned to SubDiv 9, Atlantic Fleet. Between February and November 1941 she operated along the New England coast, with two trips to St. Georges, Bermuda. Moving to Coco Solo, on the Atlantic end of the Panama Canal on 24 November, she was there when the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor brought the U.S. into the war.

Bass was attached to SubDiv 31, SubRon 3, Atlantic Fleet during 1942, continuing to be stationed at Coco Solo. Between March and August she made four relatively brief war patrols in the Pacific off Balboa. The last of these was marred by a fire in the after battery room on 17 August 1942. The fire spread to the after torpedo room and starboard main motor, with the resultant smoke and fumes killing 25 enlisted men.

The following day the tender Antaeus (AS-21) arrived on the scene to assist the stricken submarine, and proceeded to escort her into the Gulf of Dulce, Costa Rica. Both vessels then proceeded to Balboa.

Bass remained in the Canal Zone until October 1942, at which time she sailed for Philadelphia, where she arrived on the 19th. Following repairs at the Navy Yard, Bass moved to New London, where she conducted secret experiments of Block Island in December 1943.

Re-entering the Philadelphia Navy Yard in January 1944, she remained there until March. The rest of the year was spent assigned to SubRon 1, Atlantic Fleet, operating in the area between Long Island and Block Island while stationed at the Submarine Base, New London. She was decommissioned there on 3 March 1945, and scuttled to serve as a sonar target on the 12th.

Bass and her two sisters were among the more unusual submarine designs of the interwar years. As originally built, the design included a divided power plant, with one engine room located aft in the usual place and another forward of the control room. The aft engines were coupled directly to the motor-generators and shafts, while the forward engines, which could not practically be clutched to the propeller shafts, drove generators. The boats also had an unusual profile, with a bulbous, shark-like bow which was intended to add reserve buoyancy—a design which proved a miserable failure, as the “B” class submarines proved to be very poor sea keepers.

Following Bass‘ fire, these large boats were converted to cargo submarine on Presidential order. This was accomplished by removing the after engines, leaving the former after engine room for cargo. The forward engines and generators were retained for propulsion. All torpedo tubes and the deck gun were also removed. In the event, the cargo conversions were unsuccessful, with the entire class taken out of service before the end of the war.


USS Antaeus


The Rhode Island-class frigate is a 25th Century upgrade of the Nova. Like its predecessor, the Rhode Island-class focuses heavily on science and exploration with its dual deflector dishes and multiple science facilities. Its main function is to provide a platform for extended scientific and survey missions. It can also serve as a short-range patrol vessel and frontline support in emergencies when away from a Starbase. Most of the technologies used in the Nova were used in the Rhode Island as well as newer 25th Century equipment such as upgraded sensor suites, better sensors along with enhanced weapons and shields. Along with the Intrepid, the Rhode Island-class is one of the few vessels that can enter a planet's atmosphere to land and conduct repairs or missions that require the vessel to be planetside.

APC acquired a Rhode Island-class when we established a contract with Julian Meyer, who now is our shipyard commander. He brought this vessel along with multiple other hulls when he joined with us. The Antaeus has been sitting in our shipyards for a while awaiting a commander and now has one. It is now assigned to the Task Force after the loss of the USS Iberia in a Hur'q attack on Olympus. As with any Company vessel, the Antaeus has been fitted with the latest in Starfleet as well as APC equipment bringing it up to par to the newest vessels in Starfleet.

With APC's closing, the Antaeus was reactivated within Starfleet and assigned to Task Force Bellerophon. The Antaeus carries 1x Aerowing Shuttle located beneath the saucer section and 2x Work bee Style Shuttle pods in the main shuttle bay.

Following a fleet reorganisation the Antaeus was placed in reserve, to be activated whenever the need arises.


Cachet Maker Mae Weigand Pg13b


Cachets should be listed in chronological order based on earliest known usage. Use the postmark date or best guess. This applies to add-on cachets as well.

The cachets created by Mae Weigand are very distinctive in style and her covers here will be set up to follow the example of the "Naval Cover Cachet Makers Catalog"
R.D. Rawlins, Editor Universal Ship Cancellation Society, Inc., Publisher.

Thumbnail Link
To Cachet
Close-Up Image
Thumbnail Link
To Full
Cover Front Image
Thumbnail Link
To Postmark
or Back Image
Postmark Date
Postmark Type
Killer Bar Text
Ship
---------
Category

1940-10-20
Locy Type FDPS 3 (A-BBT)
"FIRST MAIL / SERVICE"
USS Mayo DD-422

First Day of Postal Service

1940-10-20
Locy Type FDPS 3 (A-BBT)
"FIRST MAIL / SERVICE"
USS Mayo DD-422

1940-10-01
Locy Type FDPS 3 (A-BBT)
"FIRST DAY / POSTAL SERV."
USS Bass SS-164

First Day of Postal Service

1940-07-01
Locy Type FDC 3 (A-BBT)
"FIRST DAY / COMMISSION"
USS Golsborough DD-188

1940-11-15
Locy Type FDPS 3 (A-BBT)
"FIRST DAY / SERVICE"
USS Howard DD-179


Navy Frigates Ships

Throughout history, the frigate ship has been an essential part of the United States Navy military operations. During World War II, these frigate ships were the homes to thousands of Navy personnel. Along with personnel, each frigate ship contained thousands of pounds of deadly asbestos. This asbestos was supplied by companies that knew the asbestos was dangerous and knew that, eventually, thousands of servicemen would contract terrible diseases from exposure to this mineral. But the companies chose profit over safety and hid those dangers from the navy and the servicemen.

Asbestos was used frequently for the insulation of pipes, boilers, electrical fixtures and hull construction. It was also used as a fire retardant material in many areas aboard ship, including non-skid flooring on decks and on bulk head walls. The worst areas on frigate ships were in the fire, pump, and engine rooms where insulation covered the pipes and wiring. Some of the personnel most at risk include boiler tenders, electrician's mates, enginemen, machinist mates, pipefitters, and shipfitters.

Many of the companies that supplied asbestos products to the navy have admitted fault and set up trust funds to compensate navy veterans. If you know someone who has mesothelioma, contact us to learn more about your rights.

Below offers a list of some frigate ships that were commissioned between 1940 and 1990 and contained risks of asbestos exposure. Personnel aboard any of these ships or civilians that provided shipyard maintenance, repair or deconstruction may have been at risk of asbestos exposure.

United States Navy Frigates Listing

USS Ainsworth (DE/FF-1090)
USS Albert David (FF-1050)
USS Antaeus (AG-67)
USS Aylwin (FF-1081)
USS Badger (DD&ndash126)
USS Badger (FF-1071)
USS Bagley (FF-1069)
USS Barbey (DE-1088/FF-1088)
USS Blakely (DE-1072/FF-1072)
USS Bowen (FF-1079)
USS Bradley (FF-1041)
USS Brewton (FF-1086)
USS Brooke (FFG-1)
USS Brumby (FF-1044)
USS Capodanno (FF-1093)
USS Connole (FF-1056)
USS Cook (FF-1083)
USS Davidson (FF-1045)
USS Donald B. Beary (FF-1085)
USS Downes (DE-1070/FF-1070)
USS Edward McDonnell (FF-1043)
USS Elmer Montgomery (FF-1082)
USS Fanning (FF-1076)
USS Francis Hammond (DE/FF-1067)
USS Garcia (FF-1040)
USS Glover (FF-1098)
USS Gray (FF-1054)
USS Harold E. Holt (FF-1074)
USS Hepburn (FF-1055)
USS Jesse L. Brown (DE/FF/FFT-1089)
USS Joseph Hewes (FF-1078)
USS Julius A. Furer (FFG-6)
USS Kirk (FF-1087)

USS Knox (DE-1052/FF-1052)
USS Koelsch (FF-1049)
USS Lang (FF-1060)
USS Lockwood (FF-1064)
USS Marvin Shields (FF-1066)
USS McCandless (FF-1084)
USS Meyerkord (FF-1058)
USS Miller (FF-1091)
USS Moinester (FF-1097)
USS O'Callahan (FF-1051)
USS Ouellet (FF-1077)
USS Patterson (FF-1061)
USS Paul (FF-1080)
USS Pharris (FF-1094)
USS Ramsey (DEG-2/FFG-2)
USS Rathburne (FF-1057)
USS Reasoner (FF-1063)
USS Richard L. Page (FFG-5)
USS Roark (FF-1053)
USS Robert E. Peary (FF-1073)
USS Sample (FF-1048)
USS Schofield (FFG-3)
USS Stein (FF-1065)
USS Talbot (FFG-4)
USS Thomas C. Hart (FF-1092)
USS Trippe (FF-1075)
USS Truett (FF-1095)
USS Valdez (FF-1096)
USS Voge (FF-1047)
USS Vreeland (FF-1068)
USS W. S. Sims (FF-1059)
USS Whipple (DE-1062/FF-1062)


Watch the video: Emergency surfacing submarines USA and Russian Top 5 -=HD=-