Talbot II DD-114 - History

Talbot II DD-114 - History

Talbot II DD-114

Talbot II(Destroyer No. 114: dp. 1,154, 1. 314'4", b. 30'11" dr. 9'10", s. 35 k., cpl. 122; a. 4 4", 1 3", 12 21" tt., cl. Wickes)The second Talbot (Destroyer No. 114) was laid down on 12 July 1917 at Philadelphia, Pa., by William Cramp & Sons; launched on 20 February 1918; sponsored byMiss Elizabeth Major, and commissioned on 20 July 1918, Lt. Comdr. Isaac F. Dorteh in command.The destroyer stood out of New York on the 31st and steamed to the British Isles. She made three more round-trip voyages to England and, in December, called at Brest, France. In 1919, she joined the Pacific Fleet and operated with it until 31 March 1923 when she was decommissioned at San Diego. While in reserve, the ship was designated DD-114 on 17 July 1920.Talbot was recommissioned on 31 May 1930 and joined Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 10 of the Battle Force at San Diego. She remained with Battle force until 1937 when she went to Hawaii to support Submarine force, Pacific Fleet, for a year. In 1939, she served with the Battle force and the Submarine force. In 1940 and 1941, the destroyer was based at San Diego.The day after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Talbot got underway in the screen of Saratoga (CV-3) and headed for Hawaii. She arrived at Pearl Harbor exactly a week after the Japanese raid, patrolled off the island for 10 days and returned to San Diego. In February 1942, the ship joined the Patrol Force of the 12th Naval District and escorted convoys along the Pacific coast.Late in May, Talbot stood out of Puget Sound to escort S-18, S-23, and S-28 to Alaska. They arrived at Dutch Harbor on 2 June and were subjected to a small and unsuccessful air attack the next day. With the exception of three escort trips back to Seattle, the destroyer performed patrol and escort duty in Alaskan waters for the next seven months. On 31 October 1942 the ship was reclassified a high-speed transport and redesignated APD-7. Talbot departed Dutch Harbor on 31 January 1943 to be converted by the Mare Island Navy Yard into a small but fast troopship. The work enabling Talbot to transport 147 combat troops, was completed on 15 March.The next day, the high-speed transport got underway for Hawaii, and she arrived at Pearl Harbor the following week. On 2 April, she headed for Espiritu Santo to join Transport Division (TransDiv) 12. For two months, the APD participated in training exercises with her division and also escorted ships to New Caledonia, New Zealand, Australia, and Guadalcanal.In mid-June, she joined Task Group (TG) 31.1, the Rendova Attack Group, for the invasion of New Georgia. She and Zane (DMS-14) were to capture two small islands that controlled the entrance to Roviana Lagoon from Blanche Channel. The two ships embarked troops of the 169th Infantry Regiment at Guadaleanal, and on the 30th, they were off their assigned beaches whenthe assault began. Heavy rains obscured the islands and Zane ran aground at 0230. After landing her troops and supplies without opposition, Talbot attempted to pull the minesweeper free but failed. Then Rail (ATO139) arrived and pulled Zane free while Talbot provided air protection. During the operation, enemy aircraft could be seen attacking the main landing force. On the night of 4 July, the ship and six other high speed transports arrived off Rice Anchorage. During the landing of assault troops the next morning a Japanese "long-lance" torpedo sank Strong (DD 167), one of the destroyers of the bombardment groupTalbot returned to Guadaleanal to prepare for the occupation of Vella Lavella. On 14 August, she sortied with TG 31.5, the Advance Transport Group of the Northern Landing force. The assault forces went ashore from the destroyer transports the next morning unopposed. However, two hours later, the Japanese began air attacks against the ships and kept up the raids throughout the day. Nevertheless, the American fleet suffered no damge and claimed to have shot down 44 of the enemy planes.The high-speed transport next devoted over a month to escorting smaller ships and carrying supplies to various islands in the Solomons. Late in September, she joined Admiral George H. Fort's Southern Attack force for the conquest of the Treasury Islands. Eight APD's and 23 smaller landing ships were loaded with troops of the 8th New Zealand Brigade force. The smaller ships departed Guadaleanal on 23 and 24 October, and the faster destroyer transports left on the 26th. On the 27th, the troops landed on Mono and Stirling islands and the transports had cleared the area by 2000.On 3 November, Talbot called at Noumea to embark reinforcements for troops who, two days before, had landed on the beaches of Bougainville at Empress Augusta Bay. She arrived on the 6th, disembarked her soldiers, loaded 19 casualties and screened a group of LST's to Guadaleanal. On the 11th, she was back at the beachhead with a resupply echelon. Four days later, she got underway for Guadaleanal. The high-speed transport loaded troops, ammunition, and rations, held a practice landing, and headed for Bougainville. On the 16th, the destroyer transport and her five sister ships rendezvoused with a group of LST's and destroyers. At 0300, a Japanese snooper dropped a flare astern of the convoy. It was followed by enemy bombers which attacked for almost an hour before hitting McKean (APD-6) and setting her afire. Although under constant air attack, Talbot's boats rescued 68 crew members and 106 marine passengers from the stricken ship.APD-7 continued to Cape Torokina and arrived there in the midst of another air attack. She landed her troops and headed for Guadalcanal.After her engines were overhauled at Noumea in December, the ship made a round-trip to Sydney. On 8 January 1944, she departed New Caledonia for Espiritu Santo to pick up a convoy and escort it to Guadalcanal She arrived off Lunga Point on the 13th and patrolled between there and Koli Point for two weeks. On the 28th, the fast transport embarked elements of the 30th New Zealand Battalion and a group of intelligence and communications specialists of the United States Navy and headed for the Green Islands to participate in a reconnaissance in force.On the night of 30 January, the destroyer transports landed the raiding party; withdrew from the area, and returned the next night to pick them up. Talbot disembarked the New Zealanders at Vella Lavella and the Navy men at Guadalcanal. On 13 February, Talbot reembarked New Zealand troops and sortied with TF 31, the Green Islands Attack Group. She was off Barahun Island on the 15th and launched her part of the assault wave. She then shuttled reinforcements and supplies from Guadalcanal to the Green Islands.On 17 March, the transport loaded elements of the 2d Battalion, 4th Marines, at Guadalcanal and sailed with the amphibious force to the St. Matthias Islands. The marines peacefully occupied Emirau on 20 March, and Talbot returned to Purvis Bay. She headed to New Guinea on 4 April to participate in practice landings with the 163d Army Regimental Combat Team (RCT). Two weeks later, she loaded 145 men of that regiment and sortied with TG 77.3, the Fire Support Group, for the assault on Aitape. On the 22d, Talbot landed her troops; shelled Tumleo Island, and returned to Cape Cretin. She escorted resupply echelons to the landing area until 10 May when the transports were released by the 7th Fleet.Talbot joined the 6th Fleet at Guadalcanal on the 13th and began training with underwater demolition teams. On 4 June, she joined a convoy to the Marshalls and arrived at Kwajalein on the 8th. Two days later the high-speed transport joined TG 63.16 of the Southern Attack force and got underway for the Marianas. However, she collided with Pennsylvania (BB-38) during an emergency turn, and the resulting flooding of several of her compartments forced her to return for repairs. Talbot got underway two days later, rejoined the group southeast of Saipan, and was off the beaches there on the 15th, D-Day. During the first days of the operation, she screened the bombardment group. On the 17th, she captured a survivor of a wrecked Japanese boat. The ship developed engine trouble and anchored in the transport area where an enemy plane dropped a stick of bombs off her port bow, but caused no damage. She transferred her underwater demolition team to Kane (APD-18) and joined a convoy for Hawaii. She was then routed back to San Francisco for an overhaul that lasted from 11 July to 28 August.Talbot returned to Pearl Harbor early in September and steamed onward to Eniwetok and Manus. She embarked Underwater Demolition Team No. 3 on 12 October and sortied with TG 77.6, the Bombardment and Fire Support Group, for Leyte. On the 18th, her swimmers made a daylight reconnaissance of the waters between San Jose and Dulag. Although opposed by enemy machine-gun and mortar fire, the team reembarked with no casualties. The transport departed with a convoy and arrived at Seeadler Harbor on the 27th, where she transferred the demolition team to President Hayes (AP-39) on the last day of the monthTalbot headed toward Oro Bay, joined George Clymer (AP-57), escorted her to Cape Gloucester, and returned to Seeadler Harbor on the 8th. Two days later, she was anchored there, only some 800 yards from Mount Hood (AE-11), when that ammunition ship suddenly exploded and showered her with over 600 pounds of metal and debris. The transport was holed in several places and some crew members were injured. Talbot's boats searched for survivors but found none.On 16 December 1944, after the high-speed transport's damage had been repaired at Manus, Talbot got underway and proceeded, via Aitape, to Noemfoor Island to participate in amphibious exercises with the 168th RCT. On 4 January 1946, she embarked troops and sortied with Task Unit 77.9.8 for Lingayen Gulf. The ship landed reinforcements at San Fabian the following week and continued on to Leyte. She embarked troops of the 11th Airborne Division on the 26th and headed for Luzon with a convoy. On 31 January, she disembarked the troops as the second wave against Nasugbu and steamed to Mindoro. She loaded mortar and rocket boats and delivered them to Leyte.On 14 February, the high-speed transport embarked units of the 161st Infantry Regiment and steamed to Batasn. She landed the troops at Mariveles Harbor the next morning and returned to Subic Bay. On the 17th, she took a load of reinforcements to Corregidor. The transport escorted a convoy back to Ulithi and remained there for several weeks before being ordered to Guam. Talbot and LSM - ~1 proceeded to Parece Vela to conduct a survey of the reef and determine the feasibility of erecting a radio, weather, and observation station there. She returned to Guam on 20 April and reached Ulithi the next day.On 22 April, Talbot joined a convoy bound fur Okinawa. Five days later, she began antisubmarine patrols south of Kerama Retto and then, on the 30th, joined a convoy for Saipan. She returned to Kerama Retto and served as a picket ship from 22 May to 6 June when she went back to Saipan. From the Marianas, the high speed transport was routed to Eniwetok, Hawaii, and the United States.Talbot arrived at San Pedro on 6 July and was to be reconverted into a destroyer. Her classification reverted to DD-114 on 16 July. However, a Board of Inspection and Survey recommended that she be inactivated. Talbot was decommissioned on 9 October and struck from the Navy list on 24 October 1946. She was sold to the Boston Metals Co., Baltimore, Md., on 30 January 1946 and scrapped.Talbot received eight battle stars for World War II service.


Talbot family genealogy

Arms: Ar. a lion ramp. gu. armed and langued az. Crest: A talbot dog ar. langued and collared gu. Supporters: Dexter, a lion, and sinister, a talbot, both ar. Motto: Forte et fidele.

The Talbots belonged to an ancient Norman family, and entered England in the suite of William the Conqueror. Two of the name, Richard and Robert, came to Ireland, temp. Henry II. Richard settled at Malahide, in the county Dublin, where his descendants still reside and whence branches of the family spread to other parts of Ireland.

Sir Thomas Talbot, of Malahide, Knight, had livery of his estate, 12th February, 23 Edward III., and was summoned to Parliament in 1372.

Sir William Talbot, of Carton, co. Kildare, Bart., son of Robert Talbot, second son of Thomas Talbot, Esq., of Malahide, was created a Baronet (extinct) in 1622 his Fun. Entry, in Ulster&rsquos Office, is dated 1633. Sir William, who was a Barrister, married Alison Netterville.

Richard[1] Talbot, youngest son of Sir William Talbot, of Carton, the first Bart., was, by James II., in 1685, created Earl of Tyrconnell, and, in 1689, raised to a Dukedom. (See his career in the note, p. 405.)

John Talbot, a Captain in Tyrconnell&rsquos Horse, was of the Belgard branch of the family. The Castle of Belgard, situate in the co. of Dublin, was a frontier fortress of the Pale, and, at that period, wars with the natives were both constant and bloody but the Talbots of Belgard were never unnecessarily harsh or cruel to the Irish people, who were fighting for their own. Captain John Talbot had fought against Cromwell, and had to follow Charles II. into exile but on the Restoration, he received back a portion of his family estates. He restored the Castle of Belgard, which was ruined in the Cromwellian war and, after a short time, again drew his sword in defence of James II., who appointed him Lord Lieutenant of the county Wicklow, and Commissary-General for the counties of Meath, Louth, Dublin, Wicklow, and Wexford. He fought at the Boyne, Aughrim, and Limerick was included within the Articles of Limerick, and so saved his estates&mdashat least some of them. Being then too old to accompany his fellow-soldiers to France, he retired to his Castle of Belgard, where he died without male issue.

His daughter, Catherine, was married to Thomas Dillon, of Brackloon, grandson of Theobald, first Lord Viscount Dillon. The son of Catherine Talbot and Thomas Dillon lived and died at Belgard.


Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

John Gunnell Talbot--born on 16 August 1844 at Danbury, Ky.--was appointed a midshipman in 1862 and graduated from the United States Naval Academy on 12 June 1966. Commissioned ensign on 12 March 1868, Talbot attained the rank of master on 26 March 1869 and of lieutenant on 21 March 1870. He was serving as executive officer of Saginaw when that steamer grounded on a reef off Ocean Island in the mid-Pacific on 29 October 1870 and broke up. Lt. Talbot and four men volunteered to go to Honolulu, the nearest port, 1,500 miles away, for help.

The men began the voyage in an open boat on 18 November and reached Kauai, Hawaii, on 19 December. However, as the party attempted to get through the heavy surf to shore, their boat capsized. Lt. Talbot and three others drowned while attempting to swim through the rough breakers to shore. The lone survivor reported the wreck of Saginaw, and her crew was saved.

Silas Talbot--born on 11 January 1751 in Dighton, Mass.-was commissioned a captain in the Continental Army on 1 July 1775. After participating in the siege of Boston and aiding in the transportation of troops to New York, he obtained command of a fireship and attempted to use it to set fire to the British warship Asia. The attempt failed, but the daring it displayed won him a promotion to major on 10 October 1777.

After suffering a severe wound while fighting to defend Philadelphia, Talbot returned to active service in the summer of 1778 and fought in Rhode Island. As commander of Pigot and later of Argo, both under the Army, he cruised against Loyalist vessels that were harassing American trade between Long Island and Nantucket and made prisoners of many of them. Because of his success fighting afloat for the Army, Congress made him a captain in the Continental navy on 17 September 1779. However, since Congress had no suitable warship to entrust to him, Talbot put to sea in command of the privateer General Washington. In it he took one prize, but soon thereafter ran into the British fleet of new York. After a chase, he struck his colors to Culloden, a 74-gun ship-of-the-line, and remained a prisoner until exchanged for a British officer in December 1781.

After the war, Talbot settled in Fulton County, N.Y. He was a member of the New York Assembly in 1792 and 1793 and served in the federal House of Representatives from 1793 to 1795. On 5 June 1794, President Washington chose him third in a list of six captains of the newly established United States Navy. Before the end of his term in Congress, he was ordered to superintend the construction of the frigate President at New York. He commanded the Santo Domingo Station in 1799 and 1800 and was commended by the Secretary of the Navy for protecting American commerce and or laying the foundation of a permanent trade with that country.

Captain Talbot resigned from the navy on 23 September 1801 and died at New York City on 30 June 1813.

The first Talbot (Torpedo Boat No. 15) was named for Lt. John Gunnell Talbot the second and third Talbots (Destroyer No. 114 and DEG-4, respectively) were named for Capt. Silas Talbot.

(Destroyer No. 114: dp. 1,154, 1. 314'4", b. 30'11" dr. 9'10", s. 35 k., cpl. 122 a. 4 4", 1 3", 12 21" tt., cl. Wickes)

The second Talbot (Destroyer No. 114) was laid down on 12 July 1917 at Philadelphia, Pa., by William Cramp & Sons launched on 20 February 1918 sponsored by Miss Elizabeth Major, and commissioned on 20 July 1918, Lt. Comdr. Isaac F. Dortch in command.

The destroyer stood out of New York on the 31st and steamed to the British Isles. She made three more round-trip voyages to England and, in December, called at Brest, France. In 1919, she joined the Pacific Fleet and operated with it until 31 March 1923 when she was decommissioned at San Diego. While in reserve, the ship was designated DD-114 on 17 July 1920.

Talbot was recommissioned on 31 May 1930 and joined Destroyer Squadron (DesRon) 10 of the Battle Force at San Diego. She remained with Battle force until 1937 when she went to Hawaii to support Submarine force, Pacific Fleet, for a year. In 1939, she served with the Battle force and the Submarine force. In 1940 and 1941, the destroyer was based at San Diego.

The day after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Talbot got underway in the screen of Saratoga (CV-3) and headed for Hawaii. She arrived at Pearl Harbor exactly a week after the Japanese raid, patrolled off the island for 10 days and returned to San Diego. In February 1942, the ship joined the Patrol Force of the 12th Naval District and escorted convoys along the Pacific coast.

Late in May, Talbot stood out of Puget Sound to escort S-18, S-23, and S-28 to Alaska. They arrived at Dutch Harbor on 2 June and were subjected to a small and unsuccessful air attack the next day. With the exception of three escort trips back to Seattle, the destroyer performed patrol and escort duty in Alaskan waters for the next seven months. On 31 October 1942 the ship was reclassified a high-speed transport and redesignated APD-7. Talbot departed Dutch Harbor on 31 January 1943 to be converted by the Mare Island Navy Yard into a small but fast troopship. The work enabling Talbot to transport 147 combat troops, was completed on 15 March.

The next day, the high-speed transport got underway for Hawaii, and she arrived at Pearl Harbor the following week. On 2 April, she headed for Espiritu Santo to join Transport Division (TransDiv) 12. For two months, the APD participated in training exercises with her division and also escorted ships to New Caledonia, New Zealand, Australia, and Guadalcanal.

In mid-June, she joined Task Group (TG) 31.1, the Rendova Attack Group, for the invasion of New Georgia. She and Zane (DMS-14) were to capture two small islands that controlled the entrance to Roviana Lagoon from Blanche Channel. The two ships embarked troops of the 169th Infantry Regiment at Guadalcanal, and on the 30th, they were off their assigned beaches when the assault began. Heavy rains obscured the islands and Zane ran aground at 0230. After landing her troops and supplies without opposition, Talbot attempted to pull the minesweeper free but failed. Then Rail (ATO-139) arrived and pulled Zane free while Talbot provided air protection. During the operation, enemy aircraft could be seen attacking the main landing force. On the night of 4 July, the ship and six other high speed transports arrived off Rice Anchorage. During the landing of assault troops the next morning a Japanese "long-lance" torpedo sank Strong (DD-167), one of the destroyers of the bombardment group

Talbot returned to Guadalcanal to prepare for the occupation of Vella Lavella. On 14 August, she sortied with TG 31.5, the Advance Transport Group of the Northern Landing force. The assault forces went ashore from the destroyer transports the next morning unopposed. However, two hours later, the Japanese began air attacks against the ships and kept up the raids throughout the day. Nevertheless, the American fleet suffered no damage and claimed to have shot down 44 of the enemy planes.

The high-speed transport next devoted over a month to escorting smaller ships and carrying supplies to various islands in the Solomons. Late in September, she joined Admiral George H. Fort's Southern Attack force for the conquest of the Treasury Islands. Eight APD's and 23 smaller landing ships were loaded with troops of the 8th New Zealand Brigade force. The smaller ships departed Guadalcanal on 23 and 24 October, and the faster destroyer transports left on the 26th. On the 27th, the troops landed on Mono and Stirling islands and the transports had cleared the area by 2000.

On 3 November, Talbot called at Noumea to embark reinforcements for troops who, two days before, had landed on the beaches of Bougainville at Empress Augusta Bay. She arrived on the 6th, disembarked her soldiers, loaded 19 casualties and screened a group of LST's to Guadalcanal. On the 11th, she was back at the beachhead with a resupply echelon. Four days later, she got underway for Guadalcanal. The high-speed transport loaded troops, ammunition, and rations, held a practice landing, and headed for Bougainville. On the 16th, the destroyer transport and her five sister ships rendezvoused with a group of LST's and destroyers. At 0300, a Japanese snooper dropped a flare astern of the convoy. It was followed by enemy bombers which attacked for almost an hour before hitting McKean (APD-5) and setting her afire. Although under constant air attack, Talbot's boats rescued 68 crew members and 106 marine passengers from the stricken ship. APD-7 continued to Cape Torokina and arrived there in the midst of another air attack. She landed her troops and headed for Guadalcanal.

After her engines were overhauled at Noumea in December, the ship made a round-trip to Sydney. On 8 January 1944, she departed New Caledonia for Espiritu Santo to pick up a convoy and escort it to Guadalcanal She arrived off Lunga Point on the 13th and patrolled between there and Koli Point for two weeks. On the 28th, the fast transport embarked elements of the 30th New Zealand Battalion and a group of intelligence and communications specialists of the United States Navy and headed for the Green Islands to participate in a reconnaissance in force.

On the night of 30 January, the destroyer transports landed the raiding party withdrew from the area, and returned the next night to pick them up. Talbot disembarked the New Zealanders at Vella Lavella and the Navy men at Guadalcanal. On 13 February, Talbot reembarked New Zealand troops and sortied with TF 31, the Green Islands Attack Group. She was off Barahun Island on the 15th and launched her part of the assault wave. She then shuttled reinforcements and supplies from Guadalcanal to the Green Islands.

On 17 March, the transport loaded elements of the 2d Battalion, 4th Marines, at Guadalcanal and sailed with the amphibious force to the St. Matthias Islands. The marines peacefully occupied Emirau on 20 March, and Talbot returned to Purvis Bay. She headed to New Guinea on 4 April to participate in practice landings with the 163d Army Regimental Combat Team (RCT). Two weeks later, she loaded 145 men of that regiment and sortied with TG 77.3, the Fire Support Group, for the assault on Aitape. On the 22d, Talbot landed her troops, shelled Tumleo Island, and returned to Cape Cretin. She escorted resupply echelons to the landing area until 10 May when the transports were released by the 7th Fleet.

Talbot joined the 6th Fleet at Guadalcanal on the 13th and began training with underwater demolition teams. On 4 June, she joined a convoy to the Marshalls and arrived at Kwajalein on the 8th. Two days later the high-speed transport joined TG 63.16 of the Southern Attack force and got underway for the Marianas. However, she collided with Pennsylvania (BB-38) during an emergency turn, and the resulting flooding of several of her compartments forced her to return for repairs. Talbot got underway two days later, rejoined the group southeast of Saipan, and was off the beaches there on the 15th, D-Day. During the first days of the operation, she screened the bombardment group. On the 17th, she captured a survivor of a wrecked Japanese boat. The ship developed engine trouble and anchored in the transport area where an enemy plane dropped a stick of bombs off her port bow, but caused no damage. She transferred her underwater demolition team to Kane (APD-18) and joined a convoy for Hawaii. She was then routed back to San Francisco for an overhaul that lasted from 11 July to 28 August.

Talbot returned to Pearl Harbor early in September and steamed onward to Eniwetok and Manus. She embarked Underwater Demolition Team No. 3 on 12 October and sortied with TG 77.6, the Bombardment and Fire Support Group, for Leyte. On the 18th, her swimmers made a daylight reconnaissance of the waters between San Jose and Dulag. Although opposed by enemy machine-gun and mortar fire, the team reembarked with no casualties. The transport departed with a convoy and arrived at Seeadler Harbor on the 27th, where she transferred the demolition team to President Hayes (AP-39) on the last day of the month

Talbot headed toward Oro Bay, joined George Clymer (AP-57), escorted her to Cape Gloucester, and returned to Seeadler Harbor on the 8th. Two days later, she was anchored there, only some 800 yards from Mount Hood (AE-11), when that ammunition ship suddenly exploded and showered her with over 600 pounds of metal and debris. The transport was holed in several places and some crew members were injured. Talbot's boats searched for survivors but found none.

On 16 December 1944, after the high-speed transport's damage had been repaired at Manus, Talbot got underway and proceeded, via Aitape, to Noemfoor Island to participate in amphibious exercises with the 168th RCT. On 4 January 1946, she embarked troops and sortied with Task Unit 77.9.8 for Lingayen Gulf. The ship landed reinforcements at San Fabian the following week and continued on to Leyte. She embarked troops of the 11th Airborne Division on the 26th and headed for Luzon with a convoy. On 31 January, she disembarked the troops as the second wave against Nasugbu and steamed to Mindoro. She loaded mortar and rocket boats and delivered them to Leyte.

On 14 February, the high-speed transport embarked units of the 161st Infantry Regiment and steamed to Bataan. She landed the troops at Mariveles Harbor the next morning and returned to Subic Bay. On the 17th, she took a load of reinforcements to Corregidor. The transport escorted a convoy back to Ulithi and remained there for several weeks before being ordered to Guam. Talbot and LSM-331 proceeded to Parece Vela to conduct a survey of the reef and determine the feasibility of erecting a radio, weather, and observation station there. She returned to Guam on 20 April and reached Ulithi the next day.

On 22 April, Talbot joined a convoy bound for Okinawa. Five days later, she began antisubmarine patrols south of Kerama Retto and then, on the 30th, joined a convoy for Saipan. She returned to Kerama Retto and served as a picket ship from 22 May to 6 June when she went back to Saipan. From the Marianas, the high speed transport was routed to Eniwetok, Hawaii, and the United States.

Talbot arrived at San Pedro on 6 July and was to be reconverted into a destroyer. Her classification reverted to DD-114 on 16 July. However, a Board of Inspection and Survey recommended that she be inactivated. Talbot was decommissioned on 9 October and struck from the Navy list on 24 October 1946. She was sold to the Boston Metals Co., Baltimore, Md., on 30 January 1946 and scrapped.

Talbot received eight [sic: nine -- New Georgia, Bismarcks, Treasury-Bougainville, Hollandia, Marianas, Leyte, Luzon, Manila Bay, Okinawa] battle stars for World War II service. Transcribed and formatted for HTML by Patrick Clancey


TALBOT DD 114

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Wickes Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid July 12 1917 - Launched February 20 1918

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.

Postmark Type
---
Killer Bar Text

2nd Commissioning May 31 1930 to October 9 1945

As DD-114
Morrissey Hand-painted add-on cachet. USS Nevada Chapter No. 103, USCS R/S on back

USCS Postmark
Catalog Illus. T-5

USCS Postmark
Catalog Illus. T-5a

USCS Postmark
Catalog Illus. CD-1a

USCS Postmark
Catalog Illus. CD-3

Other Information

TALBOT earned 8 Battle Stars for WWII service

NAMESAKE - Silas Talbot (January 11 1751 - June 30 1813)
Talbot was commissioned a Captain in the Continental Army on July 1 1775. After participating in the siege of Boston and aiding in the transportation of troops to New York, he obtained command of a Fireship and attempted to use it to set fire to the British warship ASIA. The attempt failed, but the daring it displayed won him a promotion to Major on October 10 1777. After suffering a severe wound while fighting to defend Philadelphia, Talbot returned to active service in the summer of 1778 and fought in Rhode Island. As commander of PIGOT and later of ARGO, both under the Army, he cruised against Loyalist vessels that were harassing American trade between Long Island and Nantucket and made prisoners of many of them. Because of his success fighting afloat for the Army, Congress made him a Captain in the Continental Navy on September 17 1779. However, since Congress had no suitable warship to entrust to him, Talbot put to sea in command of the Privateer GENERAL WASHINGTON. In it he took one prize, but soon thereafter ran into the British fleet off New York. After a chase, he struck his colors to CULLODEN, a 74-gun Ship-of-the-Line and remained a prisoner until exchanged for a British officer in December 1781. After the war, Talbot settled in Fulton County, N.Y. He was a member of the New York Assembly in 1792 and 1793 and served in the federal House of Representatives from 1793 to 1795. On June 5 1794, President Washington chose him third in a list of six Captains of the newly established United States Navy. Before the end of his term in Congress, he was ordered to superintend the construction of the Frigate PRESIDENT at New York. He commanded the Santo Domingo Station in 1799 and 1800 and was commended by the Secretary of the Navy for protecting American commerce and for laying the foundation of a permanent trade with that country. Captain Talbot resigned from the Navy on September 23 1801 and died at New York City on June 30 1813

If you have images or information to add to this page, then either contact the Curator or edit this page yourself and add it. See Editing Ship Pages for detailed information on editing this page.


USS Talbot (DD 114)

Decommissioned at San Diego, California, 31 March 1923
Recommissioned 31 May 1930
Reclassified high speed transport APD-7 on 15 March 1943
Reclassified back to DD-114 on 16 July 1945
Decommissioned at San Pedro, Calofornia 9 October 1945
Stricken 24 October 1945
Sold 30 January 1946 and broken up for scrap.

Commands listed for USS Talbot (DD 114)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Max Clifford Stormes, USN21 Apr 193931 May 1941
2Lt.Cdr. Edward Alspaugh McFall, USN31 May 19411 Jun 1942
3T/Lt.Cdr. Gustave Norman Johansen, USNmid 194224 Feb 1943
4Charles Cushman Morgan, USNR24 Feb 194312 Jun 1945
5Kenneth Byron Sill, USNR12 Jun 19459 Jul 1945
6Frank Stewart Streeter, USNR9 Jul 19458 Aug 1945
7Kenneth Byron Sill, USNR8 Aug 19459 Oct 1945

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'He smashed the door'

Police officers had waited outside the home of each of Talbott's family members until they got confirmation that Talbott had been arrested and then simultaneously went in and interviewed each of them.

Routh told police the alleged attack happened when she was 15 and Talbott was 17. She had lowered the volume on the radio in her bedroom and he had wanted it on full volume.

"I was trying to change my clothes and I locked the door and he smashed the door down just to run the radio up," Routh told police.


Malahide Castle – the tale of the Talbots

Most castles in Ireland have changed hands several times, over the centuries. Some have been taken by conquest, others have been given to gain favour, or taken in punishment. But one castle is notable for spending nearly its entire life in one family’s hands, from 1185 to 1975 (apart from one brief incident). That castle is Malahide Castle, just north of Dublin, and the family who owned it were the Talbots.

The gardens at Malahide Castle are almost more impressive than the castle itself.

Sir Richard de Talbot was, like most Norman knights of the 12th century, more French than English. He was not an heir to any estate or title, but in 1174 he accompanied King Henry II when the king brought his army over to Ireland. The ostensible purpose of this was to help his subjects in Ireland overcome resistance from the locals to their rule, but the true purpose was to remind them that Ireland was not beyond the king’s reach, and that their oaths of fealty were still binding no matter if they moved past where they thought their border was. Most got the message, but to make sure it stuck Henry gave out gifts of lands to followers of unimpeachable loyalty. Such a one was Sir Richard, and so when the last Danish king of Dublin rebelled and was executed, his lands were given to the young Norman knight. And he did what any Norman who owned land would do. He built a castle on it.

Malahide port today.
Picture by Pieter on Panoramio.

Malahide became an important port, and control of it gave the Talbots a great deal of prestige. In 1372 Thomas Talbot (whose father had fought for England against Robert the Bruce) was summoned to the King’s Parliament, which at the time was not elected but rather appointed based on influence in the surrounding area, as Lord Talbot. This was not an aristocratic title as such, but more a recognition of the family’s power. In 1475, the Talbots were granted the title of “Lord High Admiral of Malahide and the Seas Adjoining”, effectively making them responsible for levying customs charges and enforcing maritime law in the area. The Talbots continued to prosper, until the English Civil War came across the sea and to their doors.

Miles Corbet, politician and regicide.

Miles Corbet was a regicide, in the eyes of the English law. His was not the hand that wielded the axe that struck off the head of King Charles I, but his was the hand that signed the death warrant, him and 58 others. It was Oliver Cromwell who signed his name at the top of the list, and it was Corbet who signed his name at the bottom. With that, he was sealed in loyalty to Parliament. This saw him sent to Ireland, where he wound up as one of the commissioners overseeing the implementation of Cromwell’s plan to force the natives of Ireland to move west and give up the fertile midlands to English occupation, immortalised in his declaration that they could go “to Hell or to Connaught”. Among those exiled to the west were Sir John and Lady Talbot, who had been loyal to the Royalist cause, and it was Malahide, the most defensible castle in the region, that Corbet took as his own residence. Legend has it that he set up a brewery in the chapel, and the smoke from the fires under his boiler are said to be visible to this day. He spent eleven years as lord of Malahide, until the Restoration of King Charles II saw him fleeing for his life to the Netherlands. There he was betrayed into English hands and ended his days hung, drawn and quartered before a cheering crowd. Malahide Castle was returned to the Talbots, though they did not regain all their previous holdings, most notably losing control of the port of Malahide. One thing they did, however, was to deliberately weaken and destroy the defences of the castle that had drawn Corbet to it, with Lady Talbot declaring to her son Richard that the castle “should never again serve as a stronghold to invite the residence of an usurper”.

The Great Hall, where the White Lady’s picture is said to have hung.

Miles became noted as one of the ghosts that haunted the castle, who was said to appear in military garb, seemingly whole before collapsing into the four parts he had been left in after his execution. Other ghosts include Sir Walter Hussey, who was the rival of one of the Talbots for the affections of Lady Maud Plunkett. On the day of his wedding to her he was killed in battle, and now he haunts the halls of Malahide Castle to show his resentment of how she married the Talbot instead. Lady Maud is also said to haunt the halls, though not as a young woman but rather as an old lady hunting for the ghost of her third husband, a local judge whose name has not been recorded. More tragic is the story of Puck, the Talbot family jester in Tudor times. He fell in love with a female hostage billeted on the family by King Henry VIII and contrived to help her escape, but his plan was thwarted and he was found lying in the winter snow, stabbed in the heart. His spirit refused to rest, however, and stories abounded during the 1970s restoration of the castle of him being seen on the grounds. The most mysterious ghost is that of the White Lady. A painting of an extraordinarily beautiful woman in a white dress was said to have hung in the great hall of the castle, though nobody could name her or the artist who had painted her. The story had it that she would leave her painting and drift through the halls in the dead of night, and though the painting has gone, the stories of sighting her in the castle grounds have not.

Richard Talbot, Earl of Tyrconnell.
Portrait by Francois de Troy, court painter for King James II in his exile.

The Talbots were not confined to Malahide, of course, and it was another Talbot, Richard the Earl of Tyrconnel, who was responsible for the Irish militia coming to the aid of James II in his war with William of Orange. On the morning of the Battle of the Boyne, it is said that fourteen members of the extended Talbot clan breakfasted together before going to fight for James. By the end of the day, all but one would be dead. Still, the Talbots endured, and somehow even managed to avoid attainder and retain their estate in the aftermath of the wars. The family converted to Protestantism, and sometime around 1765 the current head of the family, Richard Talbot, married an extraordinary woman who would see the family fortunes restored. Her name was Margaret O’Reilly.

The coat of arms taken by the 1st Baroness Talbot. The lion is a traditional part of the Talbot family arms, both in Ireland and England, and actually originated as the royal arms of the Welsh House of Dinefwr, from whom the English Lord Talbots are descended.

Women sometimes get short shrift in the pages of history, and Margaret, ala, is no exception. She was the child of James O’Reilly and Barbara Nugent. The Nugents were a noble English family, and her brother Hugh would (on achieving a baronetcy) take the name over the more plebiean O’Reilly. Her younger brother Andrew would also join the aristocracy – as Andreas Graf O’Reilly von Ballinlough. He emigrated to Austria at the age of 14, joined the army ad rose through the ranks fighting against Napoleon. He married into an aristocratic Austrian family and became a Count of the Austrian Empire. With siblings like this, Margaret would need to work hard to stand out – but this she did, becoming a power to be reckoned with. In 1831, at the age of 86, she was created Baroness Talbot of Malahide. It was rare for a woman to receive such an honour in their own right, and it was a sign of the influence Lady Margaret held. In her new role she attended the coronation of William IV, before dying at the age of 89.

The most famous of Margaret’s sons was Colonel Thomas Talbot, who founded the settlement of Port Talbot in Ontario. He became infamous for ruling the settlement with an iron fist, which helped provoke the Upper Canada Rebellion of 1837.

The Talbots then became an aristocratic family in the great British tradition – sometimes admirable, often odd, and frequently both. The second Baron was Lady Margaret’s son Richard Wogan Talbot, had been elected to the Irish parliament at the age of 22 (or 24, some stories state), only to be ejected after less than a year when it was pointed out that the minimum age for a member of parliament was 25. He had joined the army and served in the Napoleonic wars, attempted to establish a cotton industry in Malahide and wound up a stalwart back bench MP in the Commons. His brother, James Talbot, joined the diplomatic service, and was engaged in “highly sensitive and covert activities” on the continent. On Richard Wogan’s death, James inherited the estate and the title, but died himself a year later and passed it on to his son.

James Talbot, 4th Baron of Malahide and 1st Baron de Malahide

The fourth baron, also named James, was a noted archaeologist and served as president of the Royal Archaeological Institute for thirty years. He added to his families titles, as he was created as a British peer in addition to the Irish title his family held. (The Irish title is noted as “of Malahide”, while the British is “de Malahide”.) This entitled him to sit in the House of Lords, where he served in the Liberal governments of the day.

Richard Wogan Talbot. He lived in Scotland before inheriting Malahide Castle, and a football team in Auchinleck still bears his name in honour of him allowing them their pitch rent-free.

The fifth baron, Richard Wogan Talbot, was a noted explorer, who made several expeditions into Africa, H was highly popular with his Irish tenants. When he and his wife returned from their honeymoon, the locals unhitched the horses from his cart and pulled it to the castle themselves, while a local band played “Come Back to Erin”. The fondness seems to have gone both ways, as he allowed the farmers to purchase the freehold of their farms from him, something that meant a great deal both symbolically and literally in the wake of the Land War. His wife was a descendant of James Boswell, the famous companion and biographer of Samuel Johnson.

The sixth baron was named James Boswell Talbot, after his mother’s family. He succeeded to the barony at the age of 47, and three years later married Joyce Gunning Kerr, the eighteen year old daughter of a London actor. Despite the upheavals in Ireland, the Talbot family remained hugely popular and the newlyweds received the same reception as his father had – a remarkable display for 1923! It was his contributions to the literary world that James was most well known for, the most notable of which were the Asloan Manuscript and the Boswell papers. The Asloan Manuscript was a 16th century collection of Scottish writings that had been in the family’s library for centuries. This remains an invaluable source to historians today. The Boswell Papers had come from his mother, and were the personal letters and diaries of James Boswell – as with the Asloan manuscript, this provided a rare unedited glimpse into history and a valuable primary source for historians.

The last Baron de Malahide was Milo, a cousin of James Boswell and grandson of the fourth baron. Milo was, like the third baron, a diplomat, with all the intrigue that title conveys. He studied at Cambridge in the thirties, being tutored by Guy Burgess and Anthony Blunt. Both men would later be revealed to be Soviet spies, and Milo’s friendship with them would lead to his early retirement in 1956. Although he was never charged, rumours swirled around him until his death in 1973 at the age of 60. These were given greater credence when his sister Rose, who inherited the estate but not the titles, was seen burning his papers after his death. His death led to the extinction of the de Malahide title, although the Irish “of Malahide” title had looser inheritance rules and passed to an English cousin.

Milo and Rose with their mother.
This painting still hangs in the castle.

Milo had been in negotiations to sell his castle to the Irish government when he died, and two years later his sister Rose reluctantly completed the sale, unable to otherwise meet the death duties on the estate. There was ill feeling on both sides, as she had separately sold much of the contents of the castle, including several antique works of art and furniture. Both the government and private benefactors wound up repurchasing some of these items and restoring them to the castle, which became a museum and a tourist attraction. So ended the long association of the Talbots and the castle, though their spirit still lingers in the stones they held so long.


Talbot II DD-114 - History

The oldest surviving example of an inhabited building in Port Talbot, Harbour House is in need of work to maintain and preserve a valuable resource. It is currently used by Port Talbot Sea Cadets as a Training Centre. Built in 1838 and Shown on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey of 1876. The Harbour master's house is on the wharf side near the original lock gates. Grade II Listed as "an unusual survival of a 19th Century Harbour house, retaining its character, and of historic interest".

Each week young people regularly attend training sessions at Harbour House, where Sea Cadets offer recognised training and qualifications. During Summer months water based activities are popular. Throughout the year land based courses such as First Aid, Meteorology, Catering and Mechanical Engineering are offered.

Plan and expected results

Our aim, as part of the National Sea Cadet charity is to support as many young people as possible to develop skills and qualifications that will benefit them in adult life.
The charity is entirely run by volunteers who give their time and expertise freely.
We need to renovate the building to provide a good learning environment.
All funds for running costs and maintenance are either raised by the cadets and volunteers or by kind donation.

The building is in need of pointing to prevent water ingress and to prevent further damage to the fabric of the building. The windows also urgently need attention. As custodians of the building, we feel we need to urgently renovate this lovely building to it's former glory and preserve it for the history of the town. It is the oldest inhabited dwelling in Port Talbot and illustrates the importance of the industrial heritage of the area.
The cadets are working on various fundraising projects and need help to care for this lovely Victorian property.
We are grateful for all the assistance our supporters generously give to assist this project.


Mục lục

Talbot được đặt lườn vào ngày 12 tháng 7 năm 1917 tại xưởng tàu của hãng William Cramp & Sons ở Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 20 tháng 2 năm 1918, được đỡ đầu bởi Cô Elizabeth Major, và được đưa ra hoạt động vào ngày 20 tháng 7 năm 1918 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Thiếu tá Hải quân Isaac Foote Dortch.

Talbot khởi hành từ New York vào ngày 31 tháng 7 để đi sang quần đảo Anh Quốc. Nó thực hiện ba chuyến khứ hồi khác đến Anh, và vào tháng 12 đã ghé qua Brest, Pháp. Sang năm 1919, nó gia nhập Hạm đội Thái Bình Dương và phục vụ cùng đơn vị này cho đến ngày 31 tháng 3 năm 1923, khi nó được cho xuất biên chế tại San Diego. Nó được mang ký hiệu lườn DD-114 vào ngày 17 tháng 7 năm 1920 đang khi ở trong lực lượng dự bị.

Talbot nhập biên chế trở lại vào ngày 31 tháng 5 năm 1930, và gia nhập Hải đội Khu trục 10 của Lực lượng Chiến trận tại San Diego. Nó tiếp tục phục vụ cùng lực lượng này cho đến năm 1937, khi nó đi đến Hawaii hỗ trợ cho Lực lượng Tàu ngầm của Hạm đội Thái Bình Dương trong một năm. Sang năm 1939, nó phục vụ cùng Lực lượng Chiến trận và Lực lượng Tàu ngầm. Trong các năm 1940 và 1941, chiếc tàu khu trục đặt căn cứ tại San Diego.

Thế Chiến II Sửa đổi

Một ngày sau khi Đế quốc Nhật Bản tấn công Trân Châu Cảng, Talbot lên đường hộ tống cho tàu sân bay Saratoga hướng đến Hawaii, đến nơi đúng một tuần sau trận tấn công. Nó tuần tra ngoài khơi quần đảo trong 10 ngày, rồi quay về San Diego. Đến tháng 2 năm 1942, nó gia nhập Lực lượng Tuần tra của Quân khu Hải quân 12 và hộ tống các đoàn tàu vận tải dọc theo bờ biển Thái Bình Dương.

Vào cuối tháng 5, Talbot rời Puget Sound hộ tống các chiếc S-18, S-23S-28 đến Alaska. Chúng đi đến Dutch Harbor vào ngày 2 tháng 6, chịu đựng một đợt không kích nhỏ bất thành vào ngày hôm sau. Ngoại trừ ba chuyến đi hộ tống ngắn đến Seattle, chiếc tàu khu trục hoạt động tuần tra và hộ tống tại vùng biển Alaska trong bảy tháng tiếp theo. Đến ngày 31 tháng 10 năm 1942, nó được xếp lại lớp như một tàu vận chuyển cao tốc với ký hiệu lườn mới APD-7. Talbot rời Dutch Harbor vào ngày 31 tháng 1 năm 1943 để được cải biến tại Xưởng hải quân Mare Island cho vai trò mới, một tàu nhỏ nhưng nhanh hơn, có khả năng vận chuyển 147 binh lính. Công việc hoàn tất vào ngày 15 tháng 3. Ngay ngày hôm sau, Talbot lên đường hướng đi Hawaii, đến Trân Châu Cảng một tuần sau đó. Vào ngày 2 tháng 4, nó lên đường đi Espiritu Santo gia nhập Đội vận chuyển 12 và trong hai tháng tiếp theo, con tàu tham gia thực tập huấn luyện cùng đội của nó, đồng thời hộ tống tàu bè đi đến Nouvelle-Calédonie, New Zealand, Australia và Guadalcanal.

Vào giữa tháng 6, nó gia nhập Đội đặc nhiệm 31.1, nhóm tấn công Rendova, cho nhiệm vụ chiếm đóng New Georgia. Nó cùng tàu quét mìn Zane phải chiếm đóng hai đảo nhỏ kiểm soát lối ra vào vũng biển Roviana từ eo biển Blanche. Hai con tàu đã nhận lên tàu các đơn vị của Trung đoàn Bộ binh 169 tại Guadalcanal, và vào ngày 30 tháng 6 đi đến ngoài khơi bãi đổ bộ được chỉ định, nơi cần tấn công. Mưa rào nặng đã che khuất các hòn đảo, và Zane bị mắc cạn lúc 02 giờ 30 phút. Sau khi cho đổ bộ binh lính và tiếp liệu lên đảo mà không gặp kháng cự, Talbot tìm cách kéo chiếc tàu quét mìn nhưng thất bại. Sau đó, Rail đến nơi và kéo thành công trong khi Talbot giúp hỗ trợ phòng không trong quá trình chiến dịch, máy bay đối phương đã tấn công lực lượng đổ bộ chính. Trong đêm 4 tháng 7, nó cùng sáu tàu vận chuyển cao tốc khác đi đến ngoài khơi chỗ neo đậu Rice, và trong khi cho đổ bộ lực lượng tấn công sáng hôm sau, một quả ngư lôi "long-lance" Nhật đã đánh chìm Strong, một trong những tàu khu trục thuộc nhóm bắn phá.

Talbot quay trở lại Guadalcanal chuẩn bị cho việc chiếm đóng Vella Lavella. Vào ngày 14 tháng 8, nó lên đường cùng với Đội đặc nhiệm 31.5, nhóm vận chuyển tiền phương của Lực lượng Đổ bộ phía Bắc binh lính được đổ bộ lên bờ từ các tàu khu trục vận chuyển sáng hôm sau mà không gặp kháng cự. Tuy nhiên, chỉ hai giờ sau đó, phía Nhật bắt đầu không kích các con tàu và kéo dài suốt cả ngày. Hạm đội Mỹ không chịu thiệt hại nào và tự nhận đã bắn rơi 44 máy bay đối phương.

Talbot sau đó dành ra hơn một tháng cho nhiệm vụ hộ tống các tàu nhỏ hơn và vận chuyển tiếp liệu đến nhiều đảo thuộc quần đảo Solomon. Vào cuối tháng 9, nó gia nhập Lực lượng Tấn công phía Nam dưới quyền Đô đốc George H. Fort để chiếm đóng quần đảo Treasury. Tám chiếc ADP và 23 tàu đổ bộ nhỏ làm nhiệm vụ chuyên chở Lữ đoàn 8 New Zealand, các tàu nhỏ rời Guadalcanal vào các ngày 23 và 24 tháng 10, trong khi các tàu khu trục nhanh hơn khởi hành vào ngày 26. Đến ngày 27 tháng 10, binh lính được đổ bộ lên các đảo Mono và Stirling, còn các tàu vận chuyển rời khu vực lúc 20 giờ 00.

Vào ngày 3 tháng 11, Talbot đi đến Nouméa để đón lên tàu binh lính tăng cường cho lực lượng mà hai ngày trước đã đổ bộ lên các bãi biển ở Bougainville tại vịnh Nữ hoàng Augusta. Nó đến nơi vào ngày 6 tháng 11, cho đổ bộ binh lính lên bờ, đón nhận 19 người bị thương rồi bảo vệ cho một nhóm tàu đổ bộ LST quay trở lại Guadalcanal. Vào ngày 11 tháng 11, Talbot quay trở lại bãi đổ bộ cùng một đợt tiếp liệu. Bốn ngày sau, nó lên đường đi Guadalcanal. Nó nhân lên tàu binh lính, đạn dược và khẩu phần ăn, tham gia một cuộc tập dượt đổ bộ, rồi lên đường hướng đến Bougainville. Vào ngày 16 tháng 11, nó cùng năm tàu chị em hội quân cùng một lực lượng LST và tàu khu trục. Lúc 03 giờ 00, một máy bay trinh sát Nhật ném pháo sáng ở cuối đoàn tàu vận tải tiếp nối bởi các máy bay ném bom đối phương tấn công đoàn tàu trong suốt gần một giờ, cho đến khi ném bom trúng McKean khiến nó bốc cháy. Cho dù bị tấn công liên tục, các xuồng của Talbot đã cứu được 68 thủy thủ và 106 binh lính hành khách trên chiếc tàu bị đánh đắm.

Talbot tiếp tục đi đến mũi Torokina, đến nơi ngay giữa cao trào của một đợt không kích khác. Nó cho đổ bộ binh lính rồi hướng đến Guadalcanal. Sau khi được đại tu động cơ tại Nouméa vào tháng 12, nó thực hiện một chuyến đi khứ hồi đến Sydney. Vào ngày 8 tháng 1 năm 1944, nó rời Nouvelle-Calédonie đi Espiritu Santo để đón một đoàn tàu vận tải và hộ tống chúng đến Guadalcanal. Nó đi đến ngoài khơi Lunga Point vào ngày 13 tháng 1, rồi tuần tra tại khu vực từ đây cho đến Koli Point trong hai tuần. Đến ngày 28 tháng 1, chiếc tàu vận chuyển cao tốc đón các đơn vị thuộc Tiểu đoàn 30 New Zealand và một nhóm chuyên viên tình báo và liên lạc của Hải quân Hoa Kỳ rồi hướng đến quần đảo Green thuộc Papua New Guinea tham gia một cuộc trinh sát bằng sức mạnh.

Trong đêm 30 tháng 1, chiếc tàu khu trục cho đổ bộ lực lượng đột kích lên bờ rồi rút lui khỏi khu vực, và quay trở lại vào đêm hôm sau để đón họ. Talbot đưa binh lính New Zealand lên bờ tại Vella Lavella và nhân sự Hải quân Mỹ tại Guadalcanal. Vào ngày 13 tháng 2, Talbot lại đón binh lính New Zealand lên tàu rồi khởi hành cùng Lực lượng đặc nhiệm 31, đơn vị làm nhiệm vụ tấn công quần đảo Green. Nó đi đến ngoài khơi đảo Bara-hun vào ngày 15 tháng 2, cho đổ bộ binh lính trong đợt tấn công. Sau đó nó đi lại để vận chuyển lực lượng tăng cường và tiếp liệu giữa Guadalcanal và quần đảo Green.

Vào ngày 17 tháng 3, chiếc tàu vận chuyển đón các đơn vị thuộc Tiểu đoàn 2, Trung đoàn 4 Thủy quân Lục chiến tại Guadalcanal rồi khởi hành cùng lực lượng đổ bộ đi đến quần đảo St. Matthias. Lực lượng Thủy quân Lục chiến chiếm đóng Emirau một cách bình yên vào ngày 20 tháng 3, và Talbot quay trở về vịnh Purvis. Nó đi đến New Guinea vào ngày 4 tháng 4, tham gia các cuộc thực hành đổ bộ cùng với toán chiến đấu của Trung đoàn bộ binh 168. Hai tuần sau, nó đón 145 binh lính của trung đoàn này và khởi hành cùng Đội đặc nhiệm 77.3, đơn vị hỗ trợ hỏa lực, cho cuộc tấn công Aitape. Vào ngày 22 tháng 4, Talbot cho đổ bộ lực lượng, bắn phá đảo Tumleo rồi quay trở về mũi Cretin. Nó hộ tống các đợt tiếp liệu đến khu vực đổ bộ cho đến ngày 10 tháng 5, khi các tàu vận chuyển được cho tách ra khỏi Hạm đội 7.

Talbot gia nhập Đệ Ngũ hạm đội tại Guadalcanal vào ngày 13 tháng 5, và bắt đầu huấn luyện cùng các Đội phá hoạt dưới nước (UDT). Vào ngày 4 tháng 6, nó gia nhập một đoàn tàu vận tải đi đến quần đảo Marshall, đi đến Kwajalein vào ngày 8 tháng 6. Hai ngày sau, chiếc tàu vận tải cao tốc gia nhập Đội đặc nhiệm 53.15 thuộc Lực lượng Tấn công phía Nam và lên đường hướng đến quần đảo Mariana. Tuy nhiên, nó gặp tai nạn va chạm với thiết giáp hạm Pennsylvania sau một cú bẻ lái khẩn cấp nhiều ngăn bị ngập nước buộc nó phải quay trở lại để sửa chữa. Talbot lên đường hai ngày sau, gia nhập trở lại đội đặc nhiệm về phía Đông Nam Saipan, và đi đến ngoài khơi các bãi đổ bộ vào ngày D 15 tháng 6. Trong những ngày đầu tiên của chiến dịch, nó hộ tống cho đội bắn phá. Vào ngày 17 tháng 6, nó bắt giữ một người sống sót của một chiếc xuồng Nhật bị đánh đắm. Con tàu gặp phải trục trặc động cơ, buộc phải thả neo tại khu vực đổ bộ nơi một máy bay đối phương ném một chùm bom xuống mạn trái mũi tàu, nhưng không gây thiệt hại nào. Nó cho chuyển đội UDT của nó sang tàu khu trục Kane rồi tham gia một đoàn tàu vận tải đi Hawaii. Từ đây nó được gửi về San Francisco để đại tu, kéo dài từ ngày 11 tháng 7 đến ngày 28 tháng 8.

Talbot quay trở lại Trân Châu Cảng vào đầu tháng 9, và tiếp tục đi đến Eniwetok và Manus. Nó đón Đội UDT 3 lên tàu vào ngày 12 tháng 10, rồi khởi hành cùng Đội đặc nhiệm 77.6, lực lượng bắn phá và hỗ trợ hỏa lực, đi đến đảo Leyte. Vào ngày 18 tháng 10, các người nhái thuộc đội UDT tiến hành cuộc trinh sát ban ngày tại vùng biển giữa San Jose và Dulag. Cho dù gặp phải sự kháng cự bởi hỏa lực súng máy và súng cối, đội UDT quay trở về tàu mà không gặp thương vong. Chiếc tàu vận chuyển lên đường cùng một đoàn tàu vận tải và đi đến Seeadler Harbor vào ngày 27 tháng 10, nơi nó chuyển đội UDT sang chiếc President Hayes vào ngày 31 tháng 10.

Talbot đi đến vịnh Oro để gặp gỡ George Clymer và hộ tống nó đi đến mũi Gloucester, rồi quay trở lại Seeadler Harbor vào ngày 8 tháng 11. Hai ngày sau, đang khi thả neo tại đây và chỉ cách chiếc Mount Hood khoảng 800 yd (730 m), chiếc tàu chở đạn bất ngờ nổ tung, rải khoảng 600 lb (270 kg) mảnh vỡ và kim loại lên chiếc tàu vận chuyển. Talbot bị thủng nhiều chỗ, và nhiều thành viên thủy thủ đoàn bị thương. Xuồng của Talbot đã tìm kiếm những người sống sót nhưng không tìm thấy ai.

Vào ngày 15 tháng 12 năm 1944, sau khi các hư hại được sửa chữa tại Manus, Talbot lại lên đường, đi ngang qua Aitape để đi đến đảo Noemfoor tham gia các cuộc thực tập đổ bộ. Ngày 4 tháng 1 năm 1945, nó nhận binh lính lên tàu rồi khởi hành cùng Đơn vị đặc nhiệm 77.9.8 hướng đến vịnh Lingayen. Nó cho đổ bộ lực lượng tăng cường lên San Fabian trong tuần lễ tiếp theo rồi tiếp tục đi đến Leyte. Nó nhận lên tàu các đơn vị thuộc Sư đoàn nhảy dù 11 vào ngày 26 tháng 1 rồi hướng đến Luzon cùng một đoàn tàu vận tải. Đến ngày 31 tháng 1, nó cho đổ bộ binh lính lên bờ trong đợt tấn công thứ hai lên Nasugbu rồi đi đến Mindoro, chất đạn pháo cối và xuồng rocket lên tàu để chuyển giao đến Leyte.

Vào ngày 14 tháng 2, chiếc tàu vận chuyển cao tốc đón lên tàu các đơn vị thuộc Trung đoàn bộ binh 151 và di chuyển đến Bataan. Nó cho đổ quân lên Mariveles Harbor sáng hôm sau rồi quay trở về vịnh Subic. Đến ngày 17 tháng 2, nó đưa hàng tiếp liệu đến Corregidor, rồi hộ tống một đoàn tàu vận tải quay trở lại Ulithi, và ở lại đây trong nhiều tuần cho đến khi được lệnh đi đến Guam. Talbot cùng với LSM-381 đi đến Parece Vela tiến hành một cuộc khảo sát khả năng xây dựng một trạm vô tuyến, quan trắc thời tiết và trinh sát tại đây. Nó quay trở về Guam vào ngày 20 tháng 4, và đi đến Ulithi vào ngày hôm sau.

Vào ngày 22 tháng 4, Talbot tham gia một đoàn tàu vận tải đi Okinawa. Năm ngày sau, nó bắt đầu các cuộc tuần tra chống tàu ngầm về phía Nam Kerama Retto, rồi đến ngày 30 tháng 4 tham gia một đoàn tàu vận tải đi Saipan. Nó quay trở lại Kerama Retto để phục vụ như một tàu canh phòng từ ngày 22 tháng 5 đến ngày 6 tháng 6, khi nó quay lại Saipan. Từ khu vực Mariana, chiếc tàu vận chuyển cao tốc đi ngang qua Eniwetok và Hawaii để quay trở về Hoa Kỳ.

Talbot về đến San Pedro vào ngày 6 tháng 7, và được cải biến trở lại thành một tàu khu trục. Ký hiệu xếp lớp của nó quay trở lại DD-114 vào ngày 16 tháng 7. Tuy nhiên, một Ủy ban Điều tra và Khảo sát đã đề nghị nó nên ngừng hoạt động. Talbot được cho xuất biên chế vào ngày 9 tháng 10, và tên nó được rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 24 tháng 10 năm 1945. Lườn tàu được bán cho hãng Boston Metals Company tại Baltimore, Maryland vào ngày 30 tháng 1 năm 1946 để tháo dỡ.

Talbot được tặng thưởng tám Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II.


Notes

In 1629 a Lion's Whelp sailed with four other ships from Gravesend on April 25, 1629 for the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Arrived and greeted by Governor John Endecott on June 30, 1629. All ships were armed merchantmen. Eight cannon were listed for this Lion's Whelp which is the number carried by the Duke of Buckingham's Lion's Whelps and most armed pinnaces as well. Is this ship Buckingham's second Lion's Whelp, diverted for a cross Atlantic run with settlers and provisions to the Massachusetts Bay Colony? A careful scrutiny of the record is not supportive of this conclusion. This Lion's Whelp is tentatively identified as the 120-ton ship that brought William Dodge, along with the Sprague family and others to Salem, Massachusetts in 1629. The Lyon's Whelp left Gravesend 24/25 April 1629 and arrived in Salem mid-July 1629, under Master John Gibbs (or Gibbon). It was one of six ships in a small fleet the others including the Talbot, George Bonaventure, Lyon, and a ship called the Mayflower (though not the Mayflower of the Pilgrims). This Lion's Whelp and her sister ships the Talbot and the George carried goods and new settlers to Naumkaeg, the Indian name for the territory settled by England's Massachusetts Bay Company at Salem.


Watch the video: अशवमध यगन क आरभ. Mahabharat Stories. B. R. Chopra. EP 113