11 October 1943

11 October 1943

11 October 1943

October 1943

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Occupants

Resistance fighters destroy the blast furnances at Zenica, Central Bosnia

India

Madras suffers its first air raid, carried out by a single Japanese aircraft



11 October 1943 - History

77' Elco
PT-20 participated in the Battle of Midway
PT-21 participated in the Battle of Midway
PT-22 participated in the Battle of Midway
PT-23 aborted voyage to Midway Atoll due to broken crankshaft
PT-25 participated in the Battle of Midway
PT-28 participated in the Battle of Midway
PT-31 scuttled January 20, 1942
PT-32 scuttled March 13, 1942 off Tagauayan Island
PT-33 scuttled to prevent capture December 26, 1941
PT-34 sunk April 9, 1942 by bombs dropped by F1M2 Petes
PT-35 scuttled April 12, 1942
PT-37 sunk February 1, 1943
PT-41 destroyed April 15, 1942
PT-43 scuttled January 2, 1943
PT-44 sunk December 12, 1942 by gunfire from destroyers Kawakaze and Suzukaze
PT-48 "Prep Tom / Deuce" displayed at Fleet Obsolete
PT-59 sunk 1976 wreckage salvaged June 2020
PT-60 ultimate fate unknown officially stricken April 21, 1944
PT-61 reclassified February 16, 1944 as a small boat C68371, ultimate fate unknown
PT-63 sunk due to accident June 18, 1944
PT-67 destroyed March 17, 1943 during refueling accident at Tufi
PT-68 grounded/scuttled October 1, 1943
80' Elco
PT-107 "Black Magic" sunk during refueling accident June 18, 1944
PT-108 "Plywood Bastard / 8 Boat / Lil' Duck" scuttled November 11, 1945 at Samar
PT-109 sunk August 2, 1943 captain John F. Kennedy two MIA , crew rescued
PT-110 sunk by depth charge after collision with PT-114
PT-111 sunk February 1, 1943 by destroyer Kawakaze
PT-112 sunk January 11, 1943 by destroyers Hatsukaze and Tokitsukaze
PT-113 "Green Banana / Zero Chaser" grounded August 8, 1943
PT-114 scuttled October 28, 1945
PT-117 sunk August 1, 1943 in Rendova Harbor by bomb dropped by Japanese aircraft
PT-119 destroyed March 17, 1943 during refueling accident at Tufi
PT-121 "Snafu" sunk by friendly fire March 27, 1944
PT-122 destroyed October 28, 1945
PT-123 sunk February 1, 1943 by F1M2 Pete off Guadalcanal
PT-124 "Who Me?" scuttled November 11, 1945 at Samar
PT-126 scuttled November 24, 1945 off Samar
PT-128 scuttled November 10, 1945 off Samar
PT-130 scuttled October 28, 1945 in the Philippines
PT-131 scuttled November 10, 1945 Samar
PT-132 "Little Lulu" scuttled November 10, 1945 Samar
PT-133 "New Guinea Ferry" sunk July 15, 1944 by shore battery
PT-143 scuttled October 28, 1945 off Samar
PT-146 scuttled October 28, 1945 off Samar
PT-150 "Lady Lucifer / Joker / Princessr" scuttled October 26, 1945 at Samar
PT-153 scuttled July 4, 1943
PT-154 damaged off Shortland November 13-14,1943
PT-157 "Aces and Eights / Old Pickle Puss" scuttled November 27, 1945
PT-158 scuttled July 5, 1943
PT-164 "Fubar" sunk August 1, 1943 in Rendova Harbor by bomb dropped by Japanese aircraft
PT-162 scuttled November 11, 1945 at Samar
PT-163 scuttled November 11, 1945 at Samar
PT-166 sunk by B-25 Mitchell October 20, 1943
PT-167 survived the war, scuttled November 11, 1945
PT-168 "Raidin' Maiden" scuttled November 11, 1945 at Samar
PT-169 scuttled November 24, 1945 at Samar
PT-170 scuttled November 11, 1945 at Samar
PT-171 scuttled November 11, 1945 at Samar
PT-172 destroyed to prevent capture September 7, 1943
PT-173 lost aboard SS Stanvac Manila when torpedoed May 24, 1943
PT-174 "Hickory" scuttled November 11, 1945 at Samar
PT-187 "Eight Ball" scuttled November 24, 1945
PT-190 "Jack O' Diamonds" sold March 1946 fate unknown
PT-191 "Bambi" ultimate fate unknown likely scrapped
PT-193 "Bitchin' Witch" captain Taylor scuttled June 25, 1944
PT-194 "Liberty Hound" scuttled November 6, 1945 Samar
PT-320 sunk November 5, 1944 Leyte Gulf
PT-323 sunk by kamikaze attack, first sunk by suicide attack
PT-331 scuttled November 10, 1945
PT-336 scuttled November 6, 1945 at Samar
PT-337 destroyed March 7, 1944 off Hansa Bay
PT-338 grounded January 27, 1945 off Semirara Island and scuttled
PT-346 sunk by friendly fire April 29, 1944
PT-347 "Zombie" sunk by friendly fire April 29, 1944
PT-350 "Shifty-Fifty" damaged by friendly fire April 29, 1944
PT-353 sunk by friendly fire March 27, 1943
PT-354 sold May 1946 ultimate fate unknown
PT-381 sold May 1946 ultimate fate unknown
PT-373 sold May 1946 ultimate fate unknown
PT-382 sold May 1946 ultimate fate unknown
PT-486 under restoration in the markings of PT-109
PT-615 (C105341, Tarbaby VI, Flagship III) sold as surplus, various owners today Fleet Obsolete
PT-617 "Dragon Lady / Big Red Cock" displayed at PT Boat Museum / Battleship Cove
78' Higgins
PT-81 "Big One / Half Hitch" scuttled November 23, 1945 Samar
PT-223 "Ball Buster" scuttled November 6, 1945 Samar
PT-300 sunk December 18, 1944 off Mindoro by Ki-51 Sonia (misidentified as D3A Val) kamikaze attack
PT-305 restored to seaworthy condition and operated by National World War II Museum (D-Day Museum) on Lake Pontchatrain
PT-365 scuttled November 1, 1945 at Samar
PT-459 "Mahogany Menace" (Beachcomber IV) sold as surplus, various owners today Fleet Obsolete
PT-658 restored in 2005 by Save The PT-Boat
PT-796 "Tail Ender" displayed at PT Boat Museum / Battleship Cove
70' Vosper
PT-724 (Endeavor II) sold as surplus, various owners today Liberty Aviation Museum
PT-728 restored and operated by Liberty Aviation Museum

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Buildup to World War II: January 1931-August 1939

The buildup of World War II increased when Adolf Hitler acquired more power by becoming chancellor of Nazi Germany in January 1933. The World War II timeline below summarizes important events that occurred from January 30, 1933 to October 14, 1933.

World War II Timeline: January 30-October 14

January 30: Adolf Hitler becomes chancellor of Nazi Germany.

February 4: Adolf Hitler tightens his absolute power in Nazi Germany with the decree "For the Protection of the German People," which gives the Nazis the authority to censor publications and ban political agitating.

February 27: The Reichstag building in Berlin is set afire. Adolf Hitler's government accuses Communists of arson, triggering an anti-Communist crackdown throughout Nazi Germany.

March 20: SS chief Heinrich Himmler announces the establishment of Dachau, the first Nazi concentration camp. The camp will receive its first inmates, political prisoners, within the next few days.

March 23: Nazi Germany's Reichstag passes the Enabling Act, affording Adolf Hitler total dictatorial powers.

March 27: Japan announces that it will no longer be part of the seemingly impotent League of Nations.

April 1: Adolf Hitler orders a boycott of all Jewish-owned businesses in Nazi Germany. The boycott itself fails when most German citizens ignore it, but Adolf Hitler will follow with a series of laws that effectively strangle the civil liberties of German Jews.

April 7: With the passage of the Aryan Law, any German who is one-quarter or more Jewish is barred from civil service employment.

July 14: All German political parties except the Nazi Party are outlawed.

October 14: Nazi Germany announces that it intends to follow Japan's lead and withdraw from the beleaguered League of Nations.

World War II Headlines

Below are more highlights and images that outline the events of World War II and show the details of the Nazi's increasing power, as well as Japan's military offensive against China in the early 1930s.

The Reichstag fire: Less than a month after Adolf Hitler was appointed chancellor, arson gave the Nazis an excuse to suspend civil liberties and crack down on their political enemies. On February 27, 1933, the Reichstag (parliament) building in Berlin went up in flames, and a Dutch Communist found at the scene was charged with the crime. Claiming that acts of terrorism were about to break out all over Nazi Germany, the Nazis imposed martial law, made mass arrests, and carried out summary executions. Many historians believe that the Nazis set the fire themselves.

The Kwangtung Army captures Shanhai Pass of the Great Wall: Once the Japanese established the puppet government of Manchukuo, the Kwangtung Army turned its attention to the northeast provinces of China. It achieved its first objective, the capture of Shanhai Pass -- the easternmost stronghold of the Great Wall -- on January 3, 1933. After Japan took the Chinese province of Jehol on March 1, Chinese troops attempted to make a stand along the Great Wall, but Japan drove them from the Wall by May 12. Representatives of both countries signed the Tanggu Truce on May 22, the provisions of which entirely favored the Japanese. China relinquished Jehol and agreed to a 100-mile-wide demilitarized zone south of the Great Wall.

Japan's military successes fuel its future imperial ambitions in the Pacific and Southeast Asia: The Russo-Japanese war of 1904-1905 demonstrated Japan's emergence as a significant 20th century power. Its successful surprise attack against Port Arthur in 1904 -- without any declaration of war -- and the destruction of the Russian fleet at Tsushima in 1905 also indicated the way that Japan might conduct itself strategically and diplomatically in the future. By the 1930s, the leadership of an increasingly militaristic and radicalized country felt strategically isolated and economically threatened by Anglo-French-U.S. encroachments within the region and by Japan's lack of raw materials. These fears eventually precipitated Japan's campaigns in Manchuria and China from 1931. Its military successes fueled its future imperial ambitions in the Pacific and Southeast Asia areas.

Nazi Germany continued to gain strength and Benito Mussolini built up his Italian military. Go on to the next page for a detailed timeline highlighting the important World War II events that occurred from November 1933 to December 1934.

For additional information about World War II, see:

The arrival of U.S. Commodore Matthew Perry in 1853 during a time of fear of Western colonization inspired a radical change in Japan's government structure. For more than 260 years, power had been vested in the decentralized Tokugawa shogunate, while the Imperial Court in Kyoto had remained mostly symbolic.

Recognizing that Japan's continued autonomy depended on a unified nation and a centralized government, a cadre of nobles and former samurai forced the collapse of the much-weakened Tokugawa shogunate in 1868. Nominal authority was returned to the emperor in what became known as the Meiji Restoration, though real power remained in the hands of the samurai activists who had overthrown the Tokugawa shogunate and seized control of the new government.

The new government forced the dissolution of some 250 semi-autonomous domains, and brought all territory under central control. Reform continued in 1889 when the Meiji Constitution established a rather ineffective two-house legislature (the Diet) and a politically powerful cabinet of ministers under the emperor. The system suffered from fundamental weaknesses in that the ministers did not have to answer to the Diet. As before, real power remained with the ruling clique of insiders.

During the period of Emperor Taisho (1912-26), a democratic movement briefly shifted influence to the parliament and democratic parties. However, economic depression in the 1920s and the rising assertiveness of the military soon stifled that movement.

The army and navy already exerted great political influence through their own cabinet ministers. Moreover, the emperor's passive role in government allowed the militarists to flourish. The military also claimed immunity from civilian control on grounds that only the emperor was commander-in-chief of the armed forces. Political leaders who opposed the militarist agenda were targeted for assassination by radical young officers.

The military demonstrated its disdain for civilian control in 1931 when the Kwangtung Army seized Manchuria without even consulting its own government. By 1941, when General Tojo was named prime minister, Japan was essentially a military autocracy.


Current Events October 29, 1943



THE STARS AND STRIPES
THE Daily Newspaper of U.S. Armed Forcesin the European Theater of Operations
Vol. 3 No. 308 New York, N.Y.—London, England Friday, Oct. 29,1943


Nazis Race West to Escape Soviet Trap

Neck of Sack
Is Tightened
By Russians

Germans Battle Fiercely
At Krivoi Rog to Slow
Arm of Pincers

While German troops fought desperately last night at Krivoi Rog to hold off the northern arm of a vast
developing pincers, others in the south raced pell-mell west to get out of a sack whose neck was being tightened by the great Russian breakthrough in the Melitopol sector.
The Red Army which smashed through Melitopol was advancing west and northwest on the Nogaisk steppe at the rate of sometimes as much as 18 miles a day. Columns striking upward from Melitopol were but 30 miles from the Lower Dnieper. Last night it had developed into a race between Germans within the Dnieper
Bend and Russians on the south side of the river. Soviet forces already were due south of Nikopol, on the Dnieper, and any German escape must be made southwestward down the railway from Aposlovo to Kherson at the Dnieper mouth.
Key Rail Point is Goal
Kherson itself was a prime goal for both. Through it lies the last remaining escape rail line from the Crimea, whose peril grows hourly with the Russian breakthrough. Meanwhile the Germans were taking a terrible beating in the center of the Dnieper Bend as they fell back fromDniepropetrovsk. In addition to heavy
losses in men and material, they were forced to give up two key rail centers and 30 populated points.
Violent fighting raged at Krivoi Rog.
The Germans threw in everything in a fanatical attempt to stop the Russian wedge from smashing down and behind Nazi forces retreating westward in the Bend. Great aerial battles continued,with the Germans using fleets of transport planes to drop supplies to the besieged defenders.
Russian bombers were pounding ground forces and hammering rail junctions and other key points in the area.

Allied Advances
Menace Isernia

Troopships Reported Off
Italy's West Coast
For New Landings

Allied forces in Italy scored a general advance of three to four miles yesterday as Britain's Eighth Army drove a wedge into the German positions in the central sector, captured the hill town of Torella and increased the threat to the big Nazi base of Isernia 14 miles away.
While Fifth Army patrols felt out enemy strength along the Massico line 40 miles westward, Eighth Army troops along the extreme right flank pushed further north up the Adriatic coast road, took over high ground overlooking theTrigno and enlarged their bridgehead over the river.
Although the Allied columns were meeting increasingly tough German resistance from artillery and mortars, a Berne dispatch to the Stockholm Svenska Dagbladet said, nevertheless, that the Nazis were preparing to evacuate southern Italy under Rommel's new supreme command.
Buttressing earlier neutral reports that the Germans feared a new Allied landing, Swiss dispatches said a large concentration of Allied transports, supply ships and warships was forming off Italy's west coast and troops were massing in Corsica for a new attack. Gaeta and Leghorn were mentioned as possible attack zones.

Japs at Rabaul
Get It Again

58 Planes Bagged as Libs
Return to -Base For
3rd Straight Day

ALLIED HQ., Southwest Pacific, Oct.
28—Rabaul,
New Britain—the Hamburg of the South Pacific—received another heavy pasting yesterday from Fifth Air Force bombers and fighters which destroyed 58 more Jap aircraft and boosted their three-day toll of enemy planes destroyed to 181.
The attack, directed chiefly at an airdrome north of Rabaul, left many fires burning and shattered planes and equipment everywhere. The Libs flew through one of the heaviest anti-aircraft barrages yet offered over the great New Britain base to drop 150 tons of bombs.
The B24s accounted for the wrecking of 21 parked planes and the damaging of 23 more. Of the 70 fighters that tried to intercept, P38s shot down 37 and damaged 20.


11 October 1943 - History

Combat Infantryman Badge
Badge and Display Recognition

Example Display Recognition:
Actual Size: 8 1/2 x 11
All Applicable Combat Missions between World War II and now.
See Operation RetroActive Recognition for Eligibility Extension to Engagements Prior to World War II

All Applicable Combat Missions to include:

Issue Requirements
You must submit the following:

NOTICE
This Display Recognition is available ONLY to authorized recipients who possess orders, or authorization form, or release documentation that confirms award eligibility. (See "Issue Requirements"). To obtain either a Display Medal or a Display Recognition for your authorized award you will be required to provide military-issued documentation authorizing your award. There are no exceptions.

WARNING!
You must NOT submit a military issued document or photocopy that:

  • has been altered in any way by you after
    the original's official issue
  • contains information or corrections or
    additions that you entered
  • lists awards or training you knowingly did not receive
  • contains highlighting, colorizing or other markings you entered

Be advised that on request any knowingly fraudulent document sent by you will be released to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) that may result in prosecution and/or fine/imprisonment.

Email Questions, or Phone: 1-562-422-4100 (Pacific Time Zone)

You have four display types to choose from:
Black & White (No Color)
Heavy Bond Enclosure

You may apply for your Display Recognition using a.

( * Upon reception of required documentation )

Complete and MAIL this APPLICATION FORM.
Don't forget to include an unaltered COPY of your DD-214 or other pre-arranged document(s).

Telephone: 1-562-422-4100 (Pacific Time Zone)

Copyright © The American War Library
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Locator Registry Applications
Accessing The Worldwide Military Personnel Database

Paragraph 2-6, Army Regulation 600-8-22 (Military Awards)
25 February 1995

The CIB is worn above the ribbon rack on the Class A uniform, and above the name tag on utility and jungle fatigues.

(1) The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) was established by the War Department on 27 October 1943. Lieutenant General Lesley J. McNair, then the Army Ground Forces commanding general, was instrumental in its creation. He originally recommended that it be called the "fighter badge." The CIB was designed to enhance morale and the prestige of the "Queen of Battle." Then Secretary of War Henry Stinson said, "It is high time we recognize in a personal way the skill and heroism of the American infantry."

(2) Originally, the Regimental Commander was the lowest level at which the CIB could be approved and its award was retroactive to 7 December 1941. There was a separate provision for badge holders to receive a $10 per month pay stipend, which was rescinded in 1948. Several factors led to the creation of the CIB, some of the most prominent factors are as follows:

(a) The need for large numbers of well-trained infantry to bring about a successful conclusion to the war and the already critical shortage of infantrymen.

(b) Of all soldiers, it was recognized that the infantryman continuously operated under the worst conditions and performed a mission which was not assigned to any other soldier or unit.

(c) The infantry, a small portion of the total Armed Forces, was suffering the most casualties while receiving the least public recognition.

(d) General Marshall's well known affinity for the ground forces soldier and, in particular, the infantryman. All these factors led to the establishment of the CIB, an award which would provide special recognition of the unique role of the Army infantryman, the only soldier whose daily mission is to close with and destroy the enemy and to seize and hold terrain. The badge was intended as an inducement for individuals to join the infantry while serving as a morale booster for infantrymen serving in every theater.

(3) In developing the CIB, the War Department did not dismiss out of hand or ignore the contributions of other branches. Their vital contributions to the overall war effort were certainly noted, but it was decided that other awards and decorations were sufficient to recognize their contributions. From the beginning, Army leaders have taken care to retain the badge for the unique purpose for which it was established and to prevent the adoption of any other badge which would lower its prestige. At the close of World War II, our largest war in which the armor and artillery played key roles in the ground campaigns, a review was conducted of the CIB criteria with consideration being given to creating either additional badges or authorizing the badge to cavalry and armor units. The review noted that any change in policy would detract from the prestige of the badge.

(1) There are basically three requirements for award of the CIB. The soldier must be an infantryman satisfactorily performing infantry duties, must be assigned to an infantry unit during such time as the unit is engaged in active ground combat, and must actively participate in such ground combat. Campaign or battle credit alone is not sufficient for award of the CIB.

(2) The definition or requirement to be "engaged in active ground combat" has generated much dialogue over the years as to the original intent of the CIB.

(a) The 1943 War Department Circular required infantrymen to demonstrate "satisfactory performance of duty in action against the enemy." The operative words "in action" connoted actual combat.

(b) A War Department determination in October 1944 specified that "action against the enemy" for purposes of award of the CIB was to be interpreted as "ground combat against enemy ground forces."

(c) In 1948, the regulation governing badges stipulated that "battle participation credit is not sufficient the unit must have been in contact with the enemy." This clearly indicated that an exchange of hostile fire or equivalent personal exposure was the intent of the Army leadership.

(d) In 1963 and 1965 HQDA messages to the senior Army commander in the Southeast Asia theater of operations authorized award of the CIB to otherwise qualified personnel "provided they are personally present and under fire." U.S. Army Vietnam regulations went so far as to require documentation of the type and intensity of enemy fire encountered by the soldier. The intended requirement to be "personally present and under fire" has not changed.

c. Specific eligibility requirements

(1) A soldier must be an Army infantry or special forces Officer (SSI 11 or 18) in the grade of colonel or below, or an Army enlisted soldier or warrant officer with an infantry or special forces MOS, who subsequent to 6 December 1941 has satisfactorily performed duty while assigned or attached as a member of an infantry, ranger or special forces unit of brigade, regimental, or smaller size during any period such unit was engaged in active ground combat. Eligibility for special forces personnel (less the special forces medical sergeant) accrues from 20 December 1989. Retroactive awards for special forces personnel are not authorized.

(2) A recipient must be personally present and under hostile fire while serving in an assigned infantry or special forces primary duty, in a unit actively engaged in ground combat with the enemy. The unit in question can be of any size smaller than brigade. For example, personnel possessing an infantry MOS in a rifle squad of a cavalry platoon in a cavalry troop would be eligible for award of the CIB. Battle or campaign participation credit alone is not sufficient the unit must have been in active ground combat with the enemy during the period.

(3) Personnel with other than an infantry or special forces MOS are not eligible, regardless of the circumstances. The infantry or special forces SSI or MOS does not necessarily have to be the soldier's primary specialty, as long as the soldier has been properly trained in infantry or special forces tactics, possesses the appropriate skill code, and is serving in that specialty when engaged in active ground combat as described above. Commanders are not authorized to make any exceptions to this policy.

(4) Awards will not be made to general officers nor to members of headquarters companies of units larger in size than brigade.

(1) To date, a separate award of the CIB has been authorized for qualified soldiers in any of three conflicts: World War II (7 December 1941 to 3 September 1945), the Korean Conflict (27 June 1950 to 27 July 1953), and the Vietnam Conflict. Service in the Republic of Vietnam conflict (after 1 March 1961) combined with qualifying service in Laos (19 April 1961 to 6 October 1962), the Dominican Republic (28 April 1965 to 1 September 1966), Korea on the DMZ (after 4 January 1969), Grenada (23 October to 21 November 1983) Panama (20 December 1989 to 31 January 1990), and the Persian Gulf War (17 January to 11 April 1991) is recognized by one award only regardless of whether a soldier has served one or multiple tours in any or all of these areas. If a soldier has been awarded the CIB for service in any of the Vietnam era areas, that soldier is not eligible to earn the Combat Medical Badge.

(2) Second and third awards of the CIB are indicated by superimposing 1 and 2 stars respectively, centered at the top of the badge between the points of the oak wreath.

e. Special provisions - Republic of Vietnam

(1) Any officer whose basic branch is other than infantry who, under appropriate orders, has commanded a line infantry (other than a headquarters unit) unit of brigade, regimental, or smaller size for at least 30 consecutive days is deemed to have been detailed in infantry and is eligible for award of the CIB notwithstanding absence of a written directive detailing that soldier in the infantry, provided all other requirements for the award have been met. Orders directing the officer to assume command will be confirmed in writing at the earliest practicable date.

(2) In addition, any officer, warrant officer, or enlisted man whose branch is other than infantry, who under appropriate orders was assigned to advise a unit listed in (4) and (5) below or was assigned as a member of a White Star Mobile Training Team or a member of MAAG-Laos as indicated in f (l) and (2) below will be eligible for award of the CIB provided all other requirements have been met.

(3) After 1 December 1967 for service in the Republic of Vietnam, noncommissioned officers serving as Command Sergeants Major of infantry battalions and brigades for periods of at least 30 consecutive days in a combat zone are eligible for award of the CIB provided all other requirements have been met.

(4) Subsequent to 1 March 1961, a soldier must have been:

(a) Assigned as advisor to an infantry unit, ranger unit, infantry type unit of the civil guard of regimental or smaller size, and/or infantry-type unit of the self defense corps unit of regimental or smaller size of the Vietnamese government during any period such unit was engaged in actual ground combat.

(b) Assigned as advisor of an irregular force comparable to the above infantry units under similar conditions.

(c) Personally present and under fire while serving in an assigned primary duty as a member of a tactical advisory team while the unit participated in ground combat.

(5) Subsequent to 24 May 1965, to qualify for the CIB, personnel serving in U.S. units must meet the requirements of c (l) above. Individuals who performed liaison duties with the Royal Thai Army or the Army of the Republic of Korea combat units in Vietnam are eligible for award of the badge provided they meet all other requirements.

f. Laos - From 19 April 1961 to 6 October 1962 a soldier must have been:

(1) Assigned as member of a White Star Mobile Training Team while the team was attached to or working with a unit of regimental (groupment mobile) or smaller size of Forces Armee du Royaume (FAR), or with irregular type forces of regimental or smaller size.

(2) A member of MAAG-Laos assigned as an advisor to a region or zone of FAR, or while serving with irregular type forces of regimental or smaller size.

(3) Personally under hostile fire while assigned as specified in (1) or (2) above.

g. Dominican Republic - From 28 April 1965 to 21 September 1966, the soldier must have met the criteria prescribed in b and c above.

h. Korea - Subsequent to 4 January 1969, a soldier must have:

(1) Served in the hostile fire area at least 60 days and been authorized hostile fire pay.

(2) Been assigned to an infantry unit of company or smaller size and must be an infantry officer in the grade of captain or lower. Warrant officers and enlisted men must possess an infantry MOS. In the case of an officer whose basic branch is other than infantry who, under appropriate orders, has commanded an infantry company or smaller size infantry unit for at least 30 days, the award may be made provided all the following requirements are met.

(3) Been engaged with the enemy in the hostile fire area or in active ground combat involving an exchange of small arms fire at least 5 times.

(4) Been recommended personally by each commander in the chain of command and approved at division level. If killed or wounded as a direct result of overt enemy action, he must be recommended personally by each commander in the chain of command and approved at division level. In the case of infantrymen killed by enemy action, the requirement for at least 5 engagements ((3) above) and the requirement for the incident to have taken place in the hostile fire area, including the 60-day requirement ((1) above), will be waived. In the case of individuals wounded, even though outside the hostile fire area, the 5 engagements requirement and the 60 day requirement may be waived when it can be clearly established that the wound was a direct result of overt hostile action.

(5) Been eligible for award of the CIB after 4 January 1969, for service in the Republic of Vietnam, as noncommissioned officers serving as Command Sergeants Major of infantry battalions and brigades for periods of at least 30 consecutive days in a combat zone.

i. Grenada (Operation URGENT FURY) - From 22 October 1983 to 21 November 1983, the soldier must have met the criteria prescribed in b and c above.

j. Panama (Operation JUST CAUSE) - From 20 December 1989 to 31 January 1990, the soldier must have met the criteria prescribed in b and c above. Special forces personnel (less the special forces medical sergeant) are eligible for the CIB effective 20 December 1989. Retroactive awards are not authorized.

k. Persian Gulf War (Operation DESERT STORM) - From 17 January 1991 to 11 April 1991, the soldier must have met the criteria prescribed in b and c above. Retroactive awards are not authorized.

(1) Current awards. Current awards of the CIB may be awarded by the Commanding General, Eighth U.S. Army, any commander delegated authority by the Secretary of the Army during war time, and the Commanding General, PERSCOM.

(2) Retroactive awards. Retroactive awards of the Combat Infantryman Badge and the Combat Medical Badge may be made to fully qualified individuals. Such awards will not be made except where evidence of injustice is presented. Active duty soldiers will forward their applications through command channels to Commander PERSCOM, ATTN: TAPC-PDA, Alexandria, VA 22332-0471. Reserve Component soldiers, retirees, and veterans should address their application to Commander, ARPERCEN, ATTN DARP-PAS-EAW, 9700 Page Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63132-5200.

I. DESCRIPTION: A silver and enamel badge 1 inch in height and 3 inches in width, consisting of an infantry musket on a light blue bar with a silver border, on and over an elliptical oak wreath. Stars are added at the top of the wreath to indicate subsequent awards one star for the second award, two stars for the third award and three stars for the fourth award.

II. SYMBOLISM: The bar is blue, the color associated with the Infantry branch. The musket is adapted from the Infantry insignia of branch and represents the first official U.S. shoulder arm, the 1795 model Springfield Arsenal musket. It was adopted as the official Infantry branch insignia in 1924. The oak symbolizes steadfastness, strength and loyalty.

III. AWARD ELIGIBILITY: Awarded to personnel in the grade of Colonel or below with an infantry military occupational specialty who have satisfactorily performed duty while assigned as a member of an infantry unit, brigade or smaller size, during any period subsequent to 6 December 1941 when the unit was engaged in active ground combat. The policy was expanded to permit award to Command Sergeants Major of infantry battalions or brigades, effective 1 January 1967. Specific criteria for each conflict was also established. Only one award is authorized for service in Vietnam, Laos, Dominican Republic, Korea (subsequent to 27 July 1954), Grenada, Panama, and Southwest Asia. The complete criteria for each area and inclusive dates are listed in Army Regulation 600-8-22.

IV. DATE APPROVED: The Combat Infantryman Badge was approved by the Secretary of War on 7 October 1943 and announced in War Department Circular 269 dated 27 October 1943. On 8 February 1952, the Chief of Staff, Army, approved a proposal to add stars to the Combat Infantry Badge to indicate award of the badge in separate wars. Under this change in policy, the badge was no longer limited to a one-time award, but may now be awarded to eligible individuals for each war in which they participated.

The two badges have a combined interesting evolution. The Combat Infantryman Badge was approved by the Secretary of War on 7 October 1943 and was initially referred to as the Combat Assault Badge however, the name was changed to Combat Infantryman Badge as announced in War Department Circular 269 dated 27 October 1943. On 8 February 1952, the Chief of Staff, Army, approved a proposal to add stars to the Badge to indicate award of the Badge in separate wars. Regulations are now in place that provide for eight such awards. The first four prescribe the Badge to be silver with an additional star attached for each award subsequent to the first award. The fifth award is gold without stars and gold stars added for subsequent awards. The Badge is one inch in height (without stars) and three inches in width. The bar is blue, the color associated with the infantry branch. The musket is adapted from the infantry insignia of branch and represents the first official U.S. shoulder arm, the Springfield Arsenal musket. It was adopted as the official infantry branch insignia in 1924. The Oak wreath symbolizes steadfastness, strength and loyalty.

The CIB is awarded "to personnel in the grade of Colonel or below with an infantry MOS who have satisfactorily performed duty while assigned as a member of an infantry unit, brigade or smaller size during any period subsequent to 6 December 1941 when the unit was engaged in active ground combat." There is absolutely no mention of length of time such engagement has to be.

On 5 April 1963 the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, in message no. DA333969, advised that "the newly established criteria in DA327892 for award of the CIB would be printed as a change to AR672-5-1 Awards." The message said in part ". . . Any officer, warrant officer or enlisted man whose branch is other than infantry who, under appropriate orders, is assigned to advise a unit (South Vietnamese) will be eligible for this award provided all other requirements for such award have been met." Public Law 393, 78th Congress as reflected in War Department circular no. 271 dated 3 July 1944 provides that "During the present war (WWII) and for 6 months thereafter any enlisted man of the Combat Ground Forces of the Army who is entitled, under regulations prescribed by the Secretary of War to wear the Expert Infantryman Badge or the Combat Infantryman Badge shall be paid additional compensation at the rate of $5.95 per month for the EIB and at the rate of $10.00 per month when entitled to wear the CIB provided that compensation for both may not be paid at the same time." Combat Ground Forces is described as "Infantry, Cavalry, Field Artillery, Coast Artillery, Armored and Tank Destroyer units and Combat Engineers."

The Expert Infantryman Badge is described as being 7/16" in height and 3 inches in width. It is the same as the CIB except that there is no oak wreath. It was approved concurrent with the CIB.

Currently, for award eligibility, "personnel must meet Department of the Army established testing requirements and must possess a military occupational specialty within Career Management Field 11 (Infantry)."


Exchange Grenadier. Bataillonen against Ost-bataillonen in October 1943

Post by AETIUS 1980 » 03 May 2021, 09:49

Hello,
I'm looking for the assignment of II./Gr.Rgt.726 in October 1943. Indeed, following various directives (AOK. 7 Ia Nr 5207/43, Gen.Kdo.LXXXIV.AK Abt Ia Nr 1873/43- korpsbefehl Nr 7 October 1943 17th) to exchange infanterie units (battalion sizes) for an higher ratio in Ost.Btlen, it's impossible for me to know the destination of this unit. At the same time, the I./Gr.Rgt.739 and II./Gr.Rgt.583 saw themselves broken down to the east.
The contribution of Ost.Btlen.643, 642, 649, then 439. will be a numerical compensation, although the II.Bataillon./Gr.Rgt.726 is fully reconstituted by the end of November, unlike the other two.
So, about the "first" II./Gr.Rgt,726:
_ Where was he sent?
_ with which units (regiment's, division's)?
_ was it dissolved and then absorbed, and if so, when?

Re: Exchange Grenadier. Bataillonen against Ost-bataillonen in October 1943

Post by jpz4 » 04 May 2021, 20:40

Are you sure the battalion ever left? Unlike the other battalions you mention there is no mention of it leaving in the Armee, Korps or Division records (unless I missed something). In October it became Korpsreserve, which could have been a step to prepare it for extraction, but like I said I've not seen any evidence that it actually was transferred. I suspect this may have be cancelled because the division was already weak with just two regiments instead of the three regiments in the other two divisions, but can't recall seeing any documents to formally cancel the transfer.
Will check though.

Dug a little deeper: Tessin does not mention the battalion leaving the division (it does mention the other two battalions leaving) and the battalion is not absent from any situation maps. Unless you have additional evidence I haven't found any evidence that the battalion left at all.

Re: Exchange Grenadier. Bataillonen against Ost-bataillonen in October 1943

Post by AETIUS 1980 » 04 May 2021, 20:53

Re: Exchange Grenadier. Bataillonen against Ost-bataillonen in October 1943

Post by jpz4 » 04 May 2021, 20:54

Where in the corps records? I may have overlooked it, but although there are orders to prepare for transfer, the actual departure is not something I've found mention of.

Now if the battalion was filled with troops who were 'Ostverwendungsfähig' (which units intended for transfer were supposed to have), I can see how it lost a lot of its troops through the 'Austausch', but that is not the same as transferring a battalion and/or disbanding and rebuilding a battalion. Instead I would not be surprised if a considerable rebuild was required to replace the transferred troops, but that's not the same as a completely new battalion.
To find an answer to where the troops ended up it might be necessary to look into how the Austausch worked and to what extend men stayed together. The option that the men became part of a Marschbtl. is also possible, which would require yet another approach.


Those known to have served with

during the Second World War 1939-1945.

  • Aldous RT.
  • Apew BV.
  • Ballantyne Leonard. Fusilier
  • Beasley Kenneth George. Cpl.
  • Beauchamp .
  • Bevan George.
  • Bevan George.
  • Billins AJ.
  • Birt GL.
  • Blake Edward Ernest. Fslr. (d.4th September 1944)
  • Blyth J.
  • Bolden Henry William. Capt.
  • Bradley Edmund Gerald. L/Cpl.
  • Chapman Leonard. Capt.
  • Clement FE.
  • Cochran William Cochran. 2Lt.
  • Cockrill Willliam. CSM.
  • Coyle John James. Pte.
  • Dat JJ.
  • Davidson WJ.
  • Dorlin Ernest. Fus.
  • Doughty William Thomas. L/Cpl.
  • Earle RC.
  • Emery William Thomas. Sgt. (d.11th May 1944)
  • Essam F.
  • Evans Idwal Emlyn. Cpl. (d.19th January 1944)
  • Fairbairn AJ.
  • Fentiman HS.
  • Fiddaman G.
  • Finch WSG.
  • Freeman Gerald.
  • Friend Robert William. W/O.
  • Gedman Albert. Fus. (d.21st Jun 1944)
  • Giffen GD.
  • Goodrich JH.
  • Gridley . Sgt.
  • Hadfield FG.
  • Haynes Ted.
  • Heath SG.
  • Higgs RC.
  • Hobbs Frederick Dennis. Sgt.
  • Holland JW.
  • Hortin Leslie Victor. Fus.
  • Horton JD.
  • Hughes John Henry. Fus (d.23rd January 1947)
  • Jacks E.
  • Jacobs William. Fus.
  • Jarman Frederick Thomas. Pte. (d.19th Oct 1945)
  • Jenkinson LW.
  • Jones JE.
  • Ketcher RJ.
  • Knight GH.
  • Kosh SF.
  • Lambert WH.
  • Lane LG.
  • Lee William Frederick. Rflmn.
  • Levett AT.
  • Lowton AE.
  • Martin PT.
  • Mintz Leslie. Pte.
  • Mounter GH.
  • Nash EC.
  • Nash Norman Edmund. Fus. (d.9th September 1943)
  • Newnham Albert Edward. Cpl.
  • Newsome Geoffrey. Cpl (d.26th December 1944)
  • North HJ.
  • Palmer George.
  • Pascoe WG.
  • Pinfield Ivan George Thornton. Lt.
  • Pittaway Frank Arthur. Pte.
  • Price George Edward. L/Sgt. (d.11th July 1944)
  • Rayner Henry.
  • Relf Frank Leslie.
  • Richards JG. A.WO2
  • Rowe Bert.
  • Savin RA.
  • Scarborough RP.
  • Simmonds Leslie. Pte.
  • Slatford Arthur. Pte. (d.18th January 1944)
  • Smith George Alfred. Cpl. (d.31st May 1940)
  • Smith JF.
  • Smith Stanley. (d.29th Nov 1943)
  • Songhurst Charles John.
  • Spain William John A.. Fus.
  • Still Walter. L/Cpl
  • Stillman William Edward. Pte.
  • Taylor Arthur.
  • Taylor M.
  • Thomas Wilfred Owen. Cpl. (d.11th Nov 1944)
  • Turner William. Fus.
  • Wardale G.
  • Wilson Robert Peter Roy. Fus.
  • Wittingham Oswald Victor. Cpl. (d.6th Sep 1944)

The names on this list have been submitted by relatives, friends, neighbours and others who wish to remember them, if you have any names to add or any recollections or photos of those listed, please Add a Name to this List


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American Airlines' Flagship Missouri Crashes, Killing 11

Flight 63 originated at Cleveland at 17:56, 17 minutes later than the scheduled departure.

Intermediate stops were made at Columbus, Dayton, Cincinnati, and at Louisville. Accumulated delay at the time of departure from Nashville amounted to one hour and 38 minutes. The DC-3, named "Flagship Missouri", climbed to 6000 feet and the pilot reported cruising at this level at 22:59. At 23:06 the flight called Nashville and requested permission to climb to 8000 feet, which was approved. However altitude was lost until the DC-3 descended into the thickly wooded southern slope of a hill which rose to a height of about 75 feet.

PROBABLE CAUSE: "Inability of the aircraft to gain or maintain altitude due to carburetor ice or propeller ice or wing ice of some combination of these icing conditions while over terrain and in weather unsuitable for an emergency landing. CONTRIBUTING FACTOR: Weather conditions which, had their nature been anticipated, should have precluded the dispatch of the flight in an aircraft no equipped with wind or propeller deicing equipment."

American Air Lines said early today it would "have to assume" an accident had occurred to one of its passenger planes five hours overdue here from Nashville, Tenn., with 10 persons aboard. Capt. B. Payne, chief pilot for the Memphis area, made the statement at 5 a.m. after an earlier announcement that the missing ship had enough gas to keep it aloft only until 2:35 a.m. (CWT). Payne said army planes from Memphis and Nashville would join in a widespread search shortly before daybreak. The army declined to reveal the number of planes but Payne said there would be "quite a few." He added that two company ships and the civil air patrol also would participate. The plane is believed to have gone down in the Tennessee River area, about mid-day between Nashville and Memphis, Payne said. He described that location as "pretty rough" for a forced landing.

American Airlines Flight 63 was an American Airlines DC-3 nicknamed the Flagship Missouri that crashed on October 15, 1943 near Centerville, Tennessee after ice formed on its wings and propeller. All eight passengers and three crewmembers perished. This was the second fatal crash of Flight 63, occurring two-and-a-half months after the crash of the Flagship Missouri’s sister ship, the Flagship Ohio.


1946: Cruel Execution of Nazi Leaders in Nuremberg

On this day the Nazi leaders were sentenced to death at the famous Nuremberg Trials. Of the 22 defendants, 12 were sentenced to death. However, Martin Bormann (Hitler’s personal secretary) was tried in absentia, while Luftwaffe commander Reichsmarschall Hermann Goering committed suicide before he was executed. Those sentenced to death included:

Wilhelm Keitel – Field marshal and chief of the Wehrmacht Supreme Command (Oberkommando der Wehrmacht)

Ernst Kaltenbrunner – SS-Obergruppenführer and chief of the Reich Main Security Office (Reichssicherheitshauptamt)

Joachim von Ribbentrop – Hitler’s Foreign Minister

Alfred Jodl – Chief of the Operations Staff of the Armed Forces High Command

Arthur Seyss-Inquart – Imperial Commissioner for the occupied Netherlands (Reichskommissar)

Hans Frank – Governor-General of a part of occupied Poland

Wilhelm Frick – Hitler’s Minister of Interior

Alfred Rosenberg – Minister for the occupied territories in the East

Fritz Sauckel – Organizer of forced labor

Julius Streicher – Publisher of the Nazi paper “Der Stürmer”

The execution of the aforementioned 10 was performed in the Nuremberg Prison. The method was hanging. It is interesting that the “long drop” method wasn’t used, even though it is less painful (it snaps the person’s neck almost instantly thus causing instant death). Instead, the “standard drop” method was used, where the condemned drops only 1.2 to 1.8 meters. The hanged Nazi leaders allegedly took a long time to die, some of them more than 25 minutes. Ribbentrop and Sauckel supposedly died after 14 minutes of agony, while Keitel’s death was the most painful – he took as long as 28 minutes to die.


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