William S. Taylor

William S. Taylor

William Sylvester Taylor was born in Butler County, Kentucky, on 10th October, 1853. Although he had no formal education after fifteen, Taylor became a successful lawyer and served two terms as county judge.

In 1884 Taylor joined the Republican Party and regularly attended national conventions and served on state committees. In 1895, William Bradley, governor of Kentucky, appointed Taylor as his attorney general.

In 1899 Taylor was selected as the Republican Party candidate for governor. His main opponent was William Goebel of the Democratic Party. The election was controversial and there were claims of ballot rigging. When the vote was announced, Taylor won by 193,714 to 191,331.

Taylor took office on 12th December, 1899. However, the Democratic Party challenged the result of the election, threats were made that if William Goebel won on appeal, he would be assassinated. Goebel was given bodyguards but on 30th January, 1900, while Goebel was entering the State House, a gun was fired from the window of the Secretary of State's office.

The bullet hit William Goebel and he was taken to hospital and while receiving treatment it was announced that as a result of the investigation he was now the governor of Kentucky. However Goebel died of his wounds on 3rd February, 1900.

Taylor fled to Indiana and refused to return to face charges of conspiring to murder Goebel. Several men were arrested including Caleb Powers, Kentucky's Secretary of State. Eventually Henry Youtsey and Jim Howard were convicted of murder while five others, including Powers, were found guilty of conspiracy.

Taylor refused to return to Kentucky to face trial and stayed in Indiana where he became a successful insurance executive. This upset those on the left when in 1905 William Hayward (general secretary of WFM) and Charles Moyer (president of WFM), were both been kidnapped in Colorado and taken to Idaho to stand trial for the murder of Frank R. Steunenberg, the former governor of Idaho.

In 1907 an article by Fred Warren, in the radical journal, Appeal to Reason, complained about the failure of the authorities to arrest and charge Taylor with murder. When Warren advertised a reward of $1,000 for the arrest of Taylor, Warren was himself arrested and charged with encouraging others to commit the crime of kidnap. After a two year delay, Warren was found guilty and sentenced to six months hard labour and a $1,500 fine.

On 23rd April, 1909, the Governor of Kentucky, Augustus Everett Willson, pardoned Taylor, Caleb Powers, and four other people who had been found guilty of conspiracy. William Sylvester Taylor died in Indiana on 2nd August, 1928.


William S. Taylor

William Sylvester Taylor (October 10, 1853 – August 2, 1928) was the 33rd Governor of Kentucky. He was initially declared the winner of the disputed gubernatorial election of 1899, but the Kentucky General Assembly, dominated by the Democrats, reversed the election results, giving the victory to his Democratic Party (United States) opponent, William Goebel. Taylor served only 50 days as governor.

A poorly educated but politically astute lawyer, Taylor began climbing the political ladder by holding local offices in his native Butler County. Though he was a Republican in an overwhelmingly Democratic state, divisions in the majority party resulted in his election as Attorney General of Kentucky on a ticket with the Commonwealth's first Republican governor, William O. Bradley. Four years later, Taylor was elected in 1899 to the governorship.

When the General Assembly reversed the election results after a dispute, incensed Republicans armed themselves and descended on Frankfort. Taylor's Democratic opponent, William Goebel, was shot and died after being sworn in on his deathbed. Taylor exhausted his finances in a legal battle with Goebel's running mate J. C. W. Beckham over the governorship. Taylor ultimately lost the battle, and was implicated in Goebel's assassination. He fled to neighboring Indiana. Despite eventually being pardoned for any wrongdoing, he seldom returned to Kentucky. Taylor died in Indianapolis, Indiana in 1928.

William Taylor was born October 10, 1853 in a log cabin on the Green River, about five miles from Morgantown, Kentucky. He was the first child of Sylvester and Mary G. (Moore) Taylor. He spent his early years working on the family farm, and did not attend school until age fifteen thereafter, he attended the public schools of Butler County and studied at home. In 1874, he began teaching, specializing in mathematics, history, and politics. He taught until 1882, and later became a successful attorney, but continued to operate a farm.

On February 10, 1878, Taylor married Sara ("Sallie") Belle Tanner. The couple had nine children, including six daughters and a son that survived infancy.

Taylor's political career began in 1878 with an unsuccessful bid to become county clerk of Butler County. In 1880, he was an assistant presidential elector for Greenback candidate James Weaver. Two years later, he was elected county clerk of Butler County. He was the first person in the history of the county to successfully challenge a Democrat for this position.

Taylor became a member of the Republican Party in 1884. In 1886, he was chosen to represent the third district on the Republican state central committee. That same year, the party nominated a full slate of candidates for county offices, including Taylor as the nominee for county judge. In the ensuing elections, the full Republican slate was elected. Taylor was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1888. He was re-elected as county judge in 1890.

In 1895, Taylor was elected Attorney General of Kentucky, and served until 1899. During his term, state senator William Goebel proposed an election law that created a state Board of Elections which was empowered to appoint all election officers in every county and certify all election results. The board was to be appointed by the General Assembly, and there were no requirements that its composition be bi-partisan. The law was widely seen as a power play by Goebel, designed to ensure Democratic victories in state elections, including Goebel's own anticipated run for governor. The law passed the General Assembly, but was vetoed by Republican governor William O. Bradley. The General Assembly promptly overrode the veto. As attorney general, Taylor opined that the bill was unconstitutional. The measure was adjudicated by the Kentucky Court of Appeals and found to be constitutional.

Bradley's election in 1895 had marked the first time in Kentucky's history that the Commonwealth had elected a Republican governor. Angry Democrats, who had controlled the governorship since the fall of the Whig Party, sought to regain what they had lost. Bitter divisions in the party led to a contentious convention that nominated William Goebel as the party candidate. A faction of the Democratic Party held a second nominating convention and chose former governor John Y. Brown as their nominee.

The Republicans were initially no less divided than the Democrats. Senator William J. Deboe backed Taylor for governor. Governor Bradley backed Judge Clifton J. Pratt of Hopkins County, and the Republicans of Central Kentucky backed state auditor Sam H. Stone. Taylor organized a strong political machine and seemed in a solid position to obtain the nomination. Bradley was incensed that the party would not unite behind his candidate and boycotted the convention. Taylor unsuccessfully tried to woo him back with a promise to make his nephew, Edwin P. Morrow, secretary of state. Because Taylor represented the western part of the state, the so-called "lily white" branch of the Republican Party, black leaders also threatened not to support him Taylor responded by hiring one of the black leaders his permanent secretary, and promised to appoint other black leaders to office if he won the election. Seeing that Taylor's nomination was likely, all the other candidates withdrew, and Taylor won the nomination unanimously.

During the campaign, Taylor was attacked by Democratic opponents because of his party's support from black voters and its ties to big business, including the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. They also charged that Governor Bradley had run a corrupt administration. Republicans answered with charges of factionalism and use of political machinery by Democrats. In particular, they derided the Goebel Election Law, which Taylor claimed subverted the will of the people.

Ex-Confederates were usually a safe voting bloc for the Democrats, but many of them deserted Goebel because he had, in 1895, approached and quickly killed his main local political opponent, the grandson of Revolutionary War General and US Congressman Thomas Sandford, the esteemed banker and former Confederate colonel John Sandford, in what he declared was an act of self-defense. On the other hand, blacks had historically been a safe bloc for the Republicans, but Taylor had alienated many of them by not strongly opposing the Separate Coach Bill, which would have racially segregated railroad facilities. Goebel also risked losing support to minor party candidates. Besides John Y. Brown, the dissenting Democrats' nominee, the Populist Party nominated a candidate, drawing votes from Goebel's populist base. To unite his traditional base, Goebel convinced William Jennings Bryan, a hero to most populists and Democrats, to campaign for him. As soon as Bryan finished his tour of the state, Governor Bradley reversed course and began speaking in favor of Taylor. While Bradley insisted that his motives were to defend his administration, journalist Henry Watterson believed Taylor had promised to support Bradley's senatorial bid if elected.

In the general election, Taylor secured just 2,383 more votes than Goebel. The Democrat-controlled General Assembly challenged the election results. Under the Goebel Election Law, a three-man Board of Elections (dominated by Democrats) were to review the results and certify the winner in the contest. Two of the members of the board had openly campaigned for Goebel, and all three owed their appointments to him, but in a surprising decision, the board voted 2—1 to certify Taylor as the winner.

The board claimed that the Goebel Election Law did not give them the power to hear proof of vote fraud or call witnesses, although the wording of their decision implied that they would have invalidated Taylor votes if they had been empowered to do so. Taylor was inaugurated on December 12, 1899. Days later, the Democratic-dominated General Assembly convened in Frankfort. They claimed the power to decide disputed elections, and formed a partisan commission (ten Democrats and one Republican) to examine the election results.

Fearing Democrats in the Assembly would "steal" the election, armed men came to Frankfort from various areas of the state, primarily Eastern Kentucky, which was heavily Republican. On January 30, Goebel was shot while entering the state capitol building. Taylor declared a state of emergency and called out the militia. He called a special session of the legislature, holding it in heavily Republican London, Kentucky rather than the capital. Democrats refused to heed the call, and met in Democratic-dominated Louisville instead. They certified the election commission's report that disqualified enough Taylor votes for Goebel to be declared the winner of the election. Shortly after being sworn in as governor, Goebel died from the gunshot wound he had received days earlier.

With Goebel dead, Democrats and Republicans met jointly and drafted a proposal to bring peace. Under terms of the proposal, Taylor and his lieutenant governor, John Marshall, would step down from their offices and be granted immunity from prosecution in the events surrounding the election and Goebel's assassination. The Goebel Election Law would be repealed, and the militia would disperse from Frankfort. Prominent leaders on both sides signed the agreement, but on February 10, 1900, Taylor announced he would not. The legislature convened on February 19, 1900 and agreed to put the election in the hands of the courts.

On March 10, 1900, the circuit court of Jefferson County upheld the General Assembly's actions that certified Goebel as governor. The case was appealed to the Kentucky Court of Appeals, then the court of last resort in Kentucky. On April 6, 1900, the Court of Appeals ruled 6—1 that Taylor had been legally unseated. Taylor appealed to the Supreme Court of the United States, and on May 21, 1900, the Court refused to hear the case. Only Kentuckian John Marshall Harlan dissented from this refusal. With Taylor's legal options exhausted, Goebel's lieutenant governor, J. C. W. Beckham, ascended to the governorship. During his short term as governor, Taylor had done little beyond making a few appointments and issuing a few pardons.

Taylor was indicted as an accessory in the assassination of Goebel. He fled to Indianapolis, where the governor refused to extradite him. At least one attempt to abduct him by force failed in 1901. Despite being pardoned in 1909 by Republican Governor Augustus E. Willson, Taylor seldom returned to Kentucky.

Financially strapped by the costs of challenging the election, Taylor became an insurance executive and practiced law. Shortly after arriving in Indiana, his wife died. In 1912, he briefly returned to Kentucky to marry Nora A. Myers. The couple returned to Indianapolis and had a son together. Taylor died of heart disease on August 2, 1928, and was buried at the Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis.


William Taylor Family of South Carolina (1776-1864)

William Taylor (Sr) had two children that we are fairly certain are his (there are others in the area who might be): William (Jr. 1803-1873, who married Susannah Daniel, dau. of Ezekiel) and Lewis (1792-1870 who married Nancy Gibson). I had it wrong above about Lewis being the brother of William Sr. He is the brother of Jr.

William Jr's children are Eliza Jane, Levi R, Harriet, Susannah, George, Martha Ann, and William E.
Lewis's children are George, Adaline, Wesley, Hannah, Ellen E., Susannah, Lissa Ann, Benjamin, Jane, Elizabeth and Lewis.

All lived in Marlboro and Marion Counties in South Carolina.

Our Taylor line goes back to at least Robert Taylor (1688 VA - 1758 Edgecombe Co NC) and there are a number of descendents named William and Lewis in this line. See http://freepages.misc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/

Do you have any male TAYLOR's in your line who have taken a y dna test ? I have found thi svery useful in making connections and in disproving a few claimed connections .

taylorydna/ more information on 400+ TAYLOR's who have tested

Regards, Josh Taylor - one of volunteer co admins for TAYLOR surname group.

hey teresa is there a nancy taylor in that family line. her parents were from sc area

Hi Zoda, I seldom come here anymore. Write me at [email protected] if she could be Nancy Ann Caroline Taylor (1845-1889) married Isaac Lee or Nancy Elizabeth Taylor (1871-1942) m. William Jackson Godwin. My other Nancy Taylors had opther maiden names and married Taylors.

My ancestors match exactly to a lot of yours. I thought I was already a member her and at the top it says I am signed in.

I have a William Lewis Taylor that was born in 1740, that married to Nancy Oakley who was born in 1750. They had a daughter Sybil Taylor that lived from 1765-1840. I don't know if any of these folks had siblings.


Taylor, William S. (1795&ndash1858)

William S. Taylor, attorney, state legislator, and planter, was born in Georgia in 1795 and lived in Fayette County, Alabama, and Tippah County, Mississippi, before moving to Texas in May 1847. He fought in the Seminole Wars in Florida in 1817–19 and was a captain in 1836. In 1841 he was appointed brigadier general of the Alabama State Militia. Taylor served in the state legislatures of Alabama, Mississippi, and Texas, where he became speaker of the House. He was first elected to the Texas legislature in 1855 as a representative of Cherokee and Anderson counties. He was reelected in 1857 and was chosen as speaker when the legislature convened on November 2, 1857. He served until December 26, when illness prevented his attending. He formally resigned because of illness on January 18, 1858. He died on July 22, 1858, and was buried in Larissa, Texas. His portrait hangs in the speaker's committee room at the Capitol. Taylor and his wife, Elizabeth, had fifteen children, one of whom, William S. Taylor, Jr., fought in the battle of San Jacinto.

The following, adapted from the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, is the preferred citation for this entry.


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William Sylvester Taylor

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About William S. Taylor, Governor

William Taylor was born October 10, 1853 in a log cabin on the Green River, about five miles from Morgantown, Kentucky. He was the first child of Sylvester and Mary G. (Moore) Taylor. He spent his early years working on the family farm, and did not attend school until age fifteen thereafter, he attended the public schools of Butler County and studied at home. In 1874, he began teaching, specializing in mathematics, history, and politics. He taught until 1882, and later became a successful attorney, but continued to operate a farm.

On February 10, 1878, Taylor married Sara ("Sallie") Belle Tanner. The couple had nine children, including six daughters and a son that survived infancy.

Taylor's political career began in 1878 with an unsuccessful bid to become county clerk of Butler County. In 1880, he was an assistant presidential elector for Greenback candidate James Weaver. Two years later, he was elected county clerk of Butler County. He was the first person in the history of the county to successfully challenge a Democrat for this position.

Taylor became a member of the Republican Party in 1884. In 1886, he was chosen to represent the third district on the Republican state central committee. That same year, the party nominated a full slate of candidates for county offices, including Taylor as the nominee for county judge. In the ensuing elections, the full Republican slate was elected. Taylor was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1888. He was re-elected as county judge in 1890.

In 1895, Taylor was elected Attorney General of Kentucky, and served until 1899. During his term, state senator William Goebel proposed an election law that created a state Board of Elections which was empowered to appoint all election officers in every county and certify all election results. The Board was to be appointed by the General Assembly, and there were no requirements that its composition be bi-partisan. The law was widely seen as a power play by Goebel, designed to ensure Democratic victories in state elections, including Goebel's own anticipated run for governor. The law passed the General Assembly, but was vetoed by Republican governor William O. Bradley. The General Assembly promptly overrode the veto. As attorney general, Taylor opined that the bill was unconstitutional. The measure was adjudicated by the Kentucky Court of Appeals and found to be constitutional.

Gubernatorial election of 1899

Bradley's election in 1895 had marked the first time in Kentucky's history that the Commonwealth had elected a Republican governor. Angry Democrats, who had controlled the governorship since the fall of the Whig Party, sought to regain what they had lost, but bitter divisions in the party led to a contentious nominating convention that saw William Goebel chosen as the Democratic nominee. A faction of the Democratic Party held a second nominating convention and chose former governor John Y. Brown as their nominee.

The Republicans were initially no less divided than the Democrats. Senator William J. Deboe backed Taylor for governor. Governor Bradley backed Judge Clifton J. Pratt of Hopkins County, and the Republicans of Central Kentucky backed state auditor Sam H. Stone. Taylor organized a strong political machine and seemed in a solid position to obtain the nomination. Bradley was incensed that the party would not unite behind his candidate and boycotted the convention. Taylor unsuccessfully tried to woo him back with a promise to make his nephew, Edwin P. Morrow, secretary of state. Because Taylor represented the western part of the state, the so-called "lily white" branch of the Republican Party, black leaders also threatened not to support him Taylor responded by making one of the black leaders his permanent secretary, and promised to appoint other black leaders to office if he won the election. Seeing that Taylor's nomination was likely, all the other candidates withdrew, and Taylor won the nomination unanimously.

During the campaign, Taylor's opponents attacked him because of his party's support from black voters and its ties to big business, including the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. They also charged that Governor Bradley had run a corrupt administration. Republicans answered with charges of factionalism and use of political machinery by Democrats. In particular, they derided the Goebel Election Law, which Taylor claimed subverted the will of the people.

Ex-Confederates were usually a safe voting bloc for the Democrats, but many of them deserted Goebel because he had, in 1895, killed former Confederate general John Sanford in a duel. On the other hand, blacks had historically been a safe bloc for the Republicans, but Taylor had alienated many of them by not strongly opposing the Separate Coach Bill, which would have segregated railroad facilities.

Goebel also risked losing support to minor party candidates. Besides John Y. Brown, the dissenting Democrats' nominee, the Populist Party also nominated a candidate, drawing votes from Goebel's populist base. To unite his traditional base, Goebel convinced William Jennings Bryan, a hero to most populists and Democrats, to campaign for him. As soon as Bryan finished his tour of the state, Governor Bradley reversed course and began speaking in favor of Taylor. While he insisted that his motives were to defend his administration, journalist Henry Watterson believed Taylor had promised to support Bradley's senatorial bid if elected.

Governorship and later life

In the general election, Taylor secured just 2,383 more votes than Goebel. The Democrat-controlled General Assembly challenged the election results. Due to the Goebel Election Law, it was up to a three-man Board of Elections to certify the winner in the contest. Two of the members of the board had openly campaigned for Goebel, and all three owed their appointments to him, but in a surprising decision, the Board voted 2𠅁 to certify Taylor as the winner. The Board claimed that the Goebel Election Law did not give them the power to hear proof of vote fraud or call witnesses, although the wording of their decision implied that they would have invalidated Taylor votes if they had been empowered to do so. Taylor was inaugurated on December 12, 1899. Days later, the General Assembly convened in Frankfort. They now claimed the power to decide disputed elections, and formed a partisan commission (ten Democrats and one Republican) to examine the election results.

Fearing Democrats in the Assembly would "steal" the election, armed men came to Frankfort from various areas of the state, primarily Eastern Kentucky, which was heavily Republican. On January 30, Goebel was shot while entering the state capitol building. The imbroglio led to Taylor declaring a state of emergency, calling out the militia, and calling a special session of the legislature not in the state capital, but in heavily Republican London, Kentucky. Democrats refused to heed the call, and met in Democratic Louisville instead. There, they certified the election commission's report that disqualified enough Taylor votes for Goebel to be declared the winner of the election. Shortly after being sworn in as governor, Goebel died from the gunshot wound he received days earlier.

With Goebel, the most controversial figure in the election, dead, Democrats and Republicans met jointly and drafted a proposal to bring peace. Under terms of the proposal, Taylor and his lieutenant governor, John Marshall, would step down from their offices and be granted immunity from prosecution in the events surrounding the election and Goebel's assassination. The Goebel Election Law would be repealed, and the militia would disperse from Frankfort. Prominent leaders on both sides signed the agreement, but on February 10, 1900, Taylor announced he would not. The legislature convened on February 19, 1900 and agreed to put the election in the hands of the courts.

On March 10, 1900, the circuit court of Jefferson County upheld the General Assembly's actions that made Goebel governor. The case was appealed to the Kentucky Court of Appeals, then the court of last resort in Kentucky. On April 6, 1900, the Court of Appeals ruled 6𠅁 that Taylor had been legally unseated. Taylor appealed to the Supreme Court of the United States, and on May 21, 1900, the Court refused to hear the case. Only Kentuckian John Marshall Harlan dissented from this refusal. With Taylor's legal options exhausted, Goebel's lieutenant governor, J. C. W. Beckham, ascended to the governorship. During his short term as governor, Taylor had done little beyond making a few appointments and issuing a few pardons.

Taylor was indicted as an accessory in the assassination of Goebel. He fled to Indianapolis, where the governor refused to extradite him. At least one attempt to abduct him by force failed in 1901. Despite being pardoned in 1909 by Republican Governor Augustus E. Willson, he seldom returned to Kentucky.

Financially strapped by the costs of challenging the election, Taylor became an insurance executive and practiced law. Shortly after arriving in Indiana, his wife died. In 1912, he briefly returned to Kentucky to marry Nora A. Myers. The couple returned to Indianapolis and had a son together. Taylor died of heart disease on August 2, 1928, and was buried at the Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis.


Taylor, William Stanhope (1819&ndash1869)

William Stanhope Taylor, soldier and planter, was born in Canton, Stark County, Ohio, in 1819, the son of Thomas and Sarah Hoyland (Bull) Taylor. William’s family moved to central Tennessee in the mid-1820s. His father obtained a Mexican land grant on April 27, 1831, via the Austin colony in present-day Fayette County. In 1832 William and his brother, George A. Taylor, traveled to Texas with their father, and then the boys returned to Tennessee that same year. After the death of his father to yellow fever in August 1833 in Louisiana, Taylor returned to Texas to take care of his father’s estate.

As reflected in Comptroller’s Military Service Record No. 1441, William Taylor enlisted in the revolutionary army on October 17, 1835, and served with Capt. John M. Bradley (Volunteers from Tunahan District) at the siege of Bexar, to include the Grass Fight, and was discharged on December 23, 1835. He re-enlisted on March 12, 1836, and served under Capt. William Ware (Second Company, Second Regiment, Texas Volunteers) and Capt. William Smith (Company J, Second Regiment, Volunteer Cavalry). On April 20, 1836, Taylor, who served as a scout/spy, volunteered to participate as part of Col. Sidney Sherman’s cavalry force in an attempt to capture the Mexican cannon at San Jacinto. On April 21 he was reassigned to Captain Smith’s Company J in the cavalry charge on the Mexican left flank, followed by the pursuit of General Santa Anna and his cavalry towards Vincent Bridge. William received Texas land via Headright Certificate No. 183 and Donation Certificate No. 353 for his military services.

Taylor married Agnes Elizabeth Garrett on June 7, 1838, in Montgomery County, Texas, and they had eleven children. In 1853 he achieved Master Mason (3rd degree) with Masonic Lodge No. 25 in Montgomery County. He was one of the vice presidents of the 1860 Know-Nothing (see AMERICAN PARTY) convention at San Jacinto that nominated Sam Houston for president of the United States as “the people’s candidate.” In 1866 he wrote a personal letter to William C. Crane, president of Baylor University and biographer of Sam Houston, defending Gen. Sam Houston’s conduct at the battle of San Jacinto and refuting incorrect information about the pursuit of Santa Anna that was printed in the Texas Almanac. Taylor’s personal account of the pursuit of Santa Anna and his cavalry was published in the Texas Almanac of 1868 and is recorded in the Texas State Archives. William Taylor died of yellow fever on February 2, 1869, in Montgomery, Montgomery County, Texas, and was buried with Masonic honors at the Montgomery Old Cemetery. In February 1879 his widow filed for a Republic of Texas veteran’s pension she died later the same year and is buried at the Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Montgomery County. A Texas Centennial marker was erected at William’s grave in 1936 to honor him as a San Jacinto veteran.

H. W. Brands, Lone Star Nation: How a Ragged Army of Volunteers Won the Battle for Texas Independence&mdashand Changed America (New York: Doubleday, 2004). James M. Day, Soldiers of Texas (Waco: Texian Press, 1973). Gregg J. Dimmick, Sea of Mud (Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 2004). T. R. Fehrenbach, Lone Star: A History of Texas and the Texans (New York: Macmillan, 1968). Stephen L. Hardin, Texian Iliad: A Military History of the Texas Revolution (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1994). Stephen L. Moore, Eighteen Minutes: The Battle of San Jacinto and the Texas Independence Campaign (Dallas: Republic of Texas Press, 2004). The Texas Almanac for 1868 (Galveston: W. Richardson & Co., Galveston News, 1867).


William S. Taylor, (1/4 Cherokee) Adopted

William S. Taylor (1/4 Cherokee) was the 3rd great grandfather of Charles Hardin Holley, known in the entertainment world as Buddy Holly.

Nancy Ward took Meli in when her parents were killed. Nancy also took in William S. Taylor who had lost his family (he was 1/4 Cherokee) and raised both. This is verified by the DAWES ROLLS application of Mary Polly (Ray) Chaney who was a granddaughter and the John Ray family Bible. Mary "Meli" Ward and William S. Taylor were married and lived on Indian lands near Chota that was given to her by Nancy Ward, until they had to relocate rather than be forced on the "Trail of Tears". They moved to Alabama. Nancy Ward was called "Granny Ward" because it was common for her to take in children with no family. William Taylor (1/4 Cherokee) and Meli Taylor (full blood Cherokee) had a daughter named Mary Polly Taylor who married John Ray. John Ray and Mary Polly had a son by the name of William Green Ray who married Elisabeth King from Mississippi who was the daughter of McKee King, Choctaw Chief. Their daughter Mary Polly (Ray) Chaney was my great grandmother.

The children of John Ray and Mary Taylor Ray applied for Cherokee benefits in 1896. They listed a William S. Taylor of MS (1/4 Cherokee) as the father of our Mary "Polly" (Taylor) Ray.

1830 United States Federal Census about William Taylor

1830 United States Federal Census about William Taylor

Home in 1830: , Fayette, Alabama

Free White Persons - Males - Under 5: 2

Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 1

Free White Persons - Males - 60 thru 69: 1 ***

Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 1

Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 14: 1

Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49: 1

Free White Persons - Females - 70 thru 79: 1

Free White Persons - Under 20: 5

Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 1

Total Free White Persons: 8

Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 8

He is listed right next to a John Ray (age 60 to 70) and family on this census. Perhaps this is the father of our John Ray.


William S. Taylor

Taylor first appeared as G.I. in Twilight Zone: The Movie' (1983). He had a supporting role as Dr. Trimble in the 1989 horror film ''Fly II'' (sequel to the 1986 horror film The Fly). Taylor played Detective Keller in Canadian suspense film The Silencer, and Mr. Garter in Willard.

In 2002, he appeared in Rick Bota's horror film Hellraiser: Hellseeker, (the sixth film in the series) inwhich Taylor had a leading role in. A year later, Taylor was featured in Scary Movie 3 as Mr. Meeks.

In 2004, he played as Mr. Jacobson in Smallville, in a single episode.

In 2007, Taylor played as Lead Riot Singer, starred alongside Canadian comedian/actor Will Arnett, American comedian/actor Danny McBridge and Canadian comedian/actor Andrew Younghusband (as Angry Father) in Hot Rod.

In 2009, he appeared in Watchmen as Prison Psychiatrist.

In 2010, Taylor appeared in the Canadian tv-show Canadian Comedy Shorts as Fire Chief.


The Taylors of. All Over the Place -- Part 1

David W. and Elizabeth Taylor, with
grandson David W. Taylor
In the last post about the David W. Taylor House, I promised a more indepth look at the Taylor family
to which he belonged. Not exactly coincidentally, my wife also happens to belong to that family (David W. is her 3rd Great Grandfather). This line of Taylors has a long history, and much of it (thankfully) has been fairly well-documented. My father-in-law, David Starkey, some years back himself wrote a piece about the Taylor line, which I know I read but didn't fully appreciate at the time. Now I do.

In all the documentation about the Taylors, most of it seemed to focus on the time that most of them spent in Pennsylvania, and less on their time in Delaware. I had not realized the impact these Taylors had in Delaware, and in Mill Creek Hundred specifically, until recently. As it turns out, even in my wife's direct line, they spent a good deal of time in Mill Creek, Christiana, and Brandywine Hundreds. They also made notable contributions in the Chadds Ford area, too. Here's a look at part of their story.

The story began (in the New World, at least) in 1682, when Welsh Quaker Thomas Taylor emigrated to William Penn's new colony with his young family. Thomas died soon after the trip, probably from something contracted onboard ship. Fortunately his children survived, and for the next few generations stayed generally in Delaware and Chester Counties. In 1773, Thomas' great grandson John Taylor, then living in Pennsbury township, had a son named William. It was William, third of fourteen children, who first moved the short distance south into Delaware, and into Mill Creek Hundred.

William married in 1798 to Ann Mercer, daughter of Richard and Elizabeth Mercer (as a shorthand, just assume about ever othery woman here is named Elizabeth -- only a slight exaggeration). I don't know where they lived the first ten years, but in 1808 William purchased 137 acres in MCH and Kennett from David Mercer of Ohio. Mercer was probably Ann's uncle or grandfather. (The deed states that Taylor was "of Mill Creek Hundred", so they may have already been living on the farm, perhaps since their marriage.) The tract was located north of Hockessin, near Lee and Benge Roads, catty corner from HB Dupont Middle School. I can't find a sale of this property, but Taylor likely sold it about 1814, when he moved his family about two miles due south to a new farm.

Approximate bounds of William Taylor's farm from 1808 to 1814
(Metes and bounds researched by Walt Chiquoine)

William Taylor, who was also a Quaker minister, purchased 137 acres along Brackenville Road (mostly) west of Mill Creek Road. There, he and Ann raised their 14(!) children, most of whom survived into adulthood. Many of them also remained in the area, and a few have already popped up in past posts. For example, eldest child Samuel Taylor's property was later incorporated into the North Star Farm of Stephen Mitchell, and two of his daughters married said Mitchell (not at the same time. they were Quakers not Mormons). Some of William's daughters married into families like the Mendenhalls and Sharplesses.

Original bounds of the 137 acres purchased in 1814. Mark indicates
location of the farmhouse, probably razed early 20th Century
(Metes and bounds researched by Walt Chiquoine)

When William Taylor died in 1829, he bequeathed his farm to second son Job (Samuel presumably already had his own). Job and wife Susanna Yeatman had but one child -- John Yeatman Taylor. John was a Naval doctor, who would later go on to serve as medical director for the US Navy and would retire as a Rear Admiral. (John's daughter Charlotte would become a writer and novelist.) So when Job died in 1846, Susanna and John sold the farm out of the family, to John Hanna.

However, the child of William Taylor that interests us the most here is David Wilson Taylor, 12th of 14, born on the Brackenville Road farm in 1819. A later history of Delaware County says of him -- "He spent his early years at the family home, leaving when he was 19 years of age and travelling extensively through the west. Returning east, he purchased farms in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia, and New Jersey, successively, following the farmer's occupation until death." For the most part I don't know where his farms were in the other states, but in 1852 David W. purchased a farm in Christiana Hundred near Centreville, on which he would build a new stone house. And as stated in the David W. Taylor House and Dilworth Farm post, Taylor sold this farm in 1867.

His next move, whether it was physical or just financial, is the only out-of-state one of which I can find even the slimmest of mentions. As you can see in the clipping below (from the August 21, 1867 Alexandria Gazette), a "David W. Taylor of Newcastle (sic), Delaware" purchased an 837 acre farm in Caroline County, Virginia. Since the history book says he bought next in Virginia and his name and home are "correct" here, I have to assume this was our David W. Taylor. Caroline County, VA is about halfway between Washington, DC and Richmond -- I-95 now cuts through its western end. As far as I can tell, the county is mostly known for two Civil War-era deaths. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson died at nearby Guinea Station in 1863, and John Wilkes Booth was captured and killed near Port Royal on the northern end of the county in 1865.

There are two possibilities when it comes to this farm and the Taylors. One is that the family moved all the way down to Virginia for a few years and then came back. I frustratingly can't find them in the 1870 Census, but the real estate ad below from January 1873 shows they were living near Centerville by then. The farm mentioned in the ad is east of Centreville, between Center Meeting and Twaddell Mill Roads. David did not own the farm, but seems to have been a tenant farmer there. If I had to guess (and it's my blog, so yes, I do), I'd say that David bought the Virginia farm as an investment and never moved there. This was still only a few years after the war, and land may have been cheap in the area. Perhaps with his money tied up in Virginia, he chose to rent a farm instead in Delaware.

About the only other purchase I can find for David W. Taylor is a ten acre lot purchased from the Twaddell family, probably in northeastern Christiana Hundred. This may have been another investment, as David and family are shown in 1880 as living back in MCH in Little Baltimore, listed directly above William H. Walker (maybe he even used the Mystery Structure). When David Wilson Taylor died in 1895, he was living with one of his sons near Hockessin (Levis, I think, although widow Elizabeth was with Newton in 1900). He was interred at the cemetery at the Hockessin Friends Meeting House.

I hope you'll allow me to continue this self-indulgent look into the Taylor family in the next post, when we'll follow David W. Taylor's second son, Pusey Philips Taylor (my wife's Great-great grandfather). Pusey and his family will leave their mark in MCH, Christiana Hundred, and finally in Brandywine Hundred. In the middle they'll intersect with local and national history in nearby Chadds Ford. So if you're interested in that beautiful area, check out the next post as we conclude our look at the Taylors of. all over the place.


Watch the video: William S. Taylor u0026 The Fah True Band - Trying Times, The Yale Hotel, Vancouver