Oliver Wolcott - History

Oliver Wolcott - History

Wolcott, Oliver

Oliver Wolcott was born in 1726 to an important Connecticut politician, Roger Wolcott. After graduating from Yale in 1747, he commenced a military career, serving as a militia captain in King George’s War (1740-1748). His conquest against the French was unsuccessful, however, and he returned home. Initially, he worked on medical studies with his brother, but he later turned to law instead.

Wolcott’s work in the public sphere began in 1751 when he held the position of county sheriff (until 1771). He also served as a member of the upper house in the colonial State legislature from 1771 until 1786, and between 1774 and 1778, he was the county judge. Wolcott attended the Continental Congress from 1775 until 1783. Due to illness, he was not present to vote on independence, and he was also unable to make it to the formal signing of the Declaration of Independence on August 2, 1776. His signature was added a few months later though, in October of 1776.

After the war, Wolcott continued to be politically active. He was Lieutenant Governor from 1787 until 1796, and he attended the ratifying convention of the United States Constitution. In 1797 he passed away at the age of seventy-one. He was buried in Litchfield Connecticut’s East Cemetery.


WOLCOTT, Oliver

WOLCOTT, Oliver, a Delegate from Connecticut born in Windsor, Conn., November 20, 1726 was graduated from Yale College in 1747 commissioned a captain by the Governor of New York in 1747 raised a company of Volunteers and served on the northwestern frontier until the peace of Aix-la-Chapelle returned to Connecticut and settled in Litchfield studied medicine, but did not practice elected sheriff of the newly organized county of Litchfield, Conn., in 1751 member of the State council 1774-1786 and at the same time judge of the county court of common pleas judge of probate for the Litchfield district many years major general of militia appointed by the Continental Congress in 1775 as one of the commissioners of Indian affairs for the northern department, intrusted with the task of inducing the Iroquois Indians to remain neutral Member of the Continental Congress 1776-1778 and 1780-1783 a signer of the Declaration of Independence commander of the fourteen Connecticut regiments sent for the defense of New York in 1776, and divided his time between Army service and service in Congress commanded a brigade of militia which took part in the defeat of General Burgoyne in 1777 Lieutenant Governor of Connecticut 1786-1796 elected Governor in 1796 and served until his death in Litchfield, Conn., December 1, 1797 interment in the East Cemetery.


Oliver Wolcott Jr

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About Gov. Oliver Wolcott, Jr., U.S. Secretary of the Treasury

Oliver Wolcott, Jr. (January 11, 1760 – June 1, 1833) was United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1795 to 1800 and the 24th Governor of Connecticut from 1817 to 1827.

REVOLUTIONARY WAR VETERAN

Born in Litchfield, Connecticut, Wolcott was the son of Oliver Wolcott, Sr. and Laura Collins Wolcott.

Wolcott served in the Continental Army from 1777 to 1779, during the American Revolutionary War, then graduated from Yale University in 1778 while serving in the war. read law at the Litchfield Law School, and was admitted to the bar in 1781. He was clerk of the Connecticut Committee on Pay-Table from 1781 to 1782. He was a member of the Connecticut Committee on Pay-Table from 1782 to 1784. He was a commissioner to settle claims of Connecticut against the United States from 1784 to 1788. He was Comptroller of Public Accounts for Connecticut from 1788 to 1789. He was Auditor for the United States Department of the Treasury from 1789 to 1791. He was Comptroller for the United States Department of the Treasury from 1791 to 1795. He was a commission merchant in New York City, New York from 1793 to 1815. He was the 2nd United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1795 to 1800.

He was a clerk in Connecticut's Office of the Committee on the Pay Table from 1781 to 1782, and a commissioner on that committee from 1782-1784. Wolcott was appointed in 1784 as one of the commissioners to mediate claims between the U.S. and the state of Connecticut. After serving as state comptroller of Connecticut from 1788�, he was named auditor of the federal treasury, and became Comptroller of the Treasury in 1791. He was appointed Secretary of the Treasury by George Washington in 1795 to succeed Alexander Hamilton.

Martha Washington's escaped slave

In late May 21, 1796 one of Martha Washington's slaves, Oney Judge, escaped from the Executive Mansion in Philadelphia, where she lived with the Washington's during his presidency, serving as Martha's chambermaid. As Secretary, Wolcott was George Washington's intermediary in getting the Collector of Customs for Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Joseph Whipple, to capture and send Martha Washington's runaway slave, Oney Judge (sometimes Ona), to Mount Vernon, where she had begun serving the Washingtons. Whipple met with Oney, discussed why she had escaped and tried to ascertain the facts of the case. After she told him she did not desire to be a slave again, Whipple refused to remove Ms Judge against her will, saying that it could cause civil unrest due to abolitionists, and recommended the President go through the courts if needed. In their correspondence, Washington said that he wanted to avoid controversy, so he did not use the courts to take advantage of the method he himself had signed into law under the 1793 Slave Act.

Washington made another attempt to apprehend her in 1798. This time he asked his nephew, Burwell Bassett, Jr to convince her to return or to take her by force, but Oney was warned by senator John Langdon and hid. Wolcott's involvement with this case ended with the first attempt to return Oney Judge to slavery.

In 1799, as Secretary of the Treasury, he designed the United States Customs Service flag.

He resigned in 1800 due to unpopularity, and a particularly vitriolic campaign against him in the press in which, among other things, he was falsely accused of setting fire to the State Department building.

Subsequent government service

Wolcott was one of President John Adams' so-called "midnight judges", appointed to a new seat as a federal judge on the United States circuit court for the Second Circuit, created by 2 Stat. 89, almost on the eve of Jefferson's inauguration in 1801. Nominated by Adams on February 18, 1801, Wolcott was confirmed by the United States Senate on February 20, 1801, and received his commission the same day. Wolcott's service was terminated on July 1, 1802, due to abolition of the court.

From 1803 to 1815 he operated in private business in New York City, afterwards retiring to Litchfield and farming. He was elected Governor of Connecticut in 1817 as a "Toleration Republican", following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, and serving ten years in the post. His tenure was noted for the economic growth and moderate policies that attended it. Additionally, he presided over a convention that created a new state constitution in 1818. Nevertheless, he was defeated for reelection as Governor of Connecticut in 1827.

Wolcott died in New York City and is interred at East Cemetery in Litchfield. Wolcott was the last surviving member of the Washington Cabinet. The town of Wolcott, Connecticut was named in honor of Oliver Jr. and his father Oliver.

Oliver Wolcott Jr. (January 11, 1760 – June 1, 1833) was United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1795 to 1800 and governor of Connecticut from 1817 to 1827.

He was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, son of Oliver Wolcott, Sr. and Laura Collins Wolcott. He graduated from Yale University in 1778, later studying law at Litchfield Law School and being admitted to the bar in 1781.

Wolcott was appointed in 1784 as one of the commissioners to mediate claims between the U.S. and the state of Connecticut. After serving as state comptroller of Connecticut from 1788-90, he was named auditor of the federal treasury, and became Comptroller of the Treasury in 1791.

He was appointed Secretary of the Treasury by George Washington in 1795 to succeed Alexander Hamilton as Secretary, he was Washington's intermediary in getting the Collector of Customs for Portsmouth, New Hampshire to ship a runaway slave-woman back to Mount Vernon if it could be done quietly it could not be, and she remained there.[1] He resigned in 1800 due to unpopularity, and a particularly vitriolic campaign against him in the press in which, among other things, he was falsely accused of setting fire to the State Department building.

In 1799, as Secretary of the Treasury, he designed the United States Customs Service flag.

Wolcott was one of President Adams' so-called "midnight judges", appointed to the second circuit bench on almost the eve of Jefferson's inauguration in 1801.[2]

From 1803 to 1815 he operated in private business in New York City, afterwards retiring to Litchfield. He was elected governor in 1817 as a "Toleration Republican", following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, and serving ten years in the post. His tenure was noted for the economic growth and moderate policies that attended it. Additionally, he presided over a convention that created a new state constitution in 1818.

Wolcott died in New York City and is interred at East Cemetery in Litchfield. Prior to his death, Wolcott had been the last surviving member of the Washington Cabinet.

The town of Wolcott, Connecticut was named in honor of Oliver Jr. and his father Oliver.

(5) Gov. Oliver Wolcott Jr., b. 1760 Litchfield CT, d. 1833 NYC. He grad. Yale College 1778, served as military aide to his father, studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1781 clerked for State Treasury, State Comptroller 1788-9, State Auditor 1789-91, Comptroller of the US Treasury 1791-5, Succeeded Alexander Hamilton as Sec. of the US Treasury 1795-1800 , Judge of the Circuit Court 1801-2, President of Mercantile Bank of NY 1803-4, President of Bank of North America 1812-14, Governor of CT 1817-1827. Oliver was given land grants at Warren NH and at Elmore NH in 1780 for his service in the Rev. War m. Elizabeth Stoughton 1785 Windsor CT.

Oliver Wolcott Jr. (January 11, 1760 – June 1, 1833) was United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1795 to 1800 and governor of Connecticut from 1817 to 1827.

He was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, son of Oliver Wolcott, Sr. and Laura Collins Wolcott. He graduated from Yale University in 1778, later studying law at Litchfield Law School and being admitted to the bar in 1781.

Wolcott was appointed in 1784 as one of the commissioners to mediate claims between the U.S. and the state of Connecticut. After serving as state comptroller of Connecticut from 1788-90, he was named auditor of the federal treasury, and became Comptroller of the Treasury in 1791.

He was appointed Secretary of the Treasury by George Washington in 1795 to succeed Alexander Hamilton as Secretary, he was Washington's intermediary in getting the Collector of Customs for Portsmouth, New Hampshire to ship a runaway slave-woman back to Mount Vernon if it could be done quietly it could not be, and she remained there.[1] He resigned in 1800 due to unpopularity, and a particularly vitriolic campaign against him in the press in which, among other things, he was falsely accused of setting fire to the State Department building.

In 1799, as Secretary of the Treasury, he designed the United States Customs Service flag.

From 1803 to 1815 he operated in private business in New York City, afterwards retiring to Litchfield. He was elected governor in 1817 as a "Toleration Republican", following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, and serving ten years in the post. His tenure was noted for the economic growth and moderate policies that attended it. Additionally, he presided over a convention that created a new state constitution in 1818.

Wolcott died in New York City and is interred at East Cemetery in Litchfield. Prior to his death, Wolcott had been the last surviving member of the Washington Cabinet.

The town of Wolcott, Connecticut was named in honor of Oliver Jr. and his father Oliver.

He was a clerk in Connecticut's Office of the Committee on the Pay Table from 1781 to 1782, and a commissioner on that committee from 182-1784. Wolcott was appointed in 1784 as one of the commissioners to mediate claims between the U.S. and the state of Connecticut. After serving as state comptroller of Connecticut from 1788-90, he was named auditor of the federal treasury, and became Comptroller of the Treasury in 1791. He was appointed Secretary of the Treasury by George Washington in 1795 to succeed Alexander Hamilton.

wikipedia Oliver Wolcott, Jr. was an American politician. He was United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1795 to 1800 and the 24th Governor of Connecticut from 1817 to 1827.

Born in Litchfield, Connecticut, Wolcott was the son of Oliver Wolcott, Sr. and Laura Collins Wolcott. He was able to graduate from Yale University in 1778, despite serving in the Continental Army from 1777 to 1779. He later read law and studied at Litchfield Law School to be admitted to the bar in 1781.

He was a clerk in Connecticut's Office of the Committee on the Pay Table from 1781 to 1782, and a commissioner on that committee from 1782-1784. Wolcott was appointed in 1784 as one of the commissioners to mediate claims between the U.S. and the state of Connecticut. After serving as state comptroller of Connecticut from 1788�, he was named auditor of the federal treasury, and became Comptroller of the Treasury in 1791. He was appointed Secretary of the Treasury by George Washington in 1795 to succeed Alexander Hamilton. In 1799, as Secretary of the Treasury, he designed the United States Customs Service flag. Though, with Timothy Pickering and James McHenry, he was one of three of the four members of Adams's Cabinet to offer persistent opposition to Adams's efforts to preserve peaceful relations with France and then to end the quasi-war with France, Adams did not request Wolcott's resignation at the time he sought McHenry's resignation and dismissed Pickering. Wolcott continued in office, but resigned on the last day of 1800 due to his growing unpopularity, and a particularly vitriolic campaign against him in the press in which, among other things, he was falsely accused of setting fire to the State Department building.

He was appointed as a committee member pertaining to the construction of the monument at Groton Heights, commemorating the battle fought there on September 6, 1781.

Wolcott was one of President John Adams' so-called "midnight judges", appointed to a new seat as a federal judge on the United States circuit court for the Second Circuit, created by 2 Stat. 89, almost on the eve of Jefferson's inauguration in 1801. Nominated by Adams on February 18, 1801, Wolcott was confirmed by the United States Senate on February 20, 1801, and received his commission the same day. Wolcott's service was terminated on July 1, 1802, due to abolition of the court.

From 1803 to 1815 he operated in private business in New York City, afterwards retiring to Litchfield and farming. Wolcott lost a campaign for Governor of Connecticut in 1816, running as a "Toleration Republican", against the Federalist Party to which he had once belonged. He ran again in 1817 and won, following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather as governor, and serving ten years in the post. His tenure was noted for the economic growth and moderate policies that attended it. Additionally, he presided over a convention that created a new state constitution in 1818 and disestablished the Congregationalist Church. Nevertheless, he was defeated for reelection as Governor of Connecticut in 1827.

In late May 21, 1796 one of Martha Washington's slaves, Oney Judge, escaped from the Executive Mansion in Philadelphia, where she lived with the Washingtons during his presidency, serving as Martha's chambermaid.[2] As Secretary, Wolcott was George Washington's intermediary in getting the Collector of Customs for Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Joseph Whipple, to capture and send Martha Washington's runaway slave, Oney Judge (sometimes Ona), to Mount Vernon, where she had begun serving the Washingtons.[3] Whipple met with Oney, discussed why she had escaped and tried to ascertain the facts of the case. After she told him she did not desire to be a slave again, Whipple refused to remove Ms Judge against her will, saying that it could cause civil unrest due to abolitionists, and recommended the President go through the courts if needed.[4] In their correspondence, Washington said that he wanted to avoid controversy, so he did not use the courts to take advantage of the method he himself had signed into law under the 1793 Slave Act.

Washington made another attempt to apprehend her in 1798. This time he asked his nephew, Burwell Bassett Jr. to convince her to return or to take her by force, but Oney was warned by senator John Langdon and hid.Wolcott's involvement with this case ended with the first attempt to return Oney Judge to slavery.

Wolcott died in New York City and is interred at East Cemetery in Litchfield. Wolcott was the last surviving member of the Washington Cabinet. The town of Wolcott, Connecticut was named in honor of Oliver, Jr. and his father Oliver, Sr..

About 1798, Fort Washington on Goat Island in Newport, Rhode Island was renamed Fort Wolcott. Fort Wolcott was an active fortification until 1836. It later became the site of the United States Naval Torpedo Station.

Oliver Wolcott Jr. was an American politician. He was United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1795 to 1800 and the 24th Governor of Connecticut from 1817 to 1827.

Born in Litchfield, Connecticut, Wolcott was the son of Oliver Wolcott Sr. and Laura Collins Wolcott. He was able to graduate from Yale University in 1778, despite serving in the Continental Army from 1777 to 1779. He later read law and studied at Litchfield Law School to be admitted to the bar in 1781.

He was a clerk in Connecticut's Office of the Committee on the Pay Table from 1781 to 1782, and a commissioner on that committee from 1782-1784. Wolcott was appointed in 1784 as one of the commissioners to mediate claims between the U.S. and the state of Connecticut. After serving as state comptroller of Connecticut from 1788�, he was named auditor of the federal treasury, and became Comptroller of the Treasury in 1791. He was appointed Secretary of the Treasury by George Washington in 1795 to succeed Alexander Hamilton. In 1799, as Secretary of the Treasury, he designed the United States Customs Service flag. Though, with Timothy Pickering and James McHenry, he was one of three of the four members of Adams's Cabinet to offer persistent opposition to Adams's efforts to preserve peaceful relations with France and then to end the quasi-war with France, Adams did not request Wolcott's resignation at the time he sought McHenry's resignation and dismissed Pickering. Wolcott continued in office, but resigned on the last day of 1800 due to his growing unpopularity, and a particularly vitriolic campaign against him in the press in which, among other things, he was falsely accused of setting fire to the State Department building.

He was appointed as a committee member pertaining to the construction of the monument at Groton Heights, commemorating the battle fought there on September 6, 1781.

Wolcott was one of President John Adams' so-called "midnight judges", appointed to a new seat as a federal judge on the United States circuit court for the Second Circuit, created by 2 Stat. 89, almost on the eve of Jefferson's inauguration in 1801. Nominated by Adams on February 18, 1801, Wolcott was confirmed by the United States Senate on February 20, 1801, and received his commission the same day. Wolcott's service was terminated on July 1, 1802, due to abolition of the court.

From 1803 to 1815 he operated in private business in New York City, afterwards retiring to Litchfield and farming. Wolcott lost a campaign for Governor of Connecticut in 1816, running as a "Toleration Republican", against the Federalist Party to which he had once belonged. He ran again in 1817 and won, following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather as governor, and serving ten years in the post. His tenure was noted for the economic growth and moderate policies that attended it. Additionally, he presided over a convention that created a new state constitution in 1818 and disestablished the Congregationalist Church. Nevertheless, he was defeated for reelection as Governor of Connecticut in 1827.

In late May 21, 1796 one of Martha Washington's slaves, Oney Judge, escaped from the Executive Mansion in Philadelphia, where she lived with the Washingtons during his presidency, serving as Martha's chambermaid. As Secretary, Wolcott was George Washington's intermediary in getting the Collector of Customs for Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Joseph Whipple, to capture and send Martha Washington's runaway slave, Oney Judge (sometimes Ona), to Mount Vernon, where she had begun serving the Washingtons. Whipple met with Oney, discussed why she had escaped and tried to ascertain the facts of the case. After she told him she did not desire to be a slave again, Whipple refused to remove Ms Judge against her will, saying that it could cause civil unrest due to abolitionists, and recommended the President go through the courts if needed. In their correspondence, Washington said that he wanted to avoid controversy, so he did not use the courts to take advantage of the method he himself had signed into law under the 1793 Slave Act.

Washington made another attempt to apprehend her in 1798. This time he asked his nephew, Burwell Bassett Jr. to convince her to return or to take her by force, but Oney was warned by senator John Langdon and hid. Wolcott's involvement with this case ended with the first attempt to return Oney Judge to slavery.

Wolcott died in New York City and is interred at East Cemetery in Litchfield. Wolcott was the last surviving member of the Washington Cabinet. The town of Wolcott, Connecticut was named in honor of Oliver Jr. and his father Oliver Sr.

About 1798, Fort Washington on Goat Island in Newport, Rhode Island was renamed Fort Wolcott. Fort Wolcott was an active fortification until 1836. It later became the site of the United States Naval Torpedo Station.


Oliver Wolcott - History

The unrestrained oppression's of imperial and kingly power, long exercised with impunity, have been receding before the light of intelligence with an ominous but rather unsteady pace for the last few centuries. As the genial rays of Liberty illuminate the crowding millions of the human family the tenure of thrones will become more slender--monarchies more limited if not annihilated. In Europe kingly power has been vibrating for years in the cradle of a political earthquake. The love of freedom has never been extinguished in the old world.

The same motive power that prompted the pilgrims to court the dangers and privations of this western hemisphere, still pervades the bosoms of those held in bondage by military force. Volcanic eruptions occasionally occur--new craters open--the time is rolling on rapidly when these craters will rush together and deluge kingly and imperial power with one broad sheet of liquid fire. In thunder tones of retribution the people will proclaim their FREEDOM.

When our ancestors planted themselves on the granite shores of America they had clear conception of a republican form of government as organized by Greece and Rome. Many of them had read the thrilling history of the rise, progress and fall of those republics in the original languages where none of the beauties or force are lost by translation. They were prepared to improve upon those governments by avoiding their errors and preserving all that was valuable. With these lights the pilgrim fathers appear to have been illuminated when rearing the incipient superstructure of a more pure republic than any before known. At first, articles of association were entered into by the people of a single or contiguous settlements, based upon the broad platform of equal rights and universal Liberty circumscribed only by eternal justice and sterling honesty. Among the earliest of these miniature republics was that consolidating Windsor, Hartford and Weathersfield in Connecticut. The articles of association adopted by this infant Colony were penned by Roger Ludlow. The revised constitution of that state is either substantially copied from the instrument drawn by Ludlow or the ideas of republicans must run in a channel that has no change.

Among those who directed the destiny of the pioneers of the new world the name of Wolcott stands conspicuous. Henry Wolcott, the patriarch ancestor, removed from England to Dorchester, Mass. in 1630. In 1636 he founded the town of Windsor, Connecticut. During the perils of the Indian wars--the difficulties with the Canadian French and through all the various vicissitudes that have pervaded New England down to the present time, the descendants of Henry Wolcott have acted a conspicuous part. They were ready to go where duty called--to the field or legislative hall.

Oliver Wolcott, the subject of this brief sketch, was the son of Roger Wolcott who was appointed Governor of Connecticut in 1751. This son was born on the 26th of November 1726 and graduated at Yale College in 1747. The same year he was commissioned to raise and command a company which he marched to the defense of the northern frontiers where he remained until the peace of Aix la Chapelle. He then returned and applied himself to the study of medicine until he was appointed the first sheriff of Litchfield County formed in 1751. In 1755 he married Laura Collins a discreet woman of great merit. In 1774 he was appointed counselor which station he filled for twelve consecutive years. He was also chief judge of the Common Pleas Court and for a long time a judge of the Probate Court. In the military field he rose from the grade of captain to that of major-general. In the summer of 1776 he commanded the fourteen regiments raised by Gov. Trumbull to act with the army in New York. He headed his division at the memorable battle that resulted in the capture of Burgoyne and revived the drooping spirits of those who were engaged in the glorious cause of equal rights. He was uniformly consulted on important military movements and listened to with great confidence. From its commencement he was a zealous and efficient advocate of the cause of freedom and stood firm amidst the revolutionary storm undaunted by the roaring of the British lion.

In 1775 Congress made him commissioner of Indian affairs for the Northern Department then an important trust. During the same year he effected much towards reconciling disputes between Colonies relative to their boundaries. Amiable and persuasive in his manners--imbued with a clear sense of justice, he was an admirable mediator. He merited the blessing pronounced on peace-makers.

In 1776 he took his seat in Congress and remained until he affixed his signature to that Declaration of Rights which burst the chains of material bondage--gave birth to our nation in a day--astonished gazing millions--shook the British throne to its center and gave us a Republic that surpasses all Greek--all Roman fame.

He then returned to the field and on all occasions proved a brave, skillful and prudent officer. When he deemed his services more useful in Congress than in the army he would take his seat in that body, which he did at intervals up to 1783. In 1785 he was associated with Arthur Lee and Richard Butler to conclude a treaty of peace with the Six Nations of Indians. The year following he was elected lieutenant-governor and performed the duties of that office with great ability and dignity up to the time of his death which occurred on the 1st day of December 1797. He died regretted by the nation at large, but most by those who knew him best.

His numerous public services were highly appreciated. They were promptly and judiciously performed without any parade, pomp or vain show. His private character was adorned by all the richness of purity--purpose and action, that render a man an ornament among the virtuous. He possessed all the sterling virtues--was a devout and consistent Christian--a useful and honest man. In the hands of such men our government is secure--our UNION safe.


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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC04861 Author/Creator: Washington, George (1732-1799) Place Written: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 1 February 1796 Pagination: 2 p. 23 x 18.7 cm.

Responds to a previous letter from Wolcott announcing the death of Samuel Huntington, Governor of Connecticut. Informs Wolcott that "At the same time that I regret the loss of so worthy a character, I cannot but feel consoled that the Administration of the Government of that State has fallen into such good hands as yours." Refers to attacks made upon his Presidential Administration, declaring that "If the enlightened, and virtuous part of the Community will make allowances for my involuntary errors, I will promise they shall have no cause to accuse me of wilful ones." Confirms the integrity of Wolcott's son, also named Oliver, who was serving as Secretary of the Treasury.

Signer of the U.S. Constitution.

Philadelphia 1st. Feby. 1796
Sir,
I have been duly honored with your letter of the 21st Ulto.- announcing the death of Mr. Huntington, late Governor of Connecticut. -
At the same time that I regret the loss of so worthy a character, I cannot but feel consoled, that the Administration of the Government of that State has fallen into such good hands as yours. - And let me pray you to accept my sincere thanks for the assurance therein given of your readiness to observe the relationship which it bears to the general Government.
I feel equally obliged by the expression of your concern for the attacks which have been made upon my Administration. - If the enlightened, and virtuous part of the Communtty will make allowances for my involuntary errors, I will promise they shall have no cause to accuse me of willful ones. - Hoping [2] for the first, I feel no concern on account of the latter. -
Your Son, as far as my knowledge of him extends, is a very deserving character. - He discharges the duties of his Office with integrity and ability and, I am persuaded, may bid defiance to all those who seem to be continually on the lookout for occasions (without being at the trouble to investigate facts) to arraign the conduct of public Officers. -
With great esteem & respect
I am - Sir
Yr. Obedt Hble Servt
Go: Washington


From Oliver Wolcott, Junior

I inclose you the pamphlet. You will see that the subject is but partially represented with a design to establish an opinion that you was concerned in speculations in the public funds. As my name is mentioned I have been repeatedly called on for explanations. What I have said is substantially as follows. That I was informed at the time, of the whole transaction, & that though Munroe Muhlenburgh & Venable at first represented the affair as connected with Speculation in the funds, yet an explanation took place in my presence when each of the Gentlemen acknowledged themselves perfectly satisfied, & that there was nothing in the affair which could or ought to affect your character as a public Officer or impair the public confidence in your integrity. I have also mentioned that no publication could have been made without a breach of confidence pledged in my presence by the Gentlemen above named. Mr. Venable I am told speaks of the publication as false & dishonourable.

I have good reason to believe that Beckley is the real author,83 though it is attributed to Calender.

You will judge for yourself, but in my opinion it will be best to write nothing at least for the present.

It is false that Duer had any hand in the transaction—the Lists are in my hands, with a Letter from Clingman & Reynolds, the Clerk who furnished the Lists was notified of the discovery by me & dismissed—his name has been hitherto concealed: I think you may be certain that your character is not affected, in point of integrity & official conduct. The indignation against those who have basely published this scandal, is I believe universal. If you determine to notice the affair, & I can assist you you may command me, but I doubt the expediency.

The faction is organized, public business is at a stand, and a crisis is approaching.

1 . Callender, a native of Scotland, fled to the United States after he was indicted for sedition in January, 1793, because of his pamphlet The political progress of Britain or, An impartial account of the principal abuses in the government of the Country, From the Revolution in 1688 the whole tending to prove the ruinous consequences of the popular system of war and conquest … Part I (London: Printed for T. Kay, 1792). Until the spring of 1796, he reported on congressional debates for The Philadelphia Gazette and Universal Daily Advertiser .

Callender’s charges against H appeared in pamphlets numbered V and VI, which were part of a series of tracts that were subsequently published in book form under the title The History of the United States for 1796 Including a Variety of Interesting Particulars Relative to the Federal Government Previous to That Period (Philadelphia: Snowden and McCorkle, 1797). The preface to Callender’s History is dated July 19, and the charges against H are in chapters VI and VII.

It should perhaps also be pointed out that on January 19, 1797, Callender had published the American Annual Register, or Historical Memoirs of the United States, for the Year 1796 (Philadelphia: Bioren and Madan). This earlier version of Callender’s history does not include any references to the “Reynolds Affair.”

Callender’s series of pamphlets present several problems which historians either have ignored or have been unable to solve. In the first place, no copies of these pamphlets have been found, and scholars who have written about the “Reynolds Affair” have without exception used Callender’s History , rather than his pamphlets, as their source for Callender’s charges against H. See, for example, Mitchell, Hamilton description begins Broadus Mitchell, Alexander Hamilton (New York, 1957–1962). description ends , II, 706, note 24 Boyd, Papers of Thomas Jefferson description begins Julian P. Boyd, ed., The Papers of Thomas Jefferson (Princeton, 1950– ). description ends , XVIII, 631, note 62, 646 Harry Ammon, James Monroe: The Quest for National Identity (New York, 1971), 606, note 7 Nathan Schachner, Alexander Hamilton (New York, 1946), 369 Jonathan Daniels, Ordeal of Ambition: Jefferson, Hamilton, Burr (New York, 1970), 164 W. P. Cresson, James Monroe (Chapel Hill, 1946), 161.

Because no copies of Callender’s pamphlets have been found, it is impossible to determine with certainty either the number of pamphlets in the series or the dates on which they were published. Mitchell states that “the tracts first appeared in eight weekly numbers” and that pamphlet “V came out June 26, VI, July 4” ( Mitchell, Hamilton description begins Broadus Mitchell, Alexander Hamilton (New York, 1957–1962). description ends , II, 706, note 24). Mitchell’s source for this information is Charles Evans, ed., American Bibliography: A Chronological Dictionary of All Books, Pamphlets and Periodical Publications Printed in the United States from the Genesis of Printing in 1639 down to and Including the Year 1820 (Chicago, 1931), XI, 159. Evans, however, does not give dates for the publication of each pamphlet, and the evidence is clear that he never saw the pamphlets in question. Boyd, without giving a source, asserts that “No. V … appeared late in June, 1797” and No. VI on July 4 ( Papers of Thomas Jefferson , XVIII, 646).

Pamphlet No. V can be dated by an advertisement in the [Philadelphia] Aurora. General Advertiser , June 24, 1797, which reads: “On Monday next [June 26] will be published … No. V, of the History of the United States for 1796 &c .” All that can be said with certainty concerning the publication date of pamphlet No. VI is that it appeared before July 7, for on that date Wolcott wrote to H: “I send you the residue of the pamph[l]et.”

Finally, the confusion concerning Callender’s pamphlets is compounded by the fact that the chapters in Callender’s History were not divided in the same fashion as his pamphlets had been. On July 8, 1797, H wrote to James Monroe: “I request to be informed whether the paper numbered V [i.e., document No. V in Callender’s History and not to be confused with Callender’s pamphlet No. V mentioned above] dated Philadelphia the 15 of December 1792 published partly in the fifth and partly in the sixth number of ‘The History of the United States for 1796’ … is the copy of a genuine original.” In Callender’s History all of document No. V appears in chapter VI. Without the original pamphlets, it is impossible to determine if there are any other significant differences between the pamphlets and the History .

2 . The “Reynolds Pamphlet” description begins Alexander Hamilton, Observations on Certain Documents Contained in No. V and VI of “The History of the United States for the Year 1796,” in which the Charge of Speculation against Alexander Hamilton, Late Secretary of the Treasury, is Fully Refuted. Written by Himself (Philadelphia: Printed for John Fenno, by John Bioren, 1797). description ends was published on August 25, 1797, under the title of Observations on Certain Documents Contained in No. V & VI of “The History of the United States for the Year 1796,” In Which the Charge of Speculation Against Alexander Hamilton, Late Secretary of the Treasury, is Fully Refuted. Written by Himself (Philadelphia: Printed for John Fenno, by John Bioren, 1797).

There is also a draft of this pamphlet in the Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Both the draft and the printed version of this document are printed below under the date of August 25, 1797.

Immediately following the publication of the “Reynolds Pamphlet,” description begins Alexander Hamilton, Observations on Certain Documents Contained in No. V and VI of “The History of the United States for the Year 1796,” in which the Charge of Speculation against Alexander Hamilton, Late Secretary of the Treasury, is Fully Refuted. Written by Himself (Philadelphia: Printed for John Fenno, by John Bioren, 1797). description ends Callender publicly challenged the authenticity of H’s defense in Sketches of the History of America (Philadelphia: Snowden and McCorkle, 1798).

4 . “Draft of the Reynolds Pamphlet,” August 25, 1797. In the printed version of the “Reynolds Pamphlet,” August 25, 1797, Maria Reynolds is identified as the “sister of Mr. G. Livingston,” which is also correct as the word “sister” in the seventeen-nineties could also mean “sister-in-law.”

5 . Wadsworth to H, August 2, 1797. Lewis DuBois was a colonel in the Fifth New York Regiment during the American Revolution, and from 1787 to 1793 he was brigadier general of the Dutchess County militia. He was sheriff of Dutchess County from 1781 to 1785 and represented the county in the state Assembly in 1786 and 1787.

6 . See “Lewis Family Bible,” Dutchess County Historical Society Year Book , XXIX (1944), 93 J. Wilson Poucher, “Dutchess County Men of the Revolutionary Period: Colonel Lewis DuBois—Captain Henry DuBois,” Dutchess County Historical Society Year Book , XX (1935), 71–85 Florence Van Rensselaer, ed., The Livingston Family in America and Its Scottish Origins (New York, 1949), 107. For information on the later life of Susan Reynolds, see the MS “Memoir of Peter A. Grotjan, written late in life” in the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

7 . David and Mary Reynolds had six children: James, Joseph, Elizabeth, Henry, Reuben, and Sarah (Draft Deposition of William W. Thompson, March 27, 1802 [Chancery Papers, BM-474-R, Hall of Records, New York City] Draft Deposition of Isaac Van Duzor, Jr., December 18, 1802 [Chancery Papers, BM-474-R, Hall of Records, New York City]). Thompson, who was a farmer in Goshen, Orange County, New York, had been sheriff of Orange County from 1781 to 1785. Van Duzor was a farmer in Cornwall, Orange County.

On April 4, 1786, the Continental Congress received the following memorial from David Reynolds: “That your Memorialist in the year 1777 was appointed one of the Commissary’s of Purchases for the Continental Army.

“That your Memorialist continued in said office purchasing ’till 1779 & 1780 when his credit fail’d as Assist. Commy. of purchases in behalf of the United States arising from a want of Cash which renderd him unable to discharge the debts he had contracted with sundry persons who had lost their confidence in public credit.

“That your Memorialist humbly begs leave to inform that in consequence of the most pressing exigencies of the Troops and the repeated Assurances of receiving Cash (daily in expectation) sufficient to discharge the Amount of such Contracts for provisions &c as he unavoidable must procure was induced to give his own private notes of hand for such supplies as there was no other means whereby they cou’d be obtain’d.

“That your Memorialist being disappointed in the arrival (or rect.) of Cash for discharging of said notes of hand, Suits were in consequence brought against him in the Supreme Court of said state, for said notes respectively.

“That your Memorialist employ’d an Attorney to defend the said Suits, but as he had no real defence to make final Judgments were enter’d in the said suits, and thereupon Executions were Issued against all the real and personal estate of your memorialist which was shortly afterwards sold at public Vendue very much below its real value, and the neat proceeds of the said sale were wholly apply’d to satisfy the said Judgments.

“That your Memorialist further begs leave to inform that he has obtained a final settlement with the Commissioners upon which there is due him a sum sufficient (if realised) to enable him to redeem a part of the lands which was sold by Executions as aforesaid.

“That your Memorialist has produced the most satisfactory voucher upon settlement to the Commissioners to shew that the Articles (for which his lands and tenements were sold by Execution) was deliver’d for the use of the Army.

“That your Memorialist by the sale of his real and personal Estate as aforesaid finds himself with a Wife and numerous family of Children reduced to the greatest distress and indigence.” (DS , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives JCC description begins Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789 (Washington, 1904–1937). description ends , XXX, 151, note 1.) The memorial was referred to the Board of Treasury, which on May 10, 1787, reported that Reynolds’s memorial “cannot be complied with” ( JCC description begins Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789 (Washington, 1904–1937). description ends , XXX, 250). For the subsequent efforts of Jacob Cuyler, deputy commissary general of purchases during the American Revolution, “to be relieved from a demand brought against him by David Reynolds … for one hundred and fourteen head of Cattle said to have been delivered by said Reynolds for the use of the Army and not charged in his accounts against the United States,” see JCC description begins Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789 (Washington, 1904–1937). description ends , XXXI, 736–37 XXXIV, 526.

In 1796 H was retained by one of the Cunninghams (Abner, Obadiah, Andrew, or Charles) in a suit initiated by Reuben Reynolds, James Reynolds’s brother. Reuben wished to regain possession of a tract of land in Cornwall which his deceased father had mortgaged in 1776 for a debt to Sheffield Howard (Bill, filed February 7, 1801 [Chancery Papers, BM-452-R, Hall of Records, New York City]). In 1783 David Currie, as the New York representative of the Connecticut mercantile firm of Barnabas Deane and Jeremiah Wadsworth, successfully brought suits against David and James Reynolds for nonpayment of debts (Judgment Roll, filed February 14, 1783 [Parchment 95-A-1, Hall of Records, New York City] Judgment Roll, filed September 15, 1783 [Parchment 94-K-5, Hall of Records, New York City] Judgment Roll, September 15, 1783 [Parchment 105-E-3, Hall of Records, New York City]). On May 20, 1796, Wadsworth, as the sole surviving partner of the firm of Deane and Wadsworth, transferred to Reuben Reynolds the balance due on these debts, and Margaret Currie, David Currie’s widow, then “transferred … to the said Reuben all and singular the Monies Still due on the aforesaid Judgments” (Bill, filed February 7, 1801 [Chancery Papers, BM-452-R, Hall of Records, New York City]). After Margaret Currie revived the two suits against David and James Reynolds (Judgment, February 28, 1797 [Parchment 94-E-4, Hall of Records, New York City]), Reuben “caused a Certain Writ of Fieri Facias to be issued upon the said Judgment directed to the Sheriff of the County of Orange, for the purpose of levying on and selling the Lands and Tenements of the said David Reynolds and Whereof he died seized, for the purpose of Satisfying the said Judgment” (Bill, filed February 7, 1801 [Chancery Papers, BM-452-R, Hall of Records, New York City]). In the meantime, Samuel Sands had bought the land in Cornwall from the legal representatives of the now deceased Sheffield Howard, and Sands sold the land to Abner Cunningham in 1792. The Cunninghams conveyed the land in 1795 to George Brown, who, in turn, conveyed it to Isaac Tobias in 1799 (Answer, filed May 14, 1801 [Chancery Papers, BM-452-R, Hall of Records, New York City]). In connection with this case, H made the following entries in his Law Register, 1795–1804:

“James Reynolds Scire Facias
Adsm [Nicholas] Evertson for Plaintiff
Margaret Currie Retained by one
Administratrix of Cunningham
David Currie 15 Ds

November 3 Notice of appearance

Abner Cunningham Same parties as above
Obadiah Cunningham
Andrew Cunningham
Charles Cunningham
Adsm
George Brown”

In 1801 the suit was taken to the New York Court of Chancery as Reuben Reynolds v Isaac Tobias , and H entered in his Law Register, 1795–1804:

“Tobias of Counsel
Adsm with [Samuel] Jones
Reynolds in Chancery

The editors are indebted to Miss Betty J. Thomas, associate editor of The Law Practice of Alexander Hamilton , for the above information.

On January 20, 1842, the following entry appears in the Journal of the House: “Mr. [James G.] Clinton presented a memorial of David Reynolds, late assistant commissary of purchases for the United States army, setting forth that he did, during the revolutionary war, furnish supplies to the army of the United States, for which he has never received any compensation and that he was subsequently arrested by each of the persons of whom he purchased such supplies, and judgment obtained against him, almost to his total ruin. He now prays relief in the premises.” This memorial was referred to the Committee on Revolutionary Claims ( Journal of the House description begins Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States (Washington, 1826). description ends , 27th Cong., 2nd Sess. [Washington, 1841], 236–37). On May 29, 1844, Joseph Vance of Ohio presented “a petition of the heirs of David Reynolds, deceased, of the State of New York, an officer in the war of the Revolution, for the payment of their claim for his services.” This petition was also referred to the Committee on Revolutionary Claims ( Journal of the House description begins Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States (Washington, 1826). description ends , 28th Cong., 1st Sess. [Washington, 1844], 983).

10 . Copy, RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters, January 1–December 29, 1789, National Archives. The petition included a postscript in William Malcom’s handwriting which reads: “We are well acquainted with the petitioner and recommend him as an honest industrious man, well Qualifyed for the office which he Sollicits.” This testimonial is signed by Malcom, Hendrick Wyckoff, and John Blagge, New York City merchants Robert Troup, a New York City attorney and close friend of H and Robert Boyd, the sheriff of New York City and County.

Boyd reads Malcom’s name as “Alwen” ( Papers of Thomas Jefferson , XVIII, 627, note 53).

11 . Journal of the House description begins Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States (Washington, 1826). description ends , I, 217–18. For these resolutions, see H to Washington, May 28, 1790, note 2.

13 . For a detailed analysis of this controversy, see Boyd, Papers of Thomas Jefferson description begins Julian P. Boyd, ed., The Papers of Thomas Jefferson (Princeton, 1950– ). description ends , XVI, 455–70 XVIII, 211–25. Boyd also states that in the Glaubeck affair H failed to understand “the impropriety of acting officially for friends …” ( Papers of Thomas Jefferson , XVIII, 686–87, note 203). For information on Baron de Glaubeck and Andrew G. Fraunces, see the introductory note to Fraunces to H, May 16, 1793.

14 . Commonwealth v James Reynolds and Jacob Clingman . Reynolds and Clingman were “Charged with having Employed, Aided and abbetted a certain John Delabar to defraud the United States of a Sum of money value near Four hundred Dollars, and having Suborned the said Delabar to commit a wilful and corrupt Perjury before George Campbell Esq register for the probate of wills and Granting Letters of Administration &Ca.” (Mayor’s Court Docket, 1792–1796, 71, Philadelphia City Archives Inspectors of the County Prison, Prisoners for Trial Docket, 1790–1797, 113, Philadelphia City Archives). On November 16, 1792, Clingman was released on bail (Inspectors of the County Prison, Prisoners for Trial Docket, 1790–1797, 113, Philadelphia City Archives).

15 . Commonwealth v John Delabar . Delabar was “Charged with having been Guilty of willful and Corrupt Perjury, and having defrauded the United States of a Sum of Money of near Four Hundred Dollars” (Mayor’s Court Docket, 1792–1796, 71, Philadelphia City Archives Inspectors of the County Prison, Prisoners for Trial Docket, 1790–1797, 113, Philadelphia City Archives).

Delabar’s trial, which was originally set for December 17, 1792, was rescheduled for the next session of the Mayor’s Court (Inspectors of the County Prison, Prisoners for Trial Docket, 1790–1797, 113, Philadelphia City Archives). On November 19, Wolcott wrote to Samuel Emery, Goodenough’s agent, “to take measures for producing the said Goodenough and some person to whom he is known” (copy, Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford). On March 7, 1793, Levi Holden received payment “for his and Ephraim Goodenough’s expences coming from Boston to Philadelphia, at the request of the Comptroller of the Treasury as witnesses in a suit instituted by the United States against Delabar and returning” (RG 217, Miscellaneous Treasury Accounts, 1790–1894, Account No. 3946, National Archives). Although the suits against Reynolds and Clingman were dismissed on December 12, 1792, Reynolds was “to be sent to the Debtors Jail when discharged from this Suit 13/0 pd.,” and Delabar remained in prison until April 1, 1793 (Inspectors of the County Prison, Prisoners for Trial Docket, 1790–1797, 113, Philadelphia City Archives).

16 . See Wolcott’s deposition, July 12, 1797, which is document No. XXIV in the appendix to the printed version of the “Reynolds Pamphlet,” August 25, 1797.

17 . See Wolcott’s deposition, July 12, 1797, which is document No. XXIV in the appendix to the printed version of the “Reynolds Pamphlet,” August 25, 1797


History of Wolcott – Mural

3. “The Long Wigwam”- The Tunxis Indians would retreat here when warned of Mohawk raids and also assemble here on special occasions. Located in the area over which present day Coe Road passes

4. —– Harvey Upson homestead – stood near present east entrance of Garrigus Court and here we have the Tame Buck Legend- a hungry, injured fawn was befriended by one of the family’s children

5. 1778 Timothy Upson Inn- General LaFayette and his troops spend the night en route to Newport

6. —– Today’s Meriden-Waterbury Tpk. and Pierpont Rd. were part of the military highway from the Hudson Valley to Hartford to Newport. American and French Armies and probably George Washington used this route

7. 1780 The French army numbering 6000 under Count Rochambeau encamps at the bottom of the Southington Mountain and are brought much needed provisions and home-cooking by the early settlers of Wolcott

8. 1913 “Green Lines Trolley”- officially The Waterbury-Milldale Tramway Co., Inc. ran electric cars from Waterbury to Milldale starting at “The Birches” between present Todd Rd. and Shelton Ave.

1770 THE SOCIETY OF FARMINGBURY PARISH

The 49 families of this area become a distinct Ecclesiastical Society separated from Waterbury and Farmington by an act passed by the Colonial General Assembly held at New Haven. They were given the right to erect a meeting house, establish school districts, and elect officials as prescribed by Colonial law. Note that the new parish name, Farmingbury, is a combination of the first and last parts of Farming ton and Water bury .

9. —– Boundline Road was the established boundary line between Waterbury and Farmington

10. 1678 Great Gray Rock or The Ordinary- the northeast corner bound of ancient Waterbury dating back to when the original settlers purchased the land from the Tunxis Indians- located south of Episcopal Church today

11. 1724 Josiah Rogers’ small farm in western part of town- possible site

12. 1729 Jacob Benson builds log cabin on “Benson’s Hill”, now Wolcott’s center town green. He operated a grist mill on the river at Great Falls ( Mad River) and a store in the center

13. 1731 John Alcock purchases 117-1/2 acres of land on Spindle Hill Road ( ancestor of Amos Bronson and Louisa May Alcott)

14. 1737 Benjamin Harrison’s 111 acres with house and barn- possible site on the easterly side of Benson’s Hill

15. 1773 Farmingbury parish meeting house is completed on the site where present Wolcott Congregational Church stands. The “bound line” passed right through the middle of the building.

16. —– Abraham Wooster, “Boss carpenter” for the new meeting house, lived in the old house next to what would become the site of town hall according to historical accounts

17. 1773 Judah Frisbie was an early settler who served under Gen. Washington in the Revolution. While working to establish his dwelling, he put his coat down on a stump at the end of the day and found it covered with ticks! Legend says that this is how Woodtick Road got its name

18. 1764 The Burying Ground, now known as Edgewood Cemetery was established

1796 THE TOWN OF WOLCOTT

On May 12, 1796, Farmingbury Parish was incorporated as a town by virtue of an act passed by the General Assembly. The new town’s representatives voted to call their town Wolcott in grateful recognition of the state’s Lieutenant Governor, Oliver Wolcott, who cast the tie-breaking vote. Wolcott became the 104th Connecticut town.

19. 1773 Beach-Minor House (512 Bound Line Road)

20. 1774 James Alcott(Alcox) House (621 Spindle Hill Road)

21. 1775 James Thomas House (36 Peterson Lane) Birthplace of Seth Thomas, American clock manufacturer, 1785

22. 1777 Josiah Atkins House (49 Center Street)

23. 1777 David Harrison House (228 Center Street)

24. 1780 Thomas Barns House (281 Center Street)

25. 1790 Solomon Alcott(Alcox) House (348 Beach Road) Site of the birthplace of Amos Bronson Alcott 1799

26. 1799 Amos Bronson Alcott- writer, teacher, philosopher, Yankee Peddler and father of Louisa May Alcott

27. 1790 Bishop-Woodward House (205 Center Street)

28. —– Small 4 room building to east of Bishop-Woodward House- summer home and servant’s quarters for 2 women teachers from New Haven

29. 1792 Daniel Tuttle House (4 Kenea Avenue)

30. 1797 Darius Wiard House ( 1 Farmingbury Road)

31. 1798 Abijah Fenn Store Building (339 Bound Line Road)

32. 1802 Obed Alcott(Alcox) House (339 Spindle Hill Road)

33. —– The West School on Spindle Hill Road was attended by Amos Bronson and William Andrus Alcott

34. —– The Center School at the top of Benson’s Hill is today’s Superintendent’s Office

35. 1810 Seth Thomas made his first clocks on Spindle Hill Road – wag-on-the-wall style

36. —– Spindle Hill Road- An old Indian trail became the first road running through the territory from Farmington to Waterbury. It is named after the sound of whirring flax wheels spinning cordage for Seth Thomas’ clocks

37. 1830 George G. Alcott House (209 Beach Road)

38. 1830 Episcopal Church built where parking lot of present town hall is

39. 1856 Town Hall- this store was purchased by town Selectmen from Anson H. Smith for $350

41. 1841 Wolcott Congregational Church (Center Street)

42. 1841 Anson G. Lane House (695 Spindle Hill Road)

43. 1843 Adna Whiting House (210 Spindle Hill Road)

44. 1843 Miles Upson House (1089 Woodtick Road)

45. 1844 David Bailey House (335 Bound Line Road)

46. 1845 Ira H. Hough House (74 Center Street)

47. 1845 Mark Tuttle House (463 Center Street)

48. 1854 Anson H. Smith House (421 Center Street)

49. 1873 Homewood Happyhollow Farm

50. 1902 Constitutional Oak- planted by Evelyn Upson, Wolcott’s Constitutional Convention delegate

51. 1930 Wolcott’s airfield- the Chuchelow pasture was cleared of rocks and obstacles “by hand and the sweat of their brow” for smooth landings and flying lessons. Hot air balloons also took off from the airfield

52. —– Wild blueberries – site of present High School

53. 1882 First Wolcott Fair held on site adjacent to present High School

54. —– Pritchard’s Mill- saw mill and cider mill at “Great Falls” where Center Street meets today’s Rt. 69

55. —– Route 69 stopped at Center Street. There was a pond where the Pat’s IGA is today

56. 1953 Wolcott’s town seal- motto- ” Spes Mea In Deo” ( My Hope is in God )

58. 1998 Gazebo- donated to the town by the Farmingbury Woman’s Club, G.F.W.C

59. MATTATUCK DRUM BAND

  • The oldest fife and drum band with continuous existence in the country
  • 1767 founded as the Farmingbury Drum Band
  • 1796 changed its name to the Wolcott Drum Band
  • 1881 some active members together with a number of Waterbury players formed the Mattatuck Drum Band

AGRICULTURE AND INDUSTRY

60. Agriculture– Wolcott’s abundance of produce, animals and homemade goods were displayed each fall at the popular Wolcott Fair. Among the exhibits were found: draft horses, pigs, cattle, sheep, chickens, oxen, apples, grains (buckwheat, rye), flax, corn, tomatoes, melons, cabbage, pumpkins, turnips, potatoes, cheese, butter, crochet, tin ware, rugs, embroidery, quilts

61. Industry– Much of Wolcott’s early industry centered around the water wheel. Among the many mills to be found along the rivers were: saw cider, grist, wooden ware, tannery, carding, fulling, paper, and cloth. Some of the other trades were: blacksmith, clock making, cooper, wheelwright, cobbler, and logging.

* All of the above information can be found in publications available from the Wolcott Historical Society


Oliver Wolcott - History

Oliver Wolcott, as much a soldier as a politician, helped convert the concept of independence into reality on the battlefield. He also occupied many local, provincial, and State offices, including the governorship. One of his five children, Oliver, also held that position and became U.S. Secretary of the Treasury.

Wolcott was the youngest son in a family of 15. Sired by Roger Wolcott, a leading Connecticut politician, he was born in 1726 at Windsor (present South Windsor), Conn. In 1747, just graduated from Yale College at the top of his class, he began his military career. As a militia captain during King George's War (1740-48), he accompanied an unsuccessful British expedition against the French in New France. Back home, he studied medicine for a time with his brother before deciding to turn to law.

In 1751, when Litchfield County was organized, Wolcott moved about 30 miles westward to the town of Litchfield and immediately took over the first of a long string of county and State offices: county sheriff (1751-71) member of the lower house (1764, 1767-68, and 1770) and upper house (1771-86) of the colonial and State legislatures and probate (1772-81) and county (1774-78) judge. By 1774 he had risen to the rank of colonel in the militia.

The next spring, the legislature named him as a commissary for Connecticut troops and in the summer the Continental Congress designated him as a commissioner of Indian affairs for the northern department. In that capacity he attended a conference that year with the Iroquois (Six Nations) at Albany, N.Y., that temporarily gained their neutrality in the war. Before the year was out, he also aided in arbitrating land disputes between Pennsylvania and Connecticut and New York and Vermont.

Wolcott sat in Congress from 1775 until 1783 except for the year 1779. In June 1776 illness caused him to return to Connecticut. Absent at the time of the voting for independence the next month and at the formal signing of the Declaration in August, he added his signature sometime after his return to Congress in October. Throughout his tour, Wolcott devoted portions of each year to militia duty, highlighted by participation as a brigadier general in the New York campaigns of 1776-77 that culminated in the surrender of Gen. John Burgoyne in October of the latter year at Saratoga (Schuylerville). During 1779, as a major general, Wolcott defended the Connecticut seacoast against the raids of William Tryon, Royal Governor of New York.

Wolcott's postwar career was varied. On the national level, he helped negotiate two Indian treaties: the Second Treaty of Fort Stanwix, N.Y. (1784), in which the Iroquois ceded to the United States some of their lands in New York and Pennsylvania and another (1789) with the Wyandottes, who gave up their tract in the Western Reserve, in present Ohio. On the State level, Wolcott continued his long period of service in the upper house of the legislature (ended 1786) enjoyed a lengthy stint as Lieutenant Governor (1787-96) attended the convention (1788) that ratified the U.S. Constitution and, like his father before him and his son after him, held the office of Governor (1796-97).

While occupying the latter position, Wolcott died, aged 71, at East Windsor. His remains rest in the East Cemetery at Litchfield.

Drawing: Oil, 1873, by James R. Lambdin, after Ralph Earl (Earle), Independence National Historical Park.


Oliver Wolcott Library


Oliver Wolcott House, South Street / Doncram

According to the Oliver Wolcott Library website:

The Oliver Wolcott Jr. House was built by Elijah Wadsworth in 1799. Elijah Wadsworth sold the estate to Frederick Wolcott in 1800. Oliver Wolcott, Jr. acquired the house in 1814 and enlarged it considerably in 1817. Mrs. Oliver Wolcott (Elizabeth Stoughton) was known for being a gracious hostess and the fame of her parties reached as far as Washington, D.C. and England. Parties were frequently held in the ballroom on the second floor. It is said that President George Washington danced his last minuet in Litchfield in that ballroom. The ballroom was restored by the Society of Colonial Wars and can be viewed upon request.

American architect and designer, Eliot Noyes studied at Harvard University receiving his master's degree in architecture in 1938. From 1939 to 1946, he served as the Director of the Department of Industrial Design at MOMA in New York and then founded his own architectural and industrial design practice in 1947. He favored open spaces and clear geometry. His use of modern design combined with the historic nature of the 1799 House remains a testimony to his gift of architectural design.


Watch the video: Independence Day Celebration - Oliver Wolcott