When did streets get names?

When did streets get names?

Some intercity roads and highways have names (eg. the King's Highway in the Bible and the Appian Way in Rome) and others are named after the place that they go to (Jaffa road in Jerusalem). When did smaller intra city streets first get names? I can think of three different kinds of intra city streets:

  1. Some streets are named after things on that street (Church street) or big landowners to whose property the street goes (Campbell Road in Dallas).
  2. Main streets and Broadways are so named because they were indeed the main street.
  3. Streets like Maple and Elm street that often have nothing to do with Maples and Elms but are named so to give them a name.

There are some very old streets in England, the oldest believed to be Vicar's Close in Somerset, from around the 14th century - but that is actually quite modern compared to others.

Pompeii is an obvious example from the 6th-7th century BCE, where the street names were clearly signed. A street plan shows that pretty much all streets and alleys were named.

Ancient streets have been found in Jerusalem, which are thought to have existed from about the 4th-6th century BCE. These have been mapped, which is been used to excavate them at the moment. I don't think it would be that much of a leap to suggest that if the streets had been planned in any way that they would also have been named - if not when they were first created, at least by the time they were mapped. The article that I linked to doesn't mention street names explicitly though, but if places like Pompeii were naming smaller streets, then it would be likely that they were in Jerusalem from at least the 6th century too.

Now, this is where my 'official internet sources' run out. I can't seem to find anything earlier than that. But one observation is that it's human nature to want to name locations and points of interest. If there was not an 'official name', it's likely that the locals would have had a name for certain streets and places anyway. You have already mentioned the reasons why people would do that, but as an example: I live in a village which was bombed during WWII and at the back of the houses on a field is a massive ditch where a bomb fell. The area is just common land and has no name, but local people call that area and the path that runs behind the houses 'The Bomb Hole'. Everyone in the village knows what you mean when you say 'I'm walking down the bomb hole' - you are taking a shortcut down the path next to the common.

So, to directly answer the question - what I can see from sites that exist today, the 6th century seems to be the earliest period where smaller streets were officially named. But saying that, it's likely that smaller streets were named earlier than that, but the maps of the time don't show it - this may say more about the style of the maps than prove that smaller streets were not named (maps of the period seem to show the areas of a city and the major roads, rather than what we would call a street map today).

This is my first answer, so any suggestions welcome. Also, if i'm totally off with this answer then let me know and i'll delete it. Many thanks.


Streets in ancient Mesopotamia had names.

A 1975 study of ancient Sippar by Rikvah Harris at the Nederlands Instituut voor het Nabije Oosten (http://www.nino-leiden.nl/download/3235) found mention of several named streets in the early 2nd Miillennium BCE, for example:

An account which mentions taxes owed by Sin-remenni describes him as a resident of Akitum Street (waššāibi ša SIL Akītum), which, from its name, may have been the processional road linking the temple of Samas with the sanctuary outside the walls (bit akītīm şa šeri). Mentioned also is the "street of the living quarters of the palace slavegirl" (DA E.SIL giinin GEME E.GAL).

Some streets of the city were named after gods, perhaps because of the location there of a chapel to the god. Sippar thus has a dImin Street, and an Ištar Street, while a Lamaštum Street was located in Sippar-rabûm.

Source: Rivkah Harris Ancient Sippar: A Demographic Study of an Old-Babylonian City (1894-1595 B.C.), Nederlands Instituut voor het Nabije Oosten Leiden, 1975


In the first century in Damascus, there was a "street called Straight".

Here it is in Acts 9:11

Now there was a certain disciple at Damascus named Ananias; and to him the Lord said in a vision, “Ananias.” And he said, “Here I am, Lord.” So the Lord said to him, “Arise and go to the street called Straight, and inquire at the house of Judas for one called Saul of Tarsus, for behold, he is praying.


A Guide to Former Street Names in Manhattan

Including also old roads, lanes, alleys, courts, terraces, parks, squares, wharves, piers, slips, markets and other named urban features that have been demapped, obliterated or renamed.

Compiled and annotated by Gilbert Tauber

Oldstreets.com will help you identify Manhattan locations mentioned in old books, articles and documents relating to New York City. It contains more than 1,600 old names of streets and other urban features that are no longer on the map.

In most cases these streets, etc. have been renamed in other cases they have been truncated or disappeared entirely. Several names have migrated. For example, today's King Street is in the West Village, but prior to 1794 King Street was the name of what we now call Pine Street. Even more vexing, the same name has sometimes been used simultaneously for two different streets. Until the 1920s there was a Manhattan Street in Harlem and a Manhattan Street on the Lower East Side. Greenwich Village had two Cornelia Streets in the 1820s, and in the 1770s there were at least three George Streets.


How Do Places Get Their Names?

Name places come from a variety of sources and can be very unique.

How Do Places Get Their Names?

How would the world be if places had no names? Obviously, it would be chaotic and full of confusion. It is, therefore, important to give places names for identification purposes but also to help in distinguishing one place from another. There is always a story behind a name that has been given to a place or a person. Different methods and means are used in naming places. Some places within a region may share names with a slight variation. It is also possible to get two or more separate places in different countries or regions sharing a name. Place names are primarily divided into names of natural features and names of settlements. The study of place names, their origin, meaning, pronunciation, and use is known as toponymy. Toponymy is a branch of onomastics which is the study of names of all kind. The names of places provide the most meaningful and accurate geographical reference system in the world.

The Geographical Names

Accuracy and consistency are required in naming places to prevent confusion. Toponymists use a well established local principle and procedures in line with the principles of the UN Group of Expert on Geographical Names to establish the geographically recognized names. A toponymist does not only rely on maps and history of the local place but also interviews with the local people to establish names for the local places. The specific language, the pronunciation, and origin of the name are important considerations in naming a place. Toponymy provides insight into the historical geography of a place. It is also responsible for the preservation the region’s culture and history through the names given to the place.

Conventional Naming Systems

The naming systems vary from one country or place to another. The names of places frequently refer to particular people, administrative activities, historical occurrences, or geographical features. In some countries like the US, some specific departments or authorities are responsible for the naming of significant places. Systems are also put in place that include negotiations with the local people before a name can be given to a place. The most common methods of naming places include the use of names of prominent people in the region or countries. Some places are also named after a phenomenal occurrence or activity.

Examples of Place-Naming

Place names in the US are easily traceable to their origins since most of the places are named after their founders or politicians at the time. Some of the places in the US named after prominent people include Washington DC (George Washington), Cleveland (General Moses Cleveland), and Denver (James W Denver) among other famous names. Most of the streets and avenues of the main cities and towns around the world are also named after prominent people in that city or town. Most places in England derived their names from rivers upon which they were built. Some of these cities have changed their names with the changing of the names of the rivers. For instance, Cambridge was initially named Grontabricc which was a bridge on Granta, but it was changed to the present name when the river was renamed, Cam.


Wall Street’s Timeline

1652-53 – The Dutch settlers of New Amsterdam build a wall to protect their colony from English invasion by land. (The wall was not built to repel immigrants, as it has been sometimes reported.)

1664 – The wall is a success and New Amsterdam is not invaded by land. The English conquer it by sea and rename the colony New York.

1711 – The city of New York officially opens its slave market on Wall Street, moving the town’s financial center.

1792 – Financial traders in New York sign the buttonwood agreement. This agreement was signed under a sycamore (or 𠇋uttonwood”) tree on Wall Street that the men would meet at to conduct trades. It set rules to keep the local government from interfering with their work. It also set rules to limit competition in finance, in part by requiring that anyone who wanted to trade securities had to be a member or approved of by the membership.

1817 – The members of the Buttonwood agreement open the New York Stock and Exchange Board, modeled after the Philadelphia Merchants Exchange. This would eventually become the New York Stock Exchange.

1837 – Samuel Morse launches his telegraph in New York City. It is seized on by Wall Street traders.

1867 – The stock ticker is first launched on Wall Street.

1882 – The New York Mercantile Exchange opens.

1882 – Thomas Edison brings electricity to the first American city, starting with New York’s financial district.

1884 – Charles Dow and Edward Jones introduce their Dow Jones Average, the first mainstream system for tracking overall market activity.

1903 – The modern New York Stock Exchange building opens at Broad Street and Wall Street.

1918 – It is generally considered that New York City has eclipsed London as a global financial center.

1929 – The stock market crashes, a financial collapse that quickly leads to the Great Depression.

1933 – Congress passes the Glass-Steagall Act, a law intended to prevent another stock market crash by separating deposit banking from investment banking. This works well for more than 60 years until many of its most significant elements are repealed over the course of the 1990s. Approximately 10 years later the stock market experienced another major decline in the Great Recession.

1949 – One of the first major uses of rules-based trading. Investor Richard Donchian starts his fund Futures, Inc. which based itself on a series of rules and conditions for trading. This would later evolve into the system of limit and stop-loss orders used today.

1971 – The NASDAQ is launched.

1970s – Over the course of the decade, Wall Street’s financial centers such as the New York Stock Exchange and the newly-created NASDAQ begin using computers to run their markets.

1999 – Congress repeals the Glass-Steagall Act, leading many banks to consolidate their investing and depository activities once again.

2008 – Following the collapse of several major investments, most notably the subprime mortgage sector, the stock market collapses into the Great Recession. Economists debate whether this financial and investment crisis had anything to do with Congress repealing a law designed to prevent financial and investment crises less than 10 years prior.


Wall Street as a Wooden Wall

1652: During the Anglo-Dutch Wars, hostilities between England and the Netherlands spilled over into North America. The Dutch settlers of Manhattan Island, called New Amsterdam at the time, feared England was planning to attack and constructed a wooden wall as defense.

Costing the settlement 5,000 guilders and constructed from 15-foot planks and dirt, the wall was 2,340 feet long and nine feet tall. It featured cannons and spanned between two gates, one located at what is now the corner of Wall Street and Pearl Street, and the other on Wall Street. and Broadway. Called � Waal Straat,” the earthen part of the structure came from earlier fortifications built to defend against possible attacks by Native Americans and pirates. The labor on the wall is believed to have been performed by slaves.

After a half century, the wall fell into disrepair and was slated for demolishment but was instead restored in 1693 in fear of a French invasion. It was finally demolished in 1699.

December 13, 1711: Wall Street was made the site of the government-sanctioned slave market in New York City. In operation until 1762 at the site of one of the original Wall gates on Pearl Street, the market was a wooden building that provided the city with tax dollars from the active trade inside.

1731: A first attempt at creating a public library was made by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, located in City Hall on Wall Street.

1788: City Hall was officially renamed Federal Hall after New York City became the first capital of the United States. It was the site of several important historical events, such as the drafting of the Bill of Rights by Congress and the inauguration of George Washington as the first president. Federal Hall was later the first home of the New York Historical Society but was demolished in 1812.


Why Egypt Paraded 22 Ancient Pharaohs Through the Streets of Cairo

Last Saturday, 22 Egyptian mummies joined the living for an extravagant celebration in downtown Cairo. Dubbed the Pharaohs’ Golden Parade, the livestreamed procession featured the relocation of 18 ancient kings and 4 queens from the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir Square to the newly opened National Museum of Egyptian Civilization (NMEC).

Wael Hussein of BBC News reports that the mummies had transportation fit for a king (and, in this case, queen): Each ruler was placed in an oxygen-free, nitrogen-filled container and carried on a boat-like vehicle equipped with shock-absorbing material. As Mostafa Ismail, head of conservation at NMEC’s Mummies Conservation Lab and Storeroom, tells CNN ’s Alaa Elassar and Sarah-Grace Mankarious, the specially created capsules protected the fragile mummies “from the effects of humidity, especially … bacteria, fungi and insects.”

The decorated carriages were designed to resemble the boats used to transport ancient Egyptian pharaohs to their tombs upon their deaths. Per the New York Times’ Mona El-Naggar, the 45-minute procession—a “made-for-TV spectacle” organized in hopes of revitalizing the country’s tourism industry—sought to highlight Egypt’s rich history, with hundreds of participants wearing traditional outfits and some performers even riding on horse-drawn chariots.

Archaeologist Nigel Hetherington, who watched the broadcast from Cumbria, England, deemed the event “absolutely amazing.”

“When these mummies were moved to the museum in the first place after their discovery [in the late 1800s], of course we’ve got photographs and the rest of it, but it’s not the same as actually witnessing,” he tells Al Jazeera. “It’s truly a momentous occasion.”

The 22 pharaohs appeared in chronological order, with Seqenenre-Taa-II, a ruler who likely suffered a gruesome death on the battlefield in the 16th century B.C., leading the procession. The golden line-up also included well-known figures like Ramses II, dubbed Rameses the Great for leading Egypt into prosperity during the 13th century B.C., and Queen Hatshepsut, one of the few women to rule ancient Egypt in her own right. The parade closed with 12th-century B.C. pharaoh Ramses IX.

The multimillion-dollar move to the NMEC marked the culmination of months of preparation and promotion. According to CBS News’ Ahmed Shawkat, 20 of the mummies will be displayed at the new museum, while 2 will be placed in storage.

“In a way, people are very proud of what they are seeing,” says Salima Ikram, an Egyptologist at the American University in Cairo, to Al Jazeera. “So although there was great expense, I think the return may be quite good in the long run.”

Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi inaugurated the museum’s main hall a few hours before the mummies’ arrival. The NMEC, an enormous, state-of-the-art facility established with support from Unesco, opened to visitors the following day.

The rulers themselves will undergo 15 days of laboratory restoration before making their public debut on April 18. Per CNN, the mummies will be displayed in cases with enhanced temperature and humidity control.

The mummies were transported in boat-like vehicles that emulated the vessels used to convey ancient Egyptian pharaohs to their tombs. (Photo by Jonathan Rashad / Getty Images)

Writing on Twitter, Sisi praised the parade as “new evidence of the greatness of this people, the guardian of this unique civilization extending into the depths of history.”

Locals, however, shared a different view of the spectacle: As the Times points out, some Cairo residents who attempted to attend the event were turned away by security. The government also erected barriers throughout the city to prevent virtual viewers from catching a glimpse of impoverished areas along the parade route.

“There is a tendency to try to show a better picture instead of fixing the existing reality,” urban planner Ahmed Zaazaa tells the Times. “The government says they are making reforms, but the vast majority of people in Cairo who live in working-class neighborhoods are excluded.”

Egypt’s tourism industry has shrunk in recent years due to political conflict and the Covid-19 pandemic. According to Reuters, the number of tourists who visited the country dropped from 13.1 million in 2019 to 3.5 million in 2020.

In addition to organizing the Pharaohs’ Golden Parade, the Egyptian government has sought to attract visitors by unveiling a spate of archaeological findings. Recently announced discoveries include a 2,000-year-old mummy with a gold tongue, an Egyptian queen’s ornate tomb and traces of an early Christian community.


Tesla Stock

For a while, 2019 had not been kind to Tesla&aposs stock. After opening at $310.12 on Jan. 1 and reaching a high of $347.31, Tesla&aposs stock price has dropped considerably. It reached a year-to-date low of $178.97 in June.

It was, in many ways, a difficult year for the company. It has lost several significant members of its executive team, including its CTO JB Straubel, CFO Deepak Ahuja and General Counsel Dane Butswinkas. Tesla began 2019 by laying off 7% of its employees and publicly contemplated closing most of its dealerships and laying off its retail employees in March.

This led to conflicting forecasts for Tesla stock. Some analysts believed that the company has a pattern of cultural, leadership and technical problems that will cause more serious problems in the long run. Others believed that the stock&aposs dip reflects an overreaction by the market to short-term news, which has priced the company based more on Elon Musk&aposs Twitter account than its actual value.

But Tesla&aposs stock began rebounding in the second half of 2019 after hitting those lows. After spending several months over $200, reports of much stronger-than-expected Q3 earnings sent the stock price surging. Share prices continued to rise through the remainder of 2019 as things continued to go well for the company - orders for its upcoming Cybertruck, Musk&aposs defamation trial ending in his favor - and closed 2019 at over $418 per share.

That momentum got even stronger in 2020, and as reports of yet another massively profitable quarter came in, shares surged to unprecedented levels. By Feb. 4, Tesla had surpassed a stock price of $900 - more than double its price when the year started just a month previously.


The History of 10 Downing Street

10 Downing Street in London has one of the most photographed front doors in Britain. Since 1735, it has been the official residence of the Prime Minister of Great Britain. Prime Ministers and world leaders have been photographed outside this famous door and important announcements have been made to the nation from here.

Some of the most famous British political leaders have lived and worked in Number 10, including Robert Walpole, William Gladstone, Benjamin Disraeli, David Lloyd George, Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher.

Sir Winston Churchill outside Number 10

So how did this rather modest looking building become home to the head of the British government? From the outside it appears quite unremarkable but a little like Dr Who’s TARDIS, it is actually much bigger than it appears.

A maze of corridors and passages join 10 Downing Street to a bigger and grander building just behind it. It also spreads out to the left of the front door, taking over much of 12 Downing Street which is itself connected by a corridor to 11 Downing Street, the official residence of the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The remaining buildings on Downing Street are government offices.

Westminster, where Downing Street is situated, has always been an important district in London. King Canute built a palace in the area and Edward the Confessor had a great abbey constructed nearby. It was however Henry VIII who created Whitehall Palace as a huge ‘entertainment complex’. It included real tennis courts, a tiltyard for jousting, a bowling green and a cockpit. Whitehall Palace was the official residence of Tudor and Stuart monarchs until it burned down in 1698. Today’s Downing Street is situated on the edge of the Palace site, just a few minutes’ walk from the Houses of Parliament.

Prime Minister Tony Blair and US Vice President Dick Cheney, 2002

The first building on the site of Number 10 dates from the Middle Ages and was a brewery owned by the Abbey of Abingdon, which by the early 16th century had fallen into disuse.

The first house known to have been built on the site was leased to Sir Thomas Knyvet in 1581 by Queen Elizabeth I. One of the Queen’s favourites, his main claim to fame was his role in the arrest of Guy Fawkes and the discovery of the Gunpowder plot in 1605.

After the death of Sir Knyvet and his wife, the building passed to their niece, Elizabeth Hampden and the house became known as Hampden House.

The building then came into the possession of George Downing. A rather unpleasant individual (Samuel Pepys described him as a “perfidious rogue”) he was nonetheless responsible for the street, its name and for the buildings we know today.

In 1682 the renowned architect Sir Christopher Wren was employed to redesign the houses. Between 1682 and 1684, a cul-de-sac of 15 to 20 terraced houses was built, now called Downing Street.

Number 10 Downing Street had several distinguished residents between 1688 and the early 1730s when King George II presented it to Sir Robert Walpole, then First Lord of the Treasury and effectively the first Prime Minister. Walpole refused to accept the property as a personal gift. Instead, he asked the king to make it available to him as an official residence, thus starting the tradition that continues today.

Walpole took up residence on 22nd September 1735. The Walpoles used their new residence as a place to entertain important guests, including royalty, politicians, writers and soldiers.

However by the turn of the 19th century, although Number 10 continued to serve as the Prime Minister’s office, it was no longer used as a home, as most prime ministers preferred to live in their own, more comfortable townhouses.

By the time Benjamin Disraeli became Prime Minister in 1868, the house was in poor shape. No-one had lived there for 30 years and Disraeli described it as “dingy and decaying”.

Cabinet Room, 10 Downing Street, 1927

The late 19th and early 20th centuries saw 10 Downing Street renovated and transformed into a grand residence with modern facilities. Disraeli persuaded the state to pay for the redecoration of the public rooms, although he paid for the refurbishment of the private rooms himself. He had the first bath with hot and cold water in the house installed for the sum of £150.3s.6d.

During William Gladstone’s occupancy in 1884, electric lighting was fitted and the first telephones were installed. Central heating was installed in 1937 and the attic rooms converted into a flat for the Prime Minister.

Only one former Prime Minister has ever died at Number 10: Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman, Prime Minister from 1905 until his resignation on April 3 1908. He was too ill to be moved from the building and died 19 days later.

Samantha Cameron and First Lady Michelle Obama chat before having tea in the private residence at Downing Street.

Following the resignation of David Cameron on 24th June 2016, Theresa May became the second female Prime Minister of Britain, taking office on 13th July.


Daniels & Fisher bldg.

The Library has many books and photographs of Denver’s historic buildings as well as archival manuscript collections including:

Denver Landmark Commission Records 1973-2010 C MSS WH887
​Collection contains binders with survey worksheets and photographs of individual structures gathered during architectural field surveys accompanying data includes information about the neighborhoods and the survey process, staff reports, applications for design review and evaluations, meeting minutes, agendas, clippings, and audiocassette recordings of meetings.

Denver Landmark Preservation
Many resources for researching historic properties, including lists of Denver Landmarks and Historic Districts, information on tax credits for historic property owners, and tips on preserving and maintaining a historic building.

History Colorado’s Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation (OAHP)
A great variety of useful information for those researching historic buildings and neighborhoods, including State and National Registers of Historic Places, Architecture and Engineering Guides, and guides to Federal and state tax incentives for historic preservation projects.

Historic Buildings Map
OAHP and the Creating Communities Project have combined resources to highlight different historic buildings within the boundaries of specific neighborhoods. These buildings are just a small sample of the historic buildings located throughout the Denver area.

OAHP Historic Contexts and Survey Reports
A variety of documents with historic context information covering various neighborhoods, municipalities and regions across Colorado. Reports include: Historic Residential Subdivisions of Metropolitan Denver 1940-1965, Commercial Resources of the East Colfax Avenue Corridor, Railroads in Colorado 1858-1948, Rural School Buildings in Colorado, and U.S. Post Offices in Colorado.

Historic Denver
A wonderful source for anything related to historic districts, buildings, architects, etc., including information on tax credits, easements, tips on maintaining and restoring historic homes, etc. Click on "Resources" and be sure to see the Virtual Tours of Denver's Historic Buildings. They also publish the invaluable Historic Denver Guide Series which is available in the Building and Neighborhood History section of the Western History/Genealogy Department.

Discover Denver
A building and neighborhood survey meant to identify historic and architecturally significant structures citywide. Historic Denver, Inc. leads this collaborative project in partnership with the City and County of Denver and History Colorado. The survey will gather information using public records, neighborhood canvassing, academic research, and tips from the public. Findings from the survey will then be accessible online so that everyone can learn about Denver’s past — building by building.

Colorado Preservation, Inc.
Includes information on Cultural Resources Surveys, the Endangered Places Program, Preservation Projects. Sponsors the “Saving Places Conference,” a great annual meeting of preservation programs and workshops.

Electronic Library of Colorado Architecture, Landscape and Planning
Documents a wide array of sites, structures, and projects, including those which are significant because they have received awards from professional design and planning associations, or because they appear on state and national registers of historic places.

National Park Service - How to Preserve Historic Properties
Provides technical assistance and guidance on the preservation of historic properties.

Pres 101
A rich site on the basics of historic preservation from History Colorado.

Explore the history of selected Denver neighborhoods in our Neighborhood History Guides exhibit.


Chicago Street Name Changes

Here is a guide to some Chicago street name changes. This info was compiled by Roy G. Benedict in 1979, using the card file in the Municipal Library of Chicago. The dates shown are the dates of the ordinances by authority of which the street names were changed. This is list is by no means exhaustive. The two ordinances of 1913 resulted in over 500 street name changes.


Ann Street 1200W
Changed to Racine Avenue

Armitage Avenue 2000N
Between Western Avenue and Ashland Avenue
Armitage Road changed to Armitage Avenue

Between Racine Avenue and Clark Street
Center Street changed 7 Oct 1936 to Armitage Avenue

Armitage Road 2000N
Between Western Avenue and Ashland Avenue
Armitage Road changed to Armitage Avenue

Ash Street 6532W
Ash Street changed 14 April 1913 to Nasby Avenue, changed 30 July 1913 to Neenah Avenue

Austin Avenue 6000W
Austin Avenue changed to Austin Blvd on 14 Oct 1919 & 17 Nov 1919

Austin Boulevard 6000W
Austin Avenue changed to Austin Blvd on 14 Oct 1919 & 17 Nov 1919

Avenue K 3624E
Between 96th Street and south city limits
Ewing Avenue changed 14 January 1895 to Avenue K, changed 15 March 1897 to Ewing Avenue

Avenue O 3432E
The Strand changed 1 July 1936 to Avenue O

Baltimore Avenue 2808 E at 8300S to 3124W at 13515S
Erie Avenue changed to Baltimore Avenue 14 April 1913

Blackstone Avenue 1436E
Between 60th Street and 61st Street
South Park Ct changed 16 April 1894 to Washington Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Blackstone Avenue

Bond Avenue 2400E
Between 71st Street and 83rd Place
Bond Avenue changed 15 October 1940 to South Shore Drive

Bosworth Avenue 1530W
Cooper Street changed 19 March 1917 to Bosworth Avenue

Brandon Avenue 3200E
Ontario Avenue changed 14 April 1913 to Brandon Avenue

Broadway Avenue 600W at 2800N to 1200W at 6358N
Evanston Avenue changed 30 July 1913 to Broadway Avenue
Portion collinear with Halsted Street
Halsted Street changed 27 May 1895 to Clarendon Ave., changed 1 November 1915 to Broadway Ave.

Burley Avenue 3234 E
Superior Avenue changed 30 July 1913 to Burley Avenue

Center Street 2000W
Between Racine Avenue and Clark Street
Center Street changed 7 Oct 1936 to Armitage Avenue

Centre Avenue 1200W
Between Madison Street and 123rd Street
Centre Avenue changed 14 April 1913 to Racine Avenue

Cermak Road 2200S
22nd Street changed 15 March 1933 to Cermak Road

Cicero Avenue 4800W
Between north city limits and North Avenue
Jefferson Avenue changed 14 January 1895 to 48th Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Hyman Avenue, changed 30 July 1913 to Cicero Avenue

Between North Avenue and 12th Street (Roosevelt Road)
48th Street, changed 14 January 1895 to 48th Avenue Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Hyman Avenue, changed 30 July 1913 to Cicero Avenue

Between 51st Street and 65th Street
48th Avenue changed 1 November 1895 to Cicero Avenue

Clarendon Avenue 600W at 2800N to 1200W at 6358N
Only the portion collinear with Halsted Street (900W)
Halsted Street changed 27 May 1895 to Clarendon Ave., changed 1 November 1915 to Broadway Ave.

Clybourne Place 1900N
Clybourn Place changed 14 April 1913 to Cortland Street

Colorado Avenue 1S at 2800W to 912S at 4948W
Between Crawford Avenue (Pulaski Road) and Madison Street
Colorado Avenue changed 7 June 1920 to Fifth Avenue

Commercial Avenue 2400E at 7100S to 2934E at 13258S
Between 79th Street and 83rd Street
Commercial Avenue changed 14 January 1895 to Exchange Avenue

Between 83rd Street and 175 feet north of 83rd Place
Commercial Avenue changed 12 April 1961 to Exchange Avenue

Cooper Street 1530W
Cooper Street changed 19 March 1917 to Bosworth Avenue

Cortland Street 1900N
Clybourn Place changed 14 April 1913 to Cortland Street

Crawford Avenue 4000W
Crawford Avenue changed 14 January 1895 to 40th Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Crawford Avenue, changed 12 December 1933 to Pulaski Road

Damen Avenue 2000W
Robey Street changed 15 June 1927 to Damen Avenue

Dewey Court 2700N
Dewey Court changed 14 January 1895 to Dewey Place, changed 1 July 1936 to Marianna Street, changed 7 October 1936 to Schubert Avenue

Dewey Place 2700N
Dewey Court changed 14 January 1895 to Dewey Place, changed 1 July 1936 to Marianna Street, changed 7 October 1936 to Schubert Avenue

Dickens Avenue 2100N
Garfield Avenue changed 7 October 1936 to Dickens Avenue

Dole Avenue 2632N
Huck Court changed to Sherman Place, changed 30 July 1913 to Dole Avenue, changed 1 July 1913 to Drummond Place

Dorchester Avenue 1400E
Madison Avenue changed 14 April 1913 to Dorchester Avenue

Drummond Place 2632N
Huck Court changed to Sherman Place, changed 30 July 1913 to Dole Avenue, changed 1 July 1913 to Drummond Place

Erie Avenue 2808 E at 8300S to 3124W at 13515S
Erie Avenue changed to Baltimore Avenue 14 April 1913

Evanston Avenue 600W at 2800N to 1200W at 6358N
Evanston Avenue changed 30 July 1913 to Broadway Avenue

Ewing Avenue 3338E at 9200S 3430S to 12040S
Between 96th Street and south city limits
Ewing Avenue changed 14 January 1895 to Avenue K, changed 15 March 1897 to Ewing Avenue

Exchange Avenue 4136S
Between 71st Street and 79th Street
Railroad Avenue changed 23 October 1911 to South Shore Avenue, changed 28 March 1917 to Exchange Avenue

Between 79th Street and 83rd Street
Commercial Avenue changed 14 January 1895 to Exchange Avenue

Between 83rd Street and 175 feet north of 83rd Place
Commercial Avenue changed 12 April 1961 to Exchange Avenue

Fifth Avenue 1S at 2800W to 912S at 4948W
Between Crawford Avenue (Pulaski Road) and Madison Street
Colorado Avenue changed 7 June 1920 to Fifth Avenue

Fifth Avenue 200W
Between Chicago Avenue and Kinzie Street
Wisconsin Street changed to Wells Street, changed 7 October 1970 or 17 October 1870 to Fifth Avenue, changed 13 December 1916 to Wells Street

Garfield Avenue 2100N
Garfield Avenue changed 7 October 1936 to Dickens Avenue

Grace Avenue
Harper Avenue (?)

Graceland Avenue 4000N
Between Clark Street and Lakefront
Irving Park Avenue changed 27 May 1895 to Graceland Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Irving Park Boulevard, changed 3 March 1937 to Irving Park Road

Grand Avenue 500 N
Between Western Avenue and the River
Indiana Street changed 23 July 1914 to Grand Avenue

Between the River and the Lakefront
Indiana Street changed 1913 to Grand Avenue

Grand Boulevard 344E at 2201S to 400E at 13456S
Grand Boulevard changed 1923 to South Park Avenue, changed 15 April 1940, 24 September 1940 and 8 October 1940 to South Parkway, changed 31 July 1968 to Martin Luther King Drive

Halsted Street 800W
Portion collinear with Broadway Avenue
Halsted Street changed 27 May 1895 to Clarendon Ave., changed 1 November 1915 to Broadway Avenue

Harper Avenue 1501E
Between 50th Street and 57th Street
Jefferson Avenue changed 14 April 1913 to Rosalie Avenue, changed 16 October 1913 to Harper Avenue

Between 62nd Street and Jackson Park Terrace (65th Street)
Washington Avenue changed 11 February 1895 to Jefferson Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Rosalie Avenue, changed 6 October 1913 to Harper Avenue

Between 77th Street and 94th Place
Washington Avenue changed 14 January 1895 to Jefferson Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Rosalie Avenue, changed 6 October 1913 to Harper Avenue

Hubbard Street 430N
Michigan Street changed 14 April 1913 to Austin Avenue, changed 2 March 1936 and 7 October 1936 to Hubbard Street

Huck Court 2632N
Huck Court changed to Sherman Place, changed 30 July 1913 to Dole Avenue, changed 1 July 1913 to Drummond Place

Hunting Street 4400W
Hunting Avenue and 44th Street changed 14 January 1895 to 44th Avenue, changed 4 April 1913 and 30 July 1913 to Kostner Avenue

Hyman Avenue 4800W
Between north city limits and North Avenue
Jefferson Avenue changed 14 January 1895 to 48th Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Hyman Avenue, changed 30 July 1913 to Cicero Avenue

Between North Avenue and 12th Street (Roosevelt Road)
48th Street, changed 14 January 1895 to 48th Avenue Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Hyman Avenue, changed 30 July 1913 to Cicero Avenue

Indiana Boulevard 3600E at 10000S to 4044E at 10576S
Indiana Boulevard changed 14 January 1895 to Indianapolis Avenue

Indiana Street 500N
Between Western Avenue and the River
Indiana Street changed 23 July 1914 to Grand Avenue

Between the River and the Lakefront
Indiana Street changed 1913 to Grand Avenue

Indianapolis Avenue 3600E at 10000S to 4044E at 10576S
Indiana Boulevard changed 14 January 1895 to Indianapolis Avenue

Irving Park Avenue 4000N
Between west city limits and Western Avenue
Irving Park Boulevard changed 14 January 1895 to Irving Park Avenue, changed 27 May 1895 to Irving Park Boulevard, changed 3 March 1937 to Irving Park Road

Between Western Avenue and Clark Street
Irving Park Avenue changed 27 May 1895 to Irving Park Boulevard, changed 3 March 1937 to Irving Park Road

Between Clark Street and Lakefront
Irving Park Avenue changed 27 May 1895 to Graceland Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Irving Park Boulevard, changed 3 March 1937 to Irving Park Road

Irving Park Boulevard 4000N
Between west city limits and Western Avenue
Irving Park Boulevard changed 14 January 1895 to Irving Park Avenue, changed 27 May 1895 to Irving Park Boulevard, changed 3 March 1937 to Irving Park Road

Between Western Avenue and Clark Street
Irving Park Avenue changed 27 May 1895 to Irving Park Boulevard, changed 3 March 1937 to Irving Park Road

Between Clark Street and Lakefront
Irving Park Avenue changed 27 May 1895 to Graceland Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Irving Park Boulevard, changed 3 March 1937 to Irving Park Road

Irving Park Road 4000N
Between west city limits and Western Avenue
Irving Park Boulevard changed 14 January 1895 to Irving Park Avenue, changed 27 May 1895 to Irving Park Boulevard, changed 3 March 1937 to Irving Park Road

Between Western Avenue and Clark Street
Irving Park Avenue changed 27 May 1895 to Irving Park Boulevard, changed 3 March 1937 to Irving Park Road

Between Clark Street and Lakefront
Irving Park Avenue changed 27 May 1895 to Graceland Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Irving Park Boulevard, changed 3 March 1937 to Irving Park Road

Jackson Park Avenue 1600E
Stony Island Avenue changed 20 May 1901 to Jackson Park Avenue, changed 4 November 1907 to Stony Island Avenue

Jefferson Avenue 4800W
Between north city limits and North Avenue
Jefferson Avenue changed 14 January 1895 to 48th Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Hyman Avenue, changed 30 July 1913 to Cicero Avenue

Between 50th Street and 57th Street
Jefferson Avenue changed 14 April 1913 to Rosalie Avenue, changed 16 October 1913 to Harper Avenue

Juniata Avenue 2400E
Between 67th Street and 71st Street
Juniata Avenue changed 25 February 1892 to Yates Avenue, changed 15 October 1940 to South Shore Drive

Karlov Avenue 4100W
41st Avenue changed 30 July 1913 to Karlov Avenue

Kenton Avenue 4600W
46th Street changed 14 January 1895 to 46th Avenue, changed 30 July 1913 to Kenton Avenue

Knox Avenue 4700W
Stewart Avenue changed 14 January 1895 to 46th Court changed 30 July 1913 to Knox Avenue

Kostner Avenue 4400W
Hunting Avenue and 44th Street changed 14 January 1895 to 44th Avenue, changed 4 April 1913 and 30 July 1913 to Kostner Avenue

Lake Park Avenue 428E at 2400S to 1517E at 5658S
Between 47th Street and 57th Street
Lake Avenue changed 14 April 1913 to Lake Park Avenue

Between 71st Street and Cheltenham Place
Lake Avenue changed 30 July 1913 to Lake Park Avenue

Laramie Avenue 5300W
Between Chicago & North Western Ry and Madison Street
52nd Street changed to Robinson Avenue, changed to 52nd Avenue 14 April 1913 and 30 July 1913 to Laramie Avenue

Between Madison Street and 12th Street (Roosevelt Road)
52nd Avenue changed 14 April 1913 and 20 July 1913 to Laramie Avenue

Madison Avenue 1400E
Madison Avenue changed 14 April 1913 to Dorchester Avenue

Marianna Street 2700N
Dewey Court changed 14 January 1895 to Dewey Place, changed 1 July 1936 to Marianna Street, changed 7 October 1936 to Schubert Avenue

Martin Luther King Drive 344E at 2201S to 400E at 13456S
Diagonal portion known as Silverton Way
Between 29th Street and 51st Street

Grand Boulevard changed 1923 to South Park Avenue, changed 15 April 1940, 24 September 1940 and 8 October 1940 to South Parkway, changed 31 July 1968 to Martin Luther King Drive

Between 60th Street and south city limits
South Park Avenue changed 31 July 1968 to Martin Luther King Drive

Michigan Street 430N
Michigan Street changed 14 April 1913 to Austin Avenue, changed 2 March 1936 and 7 October 1936 to Hubbard Street

Nasby Avenue 6532W
Ash Street changed 14 April 1913 to Nasby Avenue, changed 30 July 1913 to Neenah Avenue

Neenah Avenue 6532W
Ash Street changed 14 April 1913 to Nasby Avenue, changed 30 July 1913 to Neenah Avenue

Normandy Avenue 6700W
67th Avenue changed 14 April 1913 to Normandy Avenue

Ontario Avenue 3200E
Ontario Avenue changed 14 April 1913 to Brandon Avenue

Pulaski Road 4000 W
Crawford Avenue changed 14 January 1895 to 40th Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Crawford Avenue, changed 12 December 1933 to Pulaski Road

Racine Avenue 1200W
Between Madison Street and 123rd Street
Centre Avenue changed 14 April 1913 to Racine Avenue

Railroad Avenue 7100S to 2934E at 13258S
Between 71st Street and 79th Street
Railroad Avenue changed 23 October 1911 to South Shore Avenue, changed 28 March 1917 to Exchange Avenue

Robey Street 2000W
Robey Street changed 15 June 1927 to Damen Avenue

Robinson Avenue 5300W
Between Chicago & North Western Ry and Madison Street
52nd Street changed to Robinson Avenue, changed to 52nd Avenue 14 April 1913 and 30 July 1913 to Laramie Avenue

Roosevelt Road 1200S
12th Street changed 26 May 1919, 9 June 1919 and 14 July 1919 to Roosevelt Road,

Rosalie Avenue 1501E
Between 50th Street and 57th Street
Jefferson Avenue changed 14 April 1913 to Rosalie Avenue, changed 16 October 1913 to Harper Avenue

Between 62nd Street and Jackson Park Terrace (65th Street)
Washington Avenue changed 11 February 1895 to Jefferson Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Rosalie Avenue, changed 6 October 1913 to Harper Avenue

Between77th Street and 94th Place
Washington Avenue changed 14 January 1895 to Jefferson Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Rosalie Avenue, changed 6 October 1913 to Harper Avenue

Schubert Avenue 2700N
Dewey Court changed 14 January 1895 to Dewey Place, changed 1 July 1936 to Marianna Street, changed 7 October 1936 to Schubert Avenue

Sherman Place 2632N
Huck Court changed to Sherman Place, changed 30 July 1913 to Dole Avenue, changed 1 July 1913 to Drummond Place

Silverton Way 344E at 2201S to 400E at 13456S
Diagonal portion of South Park Avenue
Silverton Way changed 22 March 1961 to South Park Avenue, changed 31 July 1968 to Martin Luther King Drive

South Park Avenue 344E at 2201S 400E at 13456S
Diagonal portion known as Silverton Way
Between 29th Street and 51st Street

Grand Boulevard changed 1923 to South Park Avenue, changed 15 April 1940, 24 September 1940 and 8 October 1940 to South Parkway, changed 31 July 1968 to Martin Luther King Drive

Between 60th Street and south city limits
South Park Avenue changed 31 July 1968 to Martin Luther King Drive

South Park Court 1436E
Between 60th Street and 61st Street
South Park Ct changed 16 April 1894 to Washington Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Blackstone Avenue

South Parkway 344E at 2201S 400E at 13456S
Grand Boulevard changed 1923 to South Park Avenue, changed 15 April 1940, 24 September 1940 and 8 October 1940 to South Parkway, changed 31 July 1968 to Martin Luther King Drive

South Shore Avenue 4136S
Between 71st Street and 79th Street
Railroad Avenue changed 23 October 1911 to South Shore Avenue, changed 28 March 1917 to Exchange Avenue

South Shore Drive 7100S
Between 67th Street and 71st Street
Juniata Avenue changed 25 February 1892 to Yates Avenue, changed 15 October 1940 to South Shore Drive

Portion collinear with 71st Street
71st Street changed 24 September 1940 0r 15 October 1940 to South Shore Drive

Between 71st Street and 83rd Place
Bond Avenue changed 15 October 1940 to South Shore Drive

Stewart Avenue 4632W
Stewart Avenue changed 14 January 1895 to 46th Court changed 30 July 1913 to Knox Avenue

Stony Island Avenue 1600E
Stony Island Avenue changed 20 May 1901 to Jackson Park Avenue, changed 4 November 1907 to Stony Island Avenue

The Strand 3432E
The Strand changed 1 July 1936 to Avenue O

Superior Avenue 3234E
Superior Avenue changed 30 July 1913 to Burley Avenue

Washington Avenue 1436E
Between 60th Street and 61st Street
South Park Ct changed 16 April 1894 to Washington Avenue, changed 14 April 1913 to Blackstone Avenue

Wells Street 200W
Between Chicago Avenue and Kinzie Street
Wisconsin Street changed to Wells Street, changed 7 October 1970 or 17 October 1870 to Fifth Avenue, changed 13 December 1916 to Wells Street

Between the River and 59th Street
Fifth Avenue changed 14 April 1913 to Wells Street, changed 30 July 1913 to Fifth Avenue, changed 13 December 1916 to Wells Street

Wisconsin Street 200W
Between Chicago Avenue and Kinzie Street
Wisconsin Street changed to Wells Street, changed 7 October 1970 or 17 October 1870 to Fifth Avenue, changed 13 December 1916 to Wells Street

Yates Avenue 2400E
Between 67th Street and 71st Street
Juniata Avenue changed 25 February 1892 to Yates Avenue, changed 15 October 1940 to South Shore Drive

The following street names were changed per the ordinances of 14 April and 30 July 1913, effective 15 August 1913

60th Avenue to Maynard Avenue
60th Court to McVicker Avenue
61st Avenue to Meade Avenue
61st Court to Moody Avenue
62nd Avenue to Melvina Avenue
62nd Court to Merrimac Avenue
63rd Avenue to Mobile Avenue
63rd Court to Mulligan Avenue
64th Avenue to Narragansett Avenue
64th Court to Nagle Avenue
65th Avenue to Natchez Avenue
65th Court to Neenah Avenue
65th Street to Ardmore Avenue
66th Avenue to Nashville Avenue
66th Court to Natoma Avenue
67th Avenue to Normandy Avenue
67th Court to Ronan Avenue
68th Avenue to Oak Park Avenue
68th Court to Newcastle Avenue
69th Avenue to Newfield Avenue
69th Avenue to Newland Avenue
70th Avenue to Sayre Avenue
70th Court to to Nordica Avenue
71st Avenue to Nottingham Avenue
71st Court to Neva Avenue
72nd Avenue to Harlem Avenue

Photo: Bernice White standing on ladder next to a street sign for Adams Street and Cicero Avenue. Others are Alderman John S. Clark, William M. Breckenridge, and Peter M. Kelly
DN-0079731, Chicago Daily News negatives collection, Chicago History Museum.

Comments

Rees Street, which is now Evergreen. I don’t know when the name changed, but a map of Goose Island you have elsewhere on this site, which supposedly is from a 1930 newspaper, still labeled the stub on Goose Island as Rees.

There was a street named Park. What is the name of that street now?

Was May Street ever called or changed from Wall Street in 1915?

Where was 7352 North Parkhurst Avenue?

Not sure how far back this list goes, but sometime in the mid-19th century, Ashland Avenue was called Reuben Street.

What was the procedure to change a street name? For example, when South Park was changed to ML King Dr, did everyone have to change their drivers licenses right away or was there a phase-in period?

What happened to South Curtis Street? It is in the 1880 census, and seems to be near West Randolph. I have seen it in various google searches for info in the late 1800s but nothing after that.

I would be very grateful if someone know the present name of the former Stevenson Street (1900), situated in the Hyde Park area ?

Does anyone know when Auburn at 3300 South was changed to Lituania?

In response to Christina S: There was a Stephenson Street just south of 86th St that was changed to Champlain Ave.


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