Swasey I DD-273 - History

Swasey I DD-273 - History

Swasey I DD-273

Swasey I(DD-273: dp. 1,216; 1. 314'4; b. 30'11; dr. 9'4; s 34+ k.; cpl. 122; a. 4 4", 1 3", 12 21" tt.; cl. Clemoon)The first Swasey (DD-273) was laid down on 27 August 1918 by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp., Squantum, Mass.; launched on 7 May 1919; sponsored by Miss Mary L. Swasey; and commissioned on 8 August 1919.Swasey was assigned to the Pacific Fleet and, after completing fitting out and sailing to the west coast, arrived at Pearl Harbor in the fall of 1919. She served there until the summer of 1922 when she returned to San Diego. Swasey was decommissioned at San Diego on 10 June 1922 and assigned to the reserve fleet for the next 17 years. Swasey was reactivated on 18 December 1939 and, after an overhaul and sea trials, transferred to Great Britain on 26 November 1940. Swasey was struck from the Navy list on 8 January 1941.


USS Swasey (DD-273)

Після введення до строю «Свейсі» був включений до складу Тихоокеанського флоту і, завершивши підготовку та відпливши до західного узбережжя, восени 1919 року прибув до Перл-Гарбора. Корабель служив тут до літа 1922 року, коли повернувся до Сан-Дієго, Каліфорнія.

10 червня 1922 року «Свейсі» був виведений зі складу сил флоту та включений до резерву ВМС на наступні 17 років. 18 грудня 1939 року есмінець знову ввели до флоту і після капітального ремонту та морських випробувань — 26 листопада 1940 року передали Великій Британії у відповідності до Угоди «есмінці в обмін на бази».

1941 Редагувати

З січня до травня 1941 року корабель виконував завдання із супроводу конвоїв у складі 8-ї ескортної групи, до якої входили есмінці «Вотчмен», «Сардонікс», «Скімітар», «Малькольм», корвети «Арабіс», «Вербена», «Вайолет», «Монкшуд», «Петунія», «Далія».

1942 Редагувати

У березні 1942 року «Свейсі» супроводжував з ескадреними міноносцями «Ньюпорт», «Бедсворт», «Кеппель», «Лімінгтон», «Волонтер», «Боудісіа», «Антілоуп» конвої у прибережній зоні.


Warner and Swasey Building

According to one website, it is one of Cleveland's most popular places for urban exploring. In a building where world wars were once won, young people now creep through dark hallways, clamber up rusted metal stairways, and walk carefully through debris-filled rooms.

Well, perhaps it's a bit of a stretch to say that wars were won in this building. But it is a fact that, in the long-vacant Warner & Swasey building at 5701 Carnegie Avenue, critical armament parts were once manufactured that helped the United States and its allies win two world wars during the twentieth century.

The five-story building made of reddish-brown stone was constructed over a six-year period from 1904 to 1910. It replaced the original Warner & Swasey building that had been erected on the site in the early 1880s. That was just shortly after Worcester Warner and Ambrose Swasey, two young New England machinists, had come to Cleveland to build a machine shop -- to Cleveland, because they thought Chicago was just too far west.

Warner & Swasey built telescopes and machine lathes in the new, as well as the old, building on Carnegie Avenue. And in wartime, when the company built those armament parts that helped America win two world wars, thousands of Clevelanders worked there. They built parts for tommy guns in World War I. And in World War II, when 7000 Clevelanders worked for Warner & Swasey, they built parts for planes, ships and tanks.

From World War I, through World War II, and into the 1950s and the 1960s, the building on Carnegie Avenue was one of Cleveland's most important work places. People talked about Warner & Swasey in the same breath and in the same way that they talked about the city's other big employers, like Republic Steel, TRW, and Ford Motors. But then the building on Carnegie Avenue began its downward slide, much like the City of Cleveland did in the same period. In the end it was a victim of high technology, and when it closed its doors for good in 1985, only a few hundred employees were still left to be sent elsewhere.

Almost three decades have passed since Warner & Swasey left Cleveland. Its iconic early twentieth century industrial building is now owned by the City of Cleveland, which is looking to put it to a new use. In 1988, the County had considered the building as a possible site for its Department of Human Services and Child Support Enforcement Agency. That fell through. In 1992, Cleveland, which was deeded the building in the prior year, talked about making it the Charles V. Carr municipal center. It never happened. And in 2010 another proposal was put on the table. The Geis brothers, sons of German immigrants who came to Cleveland in the 1960s, proposed to convert the building into a high tech office, lab and manufacturing facility. We'll see. Their proposal has been pending for three years.

In the meantime, the Warner & Swasey building at 5701 Carnegie Avenue continues to awe the young urban explorers who visit it. In 2019, the buildng was added to the National Register of Historic Places.


USS Swasey (DD 273) was named for him the ship was sponsored by Ms. Mary L. Swasey (relationship unspecified).

The "Register of Commissioned and Warrant Officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps" was published annually from 1815 through at least the 1970s it provided rank, command or station, and occasionally billet until the beginning of World War II when command/station was no longer included. Scanned copies were reviewed and data entered from the mid-1840s through 1922, when more-frequent Navy Directories were available.

The Navy Directory was a publication that provided information on the command, billet, and rank of every active and retired naval officer. Single editions have been found online from January 1915 and March 1918, and then from three to six editions per year from 1923 through 1940 the final edition is from April 1941.

The entries in both series of documents are sometimes cryptic and confusing. They are often inconsistent, even within an edition, with the name of commands this is especially true for aviation squadrons in the 1920s and early 1930s.

Alumni listed at the same command may or may not have had significant interactions they could have shared a stateroom or workspace, stood many hours of watch together… or, especially at the larger commands, they might not have known each other at all. The information provides the opportunity to draw connections that are otherwise invisible, though, and gives a fuller view of the professional experiences of these alumni in Memorial Hall.


History

Warner and Swasey met as apprentices while working at Exeter Machine Works in Exeter, New Hampshire in 1866. 1 Both later left Exeter and relocated to Hartford, Connecticut where they worked for Pratt & Whitney, a machine tool manufacturers. Warner became in charge of an assembly floor while Swasey became a foreman of the gear-cutting department. 2 At Pratt & Whitney, Swasey invented the epicycloidal milling machine for cutting true theoretical curves for the milling cutters in use for cutting gears. Their works were exhibited at the Philadelphia Exposition in 1876. 22

In May 1880, Warner and Swasey resigned from Pratt & Whitney to start a machine tool manufacturer. 2 The pair moved to Chicago 11 but found the city to be lacking in experienced machinists. 3 In March 1881, the pair settled on Cleveland, Ohio along Mason Street (later renamed Carnegie Avenue) and the Cleveland & Pittsburgh Railway, erecting a three-story brick building, 100 feet by 45 feet in size. 11 Warner and Swasey needed to rapidly start up for they had gained an impressive order of 130 machines for the new works of the Joel Hayden Brass Company in Lorain.

The partners won medals for their lathes at the Paris World Exposition in 1889 and 1893. 22

For the next 20 years, Warner and Swasey worked without a formal corporate agreement, producing lathes, milling machines, and telescopes. 4 11

20th Century

Swasey and Warner reorganized the company under the name of The Warner & Swasey Company in 1900. 5 The new company began to place more emphasis on the production of turret lathes, which were very profitable. The company was quick to develop lathes for the plumbing industry to meet the demands for indoor fixtures. 22 Later uses included early automobiles, farm machinery and airplanes.

In 1904, a five-story addition was built to the west of the original structure. 22 The original building was demolished in 1908 to make room for a five-story extension of the circa 1904 structure. Subsequent additions were made later, including the south side of Carnegie Avenue, encompassing 22 acres and 950,000 square feet.

By 1928, Warner & Swasey was the world’s largest manufacturer of such turret lathes and other implements. 8

During World War I and World War II, the production areas of Warner & Swasey were converted to manufacture solely turret lathes, playing prominent roles in both wars. 7 8 9 An addition constructed in 1941 at the corner of East 55th Street and Carnegie Avenue allowed for additional production lines. 22 By the end of World War II, Warner & Swasey employed nearly 7,000. 7 8 9

The company began to focus on construction and materials handling equipment, and textile machinery in the 1950’s. 8 13 It employed 2,000, many at its machine tool division plant along Carnegie Avenue, by 1965.

Warner & Swasey announced on January 17, 1968 that it would relocate its corporate headquarters from its machine tool division plant to a new complex at the University Circle Research Center. 12 It leased the entire third floor of a $3.5 million building at 1100 Cedar Avenue.

In February, the company founded its electronic products division to concentrate on electronic control systems and related equipment. 13 A month later, Warner & Swasey opened a new plant at 30300 Solon Industrial Parkway in Solon. It was it third major facility in the suburban city, joining the Research & Development Center. The new complex produced turning centers, a machine that shapes metal parts by holding and turning it rapidly against the edge of a cutting tool among other implements. 9

Consolidation

Competition from Japan and Taiwan began to erode the market share for Warner & Swasey by the 1970’s, causing the company financial distress. 9

To better compete against foreign competition, Warner & Swasey was acquired by the Bendix Automation in 1980 for $300 million, 19 becoming the Warner & Swasey Division. 14 Bendix consolidated the manufacturing, sales, service and technical departments of Warner & Swasey into its own and refocused the new division into developing high-tech and automated solutions for manufacturers.

One of its first releases was in 1983 with the WSC-8E7, a stand-alone and unmanned manufacturing system designed to fit within a factory, a bridge between stand alone turning machines and automated systems. It was one of three products to be released in the year. The company also revised a circa 1960 machine that had 132 gears and shafts into one integrated unit that had just six moving parts.

In August 1982, Bendix made a hostile takeover bid for Martin Marietta. It ended two months later when Allied took over Bendix, creating the Bendix division. Allied also acquired a 38% stake in Martin Marietta. 15

Warner & Swasey reported a sharp drop in profits in November. 20 In response, the division completed a survival plan that resulted in consolidated office space in its Carnegie Avenue plant. The company also moved some product lines to Japan, closed a small plant in Tennessee and began advertisment of its high-technology products. By the end of 1983, 31% of Warner & Swasey sales came from new products developed since 1982. 14

Allied agreed to sell the ailing Bendix division to Cross & Trecker in February 1984 for $74 million, creating the world’s largest machine tool company. 16 17 Additionally, Cross & Trecker acquired LaSalle Machine Tool from National Acme of Cleveland for $13 million. 17

Closure

Cross & Trecker, like Allied before it, suffered from flat orders, weak prices, and foreign competition. 17 A downturn in automobile manufacturing, which accounted for 40% of Cross & Trecker sales, caused financial pains for the company. A cost reduction program eliminated $12 million, but the company still showed a net loss of $2.9 million for the fourth quarter of 1986. It was a sharp contrast of net income of $2.6 million a year earlier. The company did spend record amounts in research and development for new product lines.

In June 1985, Cross & Trecker announced that it was moving its Turning Division operation to Solon from the Carnegie Avenue plant. 18 The Carnegie Avenue plant was far to large for its current operations. All 325 employees were offered positions at the new facility. By 1988, Cross & Trecker’s Carnegie Avenue operations employed 500. 9

The corporate offices of Warner & Swasey, later used for the Cross & Trecker’s Warner & Swasey Division, moved to Cross & Trecker’s corporate headquarters in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. 19 Some functions remained in Cleveland. In June 1989, the remaining offices relocated to the Warner & Swasey’s factory in Solon.

Cross & Trecker was then absorbed by Giddings & Lewis, a Wisconsin tool company. Giddings & Lewis closed the Solon factory in January 1992 in response to $100 million in losses from 1988 to 1991. 6 9 It left 250 unemployed. Giddings & Lewis blamed imports from oversea companies, which accounted for 70% of the domestic market, for the closure. 9

Reuse

In 1988, Cuyahoga County considered reusing the Warner & Swasey Carnegie Avenue facility for its Health and Human Services Department and a 408-cell county jail annex. The footprint of the building was found to be too inefficient. 21

The city of Cleveland, was deeded the property in 1991. It then proposed to convert the abandoned factory into a municipal center. 6 The idea never came to fruition, although the western section was reused as a garage for idled city vehicles.

In 2010, the city solicited proposals from developers to rehabilitate the Warner & Swasey complex. 10 A round of bidding led to a $1 sale agreement with Hemingway Development, a division of the Geis Companies. 6 10 Hemingway was interested in converting the buildings into a high-tech office, laboratory and manufacturing center.

The city put forth $35,000 towards an environmental study and plan 7 and began asbestos remediation at a cost of $1.3 million. 6 At the same time, the city secured commitments for up to $13 million in federal funds, in the form of a $10 million low-interest loan and a $3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The federal money, though, was tied to job creation. To acquire the maximum loan and grant package, the Hemingway Development project needed to create 360 jobs.

The asbestos remediation took longer than expected. 6 10 Coupled with a deteriorating commercial market and renovation costs that far exceeded expectations, Hemingway parted ways with the redevelopment project.

In January 2014, the city solicited proposals from developers for a second time due to a stronger real estate market. 10 It found little interest.


Pages

Telescope and dome designed and built by The Warner & Swasey Co. Black and white photograph of 36-inch reflecting telescope (Cassegrain type). Built in 1957 for public viewing and limited research, optics by Perkin-Elmer Corp., and Doctor Jason J. Nassau at the controls., "T-1622"

PART 5 - 1968

G-660 Is Introduced

In September 1968, the Gradall model G-660 was introduced. The design features of this excavator utilized many of the proven design features of the Model G-800. This model had vertical dig and the remote control of the truck carrier as a standard option. It also featured a boom design that provided for the fast change of attachments that was originally offered with the G-1000. This G-660 was the new core model for the product line following the success of the M-2460 and G-600.

The G-800 and G-1000 gave customers power and productivity not matched by the other competitive manufacturers of telescopic boom hydraulic excavators. And the growing versatility of job applications for the various Gradall models gave the product line a wider market than other manufacturers of hydraulic excavators.

The Model G-880 was introduced in 1972. It was a productive hydraulic excavator that gained much favor for industrial maintenance and underground mining. This machine was the platform for industrial work with special industrial design options for steel mill maintenance or scaling operations in underground mining.

The Model G-880SI would become the global standard for steel mill maintenance work. To better support and carry the crawler model G-660 with greater mobility, a new tractor-type crawler undercarriage was developed for introduction with the new G-880.

In April 1975, the Gradall Division introduced the Model G-440 with all the features of the proven G-660. The G-440 was designed primarily for the municipal service and small contractor markets.


By Type

2 A Used Warner & Swasey Square Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe Ref.#L630452 Model: 3470 Lot 51 Serial No. 1969602 New: 1964 Swing Over Bed Ways 20-1/2" Swing Over Cross Slide Carria.

WARNER & SWASEY 2SC M5060

Warner Swasey 2SC M5060 CNC Lathe, 2004- Chip Conveyor, 4 5/8" Bore, Fanuc Control

WARNER & SWASEY 3A

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

Warner Swasey 3A Turret Lathe, 1950s

WARNER & SWASEY 3A

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

Warner & Swasey 3A Saddle-type Turret Lathe (Lot 9 M-3500) with QC Tool Post QC Tool Post, 3-Jaw Power Chuck, Tooling

WARNER & SWASEY 3A M-3500

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

3 A Used Warner & Swasey Square Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe Ref.#L630471 Model: 3500 Lot 41 Serial No. 2014091 New: 1964 Swing Over Bed Ways 23-1/2" Swing Over Cross Slide Carriage 1.

WARNER & SWASEY 3A M-3500

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

3 A Used Warner & Swasey Square Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe Ref.#L630465 Model: 3500 Lot 9 Serial No. 1499463 New: 1955 Note: Machine Will Have Front & Rear Aprons And Rapid Traverse Bo.

WARNER & SWASEY 3A M-3500

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

3 A Used Warner & Swasey Square Head Saddle TypeTurret Lathe Ref.#L630447 Model: M-3500 Lot 830 Serial No. 2843503 New: 1979

WARNER & SWASEY 3A M-3500

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

3 A Used Warner & Swasey Square Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe Ref.#L630459 Model: 3500 lot 72 Serial No. 2420623 New: 1970 Swing Over Bed Ways 23-1/2" Swing Over Cross Slide Carria.

WARNER & SWASEY 3A M-3500

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

3 A Used Warner & Swasey Square Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe Ref.#L630435 Model: 3500 Lot 703 Serial No. 2668088 New: 1975 Swing Over Bed Ways 23-1/2" Swing Over Cross Slide Carriage .

WARNER & SWASEY 3A M-3500

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

3 A Used Warner & Swasey Square Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe Ref.#L630436 Model: 3500 Lot 61 Serial No. 2284296 New: 1968 Swing Over Bed Ways 23-1/2" Swing Over Cross Slide Carriage 1.

WARNER & SWASEY 3A M1950

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

Warner & Swasey 3-A M-1950 Lever Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe > Not under power - in storage

WARNER & SWASEY 4A

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

4 A Used Warner & Swasey Lever Head Saddle TypeTurret Lathe Ref.#L630410 Model: 4A -1500 Serial No. 1292163 New: 1953

WARNER & SWASEY 4A M-3550

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

4 A Used Warner & Swasey Square Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe Ref.#L630417 Model: 4A - 3550 Lot 870 Serial No. 3017927 New: 1981 Swing Over Bed Ways 28-1/4" Swing Over Cross Slide Carr.

WARNER & SWASEY 4A M-3550

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

4 A Used Warner & Swasey Square Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe Ref.#L630460 Model: 4A - 3550 Lot Serial No. 2056722 New: 1965 Swing Over Bed Ways 28-1/4" Swing Over Cross Slide Carr.

WARNER & SWASEY 4A M-3550

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

4 A Used Warner & Swasey Square Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe Ref.#L630437 Model: 4A - 3550 Lot 854 Serial No. 2896893 New: 1980

WARNER & SWASEY 4A M-3550

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

4 A Used Warner & Swasey Lever Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe Ref.#L630428 Model: 4A - Model 3550 Lot Serial No. 2287534 New: 1968

WARNER & SWASEY 4A M-3550

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

W & S 4A Long Bed Turret Lathe Check out this very nice 4A long bed turret lathe under power 9 1/4" spindle hole Cross slide turret 60 h.p. main motor 3 jaw chuck with power wrench

WARNER & SWASEY 4A M-3550

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

4 A Used Warner & Swasey Square Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe

WARNER & SWASEY 4A M-3550

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

WARNER & SWASEY 4A M-3550

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

4 A Used Warner & Swasey Square Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe Ref.#L630418 Model: 4A - 3550 Serial No. 2158095 New: 1966

WARNER & SWASEY 4A M-3550

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

4 A Used Warner & Swasey Square Head Saddle TypeTurret Lathe Stock Number: L630441 Warner & Swasey 4A - 3550 Lot 48 Serial No. 2331523 Age: 1960

WARNER & SWASEY 4A M-3550

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

Warner & Swasey Model 4A M-3550 Turret Lathe with 9.5" spindle bore Swing Over Bed Ways 28-1/4" Swing Over Cross Slide Carriage 22" Center Distance 65" Spindle Hole 9-1/4" Spindle Speeds 20 To 526 .

WARNER & SWASEY 4A MODEL 1500 LOT 132

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

4 A Used Warner & Swasey Lever Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe

WARNER & SWASEY 4A SQ. HEAD M-3550

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

WARNER & SWASEY 4A-3550

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

4 A Used Warner & Swasey Square Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe Ref.#L630467 Model: 4A - 3550 Lot 713 Serial No. 2669206 New: 1974

WARNER & SWASEY 4A-M1500

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

4 A Used Warner & Swasey Lever Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe Ref.#L630410 Model: 4A -1550 Serial No. 1292163 New: 1953

WARNER & SWASEY 4A-M1500

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

4 A Used Warner & Swasey Lever Head Saddle Type Turret Lathe Ref.#L630446 Model: 4A -1550 Lot 25 Serial No. 826364 New: 1945

WARNER & SWASEY 5A-M3600

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

WARNER & SWASEY 5A-M3600

Turret Lathes (Ram & Saddle)

PRICE REDUCED Extra Heavy Duty Saddle Type Turret Lathe with 12-1/2" spindle bore, crossliding turret with taper attachment, front carriage with taper attachment, full-length leadscrew threading. .


Networking with Swasey Researchers

In doing genealogy research, we surely don't want to reinvent the wheel in researching your Swasey surname, posting a message query can help you connect with distant cousins and others who may be working on the same lines, some of whom may have advanced the research or solved some of the hard problems, but are willing to share. The article "The Art of Posting Queries" provides some valuable tips for posting successful Swasey queries.

You may also want to consider posting a query to the Community Message Boards at Genealogy Today to get assistance from other researchers on your most elusive Swasey ancestors.


Changing With the Times

Words matter. Over time, as the words ‘retardation’ and ‘retarded’ became pejorative, derogatory, and demeaning in usage, the organization evolved its terminology to reflect the desires of people with disabilities, and changed its name to ‘The Arc’. While the term still appears occasionally, it has largely been replaced and usage of ‘intellectual disability’ and ‘developmental disability’ continues to spread.

We are doing everything in our power to make sure they’re adopted more broadly and strongly believe the only ‘r-word’ that should be used when referring to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities is respect.

Name History
1953 – 1973: National Association for Retarded Children (NARC)
1973 – 1981: National Association for Retarded Citizens (NARC)
1981 – 1992: Association for Retarded Citizens of the United States (ARC)
1992 – Present: The Arc of the United States (The Arc)


Watch the video: Our History: Disability