Thomas Wolfe Memorial

Thomas Wolfe Memorial

Located in Asheville, the Thomas Wolfe Memorial is a historic site that is reminiscent of the life and writings of Thomas Wolfe — a celebrated American novelist of 20th century. Presently, it is one of the oldest edifices surviving in the Asheville, North Carolina area.Originally known as "Old Kentucky Home," the North Carolina home has been a memorial to Wolfe since 1949. It is noted for its Queen Anne style architecture, with drafty, high-ceilinged rooms.The house is found mentioned in Wolfe’s epic autobiographical novel Look Homeward, Angel – a classic of American literature. Further, Thomas Wolfe wrote many passages based on boyhood remembrances experienced in that house.Built in 1883 by Erwin E. In the same year, additions such as 11 rooms, electricity, and some indoor plumbing were made.A modern visitor center is located directly behind the Thomas Wolfe Memorial opened in 1996. There is also a gift shop.


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The Thomas Wolfe Memorial is the site of the ‘Old Kentucky Home’ boarding house, owned and run by Wolfe’s mother, and is well worth a visit on a trip to Asheville. Photo by Ken Lax.

One not-to-be-missedAsheville literary pilgrimage is the Thomas Wolfe House and Memorial, which has been one of WesternNorth Carolina’s most renowned attractions for generations. The Memorial, a sprawling, historic house, is famously known as “The Old Kentucky Home.” It is equally famous for being depicted as “Dixieland” in Wolfe’s iconic novel,Look Homeward, Angel. This local, national and international literary treasure is a treat to visit for many reasons.

Thomas Wolfe, was a contemporary of writers Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, and F. Scott Fitzgerald (who also famously spent time in Asheville at the Grove Park Inn). He was born in Asheville in 1900, the youngest of eight children. The Old Kentucky Home was originally a boarding house run by Wolfe’s mother the noted Asheville figure Julia E Wolfe. When Wolfe was six, his mother opened the boarding house and moved there with Wolfe the rest of the children, and their father, remained at the residence on Asheville’s Woodfin Street, where Wolfe spent his infancy and very early childhood.

Thomas Wolfe Memorial Presents a Vivid portrait of early 20 th Century life in Asheville

Thomas Wolfe lived at the Old Kentucky Home until he set off for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill at the prodigious age of fifteen. He later drew heavily upon his boyhood in Asheville for his acclaimed debut novel, Look Homeward, Angel. Some locals thought his depictions of life in Asheville drew too heavily on the real people of the City for comfort. As an expression of local outrage, the book was famously banned from Asheville’s local library for a number of years. In the wake of the book’s tremendous success, which catapulted Wolfe to fame, Wolfe himself did not return toWestern North Carolina for almost a decade.

In the contemporary age, Wolfe—like F. Scott Fitzgerald—is one of the city’s most beloved ghosts. And Wolfe’s novels are celebrated for their excellence in craftsmanship as well as being priceless snapshots of day-to-day life and culture as it existed in the early 1900s in Asheville.

Some travelers came to the ‘Old Kentucky Home’ with nothing more than a suitcase and hat. Photo by Monty Combs.

The Wolfe Memorial is a North Carolina Historic Site that welcomes hundreds of tourists a year. It is open for tours Tuesday-Saturday, from 9-5, for only $5.00 per person, or $2.00 for students. Visitors can purchase tickets at the visitor’s center, which is located conveniently on Market Street in downtown Asheville, behind the house.

The house’s rooms are the scenes of many celebrated episodes from Wolfe’s novels, like the bedroom where Wolfe’s father died, as chronicled in Of Time and The River. Thomas Wolfe’s own bedroom (where the seeds of his novels formed), the house’s piano parlor where the guests gathered, and the kitchen and dining areas are highlighted in the tour of the rambling home. Guests are treated to a fascinating video presentation as a primer, and led around the house by knowledgeable tour guides. Much Wolfe memorabilia is viewable, and the full oeuvre of the author’s novels is for sale.

The Old Kentucky Home suffered an act of arson in 1998, which did considerable damage to it that took seven years to repair. However, the damage was fully restored, and the house reopened to the public in 2004.

The parlor of the boarding house was a popular place for guests to gather and share stories about their travels. Photo by Monty Combs.

House a treat for history-buffs

The appeal of the home is by no means limited to literary-minded visitors those who love history and historic buildings for their own sake will also find much to delight in a tour of it. The house’s architecture and period-era furnishings are marvels in themselves. The Memorial’s location on Spruce Street, in vibrant and bustling downtown Asheville, makes visits easy to incorporate into a full day of sightseeing, wining, dining, hiking, and relaxing.

Wolfe himself died of tuberculosis at the tragically young age of thirty-seven. He is buried in Asheville at the Riverside Cemetery, for literary enthusiasts who want to visit Wolfe’s grave. His grave has been visited by countless fans over the years, and many people have incorporated their pilgrimage to his peaceful resting place with a tour of his childhood home. Visiting the Old Kentucky Home is something visitors to Asheville will always treasure and remember. More information can be found by visiting the Memorial’s official website.

Book a cabin in Asheville, only 10 minutes drive from the Thomas Wolfe Memorial.


Thomas Wolfe Memorial - History

Thomas Wolfe left an indelible mark on American letters. His mother's boardinghouse, now the Thomas Wolfe Memorial, has become one of literature's most famous landmarks. He composed many passages and created many characters based on boyhood remembrances experienced in this house. In his epic autobiographical novel Look Homeward, Angel, Wolfe immortalized the rambling Victorian building as "Dixieland"--but originally called "Old Kentucky Home." A classic of American literature, Look Homeward, Angel has never gone out of print since its publication in 1929, keeping interest in Wolfe alive and attracting visitors to the setting for this great novel. The sprawling frame Queen Anne-influenced house was originally only six or seven rooms with a front and rear porch when prosperous Asheville banker Erwin E. Sluder constructed it in 1883. By 1889 massive additions had more than doubled the size of the original house, but the architecture changed little over the next 27 years.

Historic view of Thomas Wolfe House
Photo courtesy of North Carolina Collection, Pack Memorial Public Library, Asheville, North Carolina

In Look Homeward, Angel Thomas Wolfe accurately remembered the house he moved to in 1906 as a "big cheaply constructed frame house of 18 or 20 drafty, high-ceilinged rooms." Wolfe lived here until 1916, when he entered the University of North Carolina. In 1916 Wolfe's mother, Julia Westall Wolfe, enlarged and modernized the house, adding electricity, additional indoor plumbing, and 11 rooms. Julia did not operate the boardinghouse out of any financial necessity. Thomas Wolfe's father, W. O. Wolfe, could well afford to support the family with the earnings of the tombstone shop he owned and operated on Asheville's city square. But Julia, a former teacher, had an obsession for the real estate market and used her profits to buy more property. Descendants remembered Julia, a shrewd and uncompromising businesswoman, as a "driver of hard bargains."

Thomas Wolfe was perhaps the most overtly autobiographical of this Nation's major novelists. His boyhood in the boardinghouse at 48 Spruce Street colored his work and influenced the rest of his life. His reminiscences were so frank and realistic that Look Homeward, Angel was banned from Asheville's public library for more than seven years when first printed. Today, Wolfe is celebrated as one of Asheville's most famous citizens, and his boyhood home has become a part of the Nation's literary history.

The Thomas Wolfe House, a National Historic Landmark, is located at 48 Spruce St. in downtown Asheville. The Visitor Center is located at 52 North Market St. and is open 9:00am to 5:00pm Tuesday-Saturday. For more information, call 828-253-8304 or visit their website.


She was born in 1880 in New York City, the daughter of Rebecca (Goldsmith) and Joseph Frankau, an actor. Joseph was a cousin of London cigar importer Arthur Frankau and thus, by marriage, of novelist and art historian Frank Danby, whom Aline recalled visiting as a child when Joseph Frankau was performing in London. [3] Her family was Jewish. [4] By the time she was 17, both of her parents had died and she was raised by her aunt, Rachel Goldsmith. Goldsmith had a theatrical boarding house on West 44th Street in New York City.

Between 1916 and 1951, Bernstein would do set design, costuming, or both for 51 productions. [5]

Bernstein was a theater set and costume designer for the Neighborhood Playhouse on the Lower East Side, volunteering her work to make her name.

In 1926 she struggled but prevailed in becoming the first female member of the designers union. This membership opened up opportunities for Broadway commissions. However, as a woman, she still found that it was much easier to find work as a costume designer rather than as a set designer. [6] Her career ran in phases early on, she focused largely on costume design. After about 14 years of work, in 1930, she was able to move into set design. For about a decade, she primarily did set design work, only to return to costume design again around 1940 for the final phase of her career. [5]

In the 1930s she also began to write, with two books published by Knopf, a highly respected publisher at that time. [6] She was personal friends with Arthur and Blanche Knopf. [7]

Her first book, Three Blue Suits, helped to more firmly establish her as a designer in New York. The book included a series of three stories in which three very different men wear the same blue serge suit. The details regarding how each man wears – or drags (the jacket on the floor) – his suit, reveal aspects of each man's character in subtle ways. A common trope among costume designer is that costumes, if they are good, should ultimately not be noticed. In contrast, the blue suit stories reveal Bernstein's ability to discern how critical details of costume evoke, and interact with, a character, and ultimately her skill as a costume designer at making this happen effectively. [6]

Some of her publications include:

  • Three Blue Suits (collection of short stories), 1933
  • The Journey Down (over her relationship with Wolfe), Knopf, 1938
  • Miss Condon, Knopf, 1947
  • An Actor's Daughter (memoir), 1940
  • The Martha Washington Doll Book, 1945
  • Masterpieces of Women's Costume of the 18th and 19th Centuries, 1959 (published posthumously)

In 1950, Aline Bernstein finally won some hard earned recognition. In 1949 she had designed costumes for the opera Regina. The music and libretto were written Marc Blitzstein but based on the play The Little Foxes by Lillian Hellman, a play for which Bernstein had previously designed costumes. [8] [5] Although that production of Regina (it would be regularly revived in the 20th century) only ran for a month and a half, Bernstein won a Tony for her costume design in 1950. [5]

Aline married Theodore F. Bernstein, a Wall Street broker, on November 19, 1902. [9] Bernstein and her husband had two children: Theodore Frankau Bernstein (1904–1949), and Edla Cusick (1906–1983). [10] [11] Her marriage remained intact throughout and despite her affair with Thomas Wolfe. [12]

Bernstein died on September 7, 1955, in New York City, aged 74. [13]

Relationship with Thomas Wolfe Edit

I am deliberately writing [Look Homeward, Angel] for two or three people, first and chiefest, for you.

Bernstein met Thomas Wolfe in 1925 aboard the RMS Olympic when Wolfe was 25 and Bernstein 44. [note 1] [14] Bernstein became Wolfe's lover and provided Wolfe with emotional, domestic, and financial support while he wrote his first novel, Look Homeward, Angel, which he dedicated to Bernstein. [2] [15]

Wolfe immortalized Bernstein as the character Esther Jack in his novels Of Time and the River, The Web and the Rock, You Can't Go Home Again, and The Good Child's River. Bernstein, in turn, centered her autobiographical novel The Journey Down around her affair with Wolfe. [14] Bernstein's and Wolfe's affair ended after a few years, but their friendship continued. One of Wolfe's last phone calls, when he was dying of a brain tumor at age 37, was to tell Bernstein he loved her. [2] At the time of Wolfe's death in 1938, Bernstein possessed some of Wolfe's unpublished manuscripts. [7]

In the 2016 biographical drama film Genius, Bernstein was portrayed by Nicole Kidman, while Wolfe was portrayed by Jude Law.


VIRTUAL: Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award Celebration

Originated by the Louis Lipinsky family and now also supported by Michael Sartisky, PhD, and the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Advisory Committee, we have presented the annual Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award since 1955 for printed works that focus special attention on Western North Carolina.

The December 16, 2020 award ceremony will celebrate six finalists for the 2020 award with short readings by each author from their publication. The winner of the award will be announced in early December.

This year’s six finalists were chosen from an original group of 40 nominations. The finalists, listed below, encompass a broad range of genres and forms.

Leah Hampton
F*ckface and Other Stories

Sandra Muse Isaacs
Eastern Cherokee Stories: A Living Oral Tradition and Its Cultural Continuance

Susan E. Keefe, Junaluska Heritage Association
Junaluska: Oral Histories of a Black Appalachian Community

Courtney Lewis
Sovereign Entrepreneurs: Cherokee Small-Business Owners and the Making of Economic Sovereignty

Rose McLarney, Laura-Gray Street, and L.L. Gaddy, editors
A Literary Field Guide to Southern Appalachia

Dale Neal
Appalachian Book of the Dead

Cost: WNCHA Members – By Donation (Suggested $5) General Admission – $10
Note: A link to the Zoom webinar will be sent to all those registered prior to December 16.

The WNC Historical Association presented the first Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award to Wilma Dykeman in 1955 for The French Broad. Last year winners were George Ellison and Janet McCue for their biography of Horace Kephart, Back of Beyond. Other authors who have received the award include Charles Frazier, Robert Morgan, John Parris, Gail Godwin, John Ehle, Robert Brunk, Michael McFee, Lee Smith, Ron Rash, Wiley Cash, Wayne Caldwell, Fiona Ritchie, and Doug Orr.

The Award Panel this year consists of: Catherine Frank, Chair, Director, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UNC Asheville Brandon J. Johnson, Blue Ridge National Heritage Area Leslee Johnson, English Department, UNC-Asheville Tom Muir, Historic Site Manager, Thomas Wolfe Memorial Gordon McKinney, PhD, former president, Appalachian Studies Association Terry Roberts, PhD, Director, National Paideia Center Jim Stokely, President, Wilma Dykeman Legacy.


Thomas Wolfe Memorial - History

Thomas Wolfe left an indelible mark on American letters. His mother's boardinghouse, now the Thomas Wolfe Memorial, has become one of literature's most famous landmarks. He composed many passages and created many characters based on boyhood remembrances experienced in this house. In his epic autobiographical novel Look Homeward, Angel, Wolfe immortalized the rambling Victorian building as "Dixieland"--but originally called "Old Kentucky Home." A classic of American literature, Look Homeward, Angel has never gone out of print since its publication in 1929, keeping interest in Wolfe alive and attracting visitors to the setting for this great novel. The sprawling frame Queen Anne-influenced house was originally only six or seven rooms with a front and rear porch when prosperous Asheville banker Erwin E. Sluder constructed it in 1883. By 1889 massive additions had more than doubled the size of the original house, but the architecture changed little over the next 27 years.

Historic view of Thomas Wolfe House
Photo courtesy of North Carolina Collection, Pack Memorial Public Library, Asheville, North Carolina

In Look Homeward, Angel Thomas Wolfe accurately remembered the house he moved to in 1906 as a "big cheaply constructed frame house of 18 or 20 drafty, high-ceilinged rooms." Wolfe lived here until 1916, when he entered the University of North Carolina. In 1916 Wolfe's mother, Julia Westall Wolfe, enlarged and modernized the house, adding electricity, additional indoor plumbing, and 11 rooms. Julia did not operate the boardinghouse out of any financial necessity. Thomas Wolfe's father, W. O. Wolfe, could well afford to support the family with the earnings of the tombstone shop he owned and operated on Asheville's city square. But Julia, a former teacher, had an obsession for the real estate market and used her profits to buy more property. Descendants remembered Julia, a shrewd and uncompromising businesswoman, as a "driver of hard bargains."

Thomas Wolfe was perhaps the most overtly autobiographical of this Nation's major novelists. His boyhood in the boardinghouse at 48 Spruce Street colored his work and influenced the rest of his life. His reminiscences were so frank and realistic that Look Homeward, Angel was banned from Asheville's public library for more than seven years when first printed. Today, Wolfe is celebrated as one of Asheville's most famous citizens, and his boyhood home has become a part of the Nation's literary history.

The Thomas Wolfe House, a National Historic Landmark, is located at 48 Spruce St. in downtown Asheville. The Visitor Center is located at 52 North Market St. and is open 9:00am to 5:00pm Tuesday-Saturday. For more information, call 828-253-8304 or visit their website.


Thomas Wolfe House, Downtown Asheville

Even if you have never heard of the famous writer Thomas Wolfe, his sprawling 29-room "Old Kentucky Home" and its history are very fascinating. His classic of American literature, Look Homeward Angel, has never gone out of print since its 1929 publication, keeping interest in Wolfe alive and attracting visitors from around the world to the novel's setting.

Get started in the visitors center located behind the house (52 North Market Street in downtown Asheville). Before your guided tour, watch a short film and read about Wolfe's life. The Thomas Wolfe Memorial State Historic Site is open Tuesday-Saturday and admission is just $5/person. Allow about 1.5 hours to visit.

Thomas Wolfe left an indelible mark on American letters. This home was his mother's boardinghouse and has become one of literature's most famous landmarks. Named "Old Kentucky Home" by a previous owner, Wolfe immortalized the rambling Victorian structure as "Dixieland" in his autobiographical Look Homeward, Angel.

Thomas Clayton Wolfe, the youngest of eight children, was born October 3, 1900, at 92 Woodfin Street in Asheville. His father, William Oliver Wolfe (1851-1922), was descended from hardy Pennsylvania German-English-Dutch farmers his mother, Julia Elizabeth Westall Wolfe (1860-1945), was a third-generation North Carolinian of Scots-Irish-English stock. Surprisingly, Julia Wolfe did not operate the boardinghouse because of financial need. W. O. Wolfe made enough money from the tombstone shop he owned and operated on Asheville's city square to support the family. But former teacher Julia was obsessed with the real estate market and used profits from the boardinghouse's operation to buy more property. A shrewd and hard-nosed businesswoman, Julia Wolfe was remembered as a "driver of hard bargains" by family members.

The Queen Anne-influenced house was originally built in 1883 with only six or seven rooms. By 1889, additions had more than doubled the size of the original structure, but the architecture changed little over the next 27 years. In Look Homeward Angel, Thomas Wolfe accurately remembered the house he moved into in 1906 as a "big cheaply constructed frame house of eighteen or twenty drafty, high-ceiling rooms." In 1916, Wolfe's mother enlarged and modernized the house, adding electricity, additional indoor plumbing, and 11 rooms.

Today the boardinghouse where Thomas Wolfe spent his childhood and adolescence feature furnishings that evoke the daily routine of life in both fact and fiction. In Wolfe's second novel, Of Time and the River (1935), 14 years before the "Old Kentucky Home" became a memorial, Wolfe already had intuitively assessed the house's true importance. He said his mother's "old dilapidated house had now become a fit museum."

It is preserved almost intact with original furnishings arranged by family members very much the way it appeared when the writer lived there. Memories, kept alive through Wolfe's writings, remain in each of the home's 29 rooms.

During the holiday season each year, look for a copy of Thomas Wolfe's handwritten childhood list for Santa Claus! Simple Christmas decorations, including many angels, adorn the home starting the Tuesday after Thanksgiving through the end of the year.

Thomas Wolfe was perhaps the most overtly autobiographical of this country's major novelists. His boyhood shaped his work and influenced the rest of his life. So frank and realistic were his reminiscences that Look Homeward, Angel was banned from Asheville's public library for over seven years. Today Wolfe is celebrated as one of Asheville's most famous citizens, and his boyhood home has become a part of our nation's literary history.

Of Time and the River was a continuation of Look Homeward, Angel and Wolfe's last two major novels (published posthumously), The Web and the Rock (1939) and You Can't Go Home Again(1940), followed the events of his life in New York and Brooklyn, his wandering travels through Europe, his success as a novelist, and his final sad revelation of "you can't go home again." Thomas Wolfe died in the prime of his life of tubercular meningitis on September 15, 1938, 18 days short of his 38th birthday. He is buried in Riverside Cemetery.

Wolfe's mother lived in the "Old Kentucky Home" until her death in 1945. Four years later her surviving sons and daughters sold the house to a private organization, the Thomas Wolfe House Memorial Association, and it opened to the public as a house museum on July 19, 1949. The association continued to operate the memorial until 1958, when it was taken over by the City of Asheville. On January 16, 1976, the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources acquired the property. It's now a North Carolina State Historic Site.

Address
52 North Market Street
Asheville, NC 28801
828-253-8304
Go to their Web site.

Hours & Admission
Tuesday - Saturday 9 AM-5 PM
Closed Sundays & Mondays
Adults $5 | Children $2


2. A college student won the memorial’s design contest.

Having raised the necessary cash, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund next held a design contest. The guidelines stipulated that the memorial should contain the names of every American who died in Vietnam or remained missing in action, make no political statement about the war, be in harmony with its surroundings and be contemplative in character. More than 1,400 submissions for the project were judged anonymously by a panel of eight artists and designers. In the end, the panel passed over every professional architect in favor of 21-year-old Yale University student Maya Lin, who had created her design for a class. 𠇏rom the very beginning I often wondered, if it had not been an anonymous entry 1026 but rather an entry by Maya Lin, would I have been selected?” she would later write.


Thomas Wolfe famously wrote “You can’t go home again,” but don’t let that stop you from exploring the Asheville native’s boyhood home.

A contemporary of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, Wolfe secured his place in the American literary canon with the critically acclaimed publication of his unabashedly auto-biographical novel, Look Homeward, Angel, in 1929. Local admiration didn’t come as easily: His unflattering portrayals of family and some 200 thinly disguised townspeople of Asheville (aka 𠇊ltamont”) prompted hometown scorn. Following eight years of self-imposed exile, Wolfe re-turned a hero in 1937, having boosted tourism during the Great Depression.

Asheville still embodies the 𠇋oomtown” spirit that so captivated Wolfe. “Some things will never change,” wrote Wolfe, and a walk through his onetime stomping grounds continues to reveal a colorful cast of characters. 

House Call

An itinerary following in Wolfe’s footsteps begins, appropriately enough, at his shoes. One of 30 markers along Asheville’s Urban Trail Walking Tour, a bronze replica of Wolfe’s size-13 shoes sit in front of his mother’s boardinghouse at 48 Spruce Street in downtown Asheville, now part of the Thomas Wolfe Memorial.

Officially the Old Kentucky Home and immortalized by Wolfe as 𠇍ixieland,” the yellow Queen Anne-style home provided Wolfe a boyhood rife with writing muses. When his mother moved in to manage the business, she brought with her six-year-old Tom, the youngest of her eight children. A 50-minute guided tour of the home sheds light on his unconventional upbringing. See everything from the dining room that fed his voracious appetite to the parlor’s phonograph that a boarder used to teach a young Wolfe how to dance.

While away some time on the porch in one of 12 black rocking chairs, each sponsored by a notable state author such as Charles Frazier (Cold Mountain). As you linger, contemplate that Wolfe once called the rocking chair a symbol of our culture’s inherent restlessness.

Walk His Way

Continue following the Urban Walking Trail around the corner to Woodfin Street, where you can literally stand in Wolfe’s footprints and scan a diorama that merges today’s skyline with the neighborhood he knew. Across the street at the YMCA, a plaque marks the former site of Wolfe’s birthplace, at a house his father built.

A few blocks south, a replica of the angel from his father’s monument shop𠅊 sculpture that factors throughout his famous novel—points heavenward in front of theਊsheville Art Museum. (The original Italian marble angel lives behind wrought-iron fencing down in Hendersonville’s Oakdale Cemetery.)

From Pack Square, amble south to Eagle Street, where Wolfe delivered newspapers as a boy, and over to Church Street. Here remains First Presbyterian Church, where 30 honorary pallbearers carried Wolfe’s casket at his 1938 funeral.

Eat & Drink

Grab a seat at the counter at The Med, as actor Jude Law did in preparation of his role as Wolfe in the 2016 film Genius. Open since 1969, the Greek diner evokes the sort of bustling downtown lunch counters that Wolfe frequented, both in real life and in his novels.

Final Destination

North of downtown, Riverside Cemetery nestles into the hillside over the French Broad River. Here Wolfe’s body rests at his family’s plot. Next to a jar of pencils that literary pilgrims leave (a tribute to his propensity to write by hand), the author’s gravestone quotes his own prose: “The last voyage. The longest. The best.” While you’re there, wind along the cemetery’s shaded paths to discover other notable natives such as author William Sidney Porter (O. Henry) and North Carolina Senator Zebulon Vance. Pick up a self-guided walking tour during office hours, or book a guided tour from&#[email protected] or AVL Lit Tours. 


An Early Death

In 1936, Wolfe&aposs dissatisfaction with Perkins led to a larger conflict with Scribner, and Wolfe left Scribner for Harper & Brothers. Two years after leaving Scribner, Wolfe left New York to travel to the American West. In July 1938, he became sick in Seattle, and two months later he was sent to the Johns Hopkins University Hospital. Wolfe could not recover his health, and he died at Johns Hopkins of tuberculosis of the brain shortly before his 38th birthday.

After Wolfe&aposs death, Edward Aswell, Wolfe&aposs Harper editor, assembled from the manuscripts left behind the novels The Web and the Rock (1939) and You Can&apost Go Home Again (1940). Several other collections and uncompleted works also appeared posthumously, and Wolfe&aposs legacy is that of one of America&aposs strongest writers whose potential was cut tragically short.


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