Henschel Hs 129

Henschel Hs 129

Henschel Hs 129

Introduction
Description
Development
Variants
Service Record
Eastern Front 1942
Eastern Front 1943
Eastern Front 1944-45
North Africa
Statistics
Books

Introduction

The Henschel Hs 129 was a dedicated ground attack aircraft, and a capable 'tank killer', but was never available in large enough numbers to have any significant impact. Early versions of the aircraft had a poor reputation, but most of its problems were fixed in the Hs 129B, the only version of the aircraft to enter service, and it

Description

The Henschel Hs 129 was a twin-engined monoplane, with thick low mounted wings. On the Hs 129B (the only version to enter service) they had a straight leading edge and tapering trailing edge. The cockpit was built as an armoured trough, with a single curved class windscreen and clear Perspex sides and roof. This gave the pilot excellent visibility, although the aircraft has never quite escaped from the poor reputation justifiably attached to the prototypes and Hs 129A. The main fuel tank, ammo containers, carburettors, oil coolers and engines were also given some armour protection.

The aircraft was of standard stressed-skin construction. The wing was built in three sections - the centre section, which was integrated into the fuselage, and the two outer panels which were bolted on.

The most distinctive feature of the aircraft was its very slim fuselage with a triangular cross-section, wide at the bottom and narrow at the top, with the armoured cockpit close to the front of the aircraft.

The standard armament of the Hs 129 saw it carry two 20mm cannon and two machine guns, mounted on the side of the fuselage. It could also carry a number of different bomb loads, and was later used with a wide range of anti-tank guns. On most aircraft the guns were the MG 151/20 cannon and the MG 17 machine gun. Both guns were mounted some way behind the pilot, with the cannon on top and the machine gun close to the wing root.

Development

The Hs 123 was designed in response to an RLM (German Air Ministry) specification issued in April 1937. The specification called for a small but heavily armoured aircraft, with at least two 20mm mm MG FF cannon and 7.9mm machine guns, 75mm glazing in the cockpit windows, and all using low-powered engines.

The specifications were issued to four companies - Hamburger Flugzeugbau (better known as Blohm und Voss), Gotha, Focke-Wulf and Henschel. Gotha didn’t respond, and the Hamburger proposal was soon eliminated, leaving the Focke-Wulf and Henschel designs as the only contenders.

The Focke-Wulf design was for a modified version of the Fw 189 reconnaissance aircraft. This was a twin-boom aircraft, with a glazed central nacelle carrying the crew. In the ground attack role this would be replaced with a heavily armoured nacelle, which would carry a crew of two.

Henschel produced the only original design, for a twin engined single seat monoplane. On October 1937, after examining both designs, the RLM decided to award both companies development contracts.

Henschel began detailed design work in January 1938, giving the new aircraft the designation P.46. The official designation Hs 129 followed in April, and the first visual mock-up was completed in May. A construction mock-up was ready by late July, and by August the design was finalised. Its weakest point was the Argus As 410A-0 twelve-cylinder inverted-vee air cooled engine, which didn’t provide enough power for the new aircraft. Argus had claimed that they would provide 465hp, but in use they only produced 430hp.

The Hs 129 V1 made its maiden flight on 26 May 1939. A number of changes were made after this first flight, before on 24 June the first prototype was damaged in a crash-landing.

By the autumn of 1939 both designs had been subjected to trails. Neither was particularly impressive - both suffered from a lack of power and poor visibility, but the Henschel machine cost a third less than the Focke-Wulf design, and so the RLM decided to place an order for the Hs 129.

Two more prototypes were built, both of which were delayed by shortages of key equipment. In the case of the V2 one propeller mechanism caused the first delay, but then an entire engine was taken to repair the V1, and the V2 didn't make its maiden flight until 30 November 1939. Even after both of the first prototypes were flying the test programme suffered from the unreliability of the engines. At the same time the weight of the aircraft was increasing, and its performance falling. The aircraft was particularly difficult to pull out of a dive, and on 5 January 1940 the V2 was destroyed when it failed to pull out of a dive.

The V3 didn't make its maiden flight until 2 April 1940. It was used to test the improved Argus As 410A-1 engine, which was still unreliable. This aircraft was damaged in June 1940, and was out of service until March 1941, leaving the V1 as the only flying prototype.

The A-0 aircraft went to Erprobungskommando 129, a special unit formed to bring the type into operational service. They had first seen the aircraft on 19 November 1940, when they criticised it for being under-powered and having very limited visibility. Henschel wanted to move onto a new larger aircraft, the P.76, but this would have caused unacceptable delays, and they were instead ordered to fit captured French Gnome & Rhône radial engines to a number of completed A-1 airframes to produce the first Hs 129B.

The Hs 129B-0 proved that the new engine worked, although the aircraft was still somewhat underpowered. It would always have a very long take-off run, and a poor climb rate, but as it was intended for very low level operations this wasn't a major problem. The visibility problems were solved on the B-1, which had a new canopy design.

Variants

Hs 129A-0

The Hs 129A-0 was the first pre-production series of the aircraft. It was similar to the prototype, but had the 20mm MG FF cannon replaced by two belt-fed MG 151/20 cannons, which were much more effective. It retained the two 7.9mm MG 17 machine guns of the prototypes. It was powered by two Argus As 410A-1 engines, which finally provided the 465hp promised for the A-0 engines.

The main problem with the Hs 129A was the terrible armoured cockpit. In an attempt to reduce the amount of 75mm glass this was given two very small front windows, in a 'V' configuration, and surrounded by very heavy frames. The sides and roof of the cockpit were solid metal.

Hs 129A-1

By the summer of 1940 Henschel had received an order for 12 A-1 production aircraft, later increased to 16. Work on these machines began in June 1940, but they would never be completed as A-series aircraft. In September 1940 it was decided to abandon the A-1, and attempt to fit captured Gnome & Rhône engines to the almost-complete airframes, to produce the B-0.

Hs 129B-0

Work on the Hs 129B-0 began in September 1940. They were powered by a pair of Gnône-Rhône 14M radial engines, which came in pairs that operated in opposite directions. The B-0 used the 14M4 (port) and 14M5 (starboard) engines, which were rated at 700hp for takeoff and 650hp at 13,100ft. At first the 14M engines were a little unreliable, and prone to overheating. Most of these flaws were eventually ironed out, although it took some time to find a good dust and sand filter, and they continued to run hot.

The V3 prototype was given the new engines at the start of 1941, and began flight tests in March. The sixteen A-1 airframes were then given their new engines in December 1941-January 1942.

The B-0 included all of the improvements that had been planned for the A-1, including a modified cockpit with better visibility.

Hs 129B-1

Series production of the B-1 finally began late in 1941, and the first three B-1s reached a service unit in January 1942, alongside two B-0s. The main changes between the B-0 and B-1 came in the cockpit and canopy.

On the A-0 and B-1 the cockpit had been built in two layers, with flat armour plates covered with a light metal outer surface. Improvements in manufacturing techniques meant that the B-1 could use curved armour plating. This meant that the armour could become the outer surface, increasing the space inside the cockpit and improving the view.

The B-1 also saw the adoption of a much improved canopy. This time the two front windows were replaced by a single piece of curved armoured glass, and the sides and top of the canopy were made from Plexiglass. This solved the visibility problems of the earlier models.

The B-1 and B-2 could be used with a number of conversion kits, or Rüstsatz. The Hs 129 technical handbook records four that were given Rüstsatz numbers. Rüstsatz I was used to describe the built-in armament. Rüstsatz II was a pack that could carry four MG 17s in a pack under the fuselage. This was first tested late in 1941, and was apparently not popular with the pilots. Rüstsatz III, also tested late in 1941, was a pack containing a 30mm Mk 101 cannon. Rüstsatz 8 was similar, but with a Mk 103 cannon (thanks to Martin Pegg for providing further information on the Rüstsatz sets).

The B-1 could also carry an optional bomb rack, which could carry one 250kg bomb, four 50kg bombs or ninety-six 2k SD 2 anti-personnel bombs.

The B-1 also came with under-wing bomb racks as standard. These could carry one 50kg SC 50 bomb or twenty-four 2kg SD 2 bombs.
46

The B-1 and later models of the Hs 129 were assembled at Henschel's plant in Berlin, but the components were made at factories in occupied France. This results in some delays in 1941-42 as production got underway, and effectively ended production of the aircraft in the second half of 1944 as the Allied armies captured the factories.

Hs 129B-2

The Hs 129B-2 was similar to the B-1, but with tropical equipment. Even before the disastrous debut of the B-1 in North Africa in November 1942 Henschel had been working on producing a tropicalised version of the aircraft. This involved fitting BMW air-filters and a new oil filter. Tests with one of the B-0s in March-May 1942 proved that the equipment wordked, and in May it was decided to end production of the Hs 129B-1 after the 50th machine had been completed, and switch to the B-2, complete with the new filters.

As with the B-1 the B-2 could carry the 30mm Mk 101 or 103 cannon or four MG 17 machine guns under the fuselage. The cannon armed aircraft would become increasingly common during 1943, and would turn the Hs 129 from a ground-attack aircraft into a potent anti-tank weapon. The vast majority of Hs 129s produced would be B-2s.

Hs 129B-3

The Hs 129B-3 was the last version of the aircraft to enter production, and was armed with a massive 7.5cm anti-tank gun. Work on mounted the 7.5cm PaK 40 anti-tank gun in an aircraft began early in 1942, when attempts were made to fit a manually loaded version of the gun in a Junkers Ju 88. This wasn't a great success, but did provide some useful experience for later attempts to install an automatic version of the gun in the Hs 129.

In Luftwaffe service the 7.5cm PaK 40 was known as the BK 7.5, BK standing for Bordkanone, which translates as cannon. The gun was built into the structure of the aircraft. The barrel itself was carried in a cradle mounted below the fuselage, and projected 3ft ahead of the nose of the aircraft. The 12-round magazine and automatic loading device were both built into the fuselage. The magazine was a rotating drum, and shells were fed into the gun electro-pneumatically.

Tests with the first three B-3s began in August 1944. Problems with the shell-case ejection meant that the gun was only cleared for limited operation use. A small number of B-3s were then issued to 13.(Pz)/SG 9 for service tests. These revealed problems with the reloading mechanism in front line conditions, and a specialist team spend all of November attempting to fix this problem. By then it had become clear that prolonged use of the BK 7.5 caused damage to the airframe. This hadn’t happened with the test aircraft, and differences between these aircraft and standard production aircraft were one of the possible causes, along with possible problems with faulty ammo. The experts were unable to come to any firm conclusions before in January 1945 the unit was forced to destroy all of its aircraft.

The original plan was for the B-3 to completely replace the B-2 on the production lines by October 1944, and for production to continue at least until February 1945. This plan was dramatically disrupted when the Allies captured the French factories producing components for the Hs 129, and in August 1944 Henschel was ordered to cease production. Only twenty five B-3s had been built when construction ended in September 1944. A small number of these aircraft reached the front line, where they were said to be very effective, but they were soon swept away by the Soviet advance.

Hs 129C

The Hs 129C was to have been armed with two MK 103 cannon, mounted side-by-side in remote controlled mountings with a limited range of movement. It was to have been powered by new engines, either the 840hp Isotta-Fraschini Delta IV inverted V-12 or the 820hp Gnôme-Rhône 14M38. In the summer of 1943 the RLM ordered 600-700 C-1s, with production to start in April 1944, and in August 1943 the only C-1 made its maiden flight, powered by the 14M38. The Gnôme-Rhône engines were soon dismissed because they were prone to overheating, while access to the Italian Isotta-Fraschini engines was lost after the Allied invasion of Italy. Work on the C-1 series was officially abandoned in March 1944.

Service Record

Eastern Front 1942

In the first few years of the Second World War the Luftwaffe didn't have a dedicated ground-attack wing. The only ground attack unit was II.(Schlacht)/Lehrgeschwader 2, in theory an experimental unit, equipped with the Henschel He 123 biplane and the Bf 109. By the end of 1941 it was clear that this was not long adequate, and it was decided to form the first dedicated ground attack geschwader. II.(Schlacht)/LG 2 was withdrawn from the front at the end of 1941, and its personnel used to form Schlachtgeschwader 1. This unit was to be equipped with a mix of Bf 109s, Hs 123s and the new Hs 129, which was to equip the second group, II./Sch.G.1.

The first few aircraft arrived before these changes were complete. On 3 January the Ergänzungs-Schlachtgruppe of Lehrgeschwader 2 received two B-0s and three B-1s. Three days later the unit suffered its first fatal crash, when a B-0 was lost.

The new arrangements came into force on 13 January 1942. After a period of training it was ready to take part in the German spring offensive of 1942, which was aimed at the oil fields of the Caucasus. 4./Sch.G 1, with fifteen aircraft, was the first to be deployed to the front, leaving Germany on 26 April to take part in the advance into the Crimea, intended to protect the flank of the main thrust. 5./Sch.G 1 followed in mid May, moving to the main part of the front. The two stafflen was used to fly close support missions, attacking Russian positions just in front of the German lines. The new aircraft proved to be robust in combat, able to survive quite heavy damage, but its poor dust filters were a problem, reducing the number of serviceable aircraft.

During 1942 Sch.G 1 was used to fight the Soviet offensive around Kharkov (May), to support the advance towards Stalingrad (July), and to resist the Soviet counter-attack at Stalingrad. According to figures from the unit between May and 17 August the Hs.129 squadrons had flown 2,500 operational missions. If this is the case then the Russian winter had a dramatic impact for the rest of the year, for the II./Sch.G 1 recorded 3,138 Hs 129 sorties during 1942 for the loss of 20 aircraft (in the same period it flew 1,532 Hs 123 sorties, losing 5 aircraft, and 1,939 Bf 109 sorties, losing 16).

In the summer of 1942 13.(Panzer)/Jagdgeschwader 51 was equipped with the Hs 129, after Göring decided that he wanted every fighter geschwader to have an anti-tank squadron. Between 14 August and 26 September this squadron flew 73 sorties, losing three of its eight aircraft. During this period it claimed to have hit 29 tanks. While the staffel was fairly successful, it didn't really fit in a fighter unit, and for part of the year came under the command of Sch.G 1.

Eastern Front 1943

In February 1943 Sch.G 1 was reorganised. 7.Staffel was to use the Hs 123, 4.Staffel and 8.Staffel the Hs 129 and the rest of the unit was reequipped with the Fw 190A-5. The two Hs 129 squadrons had their theoretical strength increased from 12 to 16, but even so this meant that if all three Hs 129 squadrons were at full strength there would only be 40 operation aircraft on the entire eastern Front!

Early in the year the role of the Hs 129 was changed. It was now to operate behind the German lines, attacking Soviet tanks that had broken through the front line. All three units came under the command of Oberstleutnant Otto Weiss, before in mid-April 4./Sch.G 2 returned from North Africa, and its commander, Hauptmann Bruno Meyer, took over as Führer der Panzerjäger. By the summer of 1943 he had command of five Hs 129 staffeln, after 8./Sch.G 2 followed 4./ back from North Africa. In October the Hs 129 units came together to form IV./SG 9.

During the spring and early summer of 1943 the Hs 129 was used in the fighting in the Kuban bridgehead. They were then withdrawn and brought up to full strength in preparation for the battle of Kursk. This saw the debut of the 30mm MK 103, with its faster rate of fire, but as with other new weapons introduced at Kursk the MK 103 had a disappointing debut, suffering from frequent jams. Despite this problem the Hs 129 proved its worth at Kursk, destroyed large numbers of Soviet tanks. The problem was that with only five staffeln equipped with the type there were never enough aircraft to make any real difference to the outcome of the battle. The same was true during the retreat through the Ukraine that ended the year. The situation was made worse by the ever increasing strength of Soviet anti-aircraft guns and fighter forces, which meant that the slow Hs 129 suffered ever-increasing losses.

Eastern Front 1944-45

At the start of 1944 IV./SG 9 took part in the desperate attempts to stop the Russian winter offensive that followed their victory at Kursk. The unit was slowly forced to retreat, until by the spring it was based outside Soviet territory. In mid-April the entire group was concentrated in Romania, as part of an attempt to stop the Soviet advance towards the Romanian oil fields.

IV./SG 9 wasn't involved in the opening phase of the Soviet summer offensive of 1944, which saw the destruction of Army Group Centre, but it was soon rushed north in an attempt to prevent disaster. All efforts failed, and from then until the end of the war the Hs 129 equipped group was involved in a near constant stream of desperate defensive battles. The number of Hs 129 equipped units began to decline, especially after production came to an end in the autumn of 1944. By the end of the war hardly any Hs 129s were still airworthy, and those that could still fly were often grounded by a lack of aviation fuel.

North Africa

Towards the end of 1942 a number of Hs 129 squadrons were withdrawn to form a second geschwader, Schlachtgeschwader 2. It had been hoped to deploy this second unit on the Eastern Front, but the Allied successes at El Alamein meant that it had to be rushed to North Africa instead. The first aircraft from 4.(Panzer)/ Sch G. 1 arrived at Tobruk on 7 November, and they were quickly thrown into the battle.

The Hs 129's deployment to North Africa was a near total disaster. The Gnome & Rhone engines were not suitable for use in the desert. Their poor dust filter and tendency to over-heat had caused problems in Russia, but in North Africa they combined to virtually destroy the unit

The staffel's first operation was flown on 17 November 1942, and was a relative success, but then the aircraft were caught in two sandstorms, which did terrible damage to the engines. After the first storm the aircraft's already long take-off run had doubled in length, and after the second they could barely take off. Only once their weapons and ammo had been removed could they be ferried west to keep up with Rommel's retreating army. On 31 December the staffel's seven surviving aircraft reached Castel Benito near Tripoli, and only ten days none of them were operational. Three were then destroyed in an Allied air raid on 13 January, and three more could not be repaired. The surviving aircraft managed to limp back to Tunis, while the staffel's personnel returned to Germany, before heading off to the Eastern Front.

This didn't end the Hs 129's involvement in the fighting in North Africa. In October 1942 5./Sch.G 1 had returned to Germany from the Eastern Front to receive new Hs 129 B-2s (with tropical air and oil filters). The squadron then moved to Prussia in preparation for a return to the front, but the ever worsening situation in North Africa soon led to a change of plans. Bad weather slowed down the move, but the first aircraft reached North Africa on 29 November. The staffel began operations on the following day. This time the Hs 129 was more successful, and the staffel didn't suffer its first loss until 22 December. Three more aircraft were lost on 28 December, all to Allied fighters, and senior officers in Luftflotte 2 were beginning to worry about the cost of using the Hs 129 in an area where the Allies had air superiority.

At the start of 1943 the staffel was renumbered as 8.(Pz)/Sch.G 2. A shortage of equipment almost led the staffel to be reequipped with the Fw 190, but instead a large number of fresh Hs 129s arrived. The aircraft were now given a new role. They would operate behind German lines, attacking any Allied tanks that had broken through the front line and were thus without anti-aircraft defences. This reduced the risk of heavy losses, but also reduced the number of sorties that could be flown.

The end for the Hs 129 in North Africa was not far off. Allied control of the air meant that the aircraft needed to be heavily escorted if they were to be effective, absorbing fighter resources needed elsewhere. The number of aircraft available began to drop, and by 10 April only two of the surviving sixteen aircraft were serviceable. On 20 April 8.(Pz)/Sch.G 2 became one of the first Luftwaffe units to be evacuated from North Africa. It remained away from the front line until August 1943, when it moved to the Eastern Front.

B-2
Engine: Two Gnôme-Rhone twin-row radial engines
Power: 750hp each
Crew: 1
Wing span: 46ft 7in
Length: 32ft 0in
Height: 10ft 8in
Empty Weight: 8,162lb
Loaded weight: 11,266lb
Max Speed: 253mph at 12,565ft (without kits)
Service Ceiling: 29,530ft
Range: 348 miles
Armament: Two 20mm cannon and two MG 17 machine guns

Books


Henschel Hs 129

The Henschel Hs 129 was a World War II ground-attack aircraft fielded by the German Luftwaffe. Its nickname, the Panzerknacker (tank cracker), is a deliberate pun—in German, it also means "safe cracker". [ citation needed ] In combat service the Hs 129 lacked a sufficient chance to prove itself the aircraft was produced in relatively small numbers and deployed during a time when the Luftwaffe was unable to protect them from attack.


Henschel Hs 129 Tank Buster!

Henschel was one of four companies (the others being Focke-Wulf, Gotha and Hamburger Flugzeugbau) to which, in April 1937, the Technische Amt of the Reichsluftfahrtministerium (RLM) issued a specification for a twin-engine ground-attack aircraft. It was required to carry at least two 20 mm MG FP cannon and to have extensive armour plating protection for crew and engines. The two designs for which development contracts were awarded on 1 October 1937 were the Focke-Wulf Fw 189C and Henschel Hs 129. The latter was another Friedrich Nicolaus design with a light alloy stressed-skin fuselage of triangular section. It contained a small cockpit with a restricted view, necessitating the removal of some instruments to the inboard sides of the engine cowlings. The windscreen was made of 75 mm (2.95 in) armoured glass and the nose section was manufactured from armour plating. Nose armament comprised two 20 mm MG FF cannon and two 7.92 mm (0.31 in) MG 17 machine guns. The prototype flew in the spring of 1939, powered by two 465 hp (347 kW) Argus As 410A-1 engines, and two further prototypes were flown competitively against the modified Fw 189 development aircraft for the Fw 189C.

“…in a shallow dive, or in the case of the Hs 129, a controlled plummet…”

Although the Henschel aircraft was considered to be underpowered and sluggish, and to have too small a cockpit, the company was awarded a contract for eight pre-production Hs 129A-0 aircraft, and these were issued initially to 5 (Schlacht)./LG 2 in 1940, but transferred to 4./SG 101 at Paris-Orly in 1941, with the exception of two which were converted at Schonefeld to accept Gnome-Rhone 14M 4/5 radial engines. It was with this powerplant that 10 Hs 129B-0 development aircraft were delivered from December 1941 improvements included a revised cockpit canopy and the introduction of electrically-actuated trim tabs, and armament comprised two 20 mm MG 151/20 cannon and two 7.92 mm (0.31 in) MG 17 machine guns. The production Hs 192B-1 series went into service first with 4./SchG 1 at Lippstadt in April 1942 and also became operational on the Eastern front, where the type was to be used most widely, although it served also in North North Africa, Italy and in France after the D-Day landings. Sub-variants of the M 129B-1 series included the Hs 129B-1/R1 with additional offensive armament in the form of two 110 lbs (50 kg) bombs or 96 anti-personnel bombs the Hs 129B-1/R2 with a 30-mm MK 101 cannon beneath the fuselage the Hs 129B-1/R3 with four extra MG 17 machine-guns the Hs 129B-1/R4 with an ability to carry one 551 lbs (250 kg) bomb instead of the Hs 129B-1/R1’s bombload and the Hs 129B-1/R5 which incorporated an Rb 50/30 camera installation for reconnaissance duties.

By the end of 1942 the growing capability of Soviet tank battalions made it essential to develop a version of the Hs 129 with greater fire-power, leading to the Hs 129B-2 series which was introduced into service in the early part of 1943. They included the Hs 129B-2/Rl which carried two 20 mm MG 151/20 cannon and two 13 mm (0.51 in) machine-guns the generally similar Hs 129B-2/R2 introduced an additional 30 mm MK 103 cannon beneath the fuselage the Hs 129B-2/R3 had the two MG 13s deleted but was equipped with a 37 mm BK 3,7 gun and the Hs 129B-2/R4 carried a 75 mm (2.95 in) PaK 40L (‘L’ for Luftwaffe) gun in an underfuselage pod. Final production variant was the Hs 129B-3 of which approximately 25 were built and which, developed from the Hs 129B-2/R4, substituted an electro-pneumatically operated 75 mm BK 7,5 gun for the PaK 40 (Panzer Abwehr Kanone 40). The lethal capability of the Hs 129B-2/R2 was amply demonstrated in the summer of 1943 during Operation ‘Citadel’, the German offensive which was intended to regain for them the initiative on the Eastern Front after the defeat at Stalingrad. During this operation some 37,421 sorties were flown, at the end of which the Luftwaffe claimed the destruction of 1,100 tanks. However accurate these figures, not all of those destroyed could be credited to Hs 129s, but there is little doubt that the 879 of these aircraft that were built (including prototypes) played a significant role on the Eastern front. In spite of its small numbers and deficiencies, proved extremely successful in the anti-role, however, it suffered heavy losses and not many examples survived the war.

The Hs 129B equipped three Staffeln of the 8th Assault Wing of the Royal Romanian Air Corps. On 23 August 1944 there was a coup in Romania, as a result of which the country changed from being an ally of Germany to becoming an enemy. These Hs 129Bs, accordingly were used against the German armies, finally being combined into a unit equipped with the Ju 87D Stuka.

In late September 1944, the entire manufacturing programme was abandoned, along with virtually all other German aircraft production except the ’emergency fighter programme’. Total production had amounted to only 879, including prototypes. Because of attrition and other problems, the Hs 129 was never able to fully equip the giant anti-tank force that could be seen to be needed as early as winter 1941-42, an overall effect on the war was not great. Towards the end, in autumn 1944, operations began to be further restricted by shortage of high octane petrol, and by the final collapse of Germany only a handful of these aircraft remained.

The Cockpit

Because of the triangular-section fuselage and the need to keep the airframe as small as possible the cockpit of the Hs 129 was very cramped. So cramped in fact that the Revi C 12/C gunset was mounted on the aircraft nose outside of the cockpit and certain engine instruments were mounted on the inboard side of the engine nacelles for the pilot to view. The entire nose section formed a welded armoured shell 6 mm to 12 mm thick around the pilot, with toughened 75 mm thick glass in the canopy. The total weight of the nose armour was 2,380 lbs (1080 kg). A large pilot would have a great deal of trouble in handing the aircraft in ground attacks and a short control stick required a great deal of strength to move even in the modest manoeuvres.

The massive build-up in Soviet armour strength with thick-skinned tanks contrasted with the faltering strength of the Sch.G. units, which continued to be afflicted by poor engine reliability despite the addition of properly designed air filters. The overriding need was for more powerful anti-armour weapons, and on 10 January 1944 a special unit, Erprobungskommando 26, was formed at Udetfeld out of previous Sch.G. units to centralise the desperate effort to devise new weapons and tactics. Its Hs 129s soon appeared with various new armament, some of which were too much for what was, after all, a small aircraft.

The outstanding example of the new weapons was the radically different Forstersonde SG 113A. This comprised a giant tube resembling a ship’s funnel in the centre fuselage just behind the fuselage tank. Inside this were fitted six smooth-bore tubes, each 1.6 m (5 ft 3 in) long and of 77 mm calibre. The tubes were arranged to fire down and slightly to the rear, and were triggered as a single group by a photocell sensitive to the passage of a tank close beneath. Inside each tube was a combined device consisting of a 45 mm armour piercing shell (with a small high-explosive charge) pointing downwards and a heavy steel cylinder of full calibre pointing upwards. Between the two was the propellant charge, with a weak tie-link down the centre to join the parts together. When the SG 113A was fired, the shells were driven down by their driving sabots at high velocity, while the steel slugs were fired out of the top of each tube to cancel the recoil. Unfortunately, trials at Tarnewitz Waffenprufplatz showed that the photocell system often failed to pick out correct targets.

Another impressive weapon was the huge PaK 40 anti-tank gun of 75 mm calibre. This gun weighed 3,303 lbs (1500 kg) in its original ground-based form, and fired a 7 lbs (3.2 kg) tungsten-carbide cored projectile at 3,060 ft/sec (933 m/sec). Even at a range of 3,280 ft (1000 m), the shell could penetrate 5 1/4 inches (133 mm) of armour if it hit square-on. Modified as the PaK 40L, the gun had a much bigger muzzle brake to reduce recoil and electro-pneumatic operation to feed successive shells automatically. Installed in the Hs 129B-3/Wa, the giant gun was provided with 26 rounds which could be fired at the cyclic rate of 40 rounds per minute, so that three or four could be fired on a single pass. Almost always, a single good hit would destroy a tank, even from head-on. The main problem was that the PaK 40L was too powerful a gun for the aircraft. Quite apart from the severe muzzle blast and recoil, the sheer weight of the gun made the 129B-3/Wa almost unmanageable, and in an emergency the pilot could sever the gun’s attachments and let it drop.


Henschel Hs 129

Henschel Hs 129 oli saksalainen Henschelin valmistama maataistelu- ja rynnäkkökone. Sitä käyttivät Saksan Luftwaffen lisäksi Unkarin ja Romanian ilmavoimat.

Henschel Hs 129
Tyyppi rynnäkkökone
Alkuperämaa Saksa
Valmistaja Henschel
Ensilento 1939
Esitelty 1941
Infobox OK

Vuonna 1937 Saksan ilmailuministeriö (RLM) tilasi kaksimoottorisen rynnäkkökoneen, jolla olisi hyvä suoja miehistölle, polttoainesäiliöille ja moottoreille sekä aseistuksena vähintään kaksi 20 mm tykkiä. Suunnitteluun osallistuivat Henschel, Focke-Wulf, Gotha ja Hamburger Flugzeugbau, mutta vain Henschelin ja Focke-Wulfin (Focke-Wulf Fw 189C:llä) ehdotukset tulivat ilmailuministeriön hyväksymiksi. Henschelin koneessa oli aseistuksena kaksi 20 mm MG FF -konetykkiä ja kaksi 7,92 mm MG 17 -konekivääriä, ohjaamo 75 mm paksua lasia sekä vahvasti panssaroitu nokka, jotka suojasivat lentäjää. Prototyypin moottorit olivat Argus As 410 -tyyppiä, mutta nämä eivät olleet riittävän tehokkaita (465 hevosvoimaa eli 347 kW) ja siksi ne vaihdettiin voimakkaampiin Gnome-Rhône 14M moottoreihin. Nämäkään eivät olleet riittävän tehokkaita, mutta ne otettiin käyttöön, jotta saataisiin lisää koneita itärintamalle. Neuvostoliiton suuret panssarijokot pystyivät aiheuttamaan saksalaisille ongelmia, ja siksi koneesta tehtiin versio, Hs 129B-2, joka varustettiin 30 mm tai 37 mm tykillä, myöhemmin 75 mm tykillä, jotka pystyivät tuhoamaan vihollispanssarivaunuja. 865 konetta (luku ei sisällä prototyyppejä) rakennettiin.


Henschel Hs 129

Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 04/26/2021 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.

The Henschel Hs 129 fighter-bomber was built to a 1937 German specification for a twin-engine close-support aircraft with considerable armor protection for pilot and crew and the ability to field twin 20mm cannons at least. The resulting competition left a Focke-Wulf design (the Fw 189C) and the Henschel Hs 129 design as finalists with the nod going to the Henschel firm.

The Hs 129 was by far a perfect aircraft for close-support duty. It was relatively underpowered - even with the twin Gnome-Rhone radial engines - and the cockpit small enough to cram just one person. Visibility was reported to be far from superior though something about the overall design likened the Reichsluftahrtministerium to it. Armament consisted of two nose-mounted MG FF 20mm cannons and two MG 17 7.92mm machine guns. The Hs 129V-1 prototypes gave birth to ten Hs 129B-0 developmental models which, in turn, produced the initial Hs 129B-1 production series. The Hs 129 was immediately fielded to the Eastern Front to take on the divisions of Russian armor in force.

By 1942, the Hs 129B-2 came about as a need to "up-gun" the existing Hs 129B-1 production models. The B-2 became a series that varied in armament provisions that would include the R1, which was fielded with 2 x 20mm cannons and 2 x 13mm machine guns, and the R3 which removed the machine guns in favor of a larger caliber 37mm gun along with the standard twin 20mm cannons. The B-3 model series would produce 25 or so with the larger 75mm gun system and would become the final production Hs 129 systems in service.

The Hs 129 was fielded in the East against the might of the Soviet Union by design, though later they were consequently fielded throughout North Africa and Europe (post D-Day) by necessity. By all accounts, performance results of the system proved sublime, with the Hs 129 accounting for the destruction of hundreds of Soviet tanks, particularly at the Battle of Kursk in 1943. The Hs 129 proved to be a viable asset in the close-support role, capable of engaging even the most stubborn of Allied armor with an array of cannons, machine guns and bombs.


Henschel Hs 129 – Specifications, Facts, Drawings, Blueprints

The 1938 Reichsluftfahrtministerium (RLM) specification that resulted in the Henschel Hs 129 was prompted by the need, revealed during the Spanish Civil War, for a specialised close support and ground-attack aeroplane.

The Henschel aircraft was designed by Dipl Ing Friedrich Nicolaus, detailed work being completed on the aircraft by the middle of 1938. The first prototype, the Hs 129 V1, flew in the spring of 1939. It was a small low-wing with a triangular-section fuselage and two 465 hp Argus As 410 twelve-cylinder inverted-vee air-cooled engines. The airframe was built of light alloy with stressed skin and 5 mm armoured plated protecting the engines. The nose, in which the pilot sat, comprised a ‘box’ of 6 to 12 mm armour plates spot-welded together with the windscreen of 75 mm armoured glass. The cockpit was so small that several of the instruments had to be mounted on the inboard sides of the engine cowlings.

Pilot’s reports were highly unfavourable, chiefly due to the aircraft’s inadequate power, and were sufficiently damning to prevent the Argus engined Henschel HS 129A from entering production. The existing Hs 129A-0s were not, nevertheless, too unsatisfactory to pass on to the Romanian Air Force, which used them for some months on the Russian Front.

Meanwhile, Herr Nicholaus’s team produced an alternative design, known originally by the project number P.76, but this was rejected by the RLM, which directed instead that the Hs 129A be adapted to take captured French Gnome-Rhône 12M radial engines. Thus re-engined, and with cockpit and other internal modifications, the type became known in 1941 as the Henschel Hs 129B. The Hs 129B-1, following a batch o seven pre-series Hs 129B-0s, entered production in autumn 1941, and became operational with Luftwaffe units in the Crimea early in 1942. Later, the Hs 129B appeared in numbers in North Africa, being employed primarily as an anti-tank aircraft in both theatres.

Several B-1 sub-types were produced, with various combinations of armament. Standard equipment, as installed in the B-1/R1, comprised two 20 mm Mg 151 cannon and two 7.9 mm MG 17 machine-guns, with provision for a small external bomb load. Without bombs, and with a fixed ventral 30 mm MK 101 cannon, it was B-1/R2 the B-1/R3 had the big cannon replaced by a ventral tray of four MG 17s the B-1/R4 and B-1/R5 each carried the standard quota of guns, but with a more varied bomb load and photo-reconnaissance camera respectively. The Henschel Hs 129B-1/B-2 was notably successful in the anti-tank role, and prompted the evolution of the all-gun B-2 series.

Final version was the B-2/R4, with a huge 75 mm ventral cannon whose muzzle projected nearly 8 ft (2.4 m) ahead of the aircraft’s nose. A total of eight hundred and sixty-six Henschel Hs 129Bs were built before production ceased in the summer of 1944.


Aircraft similar to or like Henschel Hs 129

Ground-attack aircraft produced by the Soviet Union in large numbers during the Second World War. Never given an official name and 'shturmovik' is the generic Russian word meaning ground attack aircraft. Wikipedia

German heavy fighter and ground-attack aircraft of World War II. Design started before the war, as a replacement for the Bf 110. Wikipedia

German twin-engine, twin-boom, three-seat tactical reconnaissance and army cooperation aircraft. Produced until mid-1944. Wikipedia

Romanian World War II low-wing monoplane, all-metal monocoque fighter and ground-attack aircraft. Comparable to contemporary designs being deployed by the airforces of the most advanced military powers such as the Hawker Hurricane and Bf 109E. Wikipedia

German World War II fighter aircraft that was, along with the Focke-Wulf Fw 190, the backbone of the Luftwaffe's fighter force. Still in service at the dawn of the jet age at the end of World War II in 1945. Wikipedia

Soviet ground attack aircraft developed at the end of World War II by the Ilyushin construction bureau. Also license-built in Czechoslovakia by Avia as the Avia B-33. Wikipedia

Ground-attack aircraft used by the Italian Regia Aeronautica during World War II. Its streamlined design and retractable undercarriage were advanced for the time, and after its debut in 1937 the aircraft established several world speed records. Wikipedia

The Bréguet 690 and its derivatives were a series of light twin-engine ground-attack aircraft that were used by the French Air Force in World War II. Intended to be easy to maintain, forgiving to fly, and capable of 480 km/h at 4,000 m (13,120 ft). Wikipedia

Single-seat biplane dive bomber and close-support attack aircraft flown by the German Luftwaffe during the Spanish Civil War and the early to midpoint of World War II. It proved to be robust, durable and effective especially in severe conditions. Wikipedia

German World War II Luftwaffe twin-engined multirole combat aircraft. Junkers Aircraft and Motor Works (JFM) designed the plane in the mid-1930s as a so-called Schnellbomber ("fast bomber") that would be too fast for fighters of its era to intercept. Wikipedia

German single-seat, single-engine fighter aircraft designed by Kurt Tank at Focke-Wulf in the late 1930s and widely used during World War II. Along with its well-known counterpart, the Messerschmitt Bf 109, the Fw 190 became the backbone of the Jagdwaffe (Fighter Force) of the Luftwaffe. Wikipedia

Name given to the strategic defensive aerial campaign fought by the Luftwaffe air arm of the combined Wehrmacht armed forces of Nazi Germany over German-occupied Europe and Nazi Germany during World War II. To prevent the destruction of German civilians, military and civil industries by the Western Allies. Wikipedia

German dive bomber and ground-attack aircraft. Designed by Hermann Pohlmann, it first flew in 1935. Wikipedia

Soviet ground-attack aircraft developed during World War II. Based on the single-seat Su-6 prototype. Wikipedia

Small German liaison aircraft built by Fieseler before and during World War II. Production continued in other countries into the 1950s for the private market. Wikipedia

German 1930s basic training aircraft which was used by the Luftwaffe during World War II. After serving in the Kaiserliche Marine in World War I, Carl Bücker moved to Sweden where he became managing director of Svenska Aero AB (Not to be confused with Svenska Aeroplan AB, SAAB). Wikipedia

Transport aircraft used by the Luftwaffe during World War II. The powered version of the Gotha Go 242 military glider transport. Wikipedia

German heavy fighter and Schnellbomber used by the Luftwaffe during World War II. Incremental improvement of the Me 210, it had a new wing plan, longer fuselage and engines of greater power. Wikipedia

German single-engine, jet-powered fighter aircraft fielded by the Luftwaffe in World War II. Designed and built quickly and made primarily of wood as metals were in very short supply and prioritised for other aircraft. Wikipedia

The aircraft in this list include prototype versions of aircraft used by the German Luftwaffe during World War II and unfinished wartime experimental programmes. In the former, development can stretch back to the 1920s and in the latter the project must have started between 1939-1945. Wikipedia

Originally designed as a parasite aircraft to protect Luftwaffe bomber formations during World War II. During its protracted development, a wide variety of other roles were suggested for it. Wikipedia

German monoplane bomber and civilian airliner designed in the early 1930s, and employed by various air forces on both sides during World War II. The civilian model Ju 86B could carry ten passengers. Wikipedia

World War II dive bomber and interceptor aircraft of the German Luftwaffe that never saw service. The unorthodox design featured a top-mounted BMW 003 jet engine (identical in terms of make and position to the powerplant used by the Heinkel He 162) and the pilot in a prone position. Wikipedia

Large German, four-engine long-range transport, maritime patrol aircraft and heavy bomber used by the Luftwaffe late in World War II that had been developed from an earlier airliner. Developed directly from the Ju 90 airliner, versions of which had been evaluated for military purposes, and was intended to replace the relatively slow Focke-Wulf Fw 200 Condor which by 1942 was proving increasingly vulnerable when confronted by Royal Air Force aircraft the Fw 200's airframe lacked sufficient strength for the role in any case. Wikipedia

German fighter aircraft designed by Walter and Siegfried Günter. One of four aircraft designed to compete for the 1933 fighter contract of the Luftwaffe, in which it came second behind the Messerschmitt Bf 109. Wikipedia

German high-altitude reconnaissance and bomber aircraft developed in World War II. Never used operationally, only existing as prototype airframes. Wikipedia

German World War II-era biplane of wood and fabric construction used by Luftwaffe training units. Although obsolete by the start of World War II, the Go 145 remained in operational service until the end of the War in Europe as a night harassment bomber. Wikipedia

1930s United States twin-engine ground-attack aircraft. The production test version of that company's A-14 Shrike. Wikipedia


Contents

Henschel Hs 129 B-1/R1
General Historical Information
Place of origin Germany
Speed 355 km/h
General Ingame Information
Debut v0.4
Used by Germany
Romania
Hungary
Guns 2× 7,9 mm MG-17 - 1000 rounds
2× 20 mm MG-151/20 - 250 rounds
Bombs 2× 50-kg bombs
4× 50-kg bombs
Historical Picture

The production Hs 192B-1 series went into service first with 4./SchG 1 at Lippstadt in April 1942 and also became operational on the Eastern front, where the type was to be used most widely, although it served also in North North Africa, Italy and in France after the D-Day landings. Sub-variants of the M 129B-1 series included the Hs 129B-1/R1 with additional offensive armament in the form of two 110 lbs (50 kg) bombs or 96 anti-personnel bombs the Hs 129B-1/R2 with a 30-mm MK 101 cannon beneath the fuselage the Hs 129B-1/R3 with four extra MG 17 machine-guns the Hs 129B-1/R4 with an ability to carry one 551 lbs (250 kg) bomb instead of the Hs 129B-1/R1's bombload and the Hs 129B-1/R5 which incorporated an Rb 50/30 camera installation for reconnaissance duties.


German Aircraft of WWII

In November of 1942, two units of Hs 129’s were sent to Tunisia to provide air support to Rommel’s Afrika Korps that was in a desperate situation. For the first few days, everything went fine, and the new German plane created a real panic among the British tank units. Unfortunately for the Luftwaffe, the Gnome-Rhône motor was extremely sensible to desert sand, and after three weeks, the whole Geschwader was out of business… Thus ended the short career of the Henschel 129 in North Africa.

Henschel was one of four companies (the others being Focke-Wulf, Gotha and Hamburger Flugzeugbau) to which, in April 1937, the Reichsluftfahrtministerium issued a specification for a twin-engine ground-attack aircraft. It was required to carry at least two 20-mm MG FF cannon and to have extensive armour plating protection for crew and engines. The two designs for which development contracts were awarded on 1 October 1937 were the Focke-Wulf Fw 189C and Henschel Hs 129. The latter was another Friedrich Nicolaus design with a light alloy stressed-skin fuselage of triangular section. It contained a small cockpit with a restricted view, necessitating the removal of some instruments to the inboard sides of the engine cowlings. The windscreen was made of 75-mm (2.95-in) armoured glass and the nose section was manufactured from armour plating. Nose armament comprised two 20-mm MG FF cannon and two 7.92-mm (0.31-in) MG 17 machine-guns. The prototype flew in the spring of 1939, powered by two 465-hp (347-kW) Argus As 410 engines, and two further prototypes were flown competitively against the modified Fw 189 development aircraft for the Fw 189C. Although the Henschel aircraft was considered to be underpowered and sluggish, and to have too small a cockpit, the company was awarded a contract for eight pre-production Hs 129A-o aircraft, and these were issued initially to 5 (Schlacht)./LG 2 in 1940, but transferred to 4./SG 101 at Paris-Orly in 1941, with the exception of two which were converted at Schonefeld to accept Gnome-Rhone 14M 4/5 radial engines. It was with this powerplant that 10 Hs 129B-0 development aircraft were delivered from December 1941 improvements included a revised cockpit canopy and the introduction of electrically actuated trim tabs, and armament comprised two 20mm MG 151/20 cannon and two 7.92-mm (0.31-in) MG 17 machine-guns. The production Hs 192B-1 series went into service first with 4./SchG 1 at Lippstadt in April 1942 and also became operational on the Eastern Front, where the type was to be used most widely, although it served also in North Africa, Italy, and in France after the D-Day landings.

Sub-variants of the Hs 129B-1 series included the Hs 129B-11R1 with additional offensive armament in the form of two 110lb (50-kg) bombs or 96 anti-personnel bombs the Hs 129B-11R2 with a 30-mm MK 101 cannon beneath the fuselage the Hs 129B-11R3 with four extra MG 17 machine-guns the Hs 129B-11R4 with an ability to carry one 551-lb (250-kg) bomb instead of the Hs 129B11R1′ s bombload and the Hs 129B-11R5 which incorporated an Rb 50/30 camera installation for reconnaissance duties.

By the end of 1942 the growing capability of Soviet tank battalions made it essential to develop a version of the Hs 129 with greater firepower, leading to the Hs 129B-2 series which was introduced into service in the early part of 1943. They included the Hs 129B-21R1 which carried two 20-mm MG 151/20 cannon and two 13-mm (0.51-in) machine-guns the generally similar Hs 129B-21R2 introduced an additional 30-mm MK 103 cannon beneath the fuselage the Hs 129B-21R3 had the two MG 13s deleted but was equipped with a 37mm BK 3,7 gun and the Hs 129B-21R4 carried a 75-mm (2.95-in) PaK 40 gun in an underfuselage pod. Final production variant was the Hs 129B-3 of which approximately 25 were built and which, developed from the Hs 129B-2/R4, substituted an electra-pneumatically operated 75-mm BK gun for the PaK 40. The lethal capability of the Hs 129B-21R2 was amply demonstrated in the summer of 1943 during Operation ‘Citadel’, the German offensive which was intended to regain for them the initiative on the Eastern Front after the defeat at Stalingrad. During this operation some 37,421 sorties were flown, at the end of which the Luftwaffe claimed the destruction of 1,100 tanks. However accurate these figures, not all of those destroyed could be credited to Hs 129s, but there is little doubt that the 879 of these aircraft that were built (including prototypes) played a significant role on the Eastern Front.

Specification
Henschel Hs 129B-1/R2
Type: single-seat ground-attack aircraft
Powerplant: two 700-hp (522-kW) Gnome-Rhone 14M 4/5 14-cylinder radial piston engines
Performance: maximum speed 253 mph (407 km/h) at 12,565 ft (3830 m) service ceiling 29,525 ft (9000 m) range 348 miles (560 km)
Weights: empty 8,400 lb (3810 kg) maximum take-off 11,2661b (5110 kg)
Dimensions: span 46 ft 7 in (14.20 m) length 31 ft 11 ¾ in (9.75 m) height 10 ft 8 in (3.25 m) wing area 312.16 sq ft (29.00 m2)
Armament: two 20-mm MG 151/20 cannon, two 7.92mm (0.31-in) MG 17 machine-guns and one 30-mm MK 101 cannon
Operators: Luftwaffe, Romania


Radical new weapons

The outstanding example of the new weapons was the radically different Forstersonde SG 113A. This comprised a giant tube resembling a ship's funnel in the centre fuselage just behind the fuselage tank. Inside this were fitted six smooth-bore tubes, each 1.6 m (5 ft 3 in) long and of 77-mm caliber. The tubes were arranged to fire down and slightly to the rear, and were triggered as a single group by a photocell sensi­tive to the passage of a tank close beneath. Inside each tube was a com­bined device consisting of a 45-mm armour-piercing shell (with a small high-explosive charge) pointing downwards and a heavy steel cylinder of full calibre pointing upwards. Between the two was the propellant charge, with a weak tie-link down the centre to joint the parts together. When the SG 113A was fired, the shells were driven down by their driving sabots at high velocity, while the steel slugs were fired out of the top of each tube to cancel the recoil. Unfortunately, trials at Tamewitz Waffenprüfplatz showed that the photocell system often failed to pick out correct targets.

Another impressive weapon was the huge PaK 40 anti-tank gun of 75-mm calibr e. This gun weighed 1500 kg (3,306 lb) in its original ground-based form, and fired a 3.2-kg (7-lb) tungsten-carbide cored

projectile at 933 m/sec (3,060 ft/sec). Even at a range of 1000 m (3,280 ft), the shell could pen etrate 133 mm (5Y4 in)of armour if it hit square-on. Modified as the PaK 40L, the gun had a much bigger muzzle brake to reduce recoil and electro-pneumatic operation to feed successive shells automatically. Installed in the Hs 129B-3/Wa, the giant gun was provided with 26 rounds which could he fired at the cyclic rate of 40 rounds per minute, so that three or four could be fired on a single pass. Almost always, a single good hit would destroy a tank, even from head-on. The main problem was that the PaK 40L was too powerful a gun for the aircraft. Quite apart from the severe

In order to provide a hard-hitting weapon against Soviet tanks, the

Hs 129B-3/Wa was evolved , with a 75-mm Panzerabwehrkanone 40 in a large ventral fairing. Performance and agility were drastically reduced, although one shot could knock out the biggest Soviet tank.


Watch the video: Abdul Majeed Abdullah.. Alf Marra. عبد المجيد عبد الله.. الف مرة