Adena Miller Rich

Adena Miller Rich

Adena Miller was born in 1888. After graduating from Oberlin College in Ohio she worked at the Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy.

In 1916 Adena was appointed as civic director of the Women's City Club in Cincinnati. She later returned to Chicago and with her husband, Kenneth Rich, became residents at the Hull House Settlement.

Adena had been involved in the struggle for women's suffrage and in 1923 was elected vice-president of the League of Women Voters, where she worked closely with the president, Maud Park. In 1926 left the post to become director of the Immigrants' Protective League.

On the death of Jane Addams in 1935, Adena, who had lived at Hull House Settlement for sixteen years, was appointed by the Hull House Association board of trustees as the new head resident. However, Adena clashed with the increasingly dogmatic Louise Bowen, president of the board of trustees and was resigned in 1937 and was replaced by Charlotte Carr as head resident.

Adena Miller Rich died in 1967.


Adena Culture

The Adena people were mobile hunter-gatherer- gardeners. The Adena people lived in extended family groups of roughly 15 to 20 people. Several extended families formed a lineage or clan. Between four to six lineage/clans would have made up an Adena social group. Leaders likely led by consent, and leadership was awarded based on merit. Division of labor was based on gender and age. Men would have been responsible for clearing the ground and hunting. Women would have been responsible for raising the children, gathering, and gardening. Religious leaders and healers, of both sexes, were elders.

The Adena people lived in small camps, often on terraces by streams or on ridgetops, and rock shelters. They moved within their home territories to best make use of seasonal wildlife and plants. They did not always return to their campsites year after year. Their homes would have been small, around 200 square feet, and most of their daily activities would have taken place outside.

Adena people, heavily built and strong, were small in stature. They rarely grew to 6 ft tall. Like preindustrial people worldwide. Adena people generally did not live much past 45 years old. Most people experienced periods of malnutrition and infection in childhood. As adults, many suffered from arthritis, anemia, and infections.

Adena people traded locally with their neighbors. They also participated in long-distance trade networks. They traded local barite for copper and marine shells.

Mounds
Only a fraction of the Adena people that lived in the Bluegrass were buried below or within mounds. They may have been important members of Adena extended families or lineage/clans. Or, they may have held important social positions in their communities, like lineage/clan leader, diplomat, healer, or shaman.They were adult men and women of all ages.

Earthworks

Adena people created impressive earthworks with only digging sticks, baskets, and human muscle. Adena earthworks and the structures beneath them were ritual sites that enclosed sacred or spiritually significant spaces. They were situated on the landscape where neighboring groups interacted.

Technology
Adena people made use of plant fibers and sinew to make twine, cord, and yarn, which they turned into bags, foot gear, and clothing. Animal skins and furs were also utilized for the same purpose. They used herbal medicines to treat tooth, stomach and head aches as well as fevers. They also made pottery tempered with limestone, that they occasionally decorated with geometric designs.


Census records can tell you a lot of little known facts about your Miller Rich ancestors, such as occupation. Occupation can tell you about your ancestor's social and economic status.

There are 3,000 census records available for the last name Miller Rich. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Miller Rich census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 642 immigration records available for the last name Miller Rich. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 1,000 military records available for the last name Miller Rich. For the veterans among your Miller Rich ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 3,000 census records available for the last name Miller Rich. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Miller Rich census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 642 immigration records available for the last name Miller Rich. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 1,000 military records available for the last name Miller Rich. For the veterans among your Miller Rich ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


Old Mill at Berry College

Constructed in 1930, the Old Mill boasts an iron hub which had originally been of service at Hermitage, an early manufacturing community near the Shannon village between Rome and Calhoun, Georgia, and was a gift to Berry from The Republic Mining (bauxite) and Manufacturing Company. Henry Ford had the hub moved to Berry where the wheel was rebuilt.  

The wooden overshot waterwheel, considered one of the largest in the world at 42 feet in diameter, was constructed by student workers. For many years, the mill was operated by Mr. Green Berry Goodson, a white-bearded miller who ground Berry-grown corn into meal and grits.  Water is piped directly from Berry's reservoir lake to the wheel. Once primed, the force of gravity is strong enough to push the water up the stone column and over the wheel, causing it to turn.

During 1977 the wheel was completely rebuilt as a cooperative project involving Berry students, staff, alumni and friends, and was dedicated to the memory of Mr. Gordon Keown on June 3, 1978. Mr. Keown was an alumnus of Berry, a long-time staff member and acting director of the Berry Schools from 1942-1944.

During 1985, physical plant staff and student volunteers restored the mechanism and made grinding of corn meal once again possible. The Old Mill is operated on special occasions such as Mountain Day. When available, the Oak Hill Gift Shop sells cornmeal ground at the Old Mill.


3 Hopewell-Adena Comparisons

The Hopewell and Adena were similar however, the Hopewell, who replaced the Adena, was a bigger group. Evidence of their existence turns up at about A.D. 100 but traces of their culture disappear around A.D. 500. Hopewell wasn’t a tribal name and no one knows what they called themselves. The Hopewell mounds were bigger than those of the Adena cultures and their burials involved more ceremony. Hopewell burials included putting ochre and other pigments on the body. Their stone and clay items had a refinement that indicated the Hopewell sculptors and potters were more proficient than the Adena.


Former Lindbergh property rich in history

1 of 44 View of the private beach on 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

2 of 44 View of the private beach and home on 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

4 of 44 View of the private beach and steps leading to the home on 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

5 of 44 View of the private beach on 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

7 of 44 View of the private beach on 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

8 of 44 View of the private beach and steps leading to the home on 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

10 of 44 View of the water from the yard at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

11 of 44 View of the private beach and steps leading to the home on 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

13 of 44 View of the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

14 of 44 View of the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

16 of 44 View of the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

17 of 44 View of the water from the yard at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

19 of 44 View of the water from the yard at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

20 of 44 View of the the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

22 of 44 View of the living area leading to the dinning area in the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

23 of 44 View of the master bedroom in the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

25 of 44 View of the front door of the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

26 of 44 View of the dinning room and living area in the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

28 of 44 View of the kitchen in the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

29 of 44 View of the kitchen island in the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

31 of 44 View of the kitchen in the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

32 of 44 View of the master bathroom leading to the changing room in the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

34 of 44 View of the master bedroom changing room in the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

35 of 44 View from the second bedroom in the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

37 of 44 View of the office loft area in the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

38 of 44 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

40 of 44 View of the patio at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

41 of 44 View of the the home at 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

43 of 44 View overlooking the water from the patio of 53 Contentment Island Road in Darien, Conn., which is for sale. It was once Charles Lindbergh's land. May 19, 2014. BK Angeletti/B.K. Angeletti Show More Show Less

DARIEN -- Land Lindbergh still remembers running around on the property his parents -- famed aviator Charles and Anne Lindbergh -- purchased at 53 Contentment Island Road from John Sherman Hoyt just after World War II. The scar on his knee is still visible from landing on a sharp rock while he ran along the water's edge.

"It was a wild and rocky place, overgrown with old trees and heavy undergrowth, open to the waters of Long Island Sound and the violent storms that came through on occasion, which is why they loved it," Land Lindbergh wrote in an email.

There was, he said, a small one-room "writing studio" on the property, but it had no running water and was destroyed during a hurricane. The Lindberghs never lived on the property instead, they resided on Tokeneke Trail in Darien.

There were plans to build a home on the empty lot, but it never happened. The property includes 3 acres with 800 feet of waterfront, 8 acres of the Fish Islands and 34 acres of oyster beds.

Then along came Theodore Rousseau, one of the original Monuments Men who strived to recover plundered artwork during World War II. He purchased the property and built the 2,800-square foot eight-room home that stands there today.

Rousseau, who was a curator for the Metropolitan Museum of Art, knew what he was doing when he built the home, said Holly Hawes, a real estate agent with Halstead Property.

The Colonial house has a view from every window. Long Island Sound even can be seen from the chauffeur's room behind the detached two-car garage. Every day, the sunrise and sunset over the water can be seen from the property.

The property, which has had a short list of owners but plenty of history, was placed on the market May 13 for the first time in 40 years with a listing price of $19.9 million.

Judith and Edward Felder purchased the home in 1974 for $275,000 following Rousseau's death in 1973. Edward died in November 2013 and Judith in February.

"It's absolutely a little gem," said Robyn Kammerer, executive director of communications at Halstead Property, which is handling the listing. "Once you uncover it, you don't want to leave."

Hawes and her husband, David, who are representing the seller, were friends with the Felders while they were alive. Often, Holly said, Judith would invite her over to swim and float in the water off their private beach. The beach, much like the property, is a rarity. The sands are fine grain, unlike that found along the rest of Connecticut's coast. Sand never was trucked onto the property.

Up a small stone path and into the small gardens full of perennial flowers and plants is the entrance to the kitchen. The large floor-to-ceiling windows and wide sliding doors welcome guests into the dining room that is adjacent to the kitchen.

The St. Charles kitchen is a collectible, Kammerer said. The metal cabinets and drawers are in "remarkable condition."

While the three-bedroom home is a rare purchase, the property is the true sight to behold.

Along the water's edge in front of the house is a small rock wall that curves along the cliff's edge, reminiscent of Cliff Walk in Newport, R.I., but with a much shorter drop.

The Fish Islands stand between the home and the rest of Long Island Sound.

For as long as the Felders owned the property, the islands were made available to boaters, kayakers and anyone else out in the water, according to Holly and David Hawes.

David Hawes recalls Edward Felder saying how much he enjoyed sharing the property and the Fish Islands with people. As David spoke about the Fish Islands, an oyster-farming boat slowly made its way though the water.

"It's a national treasure," David said.

But the water off the Contentment Island property also has a bit of interesting history.

In June 1781, during the Revolutionary War, the Loyalists planned to capture one of southwest Connecticut's most influential Patriots: the Rev. Moses Mather, of the Middlesex Parish -- the land that once was part of Stamford and would become Darien, according to "The Story of Darien, Connecticut."

The Loyalists were from Middlesex and New Canaan and knew the area, which made navigation easy on a moonless night. They made their way to the Middlesex shore via the Fish Islands and onto land where they surrounded the parish.

In the afternoon, once the parish was full, the Loyalists took it captive -- 50 men and 40 horses. The Loyalists marched their captives along Old Kings Highway to the Fish Islands and across the sandbar at low tide. Following an exchange of gunfire with the Patriots, the Loyalists loaded the prisoners and horses aboard a ship and set sail across the Sound to Long Island.

It would take five months for all of the captors to be set free. Mather was one of the last to reclaim his freedom after being released on Dec. 27, 1781.

"The property has great personality," Holly Hawes said.

At one time, the property served as inspiration for world-renowned artist John Frederick Kensett, who painted the landscapes at the Contentment Island Road property. Some of Kensett's work is displayed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

"People appreciate the naturalness of the property," Holly said.

"Someone can create their dream home or this can be their dream home," Kammerer said.


Ohio's first capitals | Original statehouse is gone, but rich history remains in Chillicothe

Columbus has been the capital city of the Buckeye State since 1816. But before that, two other cities played the role of capital: Chillicothe and Zanesville. This week and next, the Dispatch will explore the two former capitals with an eye toward their history.

CHILLICOTHE &mdash Back when Columbus was still just a gleam in the eyes of land speculators, two other Ohio cities served as the first state capitals. Those cities, Chillicothe and Zanesville, now celebrate their role as the seat of government at several historical sites that are fun and interesting day-trip destinations for history-minded travelers.

When statehood was granted in 1803, the statehouse was located in Chillicothe, which remained the capital until 1816, with a two-year gap from 1810 to 1812 when the capital moved to Zanesville.

Although Ohio&rsquos first statehouse in Chillicothe is long gone, a replica built in 1940 to house the local newspaper still stands a block from the original site. The newspaper has since moved, too. Today the faux capitol, which incorporates a few of the original statehouse stones, houses several other commercial offices.

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(Travelers who would like to get a good feeling for what the Chillicothe statehouse was really like can visit Indiana&rsquos old capitol building at Corydon, which closely resembles the structure that stood in Ohio, and today is furnished as both capitols would have been during legislative sessions.)

The Ross County Courthouse sits on the site of the original statehouse, which was demolished in 1852. Work on the new courthouse, one of the oldest in Ohio, began in 1855 and the building opened in 1858. The courthouse&rsquos beauty and history takes away some of the sting of the first capitol building's demise.

The story of early Ohio is related in depth at Adena Mansion & Gardens, the home of Thomas Worthington, called the &ldquoFather of Ohio Statehood.&rdquo

Worthington, who successfully lobbied political ally Thomas Jefferson to support Ohio statehood, was one of the new state&rsquos first U.S. senators and later was elected the sixth Ohio governor. His mansion, Ohio&rsquos equivalent to Mount Vernon or Monticello, was built in 1807 and was the place to stop in Ohio for illustrious guests during that early period.

Dignitaries entertained at Adena included Shawnee Indian chief Tecumseh, President James Monroe, future president William Henry Harrison and fabled Kentucky statesman Henry Clay. Visitors can tour the restored mansion with a costumed guide and explore the gardens designed to resemble those of Worthington&rsquos day.

The adjacent museum tells the history of early statehood and the political battles that saw Chillicothe gain and lose and gain and lose the seat of state government. A video in Statehood Theater outlines the politics that swirled around Chillicothe in the days leading to Ohio entering the union. The villain in the tale, at least according to Thomas Worthington, was Arthur St. Clair, the appointed governor of the Northwest Territories. St. Clair wanted to delay statehood and divide what is now Ohio at the Scioto River, forming two states with capitals at Marietta and Cincinnati, rendering Chillicothe politically impotent.

St. Clair lost. But unlike the first statehouse, the modest, nondescript building that served as his headquarters (and is now an accounting company&rsquos office) still stands downtown.

Far grander than St. Clair&rsquos digs (but not as grand as Adena) are the two mansions that serve as the home of the Ross County Heritage Center. Connected by an atrium, the houses contain the county museum and research library.

Also on the site is the Knoles Log House, constructed around 1820 and later moved to the museum complex.

The Heritage Center has a large, well-curated collection of local history, including a large display of ancient Indian artifacts and the table upon which the Ohio Constitution was first signed. Visitors also will see the larger-than-life statue of Ohio Gov. William Allen that once stood in Statuary Hall in the U.S. Capitol.

(Allen, a pro-slavery Democrat who opposed the Civil War, was deemed no longer fit to stand as one of two Ohio representatives in Statuary Hall and, in 2016, was replaced by inventor Thomas Edison, who was born in Milan. But, truth be told, Edison didn&rsquot invent anything during his short time in the Buckeye State.)

Nearby is another historic site, the Lucy Webb Hayes Heritage Center, located in the house where the wife of 19th President Rutherford B. Hayes was born in 1831. Visitors can tour the home and learn about &ldquoLemonade Lucy,&rdquo who eschewed serving alcohol in the White House, but was still regarded as a first-rate hostess and first lady.

The most historic site in Chillicothe, and perhaps the entire state, is actually prehistoric.

The Mound City group at Hopewell Culture National Historical Park marks the site of the largest concentration of ancient earthworks in the country.

A lot of Ohio&rsquos ancient earthworks have fared no better than the first statehouse. Those at Mound City were no exception, and many of the mounds there were leveled when the site was covered by Camp Sherman, a World War I training camp. But the mounds have been reconstructed on their original locations, and visitors can get a good look at the ancient site that might have served as a place of religious pilgrimage.

The park&rsquos museum also contains information about the extensive earthworks in Ohio and displays many of the beautiful artifacts recovered from Ohio mounds.

The word Chillicothe, as it happens, is derived from a Shawnee term for the village where the tribal leader dwelt. Although the city might no longer qualify, its historical importance remains.


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Robert Hanssen: American Traitor

One of the most damaging double agents in modern American history, Robert Hanssen gave the Soviets, and later the Russians, thousands of pages of classified material that revealed such sensitive national security secrets as the identities of Soviets spying for the U.S., specifics about America’s nuclear operations and the existence of an FBI-built tunnel underneath the Soviet Embassy in Washington.

Hanssen’s double life began in 1979 and ended in 2001, when he was arrested after the FBI discovered, thanks to help from an ex-KGB officer, that Hanssen was a mole. A church-going father of six, Hanssen is thought to have been motivated by money rather than ideological beliefs. While covertly working for Moscow on and off over the years, he was paid $600,000 in cash and diamonds, with another $800,000 supposedly held for him in a Russian bank. Hanssen was only the third agent in FBI history charged with spying.

Born in 1944, Hanssen was a Chicago native and son of a police officer. He graduated from Knox College in 1966 then attended dental school at Northwestern University before quitting the program to earn an MBA. He went on to work as an investigator for the Chicago Police Department then joined the FBI in 1976. He worked for the agency in Indiana and later New York City.
Hanssen’s deceit began in 1979, when he volunteered to spy for GRU, the Soviet military intelligence agency. He soon informed the Soviets that one of their generals, Dmitri Polyakov, was in fact a CIA informant who𠆝 been spying for America since the 1960s. The Soviets eventually executed Polyakov.

In 1980, after Hanssen’s wife reportedly caught him with some suspicious-looking papers, he admitted to selling secrets to the Soviets, but claimed the information he𠆝 given them was worthless. At his wife’s insistence, Hanssen promised to sever ties with the Soviets and confessed to a priest, who told him to donate the dirty money to charity. However, in 1985, Hanssen resumed his espionage activities, this time for the KGB. He gave the KGB the names of three Soviet officers collaborating with the CIA and FBI. The three spies were arrested and executed.

Meanwhile, Hanssen continued to rise through the FBI’s ranks, eventually working in senior counterintelligence roles. In 1991, with the Soviet Union breaking apart, he stopped spying, possibly due to fears that he𠆝 be found out. But In 1999, while serving as the FBI liaison to the U.S. State Department, he once again resumed his double-agent career, this time for the SVR, a post-
Soviet, Russian intelligence service.

Hanssen’s downfall came in 2000 when the FBI, which by then suspected there was a mole in its ranks, paid $7 million to an ex-KGB officer to procure information from SVR headquarters that helped identify Hanssen as the turncoat. The FBI put Hanssen under surveillance in late 2000, and on February 18, 2001, he was arrested at a park in Vienna, Virginia, after making a drop of classified documents in a plastic garbage bag for the Russians. Nearby, FBI agents discovered a bag with $50,000 in cash, intended as Hanssen’s payment. When he was arrested, Hanssen reportedly exclaimed, “What took you so long?”

An artist’s drawing shows alleged US spy Robert Hanssen during Hanssen’s arraignment on spying charges. (Credit: MANNY CENETA/AFP/Getty Images)

In order to avoid the death penalty, Hanssen struck a deal with the government and agreed to cooperate. In July 2001, he pleaded guilty to 15 counts of espionage. The following May, he was sentenced to 15 consecutive life sentences behind bars with no possibility of parole. He is doing his time at the federal supermax prison near Florence, Colorado, along with such notorious fellow inmates include “Unabomber” Ted Kaczynski, Oklahoma City Bombing co-conspirator Terry Nichols and Ramzi Yousef, who carried out the 1993 World Trade Center bombing.

Hanssen wasn’t the first FBI agent arrested for spying for the Russians. In 1984, 17 years before Hanssen’s arrest, Richard Miller, a 20-year veteran who was stationed at the FBI’s foreign counterintelligence unit in Los Angeles at the time of his arrest, was arrested for selling classified documents to Russian agents, one of whom he was having an affair with. In 1986, Miller was convicted and sentenced to life in prison. His conviction later was overturned but at a second trial in 1990 he was again found guilty. Miller was released from prison in 1994.

The second FBI agent caught spying for Moscow was Earl Pitts, who volunteered to become a mole for the KGB in 1987. He handed over classified information to the Russians until 1992, by which point they𠆝 paid him more than $220,000. In 1996, Pitts was caught in an FBI sting operation. He pleaded guilty to espionage and in 1997 was given 27 years in prison.

Robert Hanssen shares the title of one of America’s most notorious moles with Aldrich Ames. A CIA operative who spent more than 30 years with the agency and specialized in Soviet and Russian intelligence services, Ames was arrested for spying for Moscow in February 1994, almost seven years to the day before Hanssen was caught.

Former CIA officer Aldrich Ames following his arraignment in 1994. (Credit: LUKE FRAZZA/AFP/Getty Images)

The son of a CIA officer, Ames began working for the CIA in the early 1960s and started selling classified information to the Soviets in 1985. Like Hanssen, he volunteered his services rather than being recruited. Apparently motivated by greed, Ames raked in some $2.5 million in illicit payments from the KGB and other Russian spy groups over the years. CIA agents grew suspicious of Ames when they noticed he was living seemingly above his means.


Прагматичный подход

Увидели свет первые часы Richard Mille – модель RM 001 Tourbillon, выпущенная в количестве 17 экземпляров. За ней последовала вторая модель с турбийоном, RM 002, развивающая потенциал RM 001, которая продемонстрировала еще два новаторских решения: плата из титана и индикатор выбранной функции – режим завода, нейтральное положение или режим ручной настройки.

Richard Mille представляет модель RM 003 Tourbillon с индикацией времени второго часового пояса и становится брендом, который оказал наибольшую поддержку первому заезду Le Mans Classic – уникальной ретроспективе легендарной 24-часовой гонки.

Премьера модели RM 004 Split Seconds Chronograph. Работа по усовершенствованию этих часов продолжалась более пяти лет. Вместо традиционного метода, основанного на применении колонного колеса, которое останавливается и приводится в движение системой рычагов, бренд разработал новаторскую систему сплит-секундного хронографа с титановым блокиратором. Оба его плеча взаимодействуют с колесом одновременно, блокируя трансмиссию сплит-секундной стрелки одним плавным движением.

Выпуск сложнейшей модели RM 008 Tourbillon Split Seconds Chronograph. Коллекцию Richard Mille пополнили модель RM 005 Automatic с указателем даты и первая модель со сверхлегким турбийоном RM 006, разработанная при участии первого партнера RM – Фелипе Масса.

Richard Mille представляет RM 007 Automatic, свои первые женские часы, и экспериментальную модель RM 009 Tourbillon Felipe Massa, выпущенную ограниченной серией в количестве 25 экземпляров. В ней используется материал ALUSIC®, применяемый в аэрокосмической отрасли.

В Гонконге открывается первый бутик Richard Mille.

Richard Mille входит в мир больших яхт и ведущих шкиперов: в партнерстве с компанией Perini Navi, мировым лидером по производству элитных яхт, появляется модель RM 014 Tourbillon Perini Navi.

Увидела свет модель RM 012 Tourbillon – крайне сложные в изготовлении. часы с архитектурной трубчатой конструкцией, минималистской структурой и эффектными линиями, образующими идеальную визуальную гармонию.

Бренд становится членом Фонда Высокого часового искусства и представляет RM 016. Эта ультратонкая новинка является первой моделью прямоугольной формы в коллекции, известной часами с корпусом формы tonneau, ставшим визитной карточкой Richard Mille.

Представлена модель RM 011 Flyback Chronograph Felipe Massa, которой предстоит стать знаковой.

На женевском Гран-при часового искусства модель RM 012 Tourbillon получает самый престижный приз – «Золотую стрелку».

Richard Mille представляет две уникальные новинки – модели RM 020 Tourbillon Pocket Watch и RM 018 Tourbillon Boucheron, в механизме которых используются колеса, выточенные из драгоценных и полудрагоценных камней.

Специально к исторической гонке Le Mans Classic, проводимой в четвертый раз, выпущена особая версия модели RM 011, Le Mans Classic Limited Edition, в количестве 150 экземпляров.

На этот год приходится выпуск целого ряда новинок, включая первые дайверские часы бренда, первые в коллекции модели с круглым корпусом RM 025 Tourbillon Chronograph, а также женские ювелирные часы с турбийоном RM 019 и RM 023 Automatic.

Richard Mille впервые принимает участие в Международном салоне Высокого часового искусства (SIHH), а несколько месяцев спустя представляет модель RM 027 Tourbillon, которая украшает запястье Рафаэля Надаля, нового партнера бренда, во время его выступления на турнире «Ролан Гаррос».

Мишель Йео становится первой женщиной, присоединившейся к семье Richard Mille, а бренд выступает главным партнером самой первой регаты Les Voiles de St. Barth.

Увидела свет первая ультратонкая модель с турбийоном разработки Richard Mille – RM 017 в прямоугольном корпусе.

Бренд увеличивает срок действия гарантии на свои часы с трех до пяти лет ( система RM «3+2»).

Гольфист Бубба Уотсон и игрок в поло Пабло МакДоноу становятся партнерами RM.

Модель RM 031 High Performance входит в ряд самых точных часов в мире благодаря исключительным хронометрическим качествам: погрешность хода ее механизма составляет менее 30 секунд в месяц.

Модель RM 056 становится первыми в мире часами с корпусом формы tonneau, изготовленным из цельного сапфирового стекла.

С выпуском часов RM 039 Aviation Chronograph бренд покоряет мир авиации. Эта модель, насчитывающая более 1000 деталей, становится одним из самых сложных творений современного Высокого часового искусства.

Объявлена новость о партнерстве бренда с ямайским спринтером Йоханом Блейком.

Модель RM 27-01 Tourbillon Rafael Nadal устанавливает новый рекорд в области высокотехнологичных устройств, став самыми легкими в мире часами с турбийоном: ее вес вместе с ремешком не превышает 18,83 г.

Итальянская гольфистка Диана Луна становится первой спортсменкой-партнером бренда. Также к семье Richard Mille присоединяется автогонщик Себастьен Леб.

В этом году, объявленном брендом «Годом женщины», коллекция Richard Mille пополняется автоматическими калибрами RM 07-01 и RM 037 собственного производства, первым браслетом из драгоценного металла, а также моделями RM 19-01 Tourbillon и RM 51-01 Tourbillon Michelle Yeoh.

К семье RM присоединяются еще два спортсмена: французский лыжник Алекси Пентюро и американская гольфистка Кристи Керр.

Организован первый конкурс Chantilly Arts & Elegance Richard Mille.

На Международном салоне Высокого часового искусства (SIHH) представлена модель RM 19-02 Tourbillon Fleur – первые автоматические часы с парящим турбийоном собственного производства.

Несколько месяцев спустя увидел свет RM 27-02 Tourbillon Rafael Nadal с первой платой типа «монокок».

В сентябре Richard Mille представляет RM 69 Tourbillon Erotic и RM 26-02 Tourbillon Evil Eye.

2016 год отмечен появлением целого ряда новых партнеров, таких как авиапроизводитель Airbus Corporate Jets (ACJ), команды Haas F1 и Mclaren F1, немецкая чемпионка по выездке Джессика фон Бредов-Верндль и чемпион мира по ралли Себастьен Ожье.

Richard Mille представляет модель с турбийоном RM 50-02 ACJ, модель RM 67-01 Automatic Extra-flat с механизмом собственного производства и собственную механическую перьевую ручку.

RM 68-01 Tourbillon Cyril Kongo – первый опыт совместной работы бренда и уличного художника в рамках арт-проекта по созданию современного часового произведения.

В рамках конкурса Chantilly Arts & Élégance Richard Mille состоялась премьера нового поколения эмблематической модели RM 011: RM 11-03.

Richard Mille представляет часы RM 50-03 Tourbillon McLaren F1, созданные при участии знаменитой команды Формулы-1. В данной модели Richard Mille впервые в истории часового производства использует принципиально новый материал Graph TPT® – высокотехнологичный графеносодержащий композит.

К семье Richard Mille присоединяются Симон Пажно, французский гонщик серии IndyCar, и австралийская актриса Марго Робби.

Часы, выдерживающие ускорения величиной до 10 000 «g»: RM 27-03 Tourbillon Rafael Nadal становится новой вехой в истории часового искусства.

RM 53-01 Tourbillon Pablo Mac Donough – вторые часы для игры в поло в коллекции бренда и первые часы в истории с многослойным сапфировым стеклом циферблата.

Richard Mille официально объявляет о своем партнерстве с McLaren Automotive в рамках Международного автосалона в Женеве, где бренд представляет модель RM 11-03 McLaren.

Запуск программы Richard Mille Young Talent Academy с целью выявления юных дарований и наведения «моста» между картингом и автогонками.

Премьера женской модели RM 71-01 Tourbillon Talisman, оснащенной первым собственным автоматическим механизмом с турбийоном.

Коллекция Bonbon – дерзкая коллекция Richard Mille в кислотно-яркой цветовой гамме – была представлена на последнем часовом салоне SIHH. Несколько месяцев спустя вниманию публики были предложены две новые модели с автоподзаводом: RM 33-02 и RM 11-04 Mancini.

Новая модель RM 62-01 ACJ оснащена функцией вибрирующего будильника: это новейшее часовое усложнение, выводящее функциональные характеристики часов на новый уровень.

Гран-при Сингапура 2019 года, один из этапов Формулы-1, стал для Richard Mille отличным поводом представить как модель RM 50-04 Tourbillon Split-Seconds Chronograph Kimi Räikkönen, так и своего партнера, в честь которого названа новинка. На другом конце света, в Майами, бренд представляет модель RM 52-05 Pharrell Williams.


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