John W. Thomason DD- 760 - History

John W. Thomason DD- 760 - History

John W. Thomason DD- 760

John W. Thomason

(DD-760: dp. 2,200; 1. 376'5"; b. 41'; dr. 15'8", s. 34 k.
cpl. 336; a. 6 5", 16 40mm., 20 20 mm, 2 act., 6 dcp., 5
21" tt.; cl. Allen 31. Sumner)

John W. Thomason (DD-760) was launched by Bethlehem Steel Co., San Francisco, Calif., 30 September 1944; sponsored by Mrs. John W. Thomason, widow of Colonel Thomason, and commissioned 11 October 1945, Comdr. W. L. Tagg in command.

The new destroyer conducted shakedown training out of San Diego, followed hy a series of Naval Reserve training cruises from Seattle and San Franciseo. From November 1947 to December 1948 the ship carried out training maneuvers. She sailed 5 December 1948 for her first deployment to the Far East, arriving Tsingtao 1 January 1949 for operations supporting the marines ashore in China. Departing 24 May 1949, John W. Thompson returned via Okinawa to San Diego 23 June 1949 and spent the remainder of the year training.

The ship returned to the Far East in early 1950, arriving Yokosuka 29 January. During this critical post-war period, she operated with British ships on training maneuvers off the coast of Indochina nud Korea, returning to San Diego 25 April 1950. Two months later, North Korean aggression plunged the United States and the United Nations into the Korean conflict. Thomason sailed 30 September to join the 7th Fleet, operating in the screen of carrier task groups pounding Communist positions and supply lines. She arrived Wonsan 9 November to patrol and bombard during the campaign against that port. Antliubmarine exercises took her to Pearl Harbor January-March 1951, but John W. Thon~ason arrived off Korea again 26 March to operate with Boxer (CV-21) and Princeton (CV-37) during air strikes. Two weeks in April were spent on the important Formosa Patrol, after which she returned to the carrier task force. With battleship New Jersey and another destroyer, she moved close in 24 May 1951 for gun bombardment of Yang Yang. The veteran ship returned to San Diego from this deployment 2 July 1951.

John W. Thomason sailed again for Korea 4 January 1952 and resumed operations with Task Force 77 off the coast of North Korea. She fired at raikvay targets 21 February in the SongJin area. During this period of stalemate on land, Navy strikes made up the bulk of offensive operations. The destroyer returned to Formosa Patrol duty in April. Back at Songiin and Wonsan 26 April, the ship screened larger units, took part in shore bombardment, and patrolled offshore. She was relieved by a British destroyer 21 June and returned to San Diego 11 July 1952.

The destroyer operated off the California coast for the
remainder of 1952, then sailed once more for Korea 21 February 1953. Formosa Patrol duty alternated with carrier task forcP operations off North Korea. Thon~ason arrived NVonsan harbor 2 July; while firing at shore targets five days later, she received numerous shrapnel hits in a duel with enemy batteries. Maneuvering in the restricted waters, Commander Ratliff skillfully returned the fire until three batteries had been silenced. She continued to operate off Wonsan until the armistice 27 July, and after a brief stay in Japan arrived San Diego 22 September 1953.

In 1954, 1955, and 1956 John W. Thomason returned to the now-familiar waters off Korea and in the explosive Formosa Strait, serving with 7th Fleet to keep the peace and protect American interest in the strategic area. The first half of 1957 was spent in readiness exercises off San Diego. Thomason then sailed 29 July for a cruise which took her to Pago Pago, Aukland, and Manus. Upon arrival Yokosuka 7 September 1957 she resumed operations in the Formosa Straits and antisubmarine exerci£es with 7th Fleet ships. The ship returned to San Diego 8 January 1958, and conducted manuevers off California and Hawaii.

In March 1959, John W. Thomason entered Long BeachNaval Shipyard as prototype ship for the new FRAM (Fleet Rehabilitation And Modernization) program. During this extensive repair and modernization period sho received a helicopter deck and hanger aft, variable depth sonar, the latest electronic equipment, and many improvements in living and working spaces. The conversion was followed by extensive trials and local training operations. As new flagship of Destroyer Division 72 she sailed S March 1961 for 7th Fleet duty. She sailed to the coast of Laos 27 April to help stabilize that volatile Southwest Asian country, patrolling for 21 days in a graphic demonstration of America's determination to prevent a Communist take-over. After further operation John W. Tho7nason sailed to San Diego, artlving 18 September 1961.

Extensive conversion and installation of new sonar equipment at Long Beach occupied the ship until July 1962. In December she took part in a massive antiaircraft exercise with units of the 1st Fleet off California. She sailed again for the Far East, a part of the readyhunter-killer group. En route, however, she took part in recovery operations for Major Cooper's Mercury Space shot as part of a task unit built around veteran carrier Kearsar'7e. During the cruise which followed, the ship perfected her antisubmarine warfare tactics and became familiar with her new equipment in operations with 7th Fleet and the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force. Thomason returned to San Diego 3 December 1963.

Most of 1964 was spent in ASW exercises in the Eastern Pacific. On 23 October, she sailed with Destroyer Division 213 for redeployment exercises in Hawaii. Exactly a month later, with four other destroyers, she got under way for the western Pacific screening Yorktown (CVS10), arrived Yokosuka, Japan, 4 December and joined the 7th Fleet in its unrelenting effort to preserve freedom in the Far West. In the spring she earned her first battle star for operating in the troubled waters off the coast of Indochina from 21 March to 28 April 1965.

After returning to the West Coast, she departed San Diego for the Far East 22 March 1966 and reached Danang 19 April and the same day took station a few miles south of Chu Lai. At the end of April she supported Operation "Osage," and landed north of Danang. On 13 May she sailed for Sasebo and upkeep. Back in the war zone 6 June, she provided gunfire support and supported Operation "Deckhouse I" from 17 to 23 June. That day she retired toward Hong Rong. The destroyer returned to gunfire support duties off South Vietnam 16 August. From the 18th to the 23d she supported the amphibious Ready Group and Special Landing Force in Operation "Deckhouse III." After visiting Guam and Japan, John W. Thomason headed home 9 September, reached San Diego on the 24th and operated off the West Coast until the end of the year and into 1967 preparing for further action in the defense of freedom.

John W. Thomason received seven battle stars for Korean service and three for Vietnam service.


USS John W. Thomason (DD-760)

USS John W. Thomason (DD-760) là một tàu khu trục lớp Allen M. Sumner được Hải quân Hoa Kỳ chế tạo trong Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ hai. Nó là chiếc tàu chiến duy nhất của Hải quân Mỹ được đặt theo tên Trung tá Thủy quân Lục chiến John William Thomason, Jr. (1893-1944), người được trao tặng Huân chương Chữ thập Hải quân do chiến đấu dũng cảm trong Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ nhất. Nhập biên chế khi Thế Chiến II đã kết thúc, con tàu tiếp tục phục vụ sau đó trong Chiến tranh Triều Tiên và Chiến tranh Việt Nam cho đến khi xuất biên chế năm 1970. Con tàu được chuyển cho Đài Loan năm 1974, và hoạt động cùng Hải quân Trung Hoa dân quốc như là chiếc ROCS Nan Yang (DD-17/DDG-917) cho đến khi ngừng hoạt động và bị đánh chìm như mục tiêu năm 2000. John W. Thomason được tặng thưởng bảy Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Chiến tranh Triều Tiên, và thêm ba Ngôi sao Chiến trận khác trong Chiến tranh Việt Nam.

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6 × pháo 5 in (130 mm)/38 caliber (3×2) trên bệ Mk 38 nòng đôi
12 × pháo phòng không Bofors 40 mm (2×4 & 2×2)
11 × pháo phòng không Oerlikon 20 mm
10 × ống phóng ngư lôi Mark 15 21 in (530 mm) (2×5)


Description

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Contents

The new destroyer conducted shakedown training out of San Diego, followed by a series of Naval Reserve training cruises from Seattle and San Francisco. From November 1947 to December 1948 the ship carried out training maneuvers. She sailed on 5 December 1948 for her first deployment to the Far East, arriving at Tsingtao on 1 January 1949 for operations supporting the Marines ashore in China. Departing 24 May 1949, John W. Thomason returned via Okinawa to San Diego on 23 June 1949 and spent the remainder of the year training. Ώ]

Korea [ edit ]

The ship returned to the Far East in early 1950, arriving at Yokosuka on 29 January. During this critical post-war period, she operated with British ships on training maneuvers off the coast of Indochina and Korea, returning to San Diego 25 April 1950. Two months later, North Korean aggression plunged the United States and the United Nations into the Korean War. Under the command of Gordon Chung-Hoon, John W. Thomason sailed on 30 September to join the 7th Fleet, operating in the screen of carrier task groups attacking enemy positions and supply lines. She arrived at Wonsan on 9 November to patrol and bombard during the campaign against that port. Antisubmarine exercises took her to Pearl Harbor from January–March 1951, but John W. Thomason arrived off Korea again on 26 March to operate with Boxer and Princeton during air strikes. Two weeks in April were spent on the important Formosa Patrol, after which she returned to the carrier task force. With battleship New Jersey and another destroyer, she moved close in 24 May 1951 for gun bombardment of Yang Yang. The destroyer returned to San Diego from this deployment 2 July 1951. Ώ]

John W. Thomason sailed again for Korea on 4 January 1952 and resumed operations with Task Force 77 off the coast of North Korea. She fired at railway targets 21 February in the Songjin area. During this period of stalemate on land, Navy strikes made up the bulk of offensive operations. The destroyer returned to Formosa Patrol duty in April. Back at Songjin and Wonsan on 26 April, the ship screened larger units, took part in shore bombardment, and patrolled offshore. She was relieved by a British destroyer on 21 June and returned to San Diego on 11 July 1952. Ώ]

The destroyer operated off the California coast for the remainder of 1952, then sailed once more for Korea 21 February 1953. Formosa Patrol duty alternated with carrier task force operations off North Korea. John W. Thomason arrived at Wonsan harbor on 2 July while firing at shore targets five days later, she received numerous shrapnel hits in a duel with enemy batteries. Maneuvering in the restricted waters, Commander Ratliff returned the fire until three batteries had been silenced. She continued to operate off Wonsan until the armistice on 27 July, and after a brief stay in Japan arrived at San Diego on 22 September 1953. Ώ]

1954-1963 [ edit ]

From 1954-1956 John W. Thomason returned to the now-familiar waters off Korea and in the Formosa Strait, serving with the 7th Fleet. The first half of 1957 was spent in readiness exercises off San Diego. John W. Thomason then sailed on 29 July for a cruise which took her to Pago Pago, Auckland, and Manus. Upon arrival at Yokosuka on 7 September 1957 she resumed operations in the Formosa Straits and antisubmarine exercises with 7th Fleet ships. The ship returned to San Diego 8 January 1958, and conducted maneuvers off California and Hawaii. Ώ]

In March 1959, John W. Thomason entered Long Beach Naval Shipyard as the prototype ship for the new Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization (FRAM) program. During this extensive repair and modernization period she received a helicopter deck and hangar aft, variable depth sonar, the latest electronic equipment, and many improvements in living and working spaces. The conversion was followed by extensive trials and local training operations. As the new flagship of Destroyer Division 72, she sailed on 8 March 1961 for 7th Fleet duty. After further operation John W. Thomason sailed to San Diego, arriving 18 September 1961. Ώ]

Extensive conversion and installation of new sonar equipment at Long Beach occupied the ship until July 1962. In December she took part in a massive antiaircraft exercise with units of the 1st Fleet off California. She sailed again for the Far East, a part of the ready-hunter-killer group. En route, however, she took part in recovery operations for Project Mercury as part of a task unit built around the aircraft carrier Kearsarge. During the cruise which followed, the ship trained in her antisubmarine warfare (ASW) tactics and became familiar with her new equipment in operations with 7th Fleet and the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force. John W. Thomason returned to San Diego on 3 December 1963. Ώ]

Vietnam [ edit ]

Most of 1964 was spent in ASW exercises in the Eastern Pacific. On 23 October, she sailed with Destroyer Division 213 for redeployment exercises in Hawaii. Exactly a month later, with four other destroyers, she got under way for the western Pacific screening Yorktown and arrived at Yokosuka, Japan on 4 December, joining the 7th Fleet. In the spring she earned her first battle star for operating in the troubled waters off the coast of Indochina from 21 March to 28 April 1965. Ώ]

After returning to the West Coast, she departed San Diego for the Far East 22 March 1966 and reached Da Nang 19 April and the same day took station a few miles south of Chu Lai. At the end of April she supported Operation Osage, and landed north of Da Nang. On 13 May she sailed for Sasebo and upkeep. Back in the war zone 6 June, she provided gunfire support and supported Operation Deckhouse 1 from 17 to 23 June. That day she retired toward Hong Kong. The destroyer returned to gunfire support duties off South Vietnam 16 August. From 18 to 23 August she supported the amphibious Ready Group and Special Landing Force in Operation "Deckhouse III." After visiting Guam and Japan, John W. Thomason headed home on 9 September, reached San Diego on 24 August and operated off the West Coast into 1967. Ώ]

John W. Thomason ' s 1969 deployment was preceded by a most strenuous overhaul, refresher training, and a multitude of inspections. No sooner had the destroyer and her task group joined the 7th Fleet than the first of more than fifteen schedule changes was received. The ship was diverted to Subic Bay before sailing to the Tonkin Gulf for planeguard duties with Oriskany. The first major inport period was in Kaohsiung, Taiwan after which John W. Thomason returned to Yankee Station. Three weeks of uneventful plane guarding were followed by a week in Bangkok. Subic Bay followed and another upkeep period. This one was cut short by a call for gunfire support in UV Corps near Vung Tau. After several days along the coast, the destroyer navigated the Nha Be River to participate in gunfire support in the Rung Sat Special Zone. Completing a week’s duty as part of the naval gunfire support team, the ship returned to her plane guard duties in the Tonkin Gulf, this time for Bon Homme Richard. During this period of duty, the destroyer rescued the crew from a crashed helicopter from Bon Homme Richard. [ citation needed ]

Six days of leave in Hong Kong and an upkeep period in Sasebo, Japan, followed. John W. Thomason then returned to Yankee Station and provided plane guard services for Hancock. John W. Thomason escorted Hancock to Subic Bay and back to Yankee Station before rejoining Bon Homme Richard in this last line period. On the return home, stops were made in Subic Bay and Yokosuka. The weather demonstrated its capabilities at an inopportune time and delayed the destroyer's return to San Diego until 29 October 1969. [ citation needed ]

John W. Thomason received seven battle stars for Korean service and three for Vietnam service. Ώ]

ROCS Service [ edit ]

Transferred in 1974 and renamed ROCS Nan Yang (DD-17), taking over the name and pennant number from the ex-USS Plunkett, later reclassified to DDG-917, she served in the Republic of China Navy until 2000, when she was struck from the Navy list and sunk in a target practice.


John W. Thomason DD- 760 - History

(DD-760: dp. 2,200 l. 376'5" b. 41' dr. 15'8", s. 34 k. cpl. 336 a. 6 5", 16 40mm., 20 20 mm, 2 dct., 6 dcp., 5 21" tt. cl. Allen M. Sumner)

John W. Thomason (DD-760) was launched by Bethlehem Steel Co., San Francisco, Calif., 30 September 1944 sponsored by Mrs. John W. Thomason, widow of Colonel Thomason, and commissioned 11 October 1945, Comdr. W. L. Tagg in command.

The new destroyer conducted shakedown training out of San Diego, followed by a series of Naval Reserve training cruises from Seattle and San Francisco. From November 1947 to December 1948 the ship carried out training maneuvers. She sailed 5 December 1948 for her first deployment to the Far East, arriving Tsingtao 1 January 1949 for operations supporting the marines ashore in China. Departing 24 May 1949, John W. Thompson returned via Okinawa to San Diego 23 June 1949 and spent the remainder of the year training.

The ship returned to the Far East in early 1950, arriving Yokosuka 29 January. During this critical post-war period, she operated with British ships on training maneuvers off the coast of Indochina aud Korea, returning to San Diego 25 April 1950. Two months later, North Korean aggression plunged the United States and the United Nations into the Korean conflict. John W. Thomason sailed 30 September to join the 7th Fleet, operating in the screen of carrier task groups pounding Communist positions and supply lines. She arrived Wonsan 9 November to patrol and bombard during the campaign against that port. Antisubmarine exercises took her to Pearl Harbor January-March 1951, but John W. Thomason arrived off Korea again 26 March to operate with Boxer (CV-21) and Princeton (CV-37) during air strikes. Two weeks in April were spent on the important Formosa Patrol, after which she returned to the carrier task force. With battleship New Jersey and another destroyer, she moved close in 24 May 1951 for gun bombardment of Yang Yang. The veteran ship returned to San Diego from this deployment 2 July 1951.

John W. Thomason sailed again for Korea 4 January 1952 and resumed operations with Task Force 77 off the coast of North Korea. She fired at railway targets 21 February in the SongJin area. During this period of stalemate on land, Navy strikes made up the bulk of offensive operations. The destroyer returned to Formosa Patrol duty in April. Back at Songiin and Wonsan 26 April, the ship screened larger units, took part in shore bombardment, and patrolled offshore. She was relieved by a British destroyer 21 June and returned to San Diego 11 July 1952.

The destroyer operated off the California coast for the remainder of 1952, then sailed once more for Korea 21 February 1953. Formosa Patrol duty alternated with carrier task force operations off North Korea. John W. Thomason arrived Wonsan harbor 2 July while firing at shore targets five days later, she received numerous shrapnel hits in a duel with enemy batteries. Maneuvering in the restricted waters, Commander Ratliff skillfully returned the fire until three batteries had been silenced. She continued to operate off Wonsan until the armistice 27 July, and after a brief stay in Japan arrived San Diego 22 September 1953.

In 1954, 1955, and 1956 John W. Thomason returned to the now-familiar waters off Korea and in the explosive Formosa Strait, serving with 7th Fleet to keep the peace and protect American interest in the strategic area. The first half of 1957 was spent in readiness exercises off San Diego. John W. Thomason then sailed 29 July for a cruise which took her to Pago Pago, Aukland, and Manus. Upon arrival Yokosuka 7 September 1957 she resumed operations in the Formosa Straits and antisubmarine exercizes with 7th Fleet ships. The ship returned to San Diego 8 January 1958, and conducted maneuvers off California and Hawaii.

In March 1959, John W. Thomason entered Long Beach naval Shipyard as prototype ship for the new FRAM (Fleet Rehabilitation And Modernization) program. During this extensive repair and modernization period she received a helicopter deck and hanger aft, variable depth sonar, the latest electronic equipment, and many improvements in living and working spaces. The conversion was followed by extensive trials and local training operations. As new flagship of Destroyer Division 72 she sailed S March 1961 for 7th Fleet duty. She sailed to the coast of Laos 27 April to help stabilize that volatile Southwest Asian country, patrolling for 21 days in a graphic demonstration of America's determination to prevent a Communist take-over. After further operation John W. Thomason sailed to San Diego, arriving 18 September 1961.

Extensive conversion and installation of new sonar equipment at Long Beach occupied the ship until July 1962. In December she took part in a massive antiaircraft exercise with units of the 1st Fleet off California. She sailed again for the Far East, a part of the ready hunter-killer group. En route, however, she took part in recovery operations for Major Cooper's Mercury Space shot as part of a task unit built around veteran carrier Kearsarge. During the cruise which followed, the ship perfected her antisubmarine warfare tactics and became familiar with her new equipment in operations with 7th Fleet and the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force. John W. Thomason returned to San Diego 3 December 1963.

Most of 1964 was spent in ASW exercises in the Eastern Pacific. On 23 October, she sailed with Destroyer Division 213 for redeployment exercises in Hawaii. Exactly a month later, with four other destroyers, she got under way for the western Pacific screening Yorktown (CVS10), arrived Yokosuka, Japan, 4 December and joined the 7th Fleet in its unrelenting effort to preserve freedom in the Far West. In the spring she earned her first battle star for operating in the troubled waters off the coast of Indochina from 21 March to 28 April 1965.

After returning to the West Coast, she departed San Diego for the Far East 22 March 1966 and reached Danang 19 April and the same day took station a few miles south of Chu Lai. At the end of April she supported Operation "Osage," and landed north of Danang. On 13 May she sailed for Sasebo and upkeep. Back in the war zone 6 June, she provided gunfire support and supported Operation "Deckhouse I" from 17 to 23 June. That day she retired toward Hong Kong. The destroyer returned to gunfire support duties off South Vietnam 16 August. From the 18th to the 23d she supported the amphibious Ready Group and Special Landing Force in Operation "Deckhouse III." After visiting Guam and Japan, John W. Thomason headed home 9 September, reached San Diego on the 24th and operated off the West Coast until the end of the year and into 1967 preparing for further action in the defense of freedom.

John W. Thomason received seven battle stars for Korean service and three for Vietnam service.


Welcome to the USS John W Thomason DD-760 Guestbook Forum

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Randolph Hamerdinger
Years Served: 1953-55
I served as an ETSN-ET3 in the years stated above.

I am presently retired in Las Vegas, NV. :D I have not been in touch with any of my ship mates.

Jens Zorn
Years Served: 1952-53
I was on Guam for two years and then went aboard the Thomason as ET2 for the last eight months before mustering out in mid 1953. Went on to college (Miami U, Ohio) and graduate school (Yale) to work in physics since 1962 have been on the faculty of University of Michigan. Am currently entering retirement in order to spend full time on commemorative sculpture.

I did get together with Tony Tommasi in 1961 and in 1994, shortly before he died. Otherwise no reunions to report I would welcome messages from former shipmates, particularly the electronics gang and those with whom I bunked in the cookstewards compartment . (John Meek, are you out there?)

Ronald Farnquist
Years Served: 1955 - 1958
Hello Shipmates, I was abord the JWT for my whole hitch in the USN. My work station was the aft engine room as a MM3. Had lots of fun many years ago. Would like to hear from anyone from the engine room gang or wherever. I now live in Grand Haven Michigan. My name is Ronald Farnquist.

L.L. Ballard
Years Served: 1950-1952
I was the Fire Control then Gunery Officer. Cdr G. P. Chung-Hoon was the Captain and Cdr D.L.G. King the Exec. Later as a civilian I worked aboard the USS Norton Sound AVM-1. Just after I left in 1955, Capt. Chung-Hoon took command of AVM-1. I corresponded with his wife several years later and was told that the Admiral had just died. I guess having a collision with the USS Buck doesn't keep a Chinese-Hawaiian who plays football barefoot from making Admiral

William R. Farnquist
Years Served: 1956/1957
I came aboard the John W. Thomason in 1956. I served in the forward engine room as FN. I was on one oversea cruise. I was released from service in 1957. I was a draftee. My brother Ronald was on the same ship. It was a real memorable experience.

William Boyer
Years Served: 1960-1963
Made one WestPac cruise on the JWT in 1961. JWT was a fine ship and when I went aboard it had just come out of the yards with the FRAM II overhaul. Came aboard as a RDSN and left as a RD2. Retired in 1980.

Burton Pauly
Years Served: 1953-1957
Hello there folks

Well I was on the old can at the end of the Korean conflict until 1957 when I left the Navy. I didn't stay out long. I enlisted again in the same year, and stayed for 20 and retired . My last duty was the J.F.K.
the aircraft carrier. Phone# 6158894832 .

My father -in-law is Peterson, Melvin R. He served on the USS John W. Thomason during the Korean War in the engine room. If you remember him and have any stories the family would greatly appreciate them. Mel will be turning 90 on 3 May.
Thank you,
Al


John W. Thomason DD- 760 - History

USS Taussig , a 2200-ton Allen M. Sumner class destroyer built at Staten Island, New York, was commissioned in May 1944. Following shakedown and training in the western Atlantic and Caribbean, she transited the Panama Canal in September and, after more training, arrived in the Pacific war zone in October 1944. Operating with the fast aircraft carriers during the rest of the year, she participated in combat operations in the Philippines area and the South China Sea. Her carrier screening duties continued in 1945, during which she helped cover the invasions of Luzon, Iwo Jima and Okinawa, and a series of raids against the Japanese Home Islands. In March she used her guns to bombard Okino Daito Shima and, during the following months off Okinawa, these weapons were regularly employed against Japanese aircraft.

With the Pacific War over, Taussig returned to the United States in October 1945, but steamed back across the Pacific in February 1946 to begin the first of sixteen Far Eastern deployments over the next twenty-three years. That cruise, which ended in March 1947, was followed by training ship service off the West Coast. The destroyer's next session in the western Pacific began in May 1950, lasted until early 1951, and included active participation in the Korean War, which began in late June. Taussig made two more combat cruises off Korea, one in August 1951 - May 1952 and the second from November 1952 until July 1953. Eight more tours in Asian waters followed during the next ten years, punctuated by service in the eastern Pacific and, in 1962, by a major "FRAM II" modernization that greatly changed her appearance.

Taussig 's involvement in her third armed conflict began during her thirteenth post-World War II Far Eastern cruise, which ran from October 1964 to May 1965, when she briefly supported Vietnam War aircraft carrier operations. Her following three deployments, in April-November 1966, January-June 1968 and June-October 1969, included active service off Vietnam providing naval gunfire support for forces ashore, screening carriers and covering amphibious operations. In 1970, while preparing for another "WestPac" tour, Taussig fell victim to the then-ongoing effort to reduce the size of the active fleet. She was decommissioned at the beginning of December 1970 and placed in the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in September 1973, Taussig was sold to the Republic of China in May 1974. Renamed Lo Yang , she served in the Taiwanese Navy until the beginning of the Twenty-First Century.

USS Taussig was named in honor of Rear Admiral Edward D. Taussig (1847-1921), whose long career began during the Civil War and extended through the First World War.

This page features all the views we have related to USS Taussig (DD-746).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Underway during the later 1940s or early 1950s.
This image was received by the Naval Photographic Center in December 1959, but was taken about a decade earlier.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 92KB 740 x 595 pixels

Operating at sea, 1 April 1957.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 78KB 740 x 605 pixels

Underway off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii, 10 May 1963.
Taken by PH2 Francis L. Antoine, USN.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 111KB 600 x 765 pixels

Underway at sea, 13 January 1965.
Photographed by PH3 L.E. Cannon.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 95KB 740 x 600 pixels

In Subic Bay, Philippines, on 1 November 1963. The destroyers alongside, all "FRAM II" types of Destroyer Squadron 15, are: (from inboard to outboard):
USS Taussig (DD-746)
USS John A. Bole (DD-755)
USS Lofberg (DD-759) and
USS John W. Thomason (DD-760).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 153KB 740 x 615 pixels

In Subic Bay, Philippines, on 1 November 1963. The destroyers alongside, all "FRAM II" types of Destroyer Squadron 15, are: (from inboard to outboard):
USS Taussig (DD-746)
USS John A. Bole (DD-755)
USS Lofberg (DD-759) and
USS John W. Thomason (DD-760).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 123KB 740 x 620 pixels

Ship's officers posed on her helicopter deck, circa 1970.
Note the flag, featuring a tiger emblem.

This photograph was received from USS Taussig prior to February 1971.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 121KB 740 x 610 pixels

Seaman L.J. Kusak and Senior Chief Gunner's Mate A.A. Epperson, both of USS Dixie (AD-14), install a new 5"/38 gun in one of Taussig 's gun mounts, at Subic Bay, Philippines, 1969.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

Online Image: 79KB 595 x 765 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system as Photo # 428-N-1143149.

In addition to the images presented above, the National Archives appears to hold other photographs of USS Taussig (DD-746). The following list features some of these views:

The images listed below are NOT in the Naval Historical Center's collections.
DO NOT try to obtain them using the procedures described in our page "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions".

Reproductions of these images should be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system for pictures not held by the Naval Historical Center.


Convoys escorted [ edit | edit source ]

Convoy Escort Group Dates Notes
task force 19 1–7 July 1941 Ώ] occupation of Iceland prior to US declaration of war
HX 151 24 Sept-1 Oct 1941 ΐ] from Newfoundland to Iceland prior to US declaration of war
ON 24 13-15 Oct 1941 Α] from Iceland to Newfoundland prior to US declaration of war
SC 48 16-17 Oct 1941 Β] battle reinforcement prior to US declaration of war
HX 159 10-19 Nov 1941 ΐ] from Newfoundland to Iceland prior to US declaration of war
ON 39 11 Nov-4 Dec 1941 Α] from Iceland to Newfoundland prior to US declaration of war
HX 166 24-31 Dec 1941 ΐ] from Newfoundland to Iceland
ON 53 9-19 Jan 1942 Α] from Iceland to Newfoundland
HX 174 9-17 Feb 1942 ΐ] from Newfoundland to Iceland
ON 69 25 Feb-1 March 1942 Α] from Iceland to Newfoundland
ON 92 16–17 May 1942 Α] from Iceland to Newfoundland
AT 18 6-17 Aug 1942 Γ] troopships from New York City to Firth of Clyde

USS John W Thomason

Status: Disposed of through Security Assistance Program (SAP), transferred, cash sale, ex-US Fleet hull foreign military sale case number assigned.

Launch Date: 9/30/1944
Commission Date: 10/11/1945
Decommission Date: 12/8/1970

USS John W Thomason spent most of her early career on training missions and exercises. During the Korean War, she fired at railway targets, performed patrol duty, and screened larger units. The USS John W Thomason received seven battle stars for her service in Korea.

Destroyers serve as quick and easily maneuvered warships which generally escort larger ships in the fleet. They also serve as protection for the larger ships from torpedo and submarine attacks. Destroyers were usually outfitted with anti-aircraft guns and anti-submarine weapons, however, despite being heavily armed and prepared for any emergency, destroyers were the most frequently sunk ship during World War II. The men on these ships faced a number on dangers on a day to day basis. A danger they faced, unknowingly, was Asbestos. Asbestos was found in a number of areas on these ships, in particular the insulation that lined piping.

Anyone who served on a destroyer should speak with their doctor regarding asbestos related diseases, such as Mesothelioma and Lung Cancer, and the treatment options available.

We Can Help

Asbestos lung cancer and mesothelioma lawsuits involving active-duty or retired members of the U.S. military involve additional, complex legal issues and considerations.

At The Gori Law Firm , you’ll find lawyers with extensive experience in military asbestos and mesothelioma cases, and a staff that is highly qualified and specially trained to assist us in handling these difficult cases. We also work diligently to help people living with mesothelioma obtain a trial date within six to nine months from the time their lawsuit is filed.

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For a free case evaluation, please call our law offices directly or contact us online. An experienced attorney will be available to discuss your potential lawsuit, and to answer any questions you may have about the connection between asbestos exposure and deadly cancers such as mesothelioma, or your legal rights.


Laststandonzombieisland

Combat Gallery Sunday: The Martial Art of Col. John W. Thomason, Jr., USMC

Born in Huntsville, Texas, 28 February 1893, John Thomason was a Southerner with a family tree steeped in military tradition. His grandfather was no less a person than Thomas Jewett “TJ” Goree, one of Longstreet’s closest aides, who was immortalized in Michael Shaara’s The Killer Angels.

An uncle and four great-uncles had also been Confederate officers. As noted by Donald Morris in an excellent 1993 article on Thomason, Grandfather Goree was closer to John than his father was, and taught him to ride, hunt, and fish while he developed a passion for sketching.

It should have come as no surprise that, after spending two years at the Art Students League in New York City, and a year as a cub reporter for the Houston Chronicle while training at civilian military camps during the summers, that Thomason rushed to join the Marines when the U.S. entered World War I in April 1917.

Not too much difference from Gramps…

After a good bit of stateside training, 1st Lt. John W. Thomason, Jr., U.S.M.C., arrived in France in May 1918, in the 1/5 Marines, part of the 2d Division, American Expeditionary Forces. Fighting with his platoon (and later as Executive Officer of the 49th Company) in five major engagements and fourteen battles, including Belleau Wood, Château-Thierry, San Mihiel, Soissons, and Mont Blanc, Thomason led from the front.

As noted by the Naval History and Heritage Command, “When a German machine gun nest held up a Marine advance at Soissons 18 July 1918, Thomason and one of his men fearlessly advanced on the position and killed 13 of the enemy. For his heroism he received the Navy Cross and the Silver Star.”

5TH MARINES AT CHAMPAGNE Champagne, France 1918. By John W. Thomason, Jr., USMC

Remaining in the Marines during the “peacetime” between the two World Wars, Thomason found time to write and illustrate together no less than 11 books including Fix Bayonets (1926), Jeb Stuart (1930), Gone to Texas (1937), and Lone Star Preacher (1941) while serving a very diverse career that included deploying to Cuba, Nicaragua, China (where he was at the Legation in Peking in the 1930s and documented the China horse marines in his sketches during his time as the commander of the 38th Company) served as commander of the 103-man Marine det on the cruiser USS Rochester serving as an aide to Assistant Secretary of the Navy Col. Henry Roosevelt and worked at the Latin-American desk of the Office of Naval Intelligence just prior to Pearl Harbor.

The Automatic Riflemen, Fix Bayonets

Chinese soldier on horseback

Cantonese soldiers in China 1932

When WWII came to the U.S., Thomason was made a Colonel attached to Nimtz’s staff and, though in poor health due to ulcers and cardiovascular issues, served as war-plans officer and inspector of Marine land bases. He toured forward areas in the Solomons and survived a Japanese air attack that left all the other men in his slit trench dead.

Coming down with double pneumonia and his health continuing to decline, he was released and shipped back to the West Coast for stateside duty. There, at the Naval Hospital at San Diego on March 12, 1944, he died at age 51.

A well-known author and something of the W.E.B. Griffin of his time, he was carried by special train to Oakwood Cemetery, Huntsville, while the state of Texas lowered flags to half-staff for the week of his interment.

Recognizing his service, SECNAV named the new Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer, DD-760, after the late Col. Thomason 30 September 1944 sponsored by his widow. USS John W. Thomason remained on the Navy List, seeing action in Korea and Vietnam and having 10 battlestars to show for it, until 1974 when she was transferred to the Republic of China, serving as the ROCS Nan Yang (DD-17) until 2000.

As for the author, his bestseller Fix Bayonets is still in publication and is considered by many to be perhaps the finest account of Americans in the Great War.

His portrait hangs in the Texas Hall of Heroes at the Capitol in Austin. In addition, the Graphic Arts Building at Sam Houston State University bears his name, as does the special collections room of the university library, which houses a permanent exhibit of his drawings and manuscripts. The University of Texas at Austin also holds a number of his papers.

Besides the extensive collection maintained by the Navy and Marines, Sam Houston University’s Newton Gresham Library has over 3,900 of his works ranging from photos to sketches to paintings online.


Watch the video: US Navy Destroyers off Vietnam - Part II